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Buffy • Firefly • Mad Men • Seinfeld • Sherlock • Star Trek • The Walking Dead • X-files

100 greatest

TV SHOWS e m i T l l Of A FROM THE MAKERS OF AND

Horror

Stranger Things

Journey back to the Upside Down

Inside Game of thrones

Drama

Breaking Bad

Revisit the show that broke all the rules

As winter takes over, we talk to the cast about life in the seven kingdoms

Third edition

Digital Edition

inside

the handmaid’s tale

The Wire

the twilight zone


CONTENTS THE top 100

DRAMA

The Handmaid’s Tale........................................30 Breaking Bad....................................................................34 Better Call Saul.............................................................38 The West Wing.............................................................42 Mad Men..................................................................................44 Orange Is The New Black..........................48 The Crown.............................................................................52 The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time................................8 This Is Us..................................................................................54 SCi-FI & Fantasy

Legion............................................................................................26 Buffy The Vampire Slayer.......................56 Orphan Black....................................................................60 Star Trek....................................................................................64 Babylon 5...............................................................................70 Game Of Thrones......................................................................................................... 22 Firefly.............................................................................................74 6 | The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time


CULT

Black Mirror......................................................................................................................96 Twin Peaks.........................................................................................................................98 The X-Files..........................................................................................................................102 The Twilight Zone.................................................................................................106 Comedy

CRIME

animation

The Sopranos........................................... 110 The Simpsons......................................... 124 True Detective........................................ 116 Family Guy................................................... 128 Sherlock.............................................................. 118 The Wire............................................................ 120 horror

Cheers & Frasier.......................78 The Big Bang Theory...............84 Seinfeld.....................................88 Crazy Ex-Girlfriend...................92

The Walking Dead............................ 132 Bates Motel................................................... 136 Stranger Things..................................... 140 The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time | 7


TOP 100 wing of an airliner, The Twilight Zone was always crammed with ideas and boasted a fearsome writing staff including SF giants like Richard Matheson. But chief amongst them was Serling himself – by the end of the show’s original run he’d penned nearly 100 episodes. WS

18

The night manager Years: 2016 – present

23

Optimistic and heartstring-tugging, it makes you care for each character in a surprisingly short amount of time. AD

curb your enthusiasm

Soldier-turned-hotel manager Jonathan Pine (Tom Hiddleston) is recruited to infiltrate the inner circle of an arms dealer (Hugh Laurie). Hiddleston is often mentioned in conversations of favourites to play James Bond, and after starring in this story of revenge and deception, it’s not hard to see how well he could do if given the role. One of the best BBC mini-series in a long while. AD

Years: 2000 – present

Spinning off from a one-hour special back in 1999, Larry David: Curb Your Enthusiasm, this is the Seinfeld co-creator’s other great creation. With mostly improvised dialogue, Curb follows David in his (highly fictionalised) life in LA. It’s as snarky and acerbic as you’d expect, but also shot through with pathos. You’ll laugh, wince and thank the heavens it’s returned for a ninth season after a five-year hiatus. WS

22

Sex AND The City Years: 1998 – 2008

Hannibal Years: 2013 – 2015

Trying to outdo Anthony Hopkins’ famous turn as the manipulative cannibal may have seemed like a fools’ errand, but Mads Mikkelsen was more than up for the challenge. This eerily beautiful show is frightening, but it’s the elaborate and artfuly fetishised gore, plus a subtle sense of humour, that makes it stand out from the current thriller pack. WS

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READ MORE ON PAGE 54

This is us

Years: 2016 – present

With current TV shows having things like zombies, dragons, epic battles and superheroes, This Is Us is a more down-toearth, yet equally compelling, drama. The series follows a group of people who share the same birthday, and shows how their lives are different but share similarities.

