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the finest guitar lessons on the planet 247 SEPTEMBER 2015

play like the legendary...

carlos Santana

Learn what makes this iconic guitarist so special - master his rhythm and lead styles today!

JOHN RENBOURN 8-page tribute to a fingerstyle genius

style studies

ERIC CLAPTON

Acoustic style explained

GUNS N’ ROSES

Play like the brilliant Slash

JOHN MAYER

His bluesy side exposed

Jim Mullen

Thumb picking jazzer

CHICAGO

Classic soft rock

TRANSCRIBED

Classical

Fernando Sor’s Study In C tabbed for solo guitar

classic TRACK tabbed!

ALLMAN BROTHERS Statesboro Blues

Learn this guitar extravaganza from Duane Allman & Dickey Betts



ISSUE 247 september 2015

Just some of your regular GT technique experts... Steve allsworth

A most versatile player, Steve has played with Ronan Keating, Lulu, Rod Stewart, Westlife, LeAnn Rimes and Lily Allen. He also teaches rock at BIMM Brighton.

Shaun Baxter

One of the UK’s most respected music educators, Shaun has taught many who are now top tutors themselves. His Jazz Metal album is considered a milestone.

jon bishop

Jon is one of those great all-rounders who can turn his hand to almost any style. No ‘Jack of all trades and master of none’, he nails every one with ease!

Phil Capone

Phil is a great guitarist who specialises in blues and jazz. He teaches at ICMP in London, writes for GT and Total Guitar and has published 10 top tuition books.

les davidson

Les has worked with Mick Taylor, Rumer, Jon Anderson, Pete Townshend, Tina Turner & more. He also runs a recording studio and teaches at BIMM London.

charlie griffiths

Guitar Institute tutor Charlie first came to fame in Total Guitar’s Challenge Charlie series. He’s also one of the UK’s top rock, metal and fusion guitarists.

phil hilborne

The UK’s original magazine guitar tutor, Phil’s something of a legend. A great player, he’s currently touring Europe with the Champions Of Rock show.

pat heath

BIMM Brighton lecturer, ESP product demonstrator and all-round busy musician, Pat brings you six cool licks each month in 30-Minute Lickbag.

the

finest

guitar tuition you can buy !

Welcome THIS MONTH WE have a triple artist focus, all very different styles, feels and genres. First is a man who has been on top for decades. He shot to fame with a set that took Woodstock Festival by storm. His liquid style sounded like nothing we’d heard before and his band’s Latin rhythms had the vast crowd dancing in the mud. Yes, it’s Carlos Santana. And while Carlos does divide opinion, who can deny a career that spans six decades, 10 Grammys and album sales that top 100 million? That his recent works, Supernatural and Shaman are among his most successful of all is testament to his generation-spanning appeal. Phil Capone looks at Carlos’s unique style, covering Latin rhythms, bending and picking, tone, choice of scales and more; all ending up with a final jam that you can learn in its entirety, or use to practise your new Santana licks! Our recent ‘jam’ feature got us thinking of the American bands that inspired that great nation to take up blues guitar and which, in turn, were the key to discovering their own original blues artists. Bands like The Allman Brothers (with Duane Allman and Dickey Betts) and The Paul Butterfield Blues

Band (with Michael Bloomfield and Elvin Bishop) were the US equivalent to John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers, Fleetwood Mac and Cream, and made stars of these players just as Mayall had done. Steve Allsworth offers a faithful take on one of the group’s greatest tracks: the powerful Statesboro Blues in which Allman and Betts both display their genius. When acoustic fingerstyle giant John Renbourn died in March this year we were determined to honour this wonderful musician with a full feature on his playing. We asked Stuart Ryan to come up with something special; Stu has done us proud with a lesson that shows just what made Renbourn so respected by his peers and fans alike. So enjoy these articles and this issue’s other great lessons and features. WIN! You’ll also notice an amazing competition to win thousands of £££s’ worth of group gear. Open to UK residents only, it’s an amazing chance to kit your whole band out with top-of-the-range gear. Please do enter - and I’ll see you next month!

