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Q&A

Theory godmother

Star LETTER PRIZE

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Post your playing posers and technical teasers to: Theory Godmother, Guitar Techniques, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2BW; or email me at guitartechniques@futurenet.com - your wish is my command! Minor Mood

Dear Theory Godmother

having spent a while now practising playing over a II V I sequence using modal thinking – Dorian for the II chord, mixolydian for the V and Ionian for the I - I’ve turned my attention to tackling the minor version. But it seems that the thinking behind a minor IIm V Im isn’t quite as clear cut and, to be honest, things become confused very quickly! Is there any way you can give an understandable guide to approaching a minor IIm V Im as a basis for soloing? Pete It’s always been my impression that whereas major harmony in music is relatively logical and straightforward, when we start to discuss minor equivalents we quickly run into trouble! I mean: one major scale vs three minors – what’s that all about? Also, regular readers of Theory Godmother will know that I tend to resist turning music into a science, where formulae are dogmatically applied and adhered to, in favour of a slightly more organic approach wherever possible. For instance, the way in which you would tackle a minor IIm V Im depends a lot on the context in which you find it and so applying a single rule isn’t generally a foolproof fit.

STAR SOUND BITE...

However, as usual in these cases, let’s look at things from the ground up and see what we can discover along the way. A major II V I can be dealt with in exactly the way you describe, using the modes of the major scale: Dorian, Mixolydian and Ionian respectively (see Ex 1). A lot of teachers (including me) will tell you that in reality all that is happening is that you are improvising using the major scale of the key centre and so really it’s one scale and not three. But thinking modally does help people look at the three chords from the perspective of their separate roots and arpeggios, which is important for phrasing and so on. Another way of looking at things – and something I know is popular with Pat Metheny - is to consider all three chords as triads and work from there. I also generally recommend that students examine the melody involved and use a conglomeration of these ideas when they take a solo. Many teachers will then go on to recommend that the V chord be subjected to all kinds of chromatic alterations and additions and this is something that we looked at in recent Theory Godmother columns. Things change when we get to the minor variant of the II V I - and, to be honest with you, it can take a while to get your head around the plan of attack used by many texts on the subject. So hang on to your hat!

A very wise musicologist by the name of Cecil Sharp once said that there are very few true minor keys used in popular music, most of them being modal in nature even if they have all the apparent characteristics of minor key melody and harmony in place. He went on to say that very nearly 100% of the tunes he found that were thought to be minor were in fact modal. In other words, instead of the actual minor scale of any given key being used to harmonise a melody, it’s more likely that you’ll find Dorian or Aeolian thinking in place. Obviously a lot of jazz tunes are based around popular music of the day and so we find pretty much the same thing happening. So it’s no surprise that a IIm V Im is commonly dealt with modally, too. There are other ways of looking at it, but I’m going to stick my neck out here and say that this is possibly the most common for jazz. If you take a look at Ex 2 you’ll see the harmonised Eb scale and notice that the VII chord is a Dm7b5, just like the ii chord in our progression. Furthermore, you’ll notice that right next door there’s a convenient Cm7. In this way these two are prime candidates for use as the II and I chords of our progression; the Dm7b5 being dealt with via the D Locrian mode and the i having the C Aeolian assigned to it as a means of improvisation (Ex 3). The only chord that doesn’t really fit into the modal plan is the G7 - in the Eb scale the note G

produces a IIIm chord – Gm7 – which would be Phrygian in its natural state (see Ex 4). That’s no good to us as we need a dominant 7th to do its job of signposting the way back to the tonic chord. So what to do? It so happens that, in jazz, it’s not uncommon to find a III7 chord – a 7th built on the third note of the scale – and that’s exactly what we’re going to adopt here as a means to make the progression work. If we look at the two chords, the only difference is the Bb/B whereas we abandon the Eb scale altogether by losing the Ab, Eb and Bb (Ex 5). It might sound complex to begin with but switching to the Mixolydian and beyond when we reach the V chord will feel natural with a little orienteering in the practice room. So you now have three scales on which to base your solo: Locrian, Aeolian and Mixolydian. Naturally, many jazz players will elaborate on the V chord using altered forms and other scales in order to introduce tension at this point to make the resolution to the Im chord stronger and more effective. That lies in the future, though; at present we have enough to think about! An alternative way of looking at this – and favouring the more organic approach to improvisation – is to look at what notes we actually need to cover all three chords and we do that simply by breaking the chords down to their fundamental parts. As you can see (Ex 6) the Dm7b5 contains the notes D, F, Ab and C, the G7 has G, B, D and F and the Cm7 has C, Eb, G and Bb. If we rearrange those notes into scale order we come up with a choice between the C harmonic and natural minor scales. You could even say that C minor’s relative major Eb is a pretty good fit, too, as is the C minor pentatonic scale (Ex 7). The best approach would be to find a minor ii V i backing track and experiment; begin with the simplest solution and look at it as a modal progression, test driving the Locrian, Mixolydian and Aeolian modes. Then mix it in with a bit of C minor blues before looking at it from the natural and harmonic minor perspective. Once you have the basic sound in your head and can actually hear the transition between the three chords happening