18 | The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time

20

Often unfairly dismissed, thanks largely to its soulless cinematic offspring. Let’s ignore those – Sex And The City is a smart, effervescent comedy drama bursting with a swaggering confidence rarely seen on television. Gaudy as a glitterball in lipstick admittedly, but the show’s frank and funny foray into its unashamedly glamorous foursome’s sex lives more or less created a subgenre itself: hits such as Desperate Housewives and Cougar Town employ a similar glitzy chutzpah, but Sex And The City got there first. MH

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READ MORE ON PAGE 106

THE TWILIGHT ZONE Years: 1959 – 1964

Rod Serling’s anthology series made weird mainstream and influenced generations of science fiction and horror fans and writers. From everyday Joes trying to outsmart Death, to a gremlin on the

17

Battlestar Galactica Years: 2004 – 2009

Ex-Star Trek scribe Ronald D Moore’s dirtied-down reimagining of the glittery 1970s series proved one of high watermarks of TV SF. It’s said Battlestar is the SF programme for people who don’t like sci-fi. It’s not hard to see why. It grandly jettisoned the prosthetics porn of Star Trek and Stargate and cribbed its narrative style more from the Class of HBO than its geek-chasing stablemates. Even Stephen King wrote of it, “This is a beautifully written show, driven by character rather than effects.” SOB


the 100 greatest tv shows

16

The Shield Years: 2002 – 2008

The first episode of The Shield ends with anti-gang cop Vic Mackey shooting a colleague in the face, and his crimes just get worse from there. A twisted tale of police corruption in LA, it bagged awards by the score and was a clear influence on Breaking Bad. It’s also that rarest of things – a TV show that actually got better with each season. WS

15 House

Years: 2004 – 2012

House starts off as both a Sherlock Holmes riff and the ultimate “Irascible Genius” show. That’s all fun, especially the Holmes stuff, but as the series goes on it shifts gear into a discussion on mortality, the joys and horrors of the medical life and the burden of intelligence. Hugh Laurie turns in staggering work, but is matched beat for beat by one of the best casts in history. AS

14

Arrested Development Years: 2003 – present

Possibly the most loved and least watched comedy of the past 20 years, Arrested Development focused on the epically dysfunctional Bluths, specifically Michael (Jason Bateman), the one sane figure in a family of deepy terrible oddballs. It lasted three series on Fox US, but while being lauded by the press, it never found that big audience. A belated Netflix-funded fourth series blotted the copy book and a fifth run is nothing to write home about. SOB

13

READ MORE ON PAGE 102

The X-Files

Years: 1993 – 2002, 2016 – 2018

Mulder and Scully weren’t just TV characters – they were icons. The X-Files took pulp sci-fi and horror ideas and gave them a new found respectability by setting them in a believable world. It was an instant success, spawning books, comics, two films and a spin-off over its nine years on air – and then a rebirth to boot! Sure, somewhere along the way the show disappeared up its own arcs, adding a tangle of daft ideas to an already overstuffed alien colonisation plot, but the show was always watchable. WS

12

The West wing

11

An intensely idealistic President struggles with the day-to-day problems of being the leader of the free world. His hyperarticulate staff talk a lot and walk even more. Eccentric, compassionate, hilarious and sweet, The West Wing is Capra-like in its idealism but remains the gold standard for political TV drama and boasts an incredible cast – not least Martin Sheen’s Commander-In-Chief, Jed Bartlet. AS

The hottest show of 1990 is still the hippest show on this list. David Lynch and Mark Frost’s mystery series was the story of a murder in a none-more-quirky North American town. But while Peaks was often daft, it had a true heart of darkness, with sexual abuse, drugs and apparent demonic possession all lurking beneath the show’s ’50s-styled facade. And guess what? It’s finally back! WS

Years: 1999 – 2006

READ MORE ON PAGE 98

TWIN PEAKS

Years: 1990 – 1991, 2017 – present

“A twisted tale of police corruption in LA, it bagged awards by the score” 16 The Shield

>> The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time | 19


drama bring on thE cranston Four of the many faces of the Bad actor

Hal

Malcolm In The Middle (2000 – 2006)

You too can get a nose plaster!

Walter White

Breaking Bad (2008 – 2015)

Jack O’Donnell Argo (2012)

Joe Brody Godzilla (2014)

36 | The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time

“Part of it was recognising that when he was going to go through chemotherapy he would naturally lose his hair and we discussed that. Once we shaved off the hair it was a transformation from the milquetoast, genteel person to becoming a dangerous person. We also realised that the most intimidating look a man can have is a bald head and facial hair. Hair softens everything so when I had hair I wasn’t as intimidating as when I didn’t, and for some reason facial hair is just more intimidating.” For most of its run, Breaking Bad wasn’t what you’d call a ratings smash. In fact, creator Vince Gilligan has openly admitted that the show’s survival owes much to its popularity on Netflix. But, like its AMC stablemate Mad Men, Breaking Bad is the sort of show that critics go gooey over,

“It’s the sort of show that critics go gooey over, and Hollywood people adore”

and Hollywood people adore. Unlike fellow latecomer to US TV stardom Hugh Laurie, Cranston’s been able to translate that popularity into being massively in demand on the big screen – it obviously pays to not get sidetracked by a career singing the blues. Since Breaking Bad began, Cranston’s made a habit of being a standout in pretty much everything he’s done, from Ryan Gosling’s mechanic boss in Drive, to a CIA guy in Argo, to Big Bad Cohaagen in the (admitedly illadvised) remake of Total Recall. But even though there’s a couple of extra zeroes on the end of his paycheques than there were a couple of decades ago, Cranston says he still picks jobs the same way he always did – it’s all about making the stuff he wants to make. “I never thought I was going to be in a position to have money or become wealthy,” he says. “I have a business manager and investment counsellors and agents who are incentivised to do well with my money, and I entrust them to do that. So I take the energy that I don’t waste on that and put it towards what I love to do. Since I started doing that it flows. I don’t even know what I make.” He’s currently filming James Franco ’30s-set In Dubious Battle alongside Selena Gomez, and has leant his voice to Kung Fu Panda 3, but his


breaking bad

Walt and Jesse’s lives soon spiral out of control…

next project will be the title role in Trumbo – a biopic about screenwriter James Dalton Trumbo who was blacklisted from Hollywood in the ’40s. At the time of conducting this interview, however, he was gearing up for the release of Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla, where he played Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s dad. “I thought this would be a good opportunity to completely go in a different direction,” Cranston explains. “If I selected something that was a drama that was similar in tone to Breaking Bad, there would be comparisons made, and I didn’t think I wanted that. And quite frankly, as an actor, I don’t want to do things I’m familiar with. If I’ve played certain characters before I want to change that completely. And if this was just a monster movie, I wouldn’t be here. But because Gareth was able to guide this story into a character-driven saga, you actually invest in these characters as they go along.”

monstrous role It’s a measure of how much Cranston’s stock has risen that Edwards says the Godzilla role was written with the actor in mind. And that, in a world where studios make it a rule to sign up their stars for at least two sequels, Cranston is only on board for one. “One at a time,” he says, “We’ll see what happens after that.”

Proving that he isn’t afraid to mix things up, Cranston has hinted it might not be long before he makes his debut as a movie director. (He’s been preparing for the gig for years, having directed episodes of Breaking Bad, Modern Family, and Malcolm In The Middle.) “I hope to direct a screenplay that I wrote. It’s a murder mystery,” he says. “It’s a very dark subject, very Breaking Bad in tone, with some sick humour connected to it.” Cranston should have no problem continuing to be a chameleon. Yes he’s famous, yes he’s adored – you just had to witness his rapturous reception at Comic-Con in 2014 to see that. But unlike many stars, Cranston has the good fortune that his everyday self looks little like his signature role. “I realise this is great for me as an actor because the figure of Walter White is emblazoned in people’s minds as a bald man, and I am not a bald man,” he says, “So no offence against bald men but as an actor that allows me to change my look and to take on and wear a different mask.” Listen to that guy from Malcolm In The Middle. He knows what he’s talking about. You can watch Breaking Bad in its entirety now on Netflix, or on DVD and Blu-ray.

