Page 1

HOTTEST

NEW PLAYERS in GUITARDOM!

GUITAR&BASS TRANSCRIPTIONS

TEMPLE OF THE DOG “SAY HELLO 2 HEAVEN”

THE DARKNESS

“I BELIEVE IN A THING CALLED LOVE”

TEARS FOR FEARS “EVERYBODY WANTS TO RULE THE WORLD”

INTE

RV I E

ZAKK WYLDE

W!

GUTHRNIE GONVTAS T O

BREWTAL NEW LESSON AND INTERVIEW!

WA

OUR B L O W YD M IN

SABATON

CELEBRATING 20 PULVERIZING YEARS!

Jeff

BECK

THE GUITAR HERO'S GUITAR HERO

STEVE VAI, JOE SATRIANI, VINCE GILL AND STEVE STEVENS EXPLAIN WHY HE'S THE MASTER!

PLUS

Printed in U.S.A. GWM520.cover_digital.indd 1

NILE RODGERS + MICHAEL SWEET + STÉPHANE WREMBEL FENDER'S NEW ACOUSTASONIC TELECASTER + AND MORE! 14/10/2019 11:02


NEWS + NOTES caption Several new Washburn Michael Sweet signature models are coming down the pike in 2020; the electric is a traditional/ classic approach to an RR/V; the acoustic [right] sports quilted maple. "They're both amazing guitars," Sweet says

Sweet to the 10th Power

STRYPER FRONTMAN MICHAEL SWEET TALKS TEN, A NEW SOLO ALBUM FEATURING BLISTERING FRETWORK BY JEFF LOOMIS, TRACII GUNS, GUS G, ETHAN BROSH, ANDY JAMES, WHITESNAKE’S JOEL HOEKSTRA AND — ALMOST FORGOT — MICHAEL SWEET! By Mark McStea

PEDRO BLANCO

MICHAEL SWEET IS best known as the

frontman for Stryper, the band that invented the concept of Christian metal at a time when, ironically, rock ’n’ roll was at its most hedonistic, the early Eighties. Cynics dismissed the band’s approach as a publicityseeking gimmick, although Sweet is quick to counter that one: “Why would we choose Christian rock to try to be successful? Surely that would be a terrible stunt when you saw the success of the bands who were clearly not embracing Christianity.” Stryper enjoyed a run of successful albums until splitting in 1992. Sweet then embarked on a similarly successful solo career and reunited with Stryper in 2003, continuing to record and tour under both banners. His brand-new release, Ten, is, in fact, his 10th solo album. While previous Sweet solo albums have been quite diverse,

22

GU I TA R WOR L D • HOL I DAY 2019

Ten is a pure metal album with searing shredding scorched across every track by an all-star cast of guitar wizards. Although there are a couple of cuts with a Christian slant, overall the album is a straight-ahead celebration of the power of unabashed rock ’n’ roll that recalls the heyday of metal, when an astounding guitar solo was de rigueur on every track. What differentiates a Michael Sweet album from a Stryper album?

People have particularly picked up on the lead-off track from the album, “Better Part of Me,” and said it sounds like Stryper. I don’t see that as a negative; in fact, I view it as a positive. I am the singer, writer and producer for Stryper, so there’s always going to be similarities in flavors that taste like Stryper. I’m not going to try to escape that. When I make solo albums, I experiment

and branch out a little more. That’s the key difference. Given that you’re continuing to maintain the two strands to your career, are you writing specifically for each project?

Once I know what project is coming next, I start writing and I write a song every day. I don’t write differently for different projects. Once I have the number of songs required, I’m done. I’ve gotten to the point in my life where I know what I like, I know what’s bad and what the fans are gonna like or not like. I don’t want to sound egotistical when I say this as I’m not, but I know what I’m doing. What’s your success rate of keepers to rejects when you start that songwriting process for an album?

I’ll come up with a guitar riff first; it always starts there. Then I’ll create a drum groove


first, but I think if I had the opportunity to play a left-handed guitar at the time, I would have probably been a left-handed guitarist. You have many more choices in terms of guitar as a right-handed player so I’m glad that I stuck with it in the end. I assume your next album will be a Stryper album after this solo release.

that fits that riff that I really like. Then I take it on from there. My wife is an excellent judge of music. She will hear it and go “Meh” or “Wow, I really like that.” The “Meh” songs are usually the ones that I thought myself weren’t quite working. They might then get put on a shelf for later. Usually whatever is coming out of me at that point is working and I’m liking how it’s making me feel. Ten features a different guitarist on each track. Was that always the intention when you started the album, or did it evolve during the recording process?

I shot myself in the foot to some degree as I’ve been trying to make people understand that I’ve been a guitar player for a long time. I started playing when I was 5, way before I was ever a singer. On my last solo album, [2016’s] One Sided War, as I was working on the guitar solos, I quickly realized that when I’m playing all the solos, it will instantly be much more Stryper sounding. I brought Joel Hoekstra and Ethan Brosh to record some solos for that album to change it up a bit. When I started to prepare Ten, I took it a step further, and all of my favorite guitar players right now — including Joel and Ethan — are on the album. Did you track all the rhythm guitar parts?