QUOTE FROM TALKING GUITARS: MARK KNOPFLER ON LEARNING HIS TRADE… After I’d been in it quite a while, it struck me rather forcibly that I knew sod all about music and what I would have to do really would be to learn a little bit about it, seeing as I was doing it; going into these sessions and different things. So I thought I’d try and figure out a little more about it, that’s all. So I just sat down and made myself stick at it. It wasn’t easy, but then it just started becoming easier and easier and I realised that even if I couldn’t always remember the name of something, then I would recognise the sound. It’s like learning a language where you don’t know the long words but after a while you recognise them, like a child. So now I say, ‘That’s a 13th with a flattened 9th’ because I know the sound of it.

8 GuitarTechniques October 2012

■ Example tract taken from Talking Guitars by David Mead, published by Sanctuary, ISBN: 1–86074–620–9. Price: £9.99 (UK), $14.99 (USA).


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in your single note soloing, advance into exploring some altered scales to fit the V chord for that added jazz bite. But remember the most important thing: target the root notes and their corresponding chord tones as the progression moves along. The aim must always be to play melodically, and not just cram together a series of interlinked scales.

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bit boxy and artificial. An alternative I’m hearing more and more about would be to invest in a microphone modelling unit but I don’t know if they work. As an acoustic player yourself, have you any input on the matter? Martin I’ve actually done quite a lot of research in this area, Martin, and I’m happy to

Visit www.davidmead.net to check out David’s books and solo CD...

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Unplugged?

Dear Theory Godmother

It seems that getting a good, natural acoustic sound in a live situation is a lot harder than it sounds. I’m using an under-saddle pickup and when I play live it goes through a DI box into the PA where a little reverb and EQ are added. But it still has a tendency to sound a

3

Forgive me for going seriously offtopic here, but have you any idea why it’s common for bands to introduce their material to a live audience by saying ‘The next number we’re going to play is…’. Do you know why songs are referred to as ‘numbers’ in this way? It’s puzzled me for ages! James Switching over into Stephen Fry mode for a second James, it just so happens that I do know the answer to this one! Around 100 years ago at functions and dinner dances it was common practice for a band to hand out cards to their audience that had their repertoire listed with numbers by the side a bit like a Chinese take-away menu. So revellers and party goers could request the tunes of the day by number rather than by name. In this way it became common for band leaders to announce to their audience ‘Our next number is a waltz entitled…’ and so on. I like these bits of trivia - like the word ‘riff’ apparently comes from jazz too - “Play the refrain” , with “refrain” being shortened to “riff”.

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The Numbers Racket

Dear Theory Godmother

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share the results! I’ve used microphone modellers both live and in the studio and they definitely do something to stop the output from an under-saddle pickup sounding sterile. I’ve even carried out some A/B tests in a studio and while it’s very difficult to put into words exactly what the difference was, I can definitely say that I liked whatever it was doing. Somehow it seemed like there was more air in the signal – and of course a microphone’s job is to pick up sound waves in the air so I guess this was the simulation at work. There are alternatives to microphone modellers, though. On the market at present you’ll find quite a few systems that combine an under saddle pickup with a mic that is mounted on the guitar internally. The two signals – from the pickup and mic – are then blended together either in an integral preamp or an external device. I know a few players who use these systems and they all manage to get a very good cross section between piezo punch and microphone airiness. The best advice here is to explore the marketplace and take a good look at your options, ask a few players which systems they use and see if you can try a few guitars out with some different systems in place. That way you’ll be in a far better and more informed position to make your decision. Be aware, though, that most acoustic players I know change their minds, gear, preamps and reverb units as often as some of us change our socks - you know, around every three to six months or so!