The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time | 37


SCI-FI & Fantasy

he lived long and prospered

FROM THE ARCHIVES Originally published in 1996

In honour of the great Leonard Nimoy – the original and best Spock in Star Trek – we travel back to 1996, and this interview by Jonathan Norton

O

nce upon a time, a man put on a pair of ears and became a legend. As Mr Spock in Star Trek, Vulcan first officer of the starship Enterprise, Leonard Nimoy became a figure of both controversy and lust. He also became one of the most recognisable faces on the planet. For much of the ’70s, however, the actor seemed determined to distance himself from the character. In 1996, with the release of his second autobiography, I Am Spock – a sequel to 1975’s I Am Not Spock – man and Vulcan appeared reconciled. In honour of the great man’s passing, at the age of 83, we look back to an interview that was first published in issue four of SFX. Our interviewer was lucky enough to share a ride in

a Rolls-Royce with him, as part of an extensive promotional tour. Nimoy was tired, but on fine form, and keen to clear up misconceptions about his first book. “I wasn’t trying to turn my back on Spock,” he told us. “The title was tongue-in-cheek, but most people never read beyond the title, and just made assumptions.” Time to set the record straight...

This morning. I’m not allowed to reveal what he said, actually. He asked me to stop doing that. He started getting upset about me quoting him for the world to read. He said, “We can carry on having these conversations, but please don’t write about them any more.” So I said, “Okay.”

So, are you Spock or aren’t you Spock? I am. I am.

Ha, ha. An exclusive. No, probably not. I am doing a lot of interviews...”

Do you chat with Spock in your head, like you say you do in your book?

So did your first book – I Am Not Spock – dent his ego? Is this one way of saying you’re sorry?

I do. Indeed I do.

In a way. Well, no. Because, as I explain in this book, the first book was misinterpreted. It was never about denying Spock. He was, is, and always will be, an important part of my life. But a lot has happened to Spock since 1975, and I have had to re-evaluate my relationship with him.

When was the last time you had a chat with him? What did he say? The original crew – and the best.

So when we print that it’ll be Spock’s last ever published pearls of wisdom?

It seemed for a while though – when you declined the opportunity to appear in the proposed Star Trek: Phase II TV series, and then, allegedly, asked for Spock to be killed off in Star Trek II – that you didn’t actually like playing the character at all... I did not, in fact, ask to be killed off in Star Trek II. I was asked how I felt about it happening, and, in the end, I asked for the script to be altered, because Spock’s original death scene didn’t seem heroic enough to me. It happened too soon in the script, and didn’t have a point. We did a lot of work on the script, getting his death scene right. You’ve also got to remember >> that a lot of people were convinced that it was going to be the last of the movies at the time.

“I did not, in fact, ask to be killed off in Star Trek II ” 64 | The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time


Star Trek


Cult

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO GENERATION X?

FROM THE ARCHIVES Originally published in 2004

The X-Files brought science fiction, UFOs and paranoia to the mainstream. In 2004, Nick Setchfield met the man who started it all, Chris Carter...

C

hris Carter, prime mover of The X-Files, architect of a generation’s goosebumps, is missing. For three days now an optimistic Post-It note has drifted across my desk, promising ‘Chris Carter – phoning office – 6 pm’. For three days the transcontinental phoneline has been comatose, animated only by the frantic apologies of PR peeps, claiming that they have no knowledge of Carter’s whereabouts. Naturally I fear the worst – or at least the wildly implausible. Alien abduction? Black ops activity? A disastrous dinner date with a giant mutant flukeworm? I want to believe… “I’m on call for jury service,” Carter confesses, finally located in sunswept California. It’s a wonderful thought in itself – particularly if the defence in this case rests on a conspiracy of shadowy government operatives,

extra-terrestrials and Elvis – but I’d suspected that this former editor of Surfing Magazine was catching waves in the blue Pacific. “I wish I were surfing,” says Carter, so dryly that you want to water him. Does he still surf? “All the time. But not today.” Astoundingly, it’s eleven years since The X-Files first slipped down the occult highways of America [22 in 2015 – Ed.]. A splicing of Silence Of The Lambs, Twin Peaks and The Twilight Zone, it was hip, creepy, sexy and torch-lit, the show that crowned its creator as one of the small screen’s true revolutionaries. Carter brought an ambitious cinematic sensibility to primetime, crafting miniature movies that defined mid-90s fantasy in all its twitchy, paranoid glory. The X-Files was huge. We may all have forgotten quite how huge. It was bigger than Buffy, bigger than Star Trek, within a whisper