I did everything — the rhythm parts, overdubs, acoustic guitars. I call it the “ear candy.” There are two tracks where I don’t play any guitar at all, “Never Alone” and “When Love Is Hated.” Those were cowritten with Joel Hoekstra, who played all the guitars. It was basically to show people

what Joel and I can do together, as we will be doing an album together at some point. The album as a whole is a total shredfest, isn’t it?

Yeah. I’ve got Gus G, Jeff Loomis, Todd La Torre, Tracii Guns and Will Hunt — and that’s not even the half of it. The only solo that is just terrible that didn’t work out is the ballad “Let It Be Love.” This guy called Michael Sweet did the solo on that one [Laughs]. I think the solo on that track is probably the most memorable. It’s such a “singable” solo, where every note really counts.

Here’s the thing about my playing. The album did become a shred-fest on the whole, but I’m more of a melodic player. I try to write a composed solo that people can remember and actually sing. My list of favorite players from the Seventies and Eighties are all players who make a really strong melodic statement. I was watching a clip of you on YouTube; you were writing lyrics and you were left-handed, yet I notice that you play guitar right-handed. Was that a conscious decision?

I use my left hand to write, brush my teeth and pick my nose! That’s about it, everything else is right-handed. My dad taught me how to play on a Gibson 12-string Jumbo acoustic. It was three times the size of me at 5 years old. It was right-handed and I didn’t really have a choice about being left or righthanded for the guitar. It did feel awkward at

The plans are to start right after the first of the year; I’ll write the album and we’ll do preproduction in the studio in my house. We’ll learn the songs, then we’ll go in the recording studio and track all the basics in about two weeks. That will be everything except for lead vocals, solos and mixing, which is pretty fast. It’s about a song a day. You recently stated that in Stryper you’re all taking home approximately $7,000 to $10,000 per album. I think that surprised people.

I think people were shocked by that. Most people who criticize rock bands, thinking they’re wealthy don’t have a clue. In the old days we’d get say $200K to $400K to make an album and we’d spend most of it on the recording and going out to eat every night. We’d make very little from that process for ourselves. Nowadays if we get $100K to make an album, we’ll try to be economical and have some left over to put away for a rainy day. Each individual guy doesn’t make that much from the record, and that’s one album every few years. We make most of our money — and it’s still not a lot — by touring and merchandise. We’re certainly not rolling in the money, though, and we work very hard for what we get. I think people would be very surprised by how much most bands are making these days. You’ve discussed seeing Elvis Presley live as a kid. Was that a big moment?

Yeah. It was about 1974. I was in awe, but I didn’t realize until much later in life how much of an inspiration he was to me. I’ll sometimes see myself do moves on stage and think, gosh, that came right out of the Elvis handbook. Elvis played a big role in my life, and certainly through my father. My dad was a musician, he loved Elvis and he even looked like Elvis — and I grew up around that. None of us would be sitting around talking about rock ’n’ roll today if it wasn’t for Elvis. guitarworld.com

23


GUITAR WORLD

HOLIDAY 2019

32

GUTHRIE GOVAN HE OF THE MAD, MAD SKILLS TALKS DINOSAURS, BLIND ALLEYS AND THE ARISTOCRATS’ QUIRKYAS-HELL NEW ALBUM, YOU KNOW WHAT...? BY ALL ACCOUNTS, GUTHRIE

BY JOE BOSSO

32

GU I TA R WOR L D • NOV EM BER 2019

Govan has enjoyed the kind of career most guitarists only dream about. Just 47 years old, the British-born virtuoso has either recorded or performed with a diverse group of artists that includes progressive rock icons (Steven Wilson, Asia), electronic dance hotshots (the Young Punx), hip-hop/grime pioneers (Dizzee Rascal) and

Oscar-winning film composers (Hans Zimmer). At the same time, he’s released a solo album (2006’s Erotic Cakes) and has established himself as one of the most sought-after masters of guitar masterclasses, holding forth for budding shredders across the globe. One might assume Govan has followed some sort of grand plan that he mapped out years ago, but the guitarist admits he’s benefited mostly from lucky strokes of serendipity. “I’m not particularly business-minded,” he says, “so I’ve always tried to remain open to any random opportunities that might present themselves. I tend to


“I CONCEDE THAT WE CAN OPERATE OUR INSTRUMENTS WITH A CERTAIN DEGREE OF PROFICIENCY, BUT WHAT WE’RE REALLY HOPING TO ACHIEVE IS TO COMMUNICATE HOW MUCH FUN WE HAVE WHEN WE MAKE MUSIC TOGETHER” —GUTHRIE GOVAN

make my decisions about any new venture based largely on how much the music excites me and the extent to which I feel I might have something valid to ‘bring to the table’.” He cites his ongoing participation in the instrumental supergroup the Aristocrats (which includes two other highly sought-after session aces, bass maven Bryan Beller and drumming whiz Marco Minnemann) as one such example. Originally, the trio were brought together to perform a brief one-off set at a 2010 NAMM Show, but no sooner had the three started jamming, Govan realized they were destined for bigger things.