Neville Marten, Editor neville.marten@futurenet.com

Don’t miss our amazing digital edition Guitar Techniques’ digital edition is now even better!

david mead

As ex-editor of both Guitarist and Guitar Techniques magazines, and author of top-selling tutor books, David is the perfect choice as Theory Godmother.

bridget mermikides

Guildhall and Royal Academy trained, Bridget is a Royal College of Music, examiner, a respected classical player and award-winning blues guitarist.

COVER PHOTO: BOB KING / REDFERNS / GETTY IMAGES

Stuart Ryan

Head of Guitar at BIMM Bristol, Stu is an acoustic guitar virtuoso who performs throughout the UK. His latest book/CD ‘The Tradition’ is available now.

andy saphir

A top teacher at the Guitar Institute (ICMP), Andy is a phenomenal player in a host of styles. He mixes just the right degree of flash with consummate taste.

john wheatcroft

A phenomenal guitarist, John is a master at all styles but a legend in Gypsy Jazz. His new album Ensemble Futur is out now on iTunes and Amazon.

Tap the links

Finding your way around the magazine is easy. Tapping the feature titles on the cover or the contents page, takes you straight to the relevant articles. Any web and email links in the text are tappable too!

Animated tab & audio

Songs and lessons have the audio built in, with a moving cursor showing you exactly where you are in the music. Simply tap the ‘play’ button then you can fast-forward or scroll back at will.

Play the videos

Certain articles have accompanying videos full of useful insight and additional information. Once again, tap the play buttons to enjoy video masterclasses on your iPad or smartphone.

PLUS! Get a FREE iPad/iPhone sample of GT. For full details and how to receive our digital edition regularly, go to bit.ly/guitartechniques (if you live in the UK) or bit.ly/guitartechus (overseas). You can also find us on www.zinio.com (Please note: Zinio editions do not have interactive tab or audio).

September 2015 GuitarTechniques 3



INNE FOR W CKLI

A BA YOUR BAND

Worth over £14,000

• C ON T E N T S • SE P T E MBE R 201 5 •

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Learning Zone Lessons Introduction

51

30-minute lickbag

52

GT’s music editor Jason Sidwell introduces another action-packed lessons section. BIMM’s Pat Heath has six more great licks at easy, intermediate and advanced levels.

blues

54

rock

58

CREATIVE ROck

70

chopS shop

76

HARD ROCK

78

jazz

82

Acoustic

88

music reading

92

Les Davidson looks at a player who tops the pop charts and plays killer blues – John Mayer. Martin Cooper examines one of the mightiest of US bands: Chicago and guitarist Terry Kath.

Shaun Baxter continues to explore his stringpair cells – this month, it’s larger note groupings. Andy Saphir introduces a great scale for blues, jazz, rock and country: the Mixolydian mode. Charlie Griffiths continues his new series with a look at those bad boys of 80s US rock – the brilliant Guns N’ Roses and guitarist, Slash. John Wheatcroft unravels the unique thumb style of Scottish jazz legend, Jim Mullen.

COVER FEATURE CARLOS SANTANA

Stuart Ryan looks at the acoustic side of a blues and rock icon – the one and only Eric Clapton.

14

Santana is one of the most recognisable electric guitarists on the planet. Phil Capone analyses every facet of the great man’s style.

FEATURES

Charlie Griffiths continues his series with more full pieces for you to tackle.

VIDEO MASTERCLASS

REGULAR FEATURES Welcome 3

transcriptIon #1

Nev discusses this issue’s triple-pronged attack.

THE ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND Statesboro Blues 26

Steve Allsworth dissects a brilliant track from this legendary band with inspiring slide from Duane and cool regular solo from Dickey Betts.

SPECIAL feature #2 JOHN RENBOURN TRIBUTE Farewell to an acoustic legend 38 Stuart Ryan looks at the styles that made John Renbourn such an influential player on the world’s acoustic fingerpicking scene.

talkback

7

Theory Godmother

9

In your own words...

NIGEL PRICE, Part 1

62

This amazing British jazz guitarist astounds with his first video masterclass on chord melody.

Fingers in knots or brain tormented by some unfathomable musical conundrum? Then let Dave Mead be your Theory Godmother.