of Star Wars as an authentic, era-devouring phenomenon. Its heroes were stamped on the zeitgeist – a pouting Gillian Anderson, all lipgloss and lingerie in FHM; a laconic David Duchovny, performing guest slots on Letterman and The Larry Sanders Show. Bookshelves splintered beneath the weight of episode guides, companion volumes, spoofs and shameless cash-ins. Catatonia sang a hymn to Mulder and Scully while the show’s own spectral theme went to number one. Its fandom drove the dawn of the internet. If 1995 had a colour, it was X-Files green – that spooky, luminous hue forever evocative of autopsy sessions at Area 51. And then, like Brit-Pop and Chris Evans, The X-Files simply wasn’t there anymore. It vanished from the cultural radar, seemingly leaving little in the way of ripples, condemned to an afterlife of attics and charity shops. The truth was out there. Now it’s in Age Concern. X became ex.

A MAINSTREAM CULT “The X-Files has actually been on the cover of TV Guide twice in the last three months here,” argues Carter, while sounding as surprised as you are. “It’s weird, because it feels as though the show is still on the air. “I have some more perspective on it now,” he admits. “I don’t think I’ll ever have a true perspective. We were the biggest cult show on the planet, and I always thought of us a cult show, even when we were a mainstream hit. I used to see references to us in political editorials and advertising slogans, and that’s when you realise that you’ve penetrated a part of the culture. But you never know how you will be >>

What’s in the box? Probably an alien. Again.

102 | The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time

“The X-Files was hip, creepy, sexy and torch-lit”


The x-files


Animation

PERSONAL STYLE

WORK ETHICS

Homer: Marge, you being a cop makes you the man. Which makes me the woman... and I have no interest in that. Besides occasionally wearing the underwear. Which, as we discussed, is strictly a comfort thing. The Springfield Connection

Bart: Ugh! I’m through with working! Working is for chumps. Homer: Son, I’m proud of you! I was twice your age before I figured that out. Three Men And A Comic Book

read one book, To Kill A Mockingbird, and it gave me absolutely no insight on how to kill mockingbirds! Sure it taught me not to judge a man by the colour of his skin… but what good does that do me? Diatribe Of A Mad Housewife

Homer: Lisa, if you don’t like your job, you don’t strike. You just go in every day and do it really half-assed. That’s the American way! The PTA Disbands

Homer: What’s the point of going out? We’re just gonna wind up back here anyway. Scenes From The Class Struggle In Springfield

FINANCE MANAGEMENT

Morality

Homer: Does this make me look fat? Lisa: No, it makes you look like a tool of government oppression. Homer: But not fat? The Trouble With Trillions

Homer: I had a feeling it was too good to be true. Every time you get a million dollars, something queers the deal. Lisa: I don’t think real cheques have exclamation points. Mr. Lisa Goes To Washington Homer: Well, he’s got all the money in the world, but there’s one thing he can’t buy. Marge: What’s that? Homer: [pauses] A dinosaur! Dog Of Death

LOVE AND MARRIAGE

Marge: You will find Selma a man! Homer: All right. Marge: And not just any man. Homer: Okay. Marge: He should be honest and... and caring. And well-off. And handsome. Homer: Hey! Why should she have a better husband than you do? Principal Charming

Homer: [feeling under the sofa] OW! Pointy… EWWW! Slimy… Uh-oh! Moving… Aha! [Pulls out $20 dollar bill]. Aw, 20 dollars… I wanted a peanut. Homer’s brain: Twenty dollars can buy many peanuts! Homer: Explain how. Homer’s brain: Money can be exchanged for goods and services. Boy-Scoutz ’N The Hood

PHILOSOPHY

Homer: Books are useless! I only ever

126 | The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time

Homer: Once upon a time, there was a big mean lion who got a thorn in his paw. All the village people tried to pull it out but nobody was strong enough. So they got Hercules and Hercules used his mighty strength. And bingo! Anyway, the moral is, the lion was so happy, he gave Hercules this big... thing... of riches. Bart: How did a lion get rich? Homer: It was the olden days! Blood Feud

He had long hair and some wild ideas and he didn’t always do what other people thought was right. And that man’s name was... I forget. But the point is... well, I forget that, too. Marge, you know what I’m talking about – he used to drive that blue car? Homer The Heretic Homer: Now Marge, it takes two to lie – one to lie and one to listen. Colonel Homer

ETIQUETTE

Homer: About last night... you might have noticed Daddy acting a little strange and you probably don’t understand why. Bart: I understand why. You were wasted. The War Of The Simpsons

Homer: Kids, let me tell you about another so-called “wicked” guy.

“The information superhighway showed the average person what some nerd thinks about Star Trek”


The Simpsons

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD

Homer: Ooh, I can’t get enough of this blood pudding! Bart: The secret ingredient is blood. Homer: Blood? Ugh! I’ll just stick to the brain and kidney pie, thank you... Simpsoncalifragilisticexpiala(Anno yed Grunt)cious Homer: My beer! You never had a chance to become my urine! The Way We Weren’t Homer: Frosted Krusty Flakes are what got Bart where he is today. It could be one of those chemicals that makes him so smart. Bart The Genius Homer: [as Santa’s Little Helper eats dog food] Hey – how come he gets meat and we don’t? Marge: You wouldn’t want what he’s eating, mostly just snouts and entrails. Homer: Mmm... snouts. Dog Of Death Marge: Homer, remember you promised you’d try to limit pork to six servings a week? Homer: Marge, I’m only human! Principal Charming

CONFLICT RESOLUTION

Marge: You sound like you’re going to buy a pony. Promise me you won’t? Homer: Mmm. Marge: What was that?! Was that a yes or a no? Homer: Buh. Marge: Those aren’t even words! Homer: Snuh. Lisa’s Pony

HEALTH AND SAFETY

Bart: Hey Homer, I can’t find the safety goggles for the power saw. Homer: If stuff starts flying, just turn your head! Bart: Check! Saturdays Of Thunder Homer: Boy, you don’t have to follow in my footsteps... Bart: Don’t worry, I don’t even like using the bathroom after you. Like Father, Like Clown

CULTURAL SENSITIVITY

Homer: It seems to me if a gun can protect something as important as a bar, it’s good enough to protect my family. The Cartridge Family

suddenly implanted in your head without you even knowing it. Homer: Oh Lisa, that’s a load of rich creamery butter! Bart’s Friend Falls In Love

FAITH AND SPIRITUALITY

Homer: When will I learn? The answers to life’s problems aren’t at the bottom of a bottle – they’re on TV! There’s No Disgrace Like Home Bart: What religion are you? Homer: Oh, you know, the one with all those well-meaning rules that don’t work in real life... Er, Christianity. Homerpalooza Homer: Your mother has this crazy idea that gambling is wrong. Even though they say it’s okay in the Bible.

Lisa: Really? Where? Homer: Uhh... somewhere in the back. Lisa The Greek Homer: There’s an empty spot I’ve always had inside me. I tried to fill it with family, religion, community service, but those were dead ends. I think this [vibrating] chair is the answer. Brother, Can You Spare Two Dimes? Homer: What’s the big deal about going to some building every Sunday? I mean, isn’t God everywhere? And don’t you think the Almighty has better things to do than wonder where one guy spends one measly hour of his week? And what if we’ve picked the wrong religion? Every week we’re just making God madder and madder. Homer The Heretic

Homer: Lisa, vampires are make-believe – just like elves, gremlins and Eskimos. Treehouse Of Horror IV Homer: The information superhighway showed the average person what some nerd thinks about Star Trek. And Maggie Makes Three

SELF-IMPROVEMENT

Marge: Well, at least we got a free sample of Reading Digest... Homer: Marge, I’ve never read a magazine in my life and I’m not going to start now. Mr Lisa Goes To Washington Lisa: According to Eternity Magazine, you can lose weight through subliminal learning. That’s where an idea is The 100 Greatest TV Shows Of All Time | 127


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