“Our decision to take things further and become a long-term, proper band was based entirely on our mutual recognition of the chemistry between the three of us, which became apparent during that first set,” he recalls. “We basically walked off stage and immediately resolved to record an album, which we did about three months later.” The Aristocrats’ self-titled debut album was full of the kinds of face-melting chops one might expect from guys of their caliber; on songs that mixed metal, jazz swing and blues, the trio tapped, shredded and grooved at maximum overdrive. But beyond their

dizzying technical skills, the band also displayed a keen sense of comedic self-awareness, bestowing their hyperkinetic send-up of blues clichés with the title “Blues Fuckers”. Laying to waste the notion that the band is any kind of stodgy, ultraserious prog outfit, Guthrie says, “I concede that we can all operate our instruments with a certain degree of proficiency, but what we’re really hoping to achieve with the Aristocrats is to communicate how much fun we have when we make music together. We want to make other people feel better, not worse.” While continuing their careers as in-demand sidemen, the Aristocrats have issued two

more highly adventurous (and ridiculously entertaining) albums, 2013’s Culture Clash and 2015’s Tres Caballeros, and now comes a fourth, You Know What...? In terms of quirkiness, it’s mad as a hatter. If the psychofunk romp “D Grade Fuck Movie Jam” doesn’t throw you for a loop, then the jazztinged, odd-time wonder “Spanish Eddie” will leave you utterly breathless. Metal doesn’t get much heavier than the behemoth ode to dinosaurs, “Terrible Lizard,” and when it comes to sheer epic scale, the eight-and-ahalf-minute multi-mood gem “Last Orders” could be called the Lawrence of Arabia of instrumental rock. Licks-wise, there’s nary a fleet-fingered run or an unhinged noise that Govan doesn’t manage to cover on You Know What...? Indeed, he could pack a week’s worth of his clinics detailing his outlandish musicianship contained on the new album. But as he points out, his goal wasn’t to simply write vehicles for “guitar tricks,” as he calls them. “I’m particularly interested in two aspects of writing for this band, and they’re kind of polar opposites,” he says. “On the one hand, I always try to incorporate a loose open section where we can channel the more ‘live’ side of what we do as a trio. On the other hand, the more composed sections of my Aristocrats tunes tend to be very composed.”

The Aristocrats’ Guthrie Govan [left] and Marco guitarworld.com 33 Minnemann in action KRIS CLAERHOUT


B y DAV I D VO N BA D E R

It’s hard to ignore. ¶ Almost every time we ask a guitarist to name his “biggest influence” or “the reason you got into guitar,” the name Jeff Beck invariably pops up — along with three or four glowing adjectives, adverbs and exclamation points. ¶ In the following interviews, Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Steve Stevens, Vince Gill, Carmen Vandenberg and Tyler Bryant explain why the ever-evolving Jeff Beck is the guitar hero’s guitar hero.

PAGE 038

HOLIDAY 2019

PAGE 36


D AV I D R E D F E R N / R E D F E R N S/ G E T T Y I M A G E S

Jeff Beck on stage in 1970

guitarworld.com

39


I A N D I C K S O N / R E D F E R N S/ GETTY IMAGES

STEVE VAI What was your point of entry to Jeff Beck’s music?

I was a kid and I heard “’Cause We Ended as Lovers” [from 1975’s Blow by Blow]. I had never heard anyone craft an instrumental like that before. Beck had switched from a Les Paul to a Strat at that point and he squeezed every tonal color you possibly could out of the thing. He remains such a classy player and a mature note man. He’s really like a craftsman, and I’ve watched in stunned disbelief at how he can hit one note and do things to that one note that no one else can touch. I see a direct line between what you do as a stylist and as an expressive player and what Beck does.

It would be impossible for his influence to have not floated into my playing somehow. I was such a fan and I learned those songs as closely as possible when I was a kid. Blow by Blow and Wired [1976]? I learned every song on those records — and I think they’re beyond masterpieces. They’re also very much the foundation of what guitar heroism would become in the Eighties.

I think you hear more Beck in my playing than a lot of other guitar players from that time. The interesting thing about him is that he’s somehow continued to get better. It’s very inspiring because most people just stop dead in their tracks and stop growing and exploring at a certain point. Those are the people that lose the enthusiasm for a good idea. But that hasn’t happened to Beck. It’s so funny too because it almost seems like he doesn’t think about any of it. He doesn’t even talk about it very much. You interview me and you get deep, esoteric conversation about guitar, but Beck has always been very simple in conversation about this stuff. The way he plays is just so profound. Why discuss it? What is it about Beck that makes his playing so compel-

42

Jeff Beck — in the studio and rarin' to go in the Seventies

ling to other masters of the instrument? What makes him the guitar hero’s guitar hero?