Intro

10

Subscriptions

68

BACK ISSUES

94

60 Seconds, Session Shenanigans, One-Minute Lick, That Was The Year and Hot For Teacher. Save time and money – get GT delivered! Missed one? See how you can get it – here!

Albums

transcriptIon #2 FERNANDO SOR Study In C

95

New guitar CDs and DVDs reviewed and rated by our very own Roger Newell.

46

Bridget Mermikides arranges and transcribes another of this great Spanish composer’s etudes for solo classical guitar.

Next Month

98

Sort Out Your Picking; Parallel Worlds (major and minor); The Snack, My Sharona; Brian May, Van Halen, Buddy Guy, John Lennon and more.

Spring 2015 GuitarTechniques 5



Post: Guitar Techniques, Future Publishing, Ivo Peters Road, Bath, BA2 3QS. Email: neville.marten@futurenet.com using the header ‘Talkback’. JAMMY GENERATION

ISTOCK

Your recent editor’s letter about the days you used to jam endlessly with a friend (GT245), really struck a chord with me as I’m sure it did with many readers. When I started playing (this is not a sob story, just the truth), we had no guitar magazines that catered to our tastes; videos and DVDs weren’t invented, guitar books were rubbish with all the songs in F and C (even Stones songs that I knew were in A and D), and no one taught modern rock, pop or blues guitar. The only way a whole generation learnt to play – and that will include the Gary Moores, the Joe Satrianis and so on – was to knuckle down with a record player and slog at it, trying to figure out what you could just by listening. If you were lucky the band you liked were on Thank Your Lucky Stars, Shindig or Ready Steady Go, and you might just get to see where their fingers went. Usually the cameraman was doing pretentious angles, or focusing on the bass player during the guitar solo! The light at the end of the tunnel for us was those jams with your pals, comparing licks, laughing at each other’s wrong chords and basically striving to get better together. I don’t know if any younger readers have written in with their stories, but I’d be interested to know if our culture of learning still exists today in any form. Or, as with seemingly every other pastime, it’s turned into a solitary event that usually involves laptops or mobile phones. If that’s the case I feel sorry for the generations that are missing out on such a brilliant social, educational and enlightening way to spend their formative musical years. Bill Padstow It is indeed a different world now, Bill. Learning an instrument has never been easier, what with schools being more focused on music, parents wanting their kids to succeed in ever-broader areas and willing to stump up for extra-curricular activities such as guitar lessons. Not to mention YouTube and

the various teaching websites to which people have access. Back in my day, a few kids I knew had piano lessons, but most saw this as a form of purgatory – like learning poetry. Actually, we’ve had no letters from young people saying whether they get together and jam or not, but I’d love to hear from any that do. Perhaps genuine human interaction is not dead yet!

INTERESTING INTERVALS I loved the feature on using chord intervals in blues (GT244). I think I got more out of that than any lesson from anywhere in a long time. People always talk about homing in on chord tones but I never really knew what they meant. With this feature the penny dropped well and truly. I suppose like many older readers I’d noodled around for years, having gained a degree of fingerboard dexterity and a sort of understanding of scales but I never felt my solos went anywhere. Then I’d hear other guitarists, seemingly using the same notes as I was, but making their solos make sense and sound fantastic. Going through Jon Bishop’s examples the light went on – target the prime notes in the chords as they change! It means you need a better understanding of the licks you are playing, and where they are going, so you can ensure you do land on a good note. It didn’t take long before I started to get the hang of it. This single lesson has moved my playing on dramatically. So, thanks, Jon – and thanks GT! William Donovan Whenever I’ve done any kind of teaching, such as IGF or GuitarBreak weekends, this has been the major problem for most students – especially those in the older age

Jamming together is a great way for all of us to improve

ranges. Often people are told, ‘Use such and such a scale over such and such a chord,’ but this doesn’t get to the heart of the problem since, while the scale may indeed work, it still falls to the player to choose the best note, and put it in the best place at the best moment. Any note in D minor Pentatonic (D-F-G-A-C) will work over a D minor chord, but in the context of a piece of music that’s moving in 4/4 time the D, F and C will sound strong when played on the beat, and the G and A less so. But you also have to create a shapely lick or line in which strong notes do then land on strong beats. You need a mental road map on which you can plot the licks you are playing so this ideal situation is achieved. Something simple on paper becomes more complex in practice because so many external forces enter the equation – experience, taste, technique, musicality (or lack of it), choice of notes, and so on. The best advice I can give is that practice, and using your ears more than your eyes (ie listening rather than relying solely on tab), is most likely to yield the results you are looking for. I’m glad Jon’s article was the catalyst to your becoming the player you want to be.