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October 2012 GuitarTechniques 9


Play: aCoUSTiC

ON tHE CD

traCk 8

Tommy emmanuel moon river Our third instrumental is Tommy’s superb version of a 1961 Henry Mancini classic, originally a hit for singer Andy Williams. Stuart Ryan transcribes...

ABILITY RATING

Moderate/difficult INFO

WILL IMPROVE YOUR

KEY: C TEMPO: Various CD: Track 8

Fingerstyle technique Chord fretting Melody and chords

TOMMY EMMANUEL WILL need no introduction. Regarded as probably the finest acoustic guitar player on the planet, Tommy’s incendiary live shows and breathtaking technique have won him legions of fans across the globe. However, Tommy is also a gifted arranger and interpreter of popular music. So this month we are examining the true depth of his playing with this wonderful arrangement of Henry Mancini’s Moon River. However, don’t let this slow-paced ballad catch you

technIque FocuS

ARTIFICIAL HARMONICS Tommy achieves the basic harmonic by picking the string with his thumbpick, touching it lightly with a fingertip twelve frets above the fretted note, and releasing the finger. You can of course use your thumb, not thumbpick. With chords, he mimics the chord’s shape twelve frets up on each string. For a 3rd fret G barre chord: play the harmonic on the sixth string, 15th fret; fifth string, 17th fret; fourth string, 17th fret; third string, 16th fret; second and first strings, 15th fret. This is the most basic use of the technique: you can use other fret distances, such as seven or five frets; Tommy often alternates artificial harmonics with ‘natural’ harmonics too.

off-guard – there are enough twists and turns to ensure that it is every bit as challenging as some of Tommy’s uptempo tunes! Tommy employs a great deal of subtleties and idiosyncrasies when he approaches a slow tune and some of these may take you by surprise. Generally the picking hand follows the pim and pima conventions and these are open to your own interpretation; beyond some artificial harmonics and some fleet cross-string picking there isn’t too much to worry about with this hand. It’s when we get to the fretting hand that some of the real challenges appear – we are dealing with a

If you can get a melody out there while playing a fingerstyle arrangement it’s very exciting and very self-contained.

Tommy Emmanuel

‘chord melody’ arrangement here so you are mostly picking a melody from within a chord shape and some of these can be a real challenge. I’ve included all of Tommy’s fretting hand fingerings as a guide and you also need to watch out for those places where he uses the fretting hand thumb to reach over the neck to fret the sixth string. There are quite a few ‘jazz’ chords here that may be new to you and their resulting dissonance may take you by surprise to begin with. However, with Moon River essentially following jazz chord changes it’s no surprise to find them here and Tommy does a fantastic

job of extending and substituting the various chords he uses. It’s worth watching the YouTube footage that I transcribed this from so you can really hear Tommy’s command and control of dynamics as well as just getting the notes – he is perfectly attuned to the music and uses the ebb and flow of volume and pace to keep things moving along brilliantly. You’ll notice how at times he voices the melody with full chords whilst at other times he uses just one note or simple two-note chords to create harmony. This level of interpretation is all part of the skill of the arranger who knows just what to play at any given point. This is a wonderful arrangement of a classic tune that would be a great addition to any guitarist’s repertoire. Yes, there are inherent challenges but the visceral nature of the piece means that this will be a very deep learning experience for players of all standards. As ever if you have any questions feel free to drop me a line!

Getthetone 3

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Tommy is associated with maton guitars from Australia and has his own signature model. Any acoustic will serve you well here but an Om body size will give the required response and even dynamic range whilst a new set of strings is always a good idea for getting maximum clarity and tone.

TRACK RECORD You can’t go wrong with any of Tommy’s solo albums. But seeing him live is where the real magic happens: he is THE consummate entertainer, which separates him from so many dry, ‘technique for its own sake’ players. Type “Tommy Emmanuel Moon River” into YouTube to see him casually playing the beautiful rendition that this transcription is based on in his hotel bedroom!

30 GuitarTechniques October 2012


Tommy emmanUel: moon river

Tommy Emmanuel: the greatest acoustic guitarist of them all?

October 2012 GuitarTechniques 31


Play: aCoUSTiC

Moon River Music and lyrics by Tommy Mercer and Henry Mancini ©1961 Sony/ATV Publishing LLC. US/CAN reproduced by kind permission of Hal Leonard Corporation. UK/EU reproduced by kind permission of Music Sales Ltd. All RIghts Reserved. International Copyright Secured.

ON tHE CD

traCk 8

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[Bar 3] Right off the bat we encounter a typical Tommy embellishment that we’ll see several times during this arrangement. It’s not easy to execute this at speed so this will make a great stand-alone exercise (as will several others in the piece!). [Bar 6] Some of those tasty ‘jazz chords’ that add some darkness before resolving beautifully back into the very major orientated melody. [Bars 8-9] here is an example of the thumb used to fret the sixth string at the 1st

fret (bar 8) - quite a tricky technique when holding down the rest of the chord. In bar 9 there is picking hand flourish that may raise the heart rate! Tommy uses a thumbpick but it’s certainly not essential here. [Bar 16] This is difficult – Tommy slides his first finger up two frets while holding down the rest of the chord with the remaining fingers. The challenge is to keep the other fingers in place. he does it without breaking sweat but it’s very tricky! Am

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Tommy Emmanuel: Signature Licks (Guitar tab and CD, 127pp, £17.95, HL00696409) Take an in-depth look at the virtuosic playing of the Aussie acoustic master. Delve through detailed analysis of 12 songs including Guitar Boogie Shuffle and Angelina, plus a CD featuring demonstration tracks of Emmanuel’s style and techniques. Each track is presented as guitar tablature with standard notation. Available from: www.musicroom.com

Tommy emmanUel: moon river

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[Bar 25] Some of Tommy’s famous artificial harmonics are here (see Technique Focus). he’s not using his famous ‘harping’ technique so you just need to lightly rest the first finger of the picking hand on the string fret twelve frets above the note on the tab (marked as Ah19 etc) before picking the string with the thumb. [Bar 28] You might find this to be another chord challenge, since you need to use a barre to keep this chord in place whilst ensuring that the first and second E m7

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October 2012 GuitarTechniques 33


Play: aCoUSTiC

ON tHE CD

traCk 8

plaYInG tIpS

CD traCk 8

[Bar 37] Tommy actually plays a ‘neck bend’ here which means he holds the chord and then pushes the neck from behind with the picking hand to create a whammy bar effect. I’d say this is optional – it probably won’t harm your guitar in any way but neither Tommy nor GT want to take responsibility in the event that it does! You may want to use a different fingering for the G#9 chord. [Bar 40] And a lovely change of feel which acts as a coda to the piece - you may find some more challenges for the picking hand here. F9 # 11

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[Bar 46] And finally, just when you thought it was all over… this bar is very tricky! First you have to fret the sixth string at the 8th fret with the first finger, while using the fourth finger to create the 12th fret harmonics on the remaining strings. When Tommy does it he quickly shifts his fingering on the sixth string from first to second finger so he can perform the harmonics at the 7th fret. The key is that he keeps the sixth string sounding while changing fingers. This can take a lot of getting used to and will again serve as a great practice bar on its own.

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34 GuitarTechniques October 2012

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leSSon: Jazz

ON tHE CD

traCks 33-54

Johnny Smith

Join Pete Callard as he uncovers some of the greatest licks from the giants of jazz. This month, the incredible, multi-faceted Johnny Smith. the complete jazz guitarist. This month we’re going to explore key elements of Johnny’s soloing style and learn some of his greatest licks. Johnny Smith was born in Birmingham, Alabama in 1922 and taught himself to play in pawnshops, where in return for keeping the guitars in tune he was allowed to play them. After military service, Smith moved to New York where he swiftly carved out a busy career as a studio musician and in-house arranger at NBC, orchestral sideman with the likes of the New York Philharmonic and Philadelphia Symphony orchestras, and popular fixture on the New York jazz scene, counting Charlie Parker among his fans. An early pioneer of chord melody styles, Johnny Smith was equally adept as a soloist, showcasing impressive technique and melodic invention in his speedy, swinging lines. During the 50s he released a series of albums for the Roost label, including 1952’s acclaimed Moonlight In Vermont with saxophonist Stan Getz, a colleague from NBC. He also composed the tune Walk Don’t Run, based around the changes to the standard Softly As In A Morning Sunrise, which subsequently became a huge hit for The Ventures. Following the death of his second wife in 1958, Smith moved to Colorado Springs (where he still lives) to raise his young daughter and largely retired from the music scene from the 1960s onwards, focusing instead on teaching and running a music store. Smith’s playing takes in fast double-stop melodies, close voiced chord melodies, harmonics, intervallic ideas, speedy alternate picked runs and occasional outside flourishes, and we’ll be exploring many of these aspects in this month’s examples. Example 1 features a jaunty short III-VI-IIV-I line in G followed by our second example, which is based around a turnaround in D then a long D major II-V-I. Johnny Smith possessed a gift for slow