People want to be able to connect with a guitar player that has all of these elements of stardom and stage presence — the wild clothes and such. There’s an archetype, but when you start peeling back the layers and looking under the hood at the actual playing, very few people have the horsepower. Beck is one of those guys that really has it where it counts. Beck has always continued to expand his craft in artistic ways and it’s through the guitar that he does that. There’s not extraneous disruptions or focus on having to create a big rock show or any other distractions. And the funny thing is he still has better hair than all of the big rockstars!

STEVE STEVENS What was your point of entry for Jeff Beck?

Blow by Blow, but then I went back and listened to Beck-Ola [1969] and Rough and Ready [1971] and all of those records. I started with Blow by Blow because my cover band did “Blue Wind” and “Freeway Jam.” Those were successful records and they sold a ton, so you could play ’em in a cover band! You were still a teenager. How difficult was it learning those songs?

It was tough because I had to borrow a friend’s Strat because I didn’t know how he was doing some of the whammy bar stuff. That was actually my entry into using a whammy bar. The thing about Jeff that transcends the theatrics is his sense of rhythm and groove. The foundation to me of all of his stuff comes from old rock ‘n’ roll; you can hear Cliff Gallup and Chuck Berry and all of the things Beck grew up with as a kid as the foundation for his work. Obviously he built upon that with some pyrotechnics — and hiring [producer] George Martin to do the record didn’t hurt! But you can put on

GU I TA R WOR L D • HOL I DAY 2019

{continued on page 44

Get Workin' Jeff Beck’s Top 10 Studio Guest Appearances By DAMIAN FANELLI TYPICALLY, WHEN A legendary guitarist is invited to play on another artist’s recording session, he or she is expected to make a noticeable impact on the song or album he’s working on. Such has often been the case when Jeff Beck — as a session guitarist and/or “famous guest who just happened to be in the neighborhood so he thought he’d drop by the studio” — has lent his six-string skills to other people’s tunes throughout the ages. Below, we present what we feel are his 10 best “guest” studio appearances. Actually, it looks like we’ve thrown in a bonus track. Hey, our math was never all that great anyway!

11. BLAZE OF GLORY

Jon Bon Jovi, Blaze of Glory (1990) If you head to YouTube, you’ll notice that someone has thoughtfully posted a 31-second clip of Beck’s isolated guitar solo from this tune, the title track from Jon Bon Jovi’s 1990 solo album, Blaze of Glory. At the very end, you can hear someone scream “Yeah!” from the control room. This creative, out-of-leftfield little creation will probably inspire the very same reaction from you.

10. LEGALIZE ME

The Pretenders, Viva El Amor (1999) At first, one wonders if Beck is even playing on this song — until just around the 2:14 mark, when he boldly announces his presence with one of his freakish trademark whammy-bar moves … and it just gets better from there.

9. 54-46 WAS MY NUMBER

Toots & The Maytals, True Love (2004) This Toots album is packed with


GUITAR WORLD MAY 2019

LIVING LEGEND ZAKK WYLDE JOINS GUITAR WORLD FOR AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW AND LESSON TO CELEBRATE THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS BREWTAL BROTHERHOOD, BLACK LABEL SOCIETY

FAR BEYOND DRIVEN

Playing with Passion, Precision and Power — the Wylde Way Story and Photos by Nick Bowcott


S

play the wylde way

guitarworld.com

55

NS

GU

WORLD LE

SO

Nick Bowcott snapped this candid pic of Zakk Wylde [left] and Dimebag Darrell being photographed for GW's March 2003 cover

R I TA


GU

#2 BE DISCIPLINED “Even during my drinking years, I still enjoyed finding the balance between the dedicated discipline of Al Di Meola and John McLaughlin and the complete chaos of Keith Richards and Jimmy Page. No matter how crazy those berserker, Animal House years were, you always had to answer the bell when it was show time. It wasn’t until the very end, when the wheels were falling off, that I went, ‘Man, I think this debacle is coming to an end!’ “If you want to be as good as people like, say, Dime or Yngwie,” Zakk continues with a much more serious and assertive tone, “you need to be totally disciplined about practicing and the relentless pursuit of getting better. You either strive for greatness or you go home. It’s all or nothing — there are no participation medals in this game, son! “When I’m practicing, I like to start off with a few chromatic exercises, using all four of my fret-hand fingers and strict alternate picking.” To demonstrate this, Zakk cranks out FIGURES 2 and 3 with impressive speed and accuracy. “And, I’ll often take both of them all the way up the neck, from the 1st fret to the 15th, and then back down again. That’s a great workout for both hands.” To illustrate his point, Zakk starts playing the ascending pattern in FIGURE 4, which is the “full meal deal” version of FIGURE 2. “Another thing I’ll often do is run through the five minor pentatonic [fivenote] ‘box’ patterns all over the neck in a few keys.” FIGURE 5 shows the five box shapes for the A minor pentatonic scale (A, C, D, E, G). “As you’ll see — each pattern is only two notes per string. I’ll also do the same for the diatonic [seven-note] natural minor scale too. This time we’ll be playing three notes on each string, and there are seven patterns for this one.” FIGURE 6 shows the seven three-notes-per-string box shapes for the A diatonic natural minor scale (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) also known as the A Aeolian mode. “I realize this kind of stuff can be boring as hell, but stick with it and it’ll pay off. When you really know all these scale