DON’T KNOW OUR PIANOS FROM OUR FORTES Hitting a chord tone on a strong beat is a good place to start

First off I applaud your publication. I really appreciate the content and viewpoints and I try to take in everything I can each month. At my age, I don’t

have the rest of my life to get better gradually. As a result I really like to work from accurate and precise information. In the June issue of Guitar Techniques, in the article Dynamics and Articulations you have a large bold quote: “The first method of denoting the volume of a piece or a section is by using the letters p and f – piano and forte, or loud and soft’. However, in the article it states: ‘The first method of denoting the general volume of a piece or a section is by using the letters p and f. These are the initials of the words piano and forte; ‘p’ means soft and ‘f’ means loud…’. I don’t mean to nitpick, as I really do like what you put out, just wanted to let you know that you had a small slip-up. Thanks again for a wonderful publication and keep up the good work. Danny White Oh dear, Danny! It looks like one of those cases where someone didn’t write what they meant to (probably me since I usually select and create the pull-out quotes). The various people who read the article after that, didn’t spot it either. So slapped wrists all round and thanks for spotting the mistake – ‘piano’ is indeed soft, and ‘forte’ loud, in case there’s still any confusion. And, as I’m sure you all know, it’s the reason the piano-forte is called the piano-forte, as its pedals and touch sensitivity allow it to play both loud and soft!

September 2015 GuitarTechniques 7



Q&A

Theory Godmother

Post your posers and teasers to: Theory Godmother, Unit 5, Pines Way Industrial Estate, Ivo Peters Road, Bath, BA2 3QS; or email me at info@ davidmead.net – your every wish is Fairy Godmother’s command! Intruder Alert! Dear Theory Godmother I was looking through a songbook the other day and I found a song in the key of G that includes the chord F#7. I know that F#7 doesn’t belong in the key of G and so I’m wondering how you’d approach soloing over this change. The rest of the song appears to stick to the chords in the key of G but this oddball change seems to upset my attempts to play over it. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Dave I’ve outlined the changes you sent me in Ex 1 and, yes, the F#7 really does impose itself as a visitor in an otherwise G major chord sequence. Normally you would solo over the Gmaj7, Am7 and Bm7 using a mixture of scale and chord tones and if we wanted to look at the pure vocabulary available, it would take the form of G Ionian, A Dorian and B Phrygian (Ex2). So for three out of the four chords, you’re on pretty safe ground if you just stick to the G major scale. As you know, the trouble begins when we hit the F#7; in Ex 3, I’ve outlined both the chord and the G major scale it’s visiting and you can see straight away that the note F# itself is native to G major, but both the C# and A# present a problem. My simple solution is not to look at a relative scale for the F#7; as the chord has only a fleeting presence in the sequence anyway, the first place to look is at the chord tones themselves. I’ve written out an F#7 arpeggio in Ex 4 and as you can see, it includes the notes F#A#-C#-E. If we treat the whole sequence as a line of arpeggios, we will begin to hear the effect you want to achieve (Ex 5). It might not sound too much like a solo, but it’s accurately outlining the chords and getting the point across. The next thing to do is to get those arpeggios under your fingers using a backing track so you can hear everything falling into place. Then try some experiments: alter the rhythm, play extracts from the arpeggios, mix in some notes from the G major scale on the G, A and B chords and if you work at it, you should begin coming up with something like Ex 6. It might not be too elegant, but it’s bang on correct!