Johnny Smith: one of the all-time greats

ABILITY RATING

Moderate/Advanced INFO

WILL IMPROVE YOUR

KEY: Various TEMPO: Various CD: Tracks 33-54

Jazz soloing Phrasing Swing feel

“AN EXTRAORDINARY VIRTUOSO. As far as I’m concerned, no one in the world plays the guitar better than he. They might play it differently, but nobody plays better.” This was Barney Kessel’s view on Johnny Smith, a remarkable musician whose mastery of every aspect of jazz guitar make him in many ways

tempo ballads, as seen in Examples 3 and 4 which both feature twisting lines and flurries of activity and invention. Equally, his enviable technical proficiency meant he was a master of up-tempo soloing, as demonstrated in Examples 5 to 8. Many of the lines we’ve featured so far are fairly consecutive in their note movement, but Johnny Smith also liked to experiment with wider interval skips and occasionally angular, outside harmony, as Examples 9 and 10 show. Our final example, appropriately enough, is a simple but effective ending idea in Eb based around the Eb major pentatonic scale, closing on a pleasingly sour Eb7#9b5 chord. That’s all for now, but join me next month when we’ll be looking at some of the greatest licks of the wonderful Emily Remler.

Johnny Smith’s mastery of every aspect of jazz guitar makes him in many ways the complete jazz guitarist.

Getthetone 2

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GAIN

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Johnny Smith favoured full-bodied archtop jazz guitars, and Guild, Gibson and heritage produced signature models at different points - all designed by Smith himself. For a good classic jazz sound, use the guitar’s neck pickup with the tone control rolled off to around 3 or 4 (or take the treble down on the amp), and set up a warm clean tone on your amp. Thick strings work better, as does a hollowbody guitar, but neither is essential.

TRACK RECORD Any of Johnny Smith’s 1950s albums on the Roost label are worth investigating. Good starting points are Moonlight In Vermont, Walk Don’t Run and The Sound of the Johnny Smith Guitar. There are many great Johnnny Smith tracks available online and it’s worth checking these out to get the flavour of this often rather forgotten titan of jazz guitar.

76 GuitarTechnique October 2012


learning zone

Solo Jazz endingS ExAmplE 1 Short IIIVIIIVI In G

CD traCk 33

A short III-VI-II-V-I in G starting on G major pentatonic (G Bb C D F) and G major (G A B C D E F#) before outlining Am9 and D7 and ending back in G major pentatonic.

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example 2 REpEATInG lAST 4 BARS ThREE TImES

CD traCk 35

Our second example starts with a turnaround in D, followed by a long D major II-V-I. Smith stays in D major over the A7/G and D/F# chords, moving to outline B7b9 over the B7. Over the Em7 he throws in some chromatic passing notes, then

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suggests Em9 and A7b9 over the A7 and resolves to D major pentatonic on the Dmaj7. Smith always manages to sound effortless, both technically and in note choice - he’s never obviously thinking, “I’ll cram the Dorian scale in here.”

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ExAmplE 3 Slow tempo Short IIVIS

CD traCk 37

Smith plays around the initial chords, then eases into a speedy scalar 16th note line moving from C lydian (C D E F# G A B) to C major (C D E F G A B) then an Fdim7

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arpeggio (F Ab B D) over the E7b9, finishing in A minor pentatonic. This mix of scalic runs, chord tones and arpeggios often characterises Smith’s playing.

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October 2012 GuitarTechniques 77


leSSon: Jazz

ON tHE CD

traCks 33-54

ExAmplE 4 mInor IIVI IDea In a mInor

CD traCk 39

For this example Johnny Smith takes a dominant 7th arpeggio down in minor 3rds, E7b9 and finally running down the A natural minor scale (A B C D E F G) ending starting on G7 and E7 over the Bm7b5 then moving to Db7, Bb7 and G7 over the on the 9th (B) over the Am7. A great pattern to use over your next dom7 alt chord! B m7 b 5 E 7b 9 A m7 ©»¡™º œ œ œ œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ b œ b œ b œ b œ œ œ 4 œœ œœœœœœœ ˙ œ &4

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CD traCk 41 notes. he then takes a rhythmic figure based around the chord tones with more chromatic passing notes in bars 5 and 6, returning to Db major with chromatic passing notes, then outlines F7b9 resolving to Bb minor over the final 2 bars.

For Example 5 we’re upping the tempo for a line taking in a couple of long Db II-V-Is and a short minor II-V-I in Bb minor. Smith outlines Ebm9 over the Ebm7 and Ab7, then suggesting Ab7#5 before resolving to Db major with chromatic passing Ex 5

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ExAmplE 6 a b BeBop Sequence

CD traCk 43

Starting in Eb Dorian (Eb F Gb Ab Bb C Db) moving down chromatically to Db major pentatonic (Db Eb F Ab Bb) in bar 3, then Db Dorian (Db Eb E Gb Ab Bb B) in Ex 6

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bar 4 he embellishes the following chords before employing Bb natural minor (Bb C Db Eb F Gb Ab) over the remaining chords, ending on the 3rd (C) of Abmaj7.

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78 GuitarTechnique October 2012

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learning zone

Solo Jazz endingS ExAmplE 7 e b BeBop Sequence

CD traCk 45 Ab Bb C Db Eb), then suggests Fm7 and Bb altered (Bb Cb Db D E Gb Ab) over the Bb7, resolving to Ebmaj9. The Bb over the Am7 suggests he’s treating it as an A7, followed by a D major arpeggio over the D7 and G major pentatonic to finish.

A speedy bebop line starting in Eb and ending in G. Smith starts around Eb major in bar 2 moving to an Ebmaj9 arpeggio in bar 3, then uses chromatic and arpeggio ideas up to bar 5. Over the Fm7 he plays around Fm9 and F Dorian (F G

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ExAmplE 8 G BeBop Sequence

CD traCk 47

This up tempo bebop idea starts with a simple rhythmic motif which Smith develops masterfully over the next three bars, moving into a chromatic idea in bar 6 and outlining C9 over the C7 in bar 7. Incidentally, the C# is essentially a grace note leading into the D, but Smith tends to play these longer than most, so written

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down they come out as 8th notes even though they’re intended as grace notes). Over the F7 he plays the ‘bebop scale’ - F mixolydian (F G A Bb C Db Eb) with a major7 passing note (E) added, then moves from Bb7 to Bb altered (Bb Cb Db D E Gb Ab) over the Bb7 and ends on an Eb major triad.

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October 2012 GuitarTechniques 79


leSSon: Jazz

ON tHE CD

traCks 33-54

ExAmplE 9 G major InterVallIc lIck

CD traCk 49 a symmetrical G major pattern across the top five strings. In bar 2 he plays an Em triad then moves it down a semitone before resolving back to Gmaj7, moving into G major and finishing around a Gmaj9 (or Bm7) arpeggio.

This example is quite a departure from the previous ones, starting off with a solo break that’s surprisingly angular and ‘outside’, featuring wide interval skips. In bar 1 Smith’s outlining a G6 (or Em) arpeggio, but he’s more likely thinking in terms of

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ExAmplE 10 InterVallIc IDeaS

CD traCk 51 he then neatly nods towards the C dim7 with the Eb in bar 5, throwing in another big interval skip suggesting Gmaj7 in bar 6, then launches into a very ‘outside’ D altered line over the short II-V-I in bar 7 resolving to Gmaj7 in bar 8 and ending on the 6th (E).

here is another somewhat angular idea featuring interval skips. The first four bars are around C major but feature some wide jumps, in particular bars 2 and 3, starting with an ascending Am arpeggio and ending with a descending Dm7 arpeggio, and featuring a great descending 4ths and 5ths ‘cross string’ idea. C maj7

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ExAmplE 11 eb enDInG IDea

CD traCk 53

Over the closing II-V-I Smith repeats an Eb major pentatonic motif, then plays straight down the scale to the low Eb, ending on a pleasingly sour Eb7#9b5 chord. Ex 11

Watch out for the position shifts on the third and fifth strings, and aim to land on the low Eb with your second finger ready for the following chord.

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80 GuitarTechniques October 2012

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