4 4

T A B

5 7

fingering: 3

FIG. F I G .22

4 4

picking:

T A B

5

6

1

2

1

5

10

1

3

≥ = downstroke ≤ = upstroke ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ ≥ ≤ etc. 1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

fingering: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

5

4

4

3

F I G .33 FIG.

4 4

T A B

3

2

2

5

1

4

4

3

3

2

≥≤≥≤≥≤≥≤ 1

2

3

2

4 1

3

2 1

4

4 3

F I G .44 FIG.

T A B

4 4

3 2

1

4

4 3

3 2

4 1

~~~~~~~~~~

2

4

3

2

1

4

1

3

2

3

5 4 3 2

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1

3

4 1

1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2

2

5

4

3

2

1

4

3

2

1

1

3

4 5

4

3

2 5

3

4

2 5

4

3

2

1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1

2 1 1

1

≥≤≥≤≥≤≥≤ 1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

4

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2 5

GuitarWorld.com/Holiday2019

5

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

5

FOR THE ACCOMPANYING VIDEO FOR THIS LESSON, HEAD TO

etc. 2

play t wylde whaey

1 2 3 4

etc. 1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4 5 4 3 2

5 4 3 2

1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 4 3 2 1 4 3 2 1

etc. 5 4 3 2

4 3 2

5 4 3 2

1 4 3 2 1

5 4 3 2

5 4 3 2

4 3 2 1 4

3 2 1

3 4 5 6 1 2

3

3 4 5 6

4 1

2

3

3 4 5 6

4 1 2

3

3 4 5 6

4 1

2

3

guitarworld.com

4

57

NS

all you’ve got! Leave nothing to chance. Like some old-timers always say, ‘give it all you’ve got on stage because it might be your last show!’” Wylde adds, “Also, get inspired. Every time I see or hear a great player, I still think, ‘I’ve got work to do … time to make the donuts!’”

R WORLD LES SO

~~~~~~

FIG. FIG1 . 1

I TA


65

GUITAR WORLD

2019 HOLIDAY

war machine CELEBRATING

20 YEARS OF

Sabaton, THE MIGHTY POWER-METAL BAND FROM SWEDEN WHO BUILT A THRIVING CAREER SINGING ABOUT WORLD WAR II BOMBING CAMPAIGNS, DECORATED SNIPERS, LEGENDARY BATTLESHIPS, THE BATTLE OF

THERMOPYLAE, AND JUST ABOUT ALL THINGS WAR by JEFF KITTS

photography by TALLEE SAVAGE


GUITAR WORLD • HOLIDAY 2019

NEW VOICES IN GUITAR GUITAR WORLD

CLASS OF 2020

On the lookout for jaw-dropping new talent? Here’s our guide to 10 guitarists to keep an eye (or two) on in the coming year

P A G E

7 2

C L A U D I N E VA N D E R WA LT

BY PETER HODGSON • PART TWO OF TWO


South African guitarist Kris Xenopoulos guitarworld.com

73


H O LI DAY 2019

Gretsch G5220 Electromatic Jet BT Single-Cut

GUITAR WORLD

GOLD AWARD

the gear in review

82

ONE CONTROL BJF-S66

P

ER

Perfect Pair

FORMANC

E

GRETSCH G5220 ELECTROMATIC JET BT SINGLE-CUT AND G2622T STREAMLINER CENTER BLOCK By Chris Gill

84

FENDER Acoustasonic Telecaster

85

BLACKSTAR amPlug2 Fly Guitar

86

FRAMUS Devin Townsend Stormbender

GRETSCH GUITARS HAVE a reputation for being best

for rockabilly and country music, but they’re really versatile enough for playing pretty much every style of music, including hard rock, funk, jazz, blues, punk and just about everything else (except for maybe blackened death metal, but even then I bet one could work). To me, a Gretsch ranks as one of the top five essential electric guitars every guitarist should own, particularly since their models deliver a unique sonic voice that’s unlike most other brands. One setback for many players is that the bestknown and most highly coveted Gretsch models like the 6120, Duo Jet and White Falcon start at prices above $2,000 and go up from there. Fortunately, Gretsch also offers much more affordable Electromatic and Streamliner models that deliver impressive, genuine Gretsch style and vibe for about a quarter of the cost of the “professional” models. We took a look at a pair of Gretsch’s latest affordable new