EXAMPLES 1 – 6

GUITAR TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE 2 4 7 Ex 1 Ex 1

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Theory Godmother - David Mead

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Name That Tuning Dear Theory Godmother

Having just begun to explore the world of acoustic instrumental music for myself, I am amazed at how many players seem to have moved away from standard tuning in favour of alternatives. Some of these I can understand, like tuning to a chord obviously makes sense for certain pieces and even DADGAD is fathomable in this respect. But players like Andy McKee, Antoine Dufour and

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I know you’ve been asked this before, but what are your views on a guitarist today learning to read music? Is it really necessary or just purely a nicety and not really that vital? I ask because my teenage son seems to be deadly serious about pursuing a career in music and he is putting up a lot of resistance regarding learning to read. Bob

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guitarist knows that we are limited in terms of close harmony or some interval stretches, so often the solution is to retune the strings to make life easier. Sometimes it might be a question of dropping the bass strings from E and A to D and G, and the difference is immense in terms of fingering. On other occasions, I think adopting an unorthodox tuning can present a challenge and has the effect of freshening up your musical perspective. With the strings retuned in an abstract way, it forces you to explore the landscape anew and this is often all you need to spark a great idea.

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so on seem to choose the weirdest tunings for their music, some of which make no sense at all. So where do the acoustic’s wilder tunings originate? Ross Obviously, it’s difficult for me to get into these players’ heads, but I think that you can look at the wilder tunings in two different ways. If you’re writing a tune away from the guitar, it’s easy to come up with something that’s very difficult to put onto the fretboard. Every

Had you asked me this 20 years ago I might have replied that it can’t hurt to acquaint yourself with music’s written language. Even if you just master the basics it can provide information above and beyond the numerical sequences of tab. These days though the situation has changed. The music industry isn’t what it was and it’s often the case that freshly-graduated guitar students have to teach to subsidise their income while exploring available gigs; plus many guitarists look towards work in pit orchestras or other situations where a good reading ability is essential. Competition for work in music that will pay enough to live on is far more fierce than it was when I entered the profession many years ago. It’s very much a question of only the most wellequipped players finding the best jobs. So why not explore the idea of your son attending one of the many guitar schools out there? A quick Google search will reveal them to you and all are well aware of the skills necessary to enter the world of professional guitar playing. Tell him he needs to read!

September 2015 GuitarTechniques 7


60 Seconds With...

Just one short minute is all it takes to find out what makes a great guitarist tick. Before she jumped into her limo for the airport, we grabbed a chat with exciting Finnish blues and slide guitarist, Erja Lyytinen. GT: Do you have a type of pick that you can’t live without? EL: When playing slide I get a louder sound with Dunlop fingerpicks. I use a thumb pick and a middle-finger pick. I need fingerpicks to be able to play Travis picking style with heavy gauge strings. When playing regular guitar, I use a red Dunlop Jazz III. It fits my small hand well and makes my playing precise.

GT: Who was your first influence to play the guitar? EL: My Dad. GT: What was the best gig you ever did? EL: Opening for Robert Plant in 2001. It was just a girl and a guitar – scary, but so cool! GT: And your worst playing nightmare? EL: In Sweden, a huge biker festival. The crowd was nice, but the weather was horribly cold – two degrees C in the summer. My fingers really hurt.

GT: If you had to give up all your pedals but three, could you do it and what would they be? EL: Fulltone Clyde Standard Wah-wah. In addition to the wah sound, you can leave the pedal in different positions to get this nasal sound. TC Electronic Flashback Delay with Looper, so many pre-sets to have fun. Delay adds a feel of sustain to playing. Mad Professor Mighty Red distortion. I rarely play without distortion. GT: Do you play another instrument well enough to be in a band? EL: I play some bass and drums. I also play keys and I’d love to someday be able to record some standards – just a woman and a piano. I made the horn arrangements on the Sky Is Crying album using a piano, so it is an essential instrument to me in that respect too.

Jani Mahkonen

GT: If a music chart were put in front of you, could you read it? EL: Yes definitely! I got a Masters degree in music from Sibelius Academy, Helsinki. It’s a very basic but important skill.

Play what you feel. When you’re on stage, forget what you’ve learnt; scales, fancy chords. Feel is so important. 10 GuitarTechniques September 2015

GT: What’s the most important musical lesson you ever learnt? EL: Play what you feel. When you’re on stage, forget what you’ve learned; scales, fancy chords etc. Feel is so important. GT: Present company excepted, who’s the greatest guitarist that’s ever lived? EL: Jimi Hendrix was just phenomenal for his time.

Erja Lyytinen with sparkly G&L ASAT and Monster amp

GT: Do guitar cables really make a difference? What make are yours? EL: Yes they do. My pedal board has been built with George L’s cables. Sometimes I use a wireless system though and then it’s Stage Clix, which hardly changes the original sound, but boosts it a bit. GT: Is there anyone’s playing, of which you’re slightly jealous? EL: Eric Johnson and Pat Metheny both have a brilliant sense of melody. They’re amazing soloists and composers too. Sonny Landreth has his own unique style. GT: What’s your favourite amp and how do you set it? EL: I used to play a lot with

Monster Amps (Finnish), but recently bought a 135-watt Twin Reverb from 1975. Volume and gain both 5.5, spring reverb at 3, not too much bass.

GT: What kind of action do you have on your guitars? (Any particular quirks etc?) EL: I use a high action. Standard guitar action 2.0 mm at 17th fret and on slide guitars it is 2.5mm. GT: What kind of strings do you use? Standard guitar, it’s D’Addario .010-.046 and when playing slide, I use .012-.052 and change the highest string to .015 to get a thicker sound.

GT: Is there a solo you really wish you had played? EL: Mike Stern on Little Shoes. He has got the blues – until he shreds it to 36 million notes. GT: What’s the solo or song of your own that you’re most proud of? EL: Song: Grip Of The Blues; it has some nice chords, a deep story and lots of wah-wah distorted guitar. Solo: The Sky Is Crying – there’s the Elmore legacy and it keeps growing. Erja Lyytinen’s Live In London album is out now on Tuohi Records. Her nationwide 13-date UK tour starts October 2nd at the Darlington Blues Club. For further information on Erja Lyytinen, visit: www.erjalyytinen.com


EMILE HOLBA

F is for Freelance It has been noted by many a wiser mind than mine that Homo sapiens is a creature of habit. In the main, the average sentient being appears to find comfort and solace in the security of a defined routine. It might be only the employment of the same numbers when purchasing the weekly lottery ticket. The order and certainty of a regular job. The weekend shop. Or reading The Daily Mail on the weekday commuter run. Or a newspaper. The crossword. The inevitability of yet another ridiculous home defeat at White Hart Lane. All this and more helps to create the illusion of permanence and continuity in a wicked world, which in reality has the capricious capacity to cause upheaval and chaos on a whim. In this respect, the life of a self employed musician is no different to that of any other individual in a freelance profession. And, if you’re a big fan of certainty, well maybe it’s not for you. In a nutshell, unless you find yourself temporary shelter from the stress storm in a West End show, a lengthy tour or a permanent teaching position, you simply have no idea of what or who is going to happen next. If anything. The phone may ring. Or it may not. Colleagues and artists, contractors and companies, studios and concert halls drift in and out of focus in a kaleidoscopic, dream-like state. You may wrestle

Mitch Dalton’s

Our hero ponders the joys and fears of session work; and proves that good contacts are vital...

with the diary in a desperate attempt to force clashing dates to fit like the ugly sisters’ shoes. Or you may gaze at a week-to-view page that is as pure as the driven snow but with a tenth of the charm. You may work for days or years on end with a team of hand-picked musicians – and then you may not work with them again. Ever. It happens. In the end, you, your fingernails and your duodenal ulcer learn to cope with it. With luck and a fair wind, you stumble upon a nucleus of kind souls who find your musical contribution acceptable, useful and to their taste and are prepared to tolerate you hanging around their projects. Sometimes they even pay you. Eventually, you discover that there is a sufficiency of these sainted individuals. Enough, in fact, to provide you with the means to eat

on a regular basis, most weeks at least. And in essence, that’s about all you can hope for. It’s called a career. And then, some of these inconsiderate ingrates have the temerity to die. Or worse still, to retire. Or start to use their 21-year-

In the main, the average sentient being appears to find comfort and solace in the security of a defined routine. old girlfriend instead of you. Or a sampler. Or a girlfriend who owns a sampler. And you soldier on, manfully. Well, there’s no alternative, is there? I mean, who’d want to leave showbiz? All of which leads me to this month’s Star Tale Of The

Unexpected. In the midst of feeding the coffee and pouring the cat one average morning, the phone rang hopefully. It was Keith Mansfield. The king of TV theme tunes himself (think Grandstand, The Big Match,Wimbledon Tennis and a list of credits as long as an NHS waiting list). I last worked with Keith about 15 years ago. He is semi-retired these days but composers and arrangers like him never quit. They merely check their royalty statements. “How would you like to come down to Sussex and play on an album next week?” “Sure. Delighted. Who is the artist?” “Salena Jones.” A lady who I last saw a mere 25 years ago at the airport after our return from a three-week tour of Japan. And a great jazz singer. “Well. We’re married now, as you probably know. So I’ve written all the charts. See you next week!” And that, ladies and gentlemen, is living proof of the old adage first coined by a Mr C Berry of Memphis, Tennessee.“It just goes to show – you never can tell.” By the way. I went to Sussex. The sun shone all day. The tunes were fab. The arrangements were super slick. The food was Delia-esque. I had a ball. Wot? Give up showbiz? Mitch Dalton is one of London’s busiest and most sought-after session musicians. His latest album, Mitch Dalton & The Studio Kings is out now. For more info go to: www.mitchdalton.co.uk

PHIL HILBORNE’S ONE-MINUTE LICK Legato Chromatic Arpeggio the same fretting finger – very Van Halen! Be careful not to One of the easiest ways to spice up your arpeggio licks is to rush the timing of the chromatic notes, but sound them all add chromatic passing notes between the chord tones. Here I as cleanly as you can. Also be aware that during the sliding have achieved this simply by playing all the notes that occur section it’s easy to mis-fret, so watch your fretting-hand between the 5th (D) and 3rd (B) of the G major arpeggio – accuracy. As always, aim to develop further ideas of your beats 2 and 4 of bar 1. Notice that, as this arpeggio is played MAGAZINE 247 ONE MINUTE - aby Philstarting Hilborne own – good point would be to investigate the fouroverGUITAR an AmTECHNIQUES chord, these notes function as 11th (D), major 3rd LICK LEGATO / CHROMATIC ARPEGGIO LICKthat occur between the 1 and b3 of minor fret chromatic ideas (!) (C#), b3 (C) and 9th (B) – creating a nice jazzy effect. Bar arpeggios and the 5 and b7 of dominant chords. 2 contains an ascending sliding phrase that’s all played with

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That Was The Year...

1991 Astronauts, Airstrikes and Accidents

CHARVEL RELEASES THE ST CUSTOM, another Strat clone with a modern touch with super slim neck, cherry sunburst body, black hardware and a white pearloid scratchplate making this instantly eye-catching. Although equipped with just volume and tone controls it offers multiple sound options from the three pickups by way of the regular five-way pickup selector plus a three-way mini-toggle so all pickups can operate together as well as out of phase. BRITAIN IS HIT BY GALE FORCE WINDS and 27 people die as a result; the M40 motorway is finally completed providing a direct link through Oxfordshire to London; the government introduces Tax-Exempt Special Savings Accounts to promote personal savings; and Helen Sharman becomes the first British astronaut in space as part of the crew of the Soyuz TM-12 mission. ALLIED AIRCRAFT BEGIN BOMBING RAIDS on Iraq as the Gulf War begins. The strikes continue until a ceasefire is agreed thus halting the advance on Baghdad. Following the inquest into the Hillsborough disaster of 1989 a verdict of accidental death on the 95 people who died is reached, much to the dismay of the victims’ families. Miss Saigon opens on Broadway. RELINQUISHING THE MORTAL COIL are Freddie Mercury, Steve Marriott, Steve Clark (Def Leppard), Miles Davis, Serge Gainsbourg, composer Doc Pomus and legendary guitar builder Leo Fender. Meanwhile Leo’s former company launches the Yngwie Malmsteen Standard Stratocaster, the Jeff Beck Strat and the set-neck Telecaster. Rickenbacker celebrates the 60th anniversary of its electric guitar production with the 650A Atlantis guitar and the Chris Squire Signature 4001 bass. AFTER THE BUY BACK OF GRETSCH from Baldwin, production has finally got into full swing with guitars arriving in the UK at last. So what better way to start than with the 6128 Duo Jet and the 6131 Firebird. Identical in spec the red body surface of the Firebird has gold hardware and scratchplate while the Duo Jet sports chrome plating. They both look splendid and, although now manufactured in Japan, they still retain the magnificence and feel of the originals if not totally accurate reissues. It’s good to know that the company is firmly back in the family. ONE OF THE MOST UNUSUAL GUITAR DESIGNS EVER comes from Steve Klein with a radical body shape and a headless neck. Finished in Black or White the basswood body is conceived with comfort in mind for both standing and sitting; the neck has a smooth phenolic fingerboard and 24 frets. The three pickups are by EMG, two SA Hot Strat single coils and an 85 humbucker with coil-splitting abilities. The hardware is all Steinberger and it’s available with standard

trem or Trans-Trem, which allows you to set the tuning – so if you play a chord and depress the arm the notes shift together in parallel.

12 GuitarTechniques September 2015

Jam tracks tips

Use these tips to navigate our bonus backing tracks

➊ Shuffle Blues (C)

Instead of the usual V-IV-I in the last four bars (G-F-C), this track’s turnaround goes: V-bVI-V-I (G-Ab-G-C), thus ending on the V (G) in the last bar for a nice build-up to the next round. You’ll find that C minor Pentatonic scale (C-Eb-F-G-Bb) is a great choice for soloing over this track.

➋ Bossa Minor Blues (Gm)

For this light and breezy bossa nova feel track, use G minor Pentatonic (G-Bb-C-D-F) and G minor Blues scale (G-Bb-C-C#D-F) as well as G Minor scale itself (G-A-Bb-C-D-Eb-F). In order to really paint the colours of the chord progression, a great idea is to spell out the arpeggios of each chord as it comes around. Aim to make it sound musical though, and not like an exercise.

➌ Easy Jazz Vibe (Am)

This track has a great smooth jazz feel and so A minor Pentatonic (A-C-D-E-G) or Blues scale (A-C-D-D#-E-G) are great starting points over the Am7-Am7-F7-E7 chord progression with its typical minor jazz turnaround. If you want to try spicing things up with arpeggios, they are: Am7 (A-CE-G), F7 (F-A-C-Eb) and E7 (E-G#-B-D). Again, make them sound like music, not exercises!

➍ Funky Rockout (Gm)

This Red Hot Chili Peppers vibe track is a great platform for practising both rhythm and lead playing. It’s in three sections, and for the first and second sections try G Dorian mode (G-A-Bb-C-DE-F), while for the third section (Eb7 chord) Eb Mixolydian (Eb-F-G-Ab-Bb-C-Db) is a cool choice. Minor Pentatonic scales (Gm, Cm and Ebm respectively) will also work well if you use them to target chord tones. Jam tracks by Quist. For free scale maps and hundreds more tracks, visit www.quistorama.com. You can also subscribe to www.youtube.com/QuistTV to get all the latest free jam tracks & licks. Finally, you can also find Quist and his jam tracks on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook.

IGF Summer School: 10th-16th August

There’s still time for a last-minute booking at this year’s International Guitar Festival Summer School. Once again taking place at the beautiful Shrewsbury School in delightful surroundings, the courses offered include: Funk (Jason Sidwell); Blues (Gianluca Corona); Creative Acoustic (Chris Woods); Jazz & Beyond (Dario Cortese); Rock (Tolis Zavaliaris); Classical (Gary Ryan). All the tutors are world-class players and many of them are, or have been, associated with Guitar Techniques. A week at IGF Summer School with like-minded players of similar levels can be the most inspiring time any guitarist can experience. For full info and to book your last-minute place go to www.igf.org.uk – see you there!

HOT FOR TEACHER your RGT TUTOR Name: Malcolm Callus Town: London Styles: Rock, blues, metal, jazz, acoustic, country, flamenco, world music, etc Speciality: Metal and jazz Levels: Advanced, RGT grades to Diploma level (classical and bass to Grade 6) Sight-reading: Advanced Charges: From £8 group lessons up to £25 individual Special: Studio complete with audio and video recording facilities available Tel: 07983 868507 Email: guitar@malcolmcallus.com


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