guitarworld.com

79


SOUNDCHECK

Broad Casting

FENDER AMERICAN ACOUSTASONIC TELECASTER By Paul Ria rio FENDER, IN THEIR endless pursuit

of innovation, is continually tinkering with their most popular guitars, amps and effects — all of which has led to constant demand for their products from top to bottom. Every so often, the company takes a chance and launches something peculiar, which may not necessarily be revolutionary, but can be considered groundbreaking. I won’t waste the space to point out the specifics, but I’ll disclose that the Fender American Acoustasonic Telecaster was initially puzzling to me, but the longer I’ve played it, the more enamored I’ve become with it. And it’s why I can honestly say it would be a shame to cynically dismiss it as an overindulgent hybrid of an acoustic-electric, because it’s so much more — a truly visionary instrument delivered in one of Fender’s most iconic body shapes. FEATURES The Acoustasonic Telecaster is — first and foremost — American made, being built in Fender’s Corona, California,

84

GU I TA R WOR L D • HOL I DAY 2019

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD EX

factory. It features a unique hollow body design with transverse bracing, a bolt-on mahogany neck with a contoured neck heel, dark ebony fingerboard (my example had gorgeous caramel streaks across it) with 22 narrow tall frets, laser-etched Fender logo and GraphTech TUSQ nut. The precise contours of its mahogany body have softrolled edges and a comfortable forearm bevel that seamlessly flows into the solid Sitka spruce top, capping off a novel Teleshaped visage outlined by its binding and understated rosette. The rounded mahogany sound port is part of Fender’s patented String Instrument Resonant System (SIRS), which contributes to the guitar’s lively projection and fuller voice despite having Telecaster dimensions. Even though the guitar has a poly-satin matte finish, it has a very natural and pleasant wood feel throughout. But what clearly makes the Acoustasonic a powerhouse instrument is the Fender and Fishman-designed Acoustic Engine — a trinity of digital and analog firepower that consists of a Fishman under-

CELLENCE

saddle transducer, Fishman Acoustasonic Enhancer, and Fender’s Acoustasonic noiseless N4 magnetic pickup, wired to emulate 10 modeled body styles and tone wood combinations, all of which are accessed via the five-way “voicing” blade switch and blended with the “Mod” knob and master volume. The input jack includes a mini USB input to charge the Acoustasonic’s lithium-ion battery, with a battery indicator that flashes red when it’s time to recharge. PERFORMANCE As expected, most electric

guitarists will feel right at home with the Acoustasonic’s taut yet springy playability on its super-flat 12-inch fingerboard radius and modern slim “C” neck that’s strung with light gauge acoustic strings. While it won’t replace your favorite electric guitar or traditional acoustic, it sits somewhere between, most likely as a utility guitar, but I can easily see it as my main instrument for a wide variety of musical performances. Admittedly, I can’t wait to see the early high-profile adopters of the Acoustasonic.


SOUNDCHECK

Strapping Young Axe

GUITAR WORLD

PLATINUM AWARD

FRAMUS DEVIN TOWNSEND STORMBENDER

EX

By Chris Gill THE FRAMUS TEAMBUILT Pro

Series, which comes between the company’s flagship Masterbuilt Custom Shop models and import Standard D-Series line, offers several different Artist Series models for an interesting group of players that includes Phil X, Stevie Salas and Alice In Chains frontman William DuVall. But by far their most interesting artist is progressive metal musician Devin Townsend (best known for the Devin Townsend Project, Strapping Young Lad and his work on Steve Vai’s Sex and Religion), who collaborated with Framus on an appropriately out-ofthe-ordinary model called the Stormbender Devin Townsend Artist Series. Fitting for a visionary, genre-defying artist like Townsend, the Stormbender seems like an unconventional instrument, but it makes perfect sense once you get to know it. FEATURES Although it is built from

conventional tonewoods, including a

CHEAT SHEET

86

STREET PRICE: $3,999 MANUFACTURER: Framus, warwickbass.com/ en/Framus

GU I TA R WOR L D • HOL I DAY 2019

mahogany body and set maple neck, the Stormbender features a generously thick 2-inch body with a carved and contoured top and back with a AA flame maple top inset in an oval section running down the middle of the body. The neck has a 25.5-inch scale, 22 extra-high jumbo frets installed with Framus’s Invisible Fretwork Technology (IFT) and Plek set up. The model is available in transparent Nirvana Black, and the tigerstripe ebony fretboard is minimally adorned with a Devin Townsend circle at the 11th through 13th frets. Pickups are a pair of Townsend’s signature Fishman Fluence Transcendence ceramic magnet humbuckers with a hybrid magnetic circuit that provides two distinct humbucking and single-coil tones accessed via a push/pull switch on the master tone knob. The Evertune bridge and Graph Tech Ratio locking tuners keep the guitar perfectly in tune.

A pair of Devin Townsend’s signature Fishman Fluence Transcendence pickups provide a selection of two distinctive full humbucking and singlecoil tones.

CELLENCE

PERFORMANCE The Devin Townsend

Stormbender Artist Series boasts very aggressive and distinctive midrange, thanks to the 635Hz/3.4kHz (bridge) and 780Hz/3.4kHz (neck) peak frequencies of their humbucking and single-coil settings. As a result, the guitar delivers a throaty, full-bodied sound that works equally well with high-gain and clean amp settings and also seems to pull more tonal variation and range out of standard amp tone controls. Even with a graphic EQ set to a scooped mid setting the guitar’s tone remains robust and chunky. Our example weighed a little more than nine pounds, but the weight is well distributed and the guitar feels much lighter when strapped on and played in a standing position. The fretwork is stunning, with a smooth, fast feel, and access up and down the neck is unrestricted, thanks to the neck heel that is contoured seamlessly to the body like a neck-thru design.

The guitar always stays perfectly in tune thanks to the Evertune bridge, locking Graph Tech Ratio tuners and Graph Tech Tusq lowfriction nut.

THE BOTTOM LINE With the Stormbender Artist Series, Framus’s Teambuilt staff and Devin Townsend have joined forces to offer a solidbody guitar with style and sounds that are as innovative, appealing and distinctive as Townsend’s music.


PERFORMANCE NOTES

•••

HOW TO PLAY THIS MONTH ’S SONGS • • •

“SAY HELLO 2 HEAVEN” Temple of the Dog THIS CLASSIC EARLY-NINETIES rock ballad from the grunge era is chock full of cool chords and offers a great lesson in songcraft, arranging complementary guitar parts and arpeggiating chords to transform them into a rich melodic accompaniment. The swirly, trippy intro figure that begins the song, performed by Stone Gossard on an overdriven Les Paul, routed through what sounds like a Leslie rotating speaker cabinet, with both its slow and fast settings used (on an electronically doubled track), is performed with a flowing eighth-note triplet rhythm, with all the notes of each arpeggio ringing together. Notice how the guitarist starts off in bars 1 and 2 with a repeating ascending three-note pattern (best picked down-down-up) then switches in bar 3 to three notes up, then three notes down (pick down-down-down, up-up-down), which changes the contour beautifully. Mike McCready’s Gtr. 2 rhythm part, a Strat with a cleaner tone, offers more nice chord arpeggiation, especially during the verses (see sections B and F), where the guitarist picks out the individual notes of the various barré chords and open chords and adds soulful, Jimi Hendrix-style decorative grace-note embellishments, using hammer-ons and pull-offs within the held chord shapes. McCready’s guitar solo, beginning at section E (bar 56, Gtr. 4 part), is a tastefully crafted melodic story that begins low and climbs up into the high register, with lots of wailing string bends. Using primarily the E minor pentatonic scale (E, G, A, B, D), the guitarist conveniently hits all the sweet notes of the backing chords. Particularly cool is the final, countrystyle lick he plays in bars 73-76, utilizing a pedal steel-like oblique string bend, sliding 6th intervals and hybrid picking (pick and fingers technique). To finger that final, “twangy” bend at the end of measure 74, barré your pinkie across the top two strings as you bend the G string with your middle and index fingers. —JIMMY BROWN

96

GU I TA R WOR L D • HOL I DAY 2019

“I BELIEVE IN A THING CALLED LOVE”

The Darkness

THIS FUN, HARD-ROCKING hit song from 2001 features the Darkness co-guitarists and brothers Justin and Dan Hawkins serving up a good helping of “oldschool,” Les Pauls plugged straight into Marshall and Mesa/Boogie high-gain tube amps, fat-sounding riffs and wailing leads. The first lead break (see section E, Interlude, bars 33-36) features Justin harmonizing with himself, Brian May-style, via two overdubbed single-note lead guitar tracks. Notice how perfectly matched the half-step and whole-step string bends are here, which is something that requires a keen ear to perform. Dan plays the longer second and third guitar solos, beginning at sections G (bar 45) and J (bar 77) and makes great use of the E major pentatonic scale (E, F#, G#, B, C#) as the basis for many of his licks, which works great over the underlying chord progression that’s in the key of E major. Notice how the guitarist effectively employs his open B- and high E-string notes, which provide a nice, almost rockabilly-like “twang” to certain phrases. Particularly noteworthy is the bouncy climb up the high E string in the final solo, during bars 81-84, where the guitarist combines alternate picked 16th notes with pull-offs to the open-E pedal tone as he works his way up the fretboard through the E major scale (E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#) before climaxing on the high D-to-E whole-step “bend and shake.” The song’s pre-chorus, beginning at section C (bar 17) features some noteworthy chordplaying moves and rich voicings, including the 5th-in-the-bass Bb/F and B/F# barré chord shapes, which create the aural illusion of seven-string guitars, and the thumb-fretted F#m7add4. If you’re having trouble grabbing the low F# root note on the latter, simply omit it, strum the other five strings and let the bass player cover the low F# note, which you’ll still be doubling on the D string anyway. —JIMMY BROWN

“EVERYBODY WANTS TO RULE THE WORLD”

Tears for Fears

WHEN PERFORMING THE catchy opening lick in this classic Eighties hit (see bars 1-4), guitarist Roland Orzabal positions his pick-hand palm so that it mutes the B-string notes while allowing those on the high E string to ring out. This palm muting technique, indicated in the transcription by the abbreviation “P.M.,” involves laying the fleshy, outer edge of your palm against the strings, just forward of, and slightly in contact with the guitar’s bridge. In this case, however, you’ll need to be mindful of keeping your high E string unmuted, so as not to inadvertently mute those crucial high melody notes that are meant to ring freely. The dotted horizontal line extending over the tablature illustrates how long you should keep the palm mute applied, as moving into bar 4, we can see how Orzabal creates a build-up for the following section by lifting the mute completely and allowing the notes on both strings to ring together freely. The key to playing the first four bars of Orzabal’s guitar solo correctly (see bars 55-58) is to barré your fret-hand index-finger across the top three strings at the 2nd fret, adding and removing your middle and ring fingers as needed. This 2nd-fret barré is also essential when performing the quick double-stops lick in bar 60, where Orzabal ricochets back-andforth between 5th and 2nd positions while picking steady eighth-note triplets. Note that, on the original recording, all instruments sound slightly sharp of concert pitch, most likely due to an intentional increase in the playback speed of the tape in the mastering process. And so, in order to play along, you’ll need to tune all six of your strings approximately 40 cents sharp of standard tuning, just shy of a quarter step, or a little less than midway between E standard and F standard.

—JEFF PERRIN


9000

TRANSCRIPTIONS

“SAY HELLO 2 HEAVEN” Temple of the Dog

As heard on TEMPLE OF THE DOG Words and Music by CHRIS CORNELL • Transcribed by HEMME B. LUTTJEBOER

G5/F

Gm6/B b

Em7

2 34

1 34

Em

23

23 4

C7

F

3

G

T 321

Am7

131111

3

12fr.

134111

T A B

6 8

1

Em7/F

3

1

B b6

34

1

Csus4

F

34

let ring throughout

3

3

3

3

3

3 2

211

34

32

4

7fr.

131211

3

2

3

3

3

3

0

2

0

3

0

3

3

0

1 1 2 1

let ring

2 1 3 1

5 4 6 4

4

4

0

0

3

1333

132

C 8fr.

Csus4 3fr.

T 3411

0

3fr.

1333

1334

0

3

0

0

3 3 4 3 5 3

5

.. .. ..

3 3 4 3

.. ..

3 4 3 5 3

3

0

3 1

6 4

1

1

. 5. 4. 6. 4

4 4 5 4

6 4

5 3

3 3 4 3 5 3

.. .. ..

Bass 1

4

4

4

4

3

*Chord names apply to both gtr. parts, unless indicated otherwise “SAY HELLO 2 HEAVEN” WRITTEN BY CHRIS CORNELL © 1991 DISAPPEARING ONE MUSIC

.

5 3

0

1 1 2 1 3 1

0

0

2 1 3 1

3

0

1

0

3

3

3

3

0

3

0

A b7

F7

.. .. .

3

0

whew

3 3 4 3 5 3

3

Yeah

0

1

Gtr. 3 (w/light dist. and slow rotary spkr. effect, right channel) 1 1 2 1

0

0

Ooh

G7

Gtr. 2 (clean elec., left channel)

.

8fr.

5fr.

Em7

1

A b7

F7

1

Csus4

T 3211

D

5fr.

131211

Em7/F

(0:20)

. 2. 1. 3. 1

6fr.

32 1

D

A7sus4

0

1

C

231

A7

C 7fr.

131411

131211

131211

B7sus4

Gm6/B b

G 6/B

3

.. .. ..

B7

B b7

G

Am

*Track was electronically doubled, with one part having a fast rotary speaker setting and the other without the effect.

3

1 1 2 1 3 1

1

G7 4fr.

131211

131211

13fr.

341

3

3

3

F

A b7

F7

G/B

21 34

*Gtr. 1 (elec. w/light dist. and fast rotary spkr. effect)

3

9

3

8fr.

8fr.

311

Em7

Cadd9

Em7

Csus2 5

21

134111

Intro (0:00) Slow Rock qd = 50

G 6/B

34

G

5fr.

G5/F

1

2

Am

5fr.

131211

Csus2

134211

Em

8fr.

A

1

Em7

A7sus4

.. .. .. .. .. .

1 1 2 1

1 1 2 1

1

let ring

2 1 3 1

5 4 6 4

4

3 1

6 4

5 4 6 4

1

1

4

4

.. ..

5

4 4 5 4

4

4

6 4

5 3

4

guitarworld.com

97

Profile for Future PLC

Guitar World 520 (Sampler)  

You can subscribe to this magazine @ www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk

Guitar World 520 (Sampler)  

You can subscribe to this magazine @ www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk