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POP-UP VIDEOS no.1 for canon DSLR users The Canon conversation ideo view the v

Issue 108 • Jan 2016

creative canon photos

new skills

for christmas Festive food photos Pop-up portrait Xmas cards Light painting at night Seasonal bokeh effects

andy rouse

big gift guide

xmas gear 63 fantastic ideas to beef up your Canon kit

super t

t! best enthuess ias eos cameras t 760D, 70D, 6D & 7D mk ii

The world-famous wildlife pro on his favourite shots

new projects

top dog photos

How to use off-camera flash for fun pet portraits

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Learning how to control flash gives you more creative options, as well as solving tricky lighting problems Marcus Hawkins – Canon School

canon skills

SLR WARS

Awaken the force within your Canon EOS camera Pro techniques

tasty Food photography

Serve up shots that really www.digitalcameraworld.com are good enough to eat


Merry Christmas!

This issue we provide several great tips and techniques for taking cracking Christmas photos, including fun festive portraits for cool yule cards See page 45

Our Guarantee

Welcome... W

Peter Travers Editor

• We’re the only photo magazine in the newsagent that’s 100% dedicated to Canon EOS DSLR OWNERS so we’re 100% relevant to your needs.

hether you go mad for the festive season as early as possible or wait right up until Christmas eve, it’s a great time for taking fantastic photos. As we show you this issue, you can use your Canon DSLR to capture some really creative images, from festive food photography with a simple setup in your own kitchen – and the help of a top Canon pro in this month’s Apprentice (page 8) – to a trio of yuletide-themed projects, including painting seasonal scenes with lights at night (page 46), fun portraits to make your own pop-up-effect Christmas cards (page 52) and festive bokeh shapes (page 50). Even if you say “Bah, humbug!” to Christmas, these are all great techniques to try out during the long winter evenings. We also interview one of the biggest names in wildlife photography, Andy Rouse. He’s an interesting character with a great backstory, and talks to us about how he loves shooting wildlife with his Canon gear and what it takes to capture award-winning nature shots (page 68). We have more brilliant projects for you to try (page 45), including how to use off-camera flash to capture fun and colourful pet portraits, plus new Photoshop Elements, CC and Lightroom tutorials, all with great videos to follow. We test the four main enthusiast Canon DSLRs – the EOS 760D, 70D, 7D Mk II and 6D – to see which is best, we also try out LED lights and Canon’s new EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM wide lens, plus our Xmas Gear Guide has 63 great ideas for Christmas gifts – for you or your loved ones! We have also teamed up with Canon to offer you the chance to win a 24-page A4 hdbook to beautifully display your photos, plus 20% discount for all UK readers – details on page 87.

• We’re 100% independent which means we’re free to publish what we feel is best for every Canon DSLR photographer, from beginners to enthusiasts to professionals.

• We’re Canon enthusiasts and, with our contributors, we can offer years of expert photography experience. We’re always excited to pass on what we’ve learned.

• We’re more than just a print mag; you can buy PhotoPlus for any digital device worldwide via Apple iTunes, Google Play, Zinio, Magzter, Amazon Kindle, B&N Nook, PocketMags or PressReader.

• Our Video Disc has the very best DSLR technique & Photoshop video Guides which can also be viewed via our digital editions.

• We’re proud to use the World’s top Canon photographers and experts. Meet them on page 6.

Join our new The Canon Magazine

for great membership opportunities! See page 28 3


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CONTENTS 8

canon skills

SLR Wars

Awaken the Force in your Canon

42

Essentials

Canon pros

New tests

A stunning gallery of entries to the Lanscape Photography of the Year contest

This issue we cook up a serving of delicious food photos with a seasonal twist

109 Gear gift guide

20 Inspirations 28 Photo Club 30 SLR Wars

Join Photo Club to never miss an issue of PhotoPlus again, plus get loads of goodies Join the ‘Rebel’ Alliance to learn which Canons SLRs have the Force in their features and which have gone to the Dark Side

76 Photo Stories 82 Focus Point 138 Back issues 145 Next issue 146 Canondrum

Send us your shots and we could showcase you and your photography The place to share your points of view on the magazine and all things photographic Missed an issue? Wipe away those tears – you can order a back copy here

Find out what delights are coming your way in your next PhotoPlus fix Chris ‘Magnus Magnusson’ George’s specialist subject is all things Canon…

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8 The Apprentice 42 David Noton On Location 68 The Canon Conversation 84 My Kit

Our intrepid globetrotter revisits the medieval picturesque town of Prague

Our pick of the must-have pressies for the discerning photographer

116 Mini Test: LED panels

We shine a light on six batterypowered continuous LED panels

Wildlife supremo Andy Rouse on his love for photographing our furry friends

Test: Canon EF 35mm 118 Full f/1.4L II USM

Fast car fanatic Drew Gibson reveals his essential kit for shooting motorsports

We put the Mark II version of Canon’s fast wide-angle professional-grade prime through its paces

Canon School

90 Canon DSLR Essentials 96 Software Solutions 101 EOS S.O.S

Get flash with your flashgun as we explain all you need to know about Speedlites Learn to fix lens imperfections, both in software and in-camera

Technical trouble with your Canon Camera? Our expert Brian is here to help…

Test: 120 Super Enthusiast

Canon EOS DSLRs

We compare four mid-range Canon DSLRs, to see which offers the best bang for your buck

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132 Buyers’ Guide

Every current Canon EOS DSLR – plus every available Canon-fit lens from Canon, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina and more! www.digitalcameraworld.com


Issue 108 January 2016

68 76 9 ways to improve your photography today

46

120

Project 1: Head out after dark with a torch to create a festive light painting

52

Photoshop elements

56

Project 4: Use coloured sweet wrappers to fix your flash white balance

xx 87

50

Project 2: Get creative this Project 3: Create your very Christmas with bokeh effects own seasonal pop-up-effect using cutouts and fairy lights Christmas card

58

Photoshop CC

lightroom

64

66

Tutorial 2: Master monochrome using the Adobe Camera Raw plug-in

62

Project 5: Learn to capture Tutorial 1: Give your off-camera flash-lit portraits portraits a shot of energy of your four-legged friends with neon-like lines

Tutorial 3: Learn the essentials, from fixing colour to sharpening

Canon software

96

Canon School: In-camera and post-production lens correction tools

READ THE TUTORIALS… THEN WATCH OUR EXPERT VIDEOS

Look out FOR THIS ICON! ideo view the v

To view our ‘pop-out’ videos, tap these badges that appear alongside the tutorials inside the magazine, or type the link that appears alongside into your web browser.

THE INFORMATION PROVIDED IN THESE VIDEO TUTORIALS ARE 100% INDEPENDENT AND NOT ENDORSED OR SPONSORED BY CANON OR ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED

The Canon Magazine

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Meet the team... Print 20,240 Digital 4,289 The ABC combined print, digital and digital publication circulation for Jan-Dec 2014 is

24,529 A member of the Audited Bureau of Circulations

Merry Christmas! Here are our favourite bits of this issue…

PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, Future Publishing, Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA Editorial +44 (0)1225 442244 photoplus@futurenet.com

Peter Travers

Adam Waring

peter.travers@futurenet.com

adam.waring@futurenet.com

Editor • 5D Mark III

Operations editor • 7D

Peter loves Christmas, so there’s lots of festive-themed articles this month, but his favourite is the fun pop-up Xmas cards, where he rode a tiny felt horse. Page 52

Adam went behind the scenes on this issue’s food photography Apprentice feature. The best bit? Tucking in to all that lovely grub once the shoot was over. Page 8

Hollie Latham

Martin Parfitt

hollie.latham@futurenet.com

martin.parfitt@futurenet.com

Technique editor • 60D

Art editor • 600D

Never work with animals – not unless you’ve got a jar of peanut butter to keep them in check, as Hollie reveals in her pet portrait project. Page 58

Martin’s tried to narrow down his Christmas wish list – but it’s still 63 items long. To make it easy for Santa, he’s made a guide, with pictures. Page 109

Angela Nicholson

Tom Welsh

angela.nicholson@futurenet.com

tom.welsh@futurenet.com

Head of testing • 5D Mk III

Technique writer • 5D Mk II

Ever since Canon’s spangly new 35mm f/1.4 lens came in, Angela’s been wondering if Santa could be persuaded to pop one in her stocking. Page 118

Tom’s feeling all Christmassy after his bokeh project. Page 50 He also experimented with DIY gels to balance flash white balance. Page 56

Master food photographer Cairn shows our Apprentice how to make her food look as good as it tastes. Page 8

Andy Rouse

Andy explains why he’s never happier than when shooting animals in tropical jungles or the Arctic tundra. Page 68

Steve Fairclough

In a galaxy far, far away, Steve goes Stars Wars for Canon SLR features. The puns are weak in this one… Page 30

Drew Gibson

Motorhead Drew reveals the kit he relies on to shoot fast cars going round and round in circles… Page 84

Production & distribution Vivienne Calvert Production controller Mark Constance Production manager Michelle Brock Trade Marketing Manager 0207 429 3683 Printed in the UK by: William Gibbons & Sons Ltd Distributed by: Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT, Tel: 0207 429 4000 Overseas distribution by: Seymour International Subscriptions & back issues UK reader order line & enquiries 0844 848 2852 Overseas order line & enquiries +44 1604 251045 Online enquiries www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Email photoplus@myfavouritemagazines.co.uk Licensing Matt Ellis Senior licensing & syndication manager matt.ellis@futurenet.com Management Nial Ferguson Content & marketing director Matthew Pierce Head of content & marketing, photography Chris George Group editor-in-chief Rodney Dive Group art director

Tel +44 (0)207 042 4000 (London) Tel +44 (0)1225 442 244 (Bath)

David Noton

David explores the beautiful medieval streets and old town of Prague. It brings back memories… Page 42

Marcus Hawkins

Canon School has a new face! Marcus explains how to capture the best photos with flashguns. Page 90

James Paterson

Photoshop and photo studio guru James is behind no less than five projects and tutorials. Page 45

Matthew Richards

This issue our technical wizard pits Canon’s range of enthusiast DSLRs against one another. Page 120

Our contributors Bella the dog, Ben Andrews, George Cairns, Andrew Cottle, Cairn Emmerson, Steve Fairclough, Drew Gibson, Pete Gray, Andrew James, Simon Lees, Andrew McLaughlin, Mike McNally, David Noton, Ben O’Leary, James Paterson, Matthew Richards, Andy Rouse, Brian Worley

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Advertising & Marketing Matt Bailey Account director 01225 687511 matt.bailey@futurenet.com Claire Harris Account manager 01225 687221 claire.harris@futurenet.com Sasha McGregor Advertising Business Manager 01225 687675 sasha.mcgregor@futurenet.com Charlotte Lloyd-Williams Campaign Manager

Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman Peter Allen Chief financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand

This issue’s contributors… Cairn Emmerson

The PhotoPlus team Peter Travers Editor Adam Waring Operations editor Hollie Latham Technique editor Martin Parfitt Art editor Shona Cutt Deputy art editor Angela Nicholson Head of testing Ali Jennings Lab manager Cover photo Takashi Kitajima

Printed in the UK by William Gibbons and Sons Ltd, on behalf of Future. Distributed by Seymour Distribution Ltd, 2 East Poultry Avenue, London EC1A 9PT. Tel 020 7429 4000. Overseas distribution by Seymour International.​

PhotoPlus is an independent publication and is not in any way authorised, affiliated, nor sponsored by Canon. All the opinions expressed herein are those of the magazine and not that of Canon. ‘EOS’ and all associated trademarks are the property of Canon. © Future Publishing Limited 2015. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. Registered office: Registered office: Quay House, The Ambury, Bath, BA1 1UA. All information contained in this publication is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. You are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price and other details of products or services referred to in this publication. Apps and websites mentioned in this publication are not under our control. We are not responsible for their contents or any changes or updates to them. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.

We are committed to only using magazine paper which is derived from well managed, certified forestry and chlorine-free manufacture. Future Publishing and its paper suppliers have been independently certified in accordance with the rules of the FSC (Forest Stewardship Council).

www.digitalcameraworld.com


PHOTOPLUSApprentice

GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT This issue’s Apprentice learns how to take truly scrumptious photographs of festive food Words Adam Waring Location shots Ben O’Leary

Canon PRO Name:

Cairn Emmerson Camera:

Canon EOS 5D Mk III Cairn started out as a hobby photographer in the 1980s, developing his prints in the darkroom. He later trained in food photography under William Reavell at Leiths School of Food and Wine, and cofounded East Yorkshirebased Bakehouse Studio three years ago, specializing in commercial photography for the catering and hospitality industries: www.bakehousestudio.co.uk

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APPRENTICE Name:

Georgia Smith Camera:

Canon EOS 7D Georgia, 17, is a student and has recently completed her Level 2 Photography course at Hull College of Further Education. She’s a keen cook and something of a foodie, and loves photographing her kitchen creations, but has been disappointed that her images haven’t been quite as delicious as the dishes themselves. So, she asked PhotoPlus to help make her food look as good as it tastes…

The Canon Magazine

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PHOTOPLUSApprentice TECHNIQUE ASSESSMENT

Cairn gave Georgia a little settings advice to ensure that she was cooking with gas… Raw ingredients “Food photography is all about getting the very best from a shot, so I got Georgia to switch from JPEG to Raw for utmost flexibility and maximum quality. Raw records all the data from the sensor, capturing significantly greater levels of brightness, plus you don’t have to worry about white balance until processing the shots.”

Prop it up Look around the back of a sumptuous spread of lovely grub and you’ll see all sorts of things holding food in place. Bits of Blu-Tack, scrunched up paper, and cocktail sticks can be used to position food for the camera – it doesn’t matter if it’s a complete hotchpotch from behind, it’s how good it looks from the front that matters.

Manual everything “I got Georgia to step out of her Av and AF comfort zones and switch to Manual exposure and manual focusing. I can spend hours getting an image just right – so there’s plenty of time to review shots, check the histogram, and tweak the exposure. And as a shallow depth of field is often used, it’s better that you, rather than the camera, set focus exactly where you want.”

Tethered shooting “Most of the time I’ll shoot with the camera tethered using Canon’s EOS Utility software – it’s like having a superdetailed Live View screen and means that you can not only get a really good idea of how sharp different areas of your image are, but it’s invaluable if you’re shooting at an awkward angle, such as top-down.”

Top gear #1 Macro lens

“The Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L IS USM is the workhorse of food photography,” says Cairn. “As well as enabling you to get super-close to give hugely detailed images for truly mouth-watering food shots, macro lenses have ‘flat field’ optics, so that the edge of the frame is just as in focus as the centre, and a wide f/2.8 aperture, which is really useful when working in low light.”

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EXPERT INSIGHT

Don’t be so cheesy!

HOT SHOT #1

To get a feel for Georgia’s abilities, Cairn asked her to set up a shot of a Christmas cheeseboard and then explained how he’d approach it differently. “Georgia’s gone for a low-angle close-up and used a wide f/2.8 aperture for a shallow depth of field, but while this is a good approach if the shot is of a single piece of produce, it doesn’t work so well for a group shot. Georgia has focused on the corner of the Brie, which suggests that this is the ‘hero’ food, but we really want to present all the wonderful shapes and textures together. So I suggested she try a top-down composition instead, which allows the eye to wander freely through the frame.”

Georgia’s comment

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

1/15 sec, f/6.7, ISO100

I have to admit that my initial close-up composition was cluttered and confusing – was it all about the Brie or the entire cheeseboard? Following Cairn’s advice, switching from a macro to a standard zoom lens and shooting straight down really transformed the shot! We used a lighting panel with a diffuser on one side and a reflector on the other, so that the light and shadows gave depth to the shot.

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HOT SHOT #2 Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

1/5 sec, f/6.7, ISO100

Georgia’s comment An overhead shot can work just as well with a single item – the ‘hero’ food, as Cairn calls it – but it’s important to include plenty of other interest. We dressed our Stilton shot up with these amazing artisan breads, and the accompanying dollop of pickle was chosen for its chunky texture. We shot next to a window, carefully bouncing light back in with reflectors and mirrors.

Texture and Colour Rough wooden surfaces, marble worktops, battered baking trays and patterned plates really help to add visual interest to a shot, and are arguably just as important as the food itself. Also look for complementary colours; the red of the tablecloth and rim of the plate contrasts with the green table and skin of the fig in Hot Shot #2, for example. It’s all about creating harmony to achieve a balanced shot.

Top gear #2 Standard zoom

“My 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM enables me to shoot a scrumptious spread from close quarters and still fit everything into the frame, though I’d recommend shooting at 50mm-plus, as the distorted field of view from wider angles can make food look really unnatural. It’s great when used for overhead shots, with the camera mounted on a tripod.”

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HOT SHOT #3


SHOOT WITH A PRO

Top Ten essential food photography tips

EXPERT INSIGHT

Angles of view Cairn reveals the three main angles used to photograph food. Overhead Shooting from above enables you to clearly see all the elements that make up your dish and its environment. As you’re shooting flat-on, stopping your aperture down to between f/5.6 and f/8 will ensure that everything is equally sharp. Three-quarters view This gives the sort of viewpoint you’d have when sat at the dining table, about to tuck in. A shallow depth of field shows off the ‘hero’ food, while blurring the props to produce a pleasing image.

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/8 sec, f/4, ISO100

Au naturel Whenever possible, shoot with natural light, ideally from a northor northwest-facing window.

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Light direction Shoot with the light source behind or to one side of the subject – never from the front.

3

A time for reflection Reflect light back into the scene to highlight elements using a reflector, piece of card or a mirror.

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Be a hero The main ‘hero’ dish should be prominent in the picture, and that’s where your focus should be.

Straight on Get down really low to shoot taller dishes, such as a stack of pancakes or a burger, or shoot further back for an environmental portrait that includes the cook.

Lens

1

5 Georgia’s comment This shows how a different treatment and camera angle can give a completely fresh look to the same subject. This time we shot from close with a wide aperture and shallow camera angle. I took care to focus on the front face of the Stilton, which drops the background figs and foreground crumbs nicely out of focus. Fairy lights behind add a pleasingly soft bokeh.

Composition The usual rules of composition apply; use leading lines, the rule of thirds and groups of three for an aesthetically pleasing image.

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Focal length Avoid wide angle lenses and use a focal length of at least 50mm.

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A question of style Think about prop styling. What colours complement the food? Choose crockery based on colour, shape and texture.

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What’s it for? Think about how the image will be used. Blog photos may present a more relaxed style with crumbs, editorial shots tend to use a shallow depth of field, while packaging is usually more precise and shot at narrow apertures.

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Get steamy For an instant waft of steam, microwave a wet ball of cotton wool and pop it behind the food.

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Go steady While it’s desirable to use a tripod and ISO100 for best quality, if time is short and you must shoot handheld, you can ramp up the ISO significantly on new models.



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HOT SHOT #4

Georgia’s comment Shooting at the widest available aperture and focusing on the face of the roulade hints at its delicious, creamy delights, while everything else drops out of focus. To add interest, we sprinkled a handful of frozen berries onto the plate and put a candle in the background for that Christmassy feel.

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/5 sec, f/2.8, ISO100

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HOT SHOT #5

Backlight

“Many newbies are tempted to light their shots from the front, but I would always advise that your light source is within a 180 degree semicircle centred behind your subject, which will give you much more interesting light and shadow in your shot,” advises Cairn.

Georgia’s comment It was fascinating to see how a shot evolves from a basic idea to the finished thing, adding elements and tweaking composition along the way. I love that this isn’t simply a shot of mince pies, but tells a story. For the final touch we added a tea towel in the corner, which suggests that they’ve been taken fresh from the oven still piping hot, and the pie on the plate, with the spoonful carefully dug out, infers that it was impossible to resist taking a bite!

Top gear #3 Tripod

“By all means compose your shots handheld, but once you’ve worked out your setup and camera angle, lock your camera on a tripod,” says Cairn. “This will not only enable you to shoot at slow shutter speeds, thus keeping your ISO to a minimum, but will enable you to carefully fine-tune the shot. A pivoting centre column is a must for striking overhead shots, too…”



Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

0.7 sec, f/2.8, ISO100

EXPERT INSIGHT

Build up your shots After deciding a top-down shot was the best way to present the mince pies, Cairn and Georgia proceeded to build up the shot…

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The mince pies were placed on a battered old baking sheet and a liberal sprinkle of icing sugar added. But the composition is a little bit uninteresting.

2

Turning the tray to a jaunty angle and adding a decorative plate adds more interest to the shot, but there’s still room for improvement.

3

Next, a pie was plopped on the plate, with a spoonful dug out and a dollop of brandy butter, taking care to leave the pie’s ‘footprint’ on the baking tray.

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PHOTOPLUSApprentice Food glorious food Cairn dishes up a trio of tasty food photos…

Top gear #4

Reflectors and mirrors Reflectors are great for bouncing light back onto your whole scene to fill in shadows, while small mirrors enable you to target light precisely where you want it, which is particularly useful for directing the viewer’s attention to the ‘hero’ produce in your food setup.

Cinnamon Vanilla Swirl Protein Frappuccino This was taken as part of an ongoing social media campaign for Icon Nutrition, a supplement manufacturer. Giving consumers an idea of what they can create, rather than a simple shot of the product packaging, is much more evocative.

Kippers Food pictures often benefit from a human presence, which helps tell a story. This image, shot to promote a food festival, shows part of the process of how herring are smoked to make kippers.

Props “Photographing food is just as much about the stuff surrounding the food as the food itself. Look for interesting serving utensils and crockery – the older and more distinctive the better. We bought Christmas-themed potpourri, crackers and fairy lights to give our dishes a festive look.”

Top gear #5

Continuous light panel

Japanese scallops This image was taken for Ogino Japanese restaurant in Beverley, Yorkshire, to promote a new range of dishes. Taken with natural light from a north-facing window, and styled by the chef.

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“I prefer to use natural window light,” reveals Cairn, “but sometimes it just isn’t possible – particularly on short winter days. In these circumstances I’ll use an LED continuous light panel, rather than a flashgun, as I can see exactly how light and shadow will fall before I take the shot.”

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SHOOT WITH A PRO

Georgia’s comment For the shot of the mulled wine we used fairy lights in the background and shot with a shallow depth of field to give them a beautiful out-of-focus look. When we first approached the shot the wine was so dense that the lights in the background didn’t shine through, so we watered it down to reduce its opacity – you wouldn’t want to drink it but it made for a much better looking shot! The drink itself isn’t that photogenic, so we focused on the dried orange, cinnamon stick and star anise ingredients in front of the glass. The Canon Magazine

HOT SHOT #6 Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/4 sec, f/2.8, ISO100

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PHOTOPLUSApprentice Georgia’s comment It wouldn’t be Christmas without Christmas pud, and Cairn suggested we set it on fire with a good splash of brandy and include the ‘chef’ in the shot to add interest. We had to be fast – those flames don’t last long – so I shot handheld with a slowish 1/45 sec shutter speed; the lens’s Image Stabilizer ensured the photo didn’t suffer from camera shake! I pre-focused on the food and took a sequence of shots, so I could pick the one with the best-looking flame.

Cairn’s verdict We saved the most ambitious shot till last – but before shooting the pudding on fire we took a ‘safety shot’ with a sprig of holly on top of the pud, just in case we couldn’t get the flaming shot to work. Georgia’s slow shutter speed gives life to the licking flame, and her shallow depth of field focuses the attention on the food, while the cook and kitchen behind are dropped nicely out of focus. The cracker and holly on the serving tray really enhance the presentation. Well done Georgia!

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/45 sec, f/2.8, ISO3200

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SHOT of the day!

Next Month sTUDIO PORTRAITS

Be our next apprentice The Canon Magazine

Do you need some help to take your Canon photography to the next level? Let us know what you’d like help with and we could pair you up with a top pro for the day! Send an email to photoplus@futurenet. com with ‘PhotoPlus Apprentice’ in the subject line, and include your telephone number and address.

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Stunning imagery from the world of Canon photography

LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR COLLECTION 9 This stunning coffee table book showcases a selection of entries from the Landscape Photographer of the Year Awards 2015. Landscape Photographer of the Year: Collection 9 is out now (AA Publishing, £25). The Landscape Photographer of the Year awards are held in association with VisitBritain and Countryside is GREAT. For more information, see: www.take-a-view.co.uk

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fantastic CANON photography

01 Cloud Glacier by Andy Tibbetts

As the sun rises, a cloud inversion rolls down the glen below. A truly wild place involving a camp-out on the coldest night of the winter.

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/6 sec, f/16, ISO100

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INSPIRATIONS

02

02 LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHER OF

THE YEAR 2015 OVERALL WINNER Bat’s Head by Andy Farrer Snow this far south on the Jurassic Coast is a fairly uncommon event, and it was not until February 2015 that I managed to reach some of my favourite parts of the coast when snow had fallen. As incredible as it was to see the arch of Durdle Door covered in snow, this view, looking in the opposite direction, was every bit as captivating. The encroaching tide, revealing the warm shingle beneath, provided an enjoyable distraction for a few minutes.

Lens

Zeiss Planar T* 1.4/50 ZE

Exposure

2 secs, f/13, ISO100

03 Derwent fold by Graeme Kelly

Blencathra has always been one of my favourite Lakeland fells, one of the reasons being that there are many sides to it. I took this image during a brief gap in a snow flurry in mid-December, when the sun managed to light up the flanks of this special fell.

Lens

Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1/20 sec, f/16, ISO100

03

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fantastic CANON photography

04

04 Snowdon Horseshoe from the

Glyders by Sarah Canton The Met Office had promised amazing winter weather in Snowdonia so there was no choice but to dig out my winter walking boots and head over there. This image was taken between Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach. I arrived at this point mid-afternoon when the sun was directly ahead of me, casting strong shadows from the foreground rocks. I had a final monochrome image in mind.

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/200 sec, f/8, ISO100

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INSPIRATIONS

05

05 Dawn at Owler Bar by Daniel Casson

I set my alarm early for sunrise and, as I was heading into the Peak District, I looked to my left and saw this beautiful photo opportunity. I pulled in and quickly grabbed my camera. The sun was about to rise behind me, which created a nice orange glow around the setting moon. It was 4.30am, and being the only person enjoying this moment was pretty special.

Lens

Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1/8 sec, f/16, ISO100

06 United They Stand by David Shawe

I was exploring the Glenmore Forest Park, hoping to capture the magnificent Caledonian pine forest. Persistent drizzle provided ideal conditions, with soft mist forming to add a haunting mood to the scene. The texture of the forest floor and the crusty lichen on the foreground pines combined to add contrast and a sense of depth to the scene.

Lens

Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1.6 sec, f/22, ISO100

06

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fantastic CANON photography

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08

07 Lucretia My Reflection

by George Johnson The marshes by the town of Hertford are very close to where I live and I often go there to practise landscapes when my time is limited. Thick fog lifts from the boggy marshes several times during the year, and this particular bend in the canal is such a photogenic spot.

Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

4 secs, f/11, ISO100

The Canon Magazine

08 F  ebruary Frost by Robert Birkby

I’ve been fascinated by this landscape of undulating hills and steep valleys around Walsden. One morning I drove into a wall of freezing fog, drifting past in waves, painting the trees white as it went. I climbed onto the hillside and took several images to capture this.

Lens

Canon EF 70–200mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1/30 sec, f/11, ISO100

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INSPIRATIONS

09

09 V  iew of the River Thurne

at Sunset by Bill Allsopp This is the final image from my last photography trip in my camper van before heading down the long road to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. I am pleased to say I feel well and I shall be back out there in my camper with my camera very soon!

Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/13 sec, f/10, ISO200

10 Old Man in the Trees

by Chris Shepherd I reached Kelly Hall Tarn well before sunset and had a feeling that it was going to be a magical evening as the light was already rich and warm. As the late August sun began to set and make the landscape glow, I marvelled at the beauty of the scene that unfolded before me. Having a view like this completely to myself and capturing the essence of the scene is, for me, the real joy of landscape photography.

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Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/25 sec, f/16, ISO100

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SLRwars awaken the force in your canon SLR

30 tips to reach for the stars with your eos camera

SLR WARS

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EOS features compared!

The Canon Magazine

31


slrwars #1

A galaxy of views: Vari-angle lcd The Canon EOS 70D, 700D, 750D and 760D all feature adjustable, vari-angle LCD panels that flip out to let you view the screen from many different angles so you can get the shot in tight and unusual situations. The brightness of any EOS LCD panel can be adjusted from the tools menu. For ease of use the EOS 70D, 700D, 750D, 760D and 100D models also offer touch screen control on their rear LCD screens. A vari-angle screen is great for shooting at awkward angles, while touch screens make control easy

#3

#2

AF case studies vs standard AF AF case studies are six AF presets that allow photographers to choose the most appropriate, depending on the subject. They are available in the AF menus of the 1D X and EOS 5D Mark III and are designed to allow you to precisely adjust AF settings for tracking and locking on to moving subjects, even those moving erratically. The key advantage over standard AF settings is faster setup and the fact that each of the six case studies provides an on-screen icon with a brief explanation of what it’s for – for example, ‘For subjects that accelerate or decelerate quickly’ and ‘Instantly focus on subjects suddenly entering AF points’.

32

Warp speeds: continuous shooting Every EOS DSLR has a maximum continuous shooting speed for capturing fast-moving action, measured in frames per second (fps). These range from 3fps on the EOS 1200D up to 14fps on the 1D X. The amount of images that can be shot and successfully buffered in a continuous sequence varies from camera to camera, but for most enthusiast users, the explosive, rapid-action 10fps continuous shooting capability of the 7D Mark II should be more than enough.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


EOS Features compared!

#4

Cameras with a pop-up flash offer an easy way to wirelessly control external flashguns

Light saviours! Integrated Speedlite Transmitters The Integrated Speedlite Transmitters in the 700D, 70D and 7D Mark II DSLRs mean they can be used as the master control unit in a multi-flash setup in the same way that a Canon Speedlite flashgun can be used to optically control wireless slave units. This opens up new worlds of wireless flash shooting, without having to invest in a master flash unit or the Speedlite Transmitter.

#5

R2-Mark II: anti-flicker shooting The anti-flicker shooting function of the Canon 7D Mark II, 5DS and 5DS R cameras is designed to ensure optimal exposure when shooting in environments that have fluorescent or flickering light sources. When working in the A+ mode the anti-flicker function operates automatically without you needing to adjust any settings, making these cameras great for shooting interiors.

#6

Prime time or room to zoom? The perennial debate about whether to invest in a zoom lens or a prime depends on several factors – these include budget, what subjects you’re shooting and what degree of flexibility you require. As a rule of thumb a zoom lens will offer you more flexibility across the different focal lengths, while a prime lens usually offers the ability to shoot with faster apertures, such as f/1.2 or f/1.4, for low-light shooting, is usually lighter, and offers optimum image quality. That being said, the image quality afforded by Canon’s latest Mark II zoom lenses is superb.

The Canon Magazine

33


slrwars #7

Hand Solo!

Bigger camera bodies generally offer a better camera grip

If you want to keep a firm grip on your camera or shoot one-handed, consider the 1200D (and up) over the 100D as bigger cameras have a built-in, textured grip on the right-hand side of the camera and a rear thumb grip that will help you to keep a firm hold while shooting.

#8

The AF Protection Zone: the points battle The APS-C format EOS 7D Mark II boasts the most AF points of any EOS DSLR – 65. The benefit is that, compared to the 5D Mark III, the 7D Mark II covers a much larger percentage of the picture area – mainly due to its smaller APS-C image sensor – so it’s possible to autofocus on off-centre subjects closer to the edges of the frame. The Zone AF of the 5D Mark III allows you to select from nine different zones, or groupings of AF points, and will always try to focus on the nearest part of a subject within the zone of points.

While the 1D X, 5D Mark III and 5DS/R cameras offer just as many focus points, the 7D Mark II arguably offers the best AF performance as the AF points cover a greater image area

#9

Noise Easily: the NR options Although Noise Reduction can be applied at all ISO speeds it is, understandably, most effective at high ISOs or for when you’re seeking to reduce noise (comparable to graininess in film) in longer exposures. For High ISO speed NR use the camera settings menu tab, scroll to desired Noise Reduction setting and choose from Standard, Low, Noise reduction is bestHigh or Disable. Long exposure reserved for high-ISO or Noise Reduction settings are long-exposure photography also on the camera settings tab – in other scenarios, you’re and give you a choice of Auto, unlikely to see a great deal Enable and Disable. of benefit from using it

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EOS Features compared!

#10

The tracking sector When photographing either a moving person or a moving subject with a strong colour, the 7D Mark II uses EOS Intelligent Tracking and Recognition (iTR) AF for speedier and more accurate focusing. The 5D Mark III does not have iTR, but for tracking subjects it does have the ability to allow you to adjust tracking sensitivity of subjects within the Case Studies menu.

#11

Sensor Wars The full-frame Canon 6D incorporates a full-frame 36x24mm sensor that replicates the exact size of 35mm film and is larger than that in the APS-C format 7D Mark II (which measures 22.3x14.9mm). Due to the larger sensor, full-frame cameras generally produce images that are sharper, with finer detail and more ‘depth’. The key benefit of an APS-C model is that, due to their ‘crop factor’, you get longer effective focal lengths with your lenses – for example, a 100mm lens gives an effective focal length of 160mm with an APS-C DSLR. The Canon Magazine

#12

Popping into lightspeed: lens apertures

An APS-C sensor has both benefits and drawbacks verses full-frame models

Lenses with wider apertures enable faster shutter speeds to be used

The ‘speed’ of a lens is denoted by its aperture value, or f-number, which denotes the maximum aperture, and thus fastest ‘speed’, it can shoot at. The lower the number – for example, f/1.4 – the better it will operate in low light. A typical aperture sequence for a lens might go: f/2.8, f/4, f/5.6, f/8, f/11, f/16, f/22 and f/32 (each step is the result of multiplying the preceding number by the square root of 2). Moving from one value to the next (f/2.8 to f/4, for example) reduces the amount of light by half.

35


SLRWars #13

high dynamic range slr mode

Some EOS cameras, including the 70D and 5D Mark III, have a built-in HDR mode that enables you to capture shots with an extra-wide dynamic range. With in-camera HDR shooting enabled, the camera captures three images for each shot taken, with one underexposed, one correctly exposed and one overexposed – which are then combined in-camera.

Cameras with built-in HDR can capture a wider dynamic range than would otherwise be possible

#14

Hybrid C-MOS Eisley The Hybrid CMOS AF sensor is a ‘phase detection’ focus technology found in the newest Canon EOS cameras that uses pairs of photodiodes embedded on the image sensor to offer improved AF performance, in terms of measuring subject distance quickly and checking exact focus very accurately, when in Live View and movie shooting modes. The EOS 100D introduced Hybrid CMOS AF II, which provides AF across a wider area of the frame, extending to 80% of the shooting area, both horizontally and vertically.

#15

Don’t go to the Dark Side! Cameras equipped with a Hybrid CMOS AF sensor can focus much faster in Live View mode and when shooting movies

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Using Auto ISO can be a useful tool to ensure accurate exposure when you require a particular combination of shutter speed and aperture to give a specific effect. On cameras including the 70D, 700D and EOS 5D Mark III, it’s possible to set the Auto ISO range that the camera can select from, so you can ensure the image quality falls within a range that is acceptable to you, and doesn’t get too ‘noisy’.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


EOS Features Compared!

#17

Jar Jar Blinks! Using Highlight Alert

#16

Attack of the clones: convert your files

The Highlight Alert facility is seen in the playback menus of certain EOS DSLR cameras, including the 5D Mark III and the 70D. This setting will show you where the overexposed areas in your images are located; the image preview will blink in areas that the sensor sees as completely white so that you can adjust your settings accordingly.

In-camera processing of Raw images removes the hassle of transferring images from your camera to a computer for image conversion. Processing options include Brightness, White Balance, Picture Style, Auto Lighting Optimizer, High ISO Speed Noise Reduction, Colour Space, Peripheral Illumination Correction, Distortion Correction, Chromatic Aberration, as well as quality and resolution. After processing a Raw file in-camera, it is converted to a JPEG. You can create any number of JPEGs from a Raw file, but MRaw and SRaw images cannot be processed in-camera – they have to be processed using Canon’s DPP software.

Some DSLRs enable you to process Raw files in camera to create JPEGs

Highlight Alert gives you an at-a-glance indication of what areas of your image are overexposed, by flashing them in black and white

#18

The battle for Power (Focus) Power Focus is a two-speed mode that allows you to drive the focus motor without turning the focus ring – you use the focus preset ring instead. By turning the focus preset ring a little, you can drive the focus motor slowly; turning it more drives it faster. This allows smooth focus pulls with longer lenses, which is particularly useful when shooting movies with EOS DSLRs. Lenses with Power Focus are the EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM, EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM, EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM and EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM telephotos.

The Canon Magazine

37


SLRWars #19

Take control

The Quick Control Screen on EOS DSLRs makes changing settings from the rear LCD screen quick and easy – just press the Q button to access it. The EOS 5DS and 5DS R cameras take this convenience a step further with a Custom Quick Control Screen – this allows you to edit and customize the contents, size and placement of the information fields, so only the functions you select are shown.

With the 5DS/R, you can edit the layout of the Quick Control Screen so that only the info you need is at your fingertips

Entry-level cameras tend to offer more shooting modes

#21

Make it quick The Quick Control Dial on the back of more advanced Canon EOS DSLR cameras not only allows you to dial in exposure compensation much faster, but once a function (such as White Balance, AF Drive Mode, Flash Exposure Compensation, ISO or AF point) or any menu tab has been selected, it allows you to scroll through the available options quickly to select what setting you wish to change.

#20

A la Mode Dial The Mode dial on EOS DSLRs is on the top plate of your camera and includes the shooting modes, but the available options vary considerably, depending on the model, and the more advanced the camera, the fewer options you tend to have. While all models offer the ‘Creative Zone’ modes of P (Program), Av (Aperture Priority), Tv (Shutter Priority) and M (Manual), entry level cameras have a selection of ‘Basic Zone’ modes, including Portrait, Landscape, Close-up and Sport, represented by pictograms. These are designed to be foolproof as the camera takes control over many settings, but don’t offer nearly as much flexibility.

38

A Quick Control Dial, found on more advanced models, speeds up camera operation considerably

www.digitalcameraworld.com


EOS Features compared!

#22

The EOS app-aro sector The EOS 6D and 70D DSLRs are compatible with Canon’s Remote app – it’s an Android and iOS application that allows a smartphone or tablet to connect wirelessly to an EOS camera with built-in Wi-Fi. It has two major functions: [1] It allows you to view images located on the memory card inside the camera and download them to your smartphone or tablet. This means you can check for focus and exposure on a larger screen than on the rear of the camera. [2] It allows you to remotely control your camera directly from your smartphone or tablet.

01

02

Operating your EOS via an app can be useful in all sorts of shooting scenarios

#23

#24

Embrace the Dark Side! Going over to the ‘Dark Side’ is now easier than ever before, with all current EOS DSLRs offering the capability to shoot low-light situations to at least ISO12,800. Some EOS cameras offer expansion modes to take ISO values even higher – for example, the EOS 5D

Using IS modes Mark III has a top expansion (H2) setting of ISO102,400, and even the enthusiast-level 760D tops out at expanded ISO25,600.

Canon’s image stabilization lenses offer one, two or three IS modes, which do the following: Mode 1 – depending on the lens, this provides between two and five stops of equivalent stabilization in vertical and horizontal directions. Mode 2 – designed to offer perfect panning shots by providing stabilization in a vertical direction only. Mode 3 – this takes the benefits of standard IS (effective for both horizontal and vertical camera motion) but, instead of it being active all the time, it only activates when you fully press the shutter button to take an image. It is especially useful for sports photography, where you are likely to be moving between subjects quickly.

Even the least expensive EOS offers good high-ISO performance for low-light shooting The Canon Magazine

39


SLRWars #25

xxxxxx xxxx xxxxxx xxxx xxxxxx xxxx xxxxxx xxxx xxxx

USB 3-PO

If you want trigger an EOS DSLR camera remotely, use the USB cable that comes in the box. For more range, longer USB cables can be used, although when shooting from over 10 metres away you should consider using Wi-Fi. To access remote shooting, simply plug the camera into the computer with the USB cable and open Canon’s EOS Utility software; select ‘Camera settings/Remote shooting’ and you will be able to control the camera directly from the computer. The EOS 5DS, 5DS R and 7D Mark II are compatible with Super Speed USB 3.0 – this allows for faster transfer of image files from the cameras to computers when shooting tethered.

A USB cable enables tethered shooting, as well as transferring images to a computer

#26

Strike the white Balance

The 5DS/R features not one, but two Auto White Balance settings, the first aims to retain some of the warm tones from artificial light sources, while the second tries to eliminate them

White Balance is the camera’s ability to correct colour cast or tint under different lighting conditions. Out of the box, EOS DSLRs always have white balance set to AWB (Auto White Balance). This means that the camera is always trying to normalize the colour temperature, correcting warm orange or cool blue light towards more neutral tones. The EOS 5DS and 5DS R feature a choice of AWB settings – the ‘ambience priority’ setting retains some of the warm tones from artificial light sources (similar to AWB on other EOS DSLRs) and the ‘white priority’ setting that eliminates the warmth from tungsten lighting and tries to give colour-neutral images.

#27

The Intelligent Viewfinder advantage The ‘Intelligent Viewfinder’ in the 750D, 760D, 5D Mark III, 7D Mark II, 70D, 5DS and 5DS R models uses a transmissive LCD, which allows the cameras to display more essential information within the viewfinder, including AF points, Zone, Spot or Expansion AF points and a grid, when required. To avoid the screen looking cluttered, it is possible to A head-up display in the choose the information that viewfinder offers valuable the LCD shows, or even to shooting info, but can be have it show none at all. disabled for a clearer view

40

www.digitalcameraworld.com


EOS Features compared!

#28

The focus awakens: EF vs EF-S Canon’s EF-S lenses are designed solely for use with EOS cameras with a crop-factor APS-C sensor, while all EF lenses will fit both APS-C format and full-frame EOS DSLR bodies. The benefits of EF-S lenses are they are generally smaller and lighter, but EF lenses tend to offer slightly better image quality and a more robust build.

#29

A Wi-Fi World The EOS 6D, 750D and 760D cameras all incorporate a built-in Wi-Fi module to transfer images. The 6D Wi-Fi module can only transfer JPEG images wirelessly. If you wish to use the Wi-Fi functionality but still shoot Raw files, make sure you set the camera to Raw+JPEG shooting. This way the camera can send the JPEG file and you still have a Raw file to process later.

Canons with built-in Wi-Fi can transfer images to your computer as you shoot

#30

Take a Silent Touch The EOS 5D Mark III features a Silent Touch Control pad on the Quick Control Dial on the back of the camera. During HD movie shooting, this is used to adjust settings such as audio recording level and aperture without the risk of clicks being recorded on the audio track.

The Canon Magazine

Enth siast Canon DSLuRs tested

We put the Canon 7D Mk II and 6D EOS 760D, 70D, thro in-depth lab test ugh our new treatm See our Super Test ent. on page 120!

41


DAVIDNOTONonlocation

Prague lights Prague, Czech Republic. 8:20 local time. 6 December 2013

It’s all coming back; the Old Town is instantly familiar to David Noton as he walks through the deserted dark streets, tripod on the shoulder ’ve a new set of legs in action on this trip, a Gitzo Systematic 3542, and it’s a touch heavier than my last, but the joy of working with a decent tripod knows no bounds. I’m buzzing. This is what the game is all about, heading out in the darkness before dawn to capture daybreak over one of the most atmospheric cities in the world. Down at the Charles Bridge, I have in mind to shoot looking east along the bridge towards the towers of the Old Town with the twilight backlighting the Pro travel & landscape photographer dawn sky, but the complete absence of cloud scuppers that. I relocate to the east David is an award-winning Canon bank of the river and set up ready for the photographer with more than 28 years’ first light to start glowing on the spires of professional experience. During his career St Vitus Cathedral crowning the Castle David has travelled to just about every District beyond. With the sun rising corner of the globe. In 2012, Canon invited behind and no cloud for mood I’m not David into its Ambassador Program by hopeful of a classic session, but hopefully designating him an Official Canon Explorer. I can at least make a start. Info and photos at www.davidnoton.com 01 Four days later: Prague is looking grey and a bit dismal today. No matter, I fly home tonight after one last Blue Hour shoot. I have a laid back but with the cool blue residual twilight still lingering in the sky. smoky lunch in a bar showing a hockey game, remembering, out These night shots are all about timing; they’re not best done of the blue, an encounter I had with a guy in Alberta, decades actually at night, when the black sky is devoid of interest, but previously. In 1968 he was a member of the Czech National now, in the half-light, which lasts just minutes. Hockey Team who, during an exhibition match, fully suited, Walking the now familiar route back to my hotel a warm skated and padded, walked out of the dressing room in Montreal glow of satisfaction permeates my being. It’s been an enjoyable to defect the then-Communist country. That’s courage. I wonder and productive four days. I think I’ve got the bug back for these if he’s come back since. He’d notice a few changes. quick city-break shoots. I had lost my mojo for it all, the victim From the top of the tower at the eastern end of the Charles of just too many river/bridge/castle shoots over the decades Bridge the view looking west over the river towards the Castle chasing stock sales, but that is all just history now. District is stupendous. I half-expected to be challenged with my A lot’s changed since those days, I’m approaching my work big bag and pro tripod, but no one is worried. It’s a refreshing with a whole different mentality, and the technical evolutions change from the paranoia of London. This is the tower that was of the last decade mean I have so much more flexibility to make dominating my compositions on the last two mornings; I’m now the most of the possibilities Prague presents. Thankfully, set up with my 24-70mm lens poking out of one of the turret’s though, the quintessential essence of Prague hasn’t changed arches. The wait for the lights to come on seems interminable, since I first visited in 1989; it’s still magic, and possibly Europe’s probably because I’m half-expecting to be turfed off the rooftop most beautiful city. just as the Decisive Moment is nigh. Eventually they do shine and I make the shot as the artificial light levels balance perfectly Next month The Yukon Territories

DAVID NOTON

44

www.digitalcameraworld.com


DAVID NOTON COLUMN

02

Artificial light levels balance perfectly with the cool blue twilight lingering in the sky

01 The Charles Bridge over the Vltava River

at dusk, with the Castle District and St Vitus Cathedral beyond

Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

13 sec, f/11, ISO100

02 The Old Town Square at dusk, with the

Old Town Hall and Church of Our Lady Before Tyn

Lens

Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM

Exposure

1/6 sec, f/14, ISO6400

03 A solitary figure on the Charles Bridge

at dawn, with the towers and spires of the Old Town beyond

Lens

Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM

Exposure

8 secs, f/11, ISO200

03


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canon skills

Sharpen up your photography skills with our all-new photo projects and expert guides

Hollie Latham Technique editor

hollie.latham@futurenet.com

New projects with video guides

Follow our Canon DSLR walkthrough guides and Photoshop editing videos

Welcome... With christmas just around the corner we’ve got some fun festive projects lined up. Try your hand at light painting with an array of torches and festive-themed light stencils. If you want to try shooting portraits with flash at night, we’ve got a very handy tip on how to fix your flash white balance. Plus we show you how to create festive bokeh using some fairy lights and a bit of DIY. And if you haven’t got round to sending out your Christmas cards yet, why not create your very own pop-up card effect to email to family and friends? Finally, if you enjoy taking pictures of your beloved pets but don’t want to venture outside into the cold, learn how to use off-camera flash indoors for more pleasing results. We’ll also show you how to create a fun portrait compilation. Moving into the digital darkroom, we get the party started in Photoshop Elements, master mono in CC’s ACR plug-in, and essential edits in Lightroom.

The Canon Magazine

46 The art of light

Learn how to create colourful festive light paintings outdoors with James Paterson

50 Festive bokeh effects 52 Pop-up Xmas card Deck the halls with baubles and bokeh this Christmas with Tom Welsh

56 Warm up your flash 58 Pooch portraits How to use sweet wrappers to fix your flash white balance with Tom Welsh

Learn how to use off-camera flash indoors to shoot pet portraits with Hollie Latham

Create a pop-up card effect with shooting and Photoshop skills with James Paterson

62 Get the party glowing

Make glowing neon-like lines using layer styles and Transform tools in Photoshop Elements

View the videos

64 Master monochrome 66 Master essential edits Use Photoshop’s Camera Raw plug-in to convert to black and white in Photoshop CC

From fixing colours to enhancing tones and sharpening in Lightroom

Whenever you see this icon you’ll find an accompanying video – tap the ideo link and the video View the v will ‘pop-out’ of the page (as long as you have an internet connection). You can also download project files to your computer.

45


Project 1

The Mission Learn how to shoot long exposures in the dark and paint with different light sources Time needed One hour Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Tripod • A selection of torches and light sources • Flashgun (optional) • Remote shutter release

46

The art of light

James Paterson shows you how to create colourful festive light paintings

L

ight painting, or light graffiti as some call it, is created by moving light sources through an image while the shutter is open. This means exposures of several seconds or even minutes while we fling around torches, glow sticks or anything else that emits light. With a little practice, you can start to create words, shapes and pictures just like our festive-themed night shots. There’s something addictive about light painting. It’s almost

certain that your first attempt will be a complete mess, but you’ll quickly learn, shot by shot, how best to position the lights, which movements work best, when to shield the light source from the camera, and the length of time you need to paint for. Smooth, fluid movements work best, and serious light painters use all kinds of tricks to create patterns – for example, a torch tied to a length of string and swung around can create an orb-like shape, or even a snowman (see over the page).

All the usual tips for long exposures apply to light painting, so you’ll need a tripod to keep the camera in a fixed position, and a remote cable release if you’re out shooting solo. Your DSLR’s shutter speed maxes out at 30 seconds, which probably won’t be long enough for intricate painting, so you’ll need to use Bulb mode. Learn how to get set up, pick dark nights and good locations, and how shoot in Bulb mode, then over the page we’ll show you a few different ways to paint a scene. www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_1

festive light painting

Step by step Get set up to paint with light Learn how to set up your camera to capture exposures lasting several minutes

Avoid ambient light

01 Tripod and focus

02 Bulb mode

03 Use noise reduction

04 Start painting

Set up your camera on a tripod. Pre-focus on a spot by placing a torch in the scene and focusing on this using autofocus, then switch your lens to manual focus to lock the focus.

Long exposures are susceptible to noise, even if you use a low ISO. With Long Exposure Noise Reduction enabled, the camera takes a second exposure of the same duration as the first, and merges the two.

Select Bulb mode, and attach a cable or remote release with a lock to keep the shutter open. Set the ISO to 100 and the aperture around f/8, then take a test shot and adjust the settings if necessary.

Stand on the pre-focused spot with your light sources at the ready. Open the shutter and start painting across the scene. Try to sweep the lights around with a fluid motion to create smooth, flowing shapes.

You’ll be shooting at night, but you also need dark locations, well away from city lights and houses. If there is some ambient light around, whether it’s from streetlights or light left in the sky, take a couple of test shots to work out how long an exposure you can get away with before the lights begin blowing things out. If there’s no ambient light at all, then the exposure can be as long as you need it to be: one minute, 10 minutes, an hour – it makes no difference to the overall exposure of your shots.

Next month shoot a starscape

Essential gear Here’s what you need to paint with light

01 Light wand

A toy lightsaber creates fantastic, thick bands of light when swished around in the dark. If you don’t have one, look for a light wand – you can buy them in a range of different sizes and colours.

The Canon Magazine

02 Tripod & remote

You’ll need a tripod to keep your camera still, and a cable release or wireless remote – these have a locking feature that enables you to lock the shutter open when you’re using Bulb mode.

03 light templates

If you want recognisable shapes, make cardboard templates and shine a torch through, keeping the shape as still as possible. Cover the opening with thin white paper and coloured acetate.

04 Torches

A strong torch will create bright spots or streaks, and can also be used to light the surroundings if you want to give the scene a bit of context. Flashing LED bike lights and a head torch come in handy too.

05 Glow sticks

Glow sticks are weaker than torchlight, but they come in a variety of colours, they’re cheap, and you can swing them around to make a swirling shape that looks almost like coloured smoke.

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Project 1

Setup 1 Christmas tree

The tree was created with a toy lightsaber, swung back and forth in increasingly wide movements; we shone a torch through cardboard templates to make fairy lights and other festive shapes. Try to visualise the design from the camera’s position, and bear in mind that the brightness of a light source and how long you leave it on for will determine how bright it appears in the image – so a weak torch left on for five seconds might give the same illumination as a bright LED switched on for a second.

Kit needed: Light wand, templates, torch, bike light for flashing dots.

Exposure: 306 secs, f/8, ISO100

Setup 2 silhouette

Anything that gets between the light source and the camera will block the light and leave a dark patch in the frame, and you can use this to your advantage to create a silhouette. Simply ask a friend to stand in the scene and then paint behind them during the exposure – they’ll need to stay as still as possible throughout. To create this Rudolph the reindeer shape we made a pair of cardboard antlers, and we finished off the effect by shining a red light in the centre of the face to create the famous red nose.

Kit needed: Extra person, torches,light wands, cardboard antlers.

Exposure: 134 secs, f/8, ISO100

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


festive light painting

Combine frames

Setup 3 Snowman

Attach a light to a length of string and swing it in a circle – a light with an open or dome-shaped head will work best. Try to keep the centre of the orb – your hand – in the same position during the exposure. To create our snowman we made one orb close to the ground, then shortened the string to create a smaller orb for the head. The hat was painted with a green LED, and the snowflakes were made by shining a torch through a cardboard template.

Kit needed: String, dome-headed torch such as a bike light, green LED, snowflake template, torch.

Exposure: 170 secs, f/8, ISO100

If you like you can merge several frames together in Photoshop – this will be easier if all the frames are shot from the same position, without the camera being moved. Open the images in Photoshop, select your first image, go to Select> All, press Ctrl+C to copy, then go to another image and hit Ctrl+V to paste one image on top of another. Go to the Layers panel, and change the blending mode of the top layer from Normal to Lighten – this means that only the pixels on the top layer that are lighter than those below will show through, which is just what we need to combine light paintings from several frames.

Setup 4 Mix with flash

A flash can be used to paint just like any other light source, but its lightning-fast duration means you can freeze a person and add them into the effect. You could fire the flash from the camera’s hotshoe, but why not take it off-camera? Firing the flash from one side will make the light look much more dramatic. Simply set the flash to manual mode, take a couple of test shots to work out the right power output (1/2 power here), then fire it by hand during the long exposure. Once done, paint in the lights and then close the shutter.

Kit needed: Flashgun, torches, light wand or toy lightsaber

Exposure: 76 secs, f/8, ISO100 The Canon Magazine

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Project 2

After

Before The Mission Create Xmasthemed bokeh using home-made aperture slides Time needed One hour Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Fast lens • Tripod • Scalpel • Black paper • Lens cap • Fairy lights

Next month shoot a minimalist landscape 50

Deck the halls with baubles and bokeh!

Tom Welsh gets creative for Christmas by making festive bokeh effects

B

okeh, as you may already know, is a Japanese word that refers to the quality of the defocused areas of an image, and we’re getting in the mood for Christmas by showing you how to capture bokeh with a festive flavour. It’s the perfect project to get you into the holiday spirit, and adds a lovely touch to home-made cards for friends and family. The appearance of the bokeh in an image is dictated by the

roundness of the lens’s aperture; the more blades the aperture has, the rounder the aperture and the smoother the blur. For this project we’re photographing fairy lights with a wide aperture to create a shallow depth of field, and placing a cut-out shape over the lens. The wonders of physics will cause the out-of-focus areas in the frame to take on the shape of the cut-out; in the same way that rounded apertures soften defocused areas, by creating an aperture with distinct and straight edges we

can produce bokeh that takes on recognisable shapes. Russian manufacturer Petzval makes dedicated lenses with different-shaped aperture slides for creating these effects, but a simple piece of black card can mimic the style superbly. For the best effect you’ll need to shoot fairy lights in a dark room – if you shoot outside, even at night it’s likely that there will be too many bright areas cluttering the background, which will prevent the shapes from standing out. www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_2

christmas bokeh

Setup modify your aperture for xmas bokeh Cut out your aperture slide, then set up your DSLR, fairy lights and foreground subject

Quick Tip!

01 Mark out your aperture

02 Cut out your shape

03 Turn out the lights

04 Light up the back

Draw around your lens cap on a sheet of thick black paper. Intersect this circle to find the centre, and mark out the diameter of your aperture. Calculate this by dividing your focal length by your widest aperture; in our case 50mm divided by f/1.4 gives us 35mm.

Shoot in a darkened room with the windows blacked out so the lights stand out. Closing the curtains gave us a dark enough room – if your curtains or blinds aren’t heavy enough to block out all the light you can hang sheets or towels over the windows as well.

Draw your shape, keeping inside the aperture circle and avoiding intricate details so that you can cut the shape out easily. Carefully cut out the shape using a scalpel, holding the paper around the aperture down firmly to avoid tearing it.

If you use AF your DSLR may struggle if the card is in front of the lens; focus without the card, then switch to MF to lock the focus

Find a plain background to shoot against, ideally a dark one, and arrange your lights – the more lights you include in the frame, the more bright and vibrant your bokeh will be. We’ve draped our lights over a small Christmas tree.

Step by step How to shoot your bokeh image

01 keep your Distance

Set up your foreground subject and position it and the camera a good distance from the fairy lights in the background; the greater the distance between your focal point and the lights, the more the lights will be blurred.

The Canon Magazine

02 use a tripod

Place your camera on a tripod to hold it still while composing your image, and set the drive mode to 2-second self-timer to prevent camera shake; this will also free your hands to hold the cut-out shape in front of the lens.

03 Light your subject

Position your foreground subject, and use a torch or household lamp to illuminate it – you can use a simple home-made modifier to direct the light if needed. We’ve placed a diffuser in front of our lamp to soften the light.

04 Open up your lens

Open your aperture to its widest setting to blur the lights. We used Aperture Priority mode with our lens set to f/1.4; if your maximum aperture isn’t as fast, move the subject and/or camera further back from the lights.

05 Shape the light

Attach your cut-out shape to the front of the lens. If you’re using flexible card you can fasten it around the lens with an elastic band. Otherwise, simply hold the card up in front of the lens. For the best results, focus manually.

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The Mission Shoot and piece together a pop-up Christmas card Time needed 1-2 hours Skill level Advanced Kit needed Plain background • Christmas props and subjects • Photoshop CC, CS or Elements

Download project files to your computer from: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp108.zip

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Create a pop-up Christmas card

Follow in the festive footsteps of James Paterson and create a pop-up card effect with a combination of shooting skills and Photoshop know-how

W

ith the festive season upon us, why not get into the spirit of things and make your own pop-up Christmas card? It’s a fun photo project that involves a combination of simple shooting skills and Photoshop techniques. You could go for ‘normal’ festive poses with your card, but we’ve taken the effect one stage further by combining the PhotoPlus team with a bunch of colourful props, so that the objects look larger than life. Art

editor Martin and operations editor Adam share a cracker, technique editor Hollie perches on a bauble, and editor Peter shows off his horse-riding skills. If you want to shoot your own images for the project, make sure your subjects are against a clean backdrop as this’ll make them easier to cut out later. We headed into the studio here, but you can get similar results at home with a plain wall or white sheet. As for the Photoshop technique, this involves making cutouts of each

object and then combining them all into a single seamless montage. To speed things up, we’ve provided a range of Xmas images for you – a tree, baubles, horse, presents and more – all cut out and ready to drop into your own designs (see image download link, bottom left). Once done, why not send to friends and relatives as an e-card, or post the results on social media? We’d love to see what you come up with too, so be sure to include PhotoPlus on your pop-up Christmas card list! www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_3

3D Photo Montages Project 3

Get shooting festive props and poses Capture images for your card by shooting subjects against a clean background

Quick Tip!

Once finished, use adjustment layers to apply colour and tonal changes on top of everything to help the elements gel together

Stitched-up 01 Set up the shot

02 Camera settings for flash

03 Work the poses

04 Consistent camera angles

We’re using a high-key setup to shoot our festive portraits here. When shooting your own portraits, use a simple, clear backdrop so that all the elements are easy to cut out in Photoshop later.

If you want your subjects to be sitting on larger-thanlife Christmas objects, use blocks or chairs to help with the posing, and match the pose to the object. Here we asked Peter to assume a horse-riding pose!

When using studio flash, use Manual mode at 1/200 sec at ISO100. A fairly narrow aperture, like f/13, ensures front-to-back sharpness, which is helpful for composites, as it keeps depth of field consistent.

Get down low to make the objects look larger than life. Keep the lighting consistent too – if the shadows fall to the left on the person, they should fall to the left on the object you intend to merge them with.

We captured such a great array of poses we also created a festive photo stitch – see Welcome, page 3. Simply make loose selections around each pose, copy and paste to bring them together, and position them how you like. To make the backdrop perfectly white, merge the layers and use the Dodge tool set to Highlights to clean up any rough edges.

Next month creative lens flare

Step by step Bring everything together in Photoshop Use a combination of layer skills, montage techniques and our pre-made cutouts to create your pop-up card

01 Cut out the subjects

We’ve supplied cutouts of all the objects used here, but if you want to use your own, open the image then grab the Quick Selection tool. Paint over the subject and the tool will snap to the edges. If it goes wrong, hold Alt and paint to subtract. The Canon Magazine

02 Improve the selection

Go to Select>Refine Edge. Increase Radius to about 5px then paint over tricky patches like hair to increase the area of refinement. Use Decontaminate Colours to improve colour fringes. Once done, set Output to ‘New Layer with Layer Mask’ and hit OK.

03 Copy and position

Grab the Move tool and drag the person up to the tab of the cutout bauble image, then down and in to copy them over. Hit Ctrl+T for transform, then hold Shift and drag the corner point to resize and position the person into place.

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Project 3

04 Paint shadows

05 Colour the card

06 Add a drop shadow

07 Skew the shadow

08 Mask the edges

09 Build up the scene

10 Add words

11 fake snowflakes

12 Finishing touches

Highlight the cutout object layer then click the Create New Layer icon. Grab the Brush tool, hit D to set colour to black and 3 for 30% opacity, then paint a gentle shadow under the person where the body meets the object. Once done, hit Ctrl+Shift+Alt+E to merge a copy of all the layers.

Hit Ctrl+T then hold Ctrl and drag the top middle point and the corner points to skew the shape. To make the shadow change direction, as it would if hitting the upright side of the card, select a portion of it with the Polygonal Lasso tool then hit Ctrl+T and skew in another direction.

Highlight the card layer then grab the Type tool. Choose a font style and colour in the options and write your message. Once done, size it correctly then right-click the type layer and choose Rastorize. Hit Ctrl+T then hold Ctrl and drag the corner points to skew the words and match perspective.

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Open card.png then go to Image> Adjustments>Hue/Saturation. Check ‘Colorize’ then drag the Hue slider to choose a colour for your card. Use the Move tool to drag in the merged composite, then use Ctrl+T to transform and resize it into position.

Click the Add Mask icon in the Layers panel to add a mask to the shadow layer, then grab the Brush tool, set the colour to black and hit 3 to set the tool opacity to 30%, then paint around the edges with a soft brush to gradually soften the edges of the shadow.

Grab the Custom Shapes tool from the Tools panel, go to the options and click the Shape drop-down. Click the fly-out menu and Load All Shapes. Find the snowflake shapes, Set colour to white and drag to add snowflakes. Once you have a few, grab the Move tool and Alt-drag to make copies.

Double-click the bauble layer in the Layers panel then click Drop Shadow in the Blending Options and use the settings to add a soft shadow. Once done, right-click the Drop Shadow effect in the Layers panel and choose Create Layer. Highlight the newly created shadow layer.

Repeat the process to add in other objects in the same way, apply shadows to them where they would naturally fall. Order the layers in the Layers panel so that objects closer to the front are on top. Open backdrop.jpg and copy it in, then drag the layer to the bottom of the stack.

Zoom in close and apply the finishing touches. Here, Pete is missing a hat, so we’ve copied and pasted one in. Finally, make a merged copy of all the layers with Ctrl+Shift+Alt+E then use the Spot Healing Brush and Clone tools to tidy up any rough patches until it’s perfect. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_4

ideo view the v

Project 4

Warm up your flash

Before

Tom Welsh shows you how to use sweet wrappers to fix your flash white balance The Mission Use coloured sweet wrappers to modify your flash colour Time needed 15 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Canon DSLR with built-in flash or a flashgun • Sweet wrappers

Next month cool winter macro shots

F

lash can be a life-saver when you’re shooting portraits after dark, but getting the white balance right can prove difficult. Your Canon’s white balance settings correct for the different colour temperatures of light sources to keep colours accurate, but things get trickier when you use flash at night, as flash is much ‘cooler’ than most street and indoor lighting, at around 6000K on the Kelvin scale as opposed to around 3000K (confusingly, the warmer the light, the lower the Kelvin value). Having both light sources in an image means your images can be ruined by mismatched colours, and to get around this, you need to warm up the flash light. You can buy gel kits for this, but we’ll show you a home-made alternative using coloured translucent sweet wrappers – you don’t have to look any further than a box of Quality Street!

After dedicated kit Flash gels If you find this makeshift technique useful, why not get invest in some purpose-built flash modifiers? You can buy flash gels for use with a flashgun, or, for around £5, these plastic diffusers, which attach to your DSLR’s hotshoe, and feature interchangeable attachments to warm or cool the light from the built-in flash.

Step by step change your flash colour Use sweet wrappers to easily modify your flashgun’s temperature to suit any scene

01 Set the white balance

Select the white balance to match the main lighting in the scene – this will often be warm street or building lights, although our scene contains multi-coloured lights.

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02 Collect your ‘gels’

Collect translucent sweet wrappers of different colours – oranges and yellows are useful for warming up flash, but you can use other colours for creative lighting.

03 colour your flash

All you need to do now is choose the appropriately coloured wrapper for a scene and attach it to your flashgun – an elastic band will do the trick. www.digitalcameraworld.com


The Mission Set up a home studio and use off-camera flash for colourful pet portraits indoors Time needed Half a day Skill level Advanced Kit needed Flashgun • Reflector • Tripod or light stand • Coloured backdrop material • Photoshop

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Pooch portraits

Hollie Latham shows you how to use off-camera flash for pet portraits

I

f, like me, you have a furry four-legged friend that you absolutely adore, chances are you spend a lot of time taking photos of them. Shooting outdoors is relatively simple, as you’ll have plenty of natural light, making it easier to get sharp shots of your pet when it’s moving. When it comes to indoor shots, however, you face a number of challenges. The first is light – it’s likely that you won’t have enough of it to capture pin-sharp shots

handheld. And, just as with portraits of people, the front-on light from your DSLR’s pop-up flash or a flashgun mounted on your camera’s hotshoe can be too harsh; it can cause ‘pet-eye’, the animal equivalent of red-eye (it’s usually greenish in colour), and may even frighten your subject. Another challenge is that your subject probably won’t want to sit still for long; capturing engaging expressions can prove tricky too, as often it’ll happen so quickly that you’ll miss the shot.

Finding a clutter-free backdrop for your shoot can also be difficult. So in this project we’ll show you how to set up a simple DIY studio, and show you some easy off-camera flash techniques that will enable you to use a fast shutter speed to capture fleeting movements or expressions. By positioning the flash to one side and using a reflector to bounce light back into the shadows you can produce more even lighting – and capture more flattering shots of your precious pooch! www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_5

Flash-lit pet portraits Project 5

Step by step working with off-camera flash Learn how to use your pop-up flash to trigger an external flashgun, and how to pose your pet

Quick Tip!

To get your dog’s attention, make high-pitched noises or get a squeaky toy to get them looking towards you and the camera 01 set up the backdrop

For the best results you’ll want a plain, clutter-free backdrop that contrasts with your subject. We arranged an old white bed sheet, both as a backdrop and for our subject to sit on; later on we hung up a piece of coloured material to create a different look.

02 shutter speed and aperture

Select Manual mode and set a shutter speed no faster than your camera’s top sync speed, which is normally 1/200 or 1/250 sec. To ensure that both of your pet’s eyes and nose are in focus, set a medium aperture, such as f/8, for a good depth of field.

Flexible flash 03 Wireless flash control

04 Flash settings

05 set up the flashgun

06 keep your subject happy!

Go to Flash Control settings in the first shooting menu. Ensure flash firing is enabled, select Built-in Flash Func and set Flash Mode to Manual. Scroll down to Wireless Func and select the first option, so that only the external flashgun will affect the exposure.

Open your pop-up flash, then adjust the flashgun so the head is pointing towards the subject and the sensor is pointing towards your camera. Take a few test shots, and experiment with the position and power of the flash to get the best results. The Canon Magazine

Select Flash Output to set the external flash power; your camera’s pop-up flash will fire a pre-flash to trigger the flashgun. Set your flashgun to Slave mode and ensure it’s set to the same channel as your DSLR; you’ll see this in the Built-in Flash Func menu settings.

The benefit of using off-camera flash is that you can easily move it to create different lighting effects without having to change your composition. This is especially useful when you’re working with animals, as (unless yours is particularly well trained) you can’t simply ask them to change their pose or angle their head in a particular way, as you can with people.

Photographing dogs poses similar challenges to photographing children. They have a short attention span, so it’s best to work in short bursts. You’ll get more engaging shots if they’re happy and relaxed, so don’t be too firm with your commands!

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Project 5

Shooting setup create a home studio You don’t need to spend a fortune to produce professional flash-lit portraits 01 line of sight

02 Backdrop

The flexibility that off-camera flash gives you is great; however, when you’re using your DSLR’s pop-up flash as an optical transmitter, you need to ensure that you have a clear line of sight between your camera and your flashgun.

Adding a coloured backdrop will give your pet portraits a fun contemporary look. We used a green child’s play mat, but any piece of material will do. You can easily change the colour and remove any creases in Photoshop – see the facing page.

03 Tripod

Flashguns come with a stand, and you can simply use this and place the flash on a table or similar, but for maximum flexibility attach the flashgun to a tripod or light stand so you can move it easily. Position the flash to one side of the setup as shown.

01

02 06

05 03

04

06 Xxxxx xxx xxxx xxxx

For the best results get an assistant to help guide your dog with commands and treats. This will ease the pressure off you, so you can concentrate on getting the shot. XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

04 Reflector

For even lighting, position a reflector opposite the flashgun to bounce some of the light back onto your subject and fill in shadows. If you don’t have a reflector, a large sheet of white card or paper, or even a white wall close to the subject, will do.

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05 Subject

Before you start shooting it’s a good idea to get your pet used to the setup, which will be unfamiliar, so that they’re relaxed. Have them sit and lie in one place, and stay there, so they get an idea of what’s expected of them.

06 assistant

Your portrait shoot will go a lot more smoothly if you enlist the help of an assistant. They can attract your pet’s attention and engage with them, leaving you free to move around and concentrate on getting your shots. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Flash-lit pet portraits

Posing tips treats and toys You can get your pet to pose by using a few tricks… Treats aren’t just useful for bribing your dog to respond to commands, they can also evoke some fantastic expressions. Your dog licking their lips is a great expression to capture, but you can hardly expect them to do this on command – we found that putting some peanut butter on my dog Bella’s favourite treat ensured we got plenty of lip-smacking shots. Toys are handy too – to get your dog looking in a particular direction just get your assistant to hold up their favourite toy or ball.

Step by step Create pet pop art! Produce pet portraits with a difference by changing the background colour in Photoshop

Clipping masks

01 Make a grid

02 Select the background

03 Tidy and adjust colour

04 Position on grid

Go to File>New and create a document with a height and width of 30cm. Take the Rectangle tool, and Shift-drag to create a square shape layer. Take the Move tool, Alt-drag the shape layer to make three copies, and position them as shown.

Ctrl-click the new layer’s thumbnail to load the outline of the backdrop as a selection. Go to Filter>Blur> Gaussian Blur and increase the Radius to blur creases in the backdrop. Add a Hue/Saturation adjustment layer, and adjust the Hue slider to change the colour. The Canon Magazine

Open four portraits, and select the first one. To select the background, go to Select>Colour Range, click in the backdrop and adjust the Fuzziness slider until the entire area is selected (it’ll turn white in the preview). Copy the selection, and paste it into a new layer.

Flatten the image, copy it and paste it into the grid document. Position and resize the layer, then move it above the corresponding square layer in the Layers panel and Alt-click the line between the two layers to create a clipping mask. Repeat for the other images.

In Step 4 we use clipping masks to display each portrait in its frame. When you create a clipping mask the content of the lower ‘base’ layer reveals the corresponding areas of the upper layer, and transparent areas of the base layer mask the upper layer – so in this case the blackfilled squares reveal the portraits, and the transparent parts of the layer hide the edges of the portraits.

Next month creating spirographs with light 61


Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_6

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Photoshop Elements

Before

After The Mission Add neon light trail effects to a portrait Time needed 20 minutes Skill level Intermediate Kit needed Photoshop Elements

Download project files to your computer from: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp108.zip

62

Get the party glowing

James Paterson shows you how to give your portraits a shot of energy by using layer styles and the Transform tools to create glowing neon-like lines

S

ome Photoshop ‘special effects’ tend to look a little generic, and not all that impressive, especially if, as with most filter effects, they’re simply slapped on top of an image. One way to make effects stand out from the crowd is to give them the appearance of depth and have them interact with the figures or

objects in your image, like these fantastic glowing lines. Curved lines aren’t the easiest of shapes to create, as Photoshop Elements lacks the Pen tool found in its bigger brother Photoshop CC, so to create smoothly curling, tapered lines we’ll need to use a combination of tools and filters. For simplicity, we’ll create our lines against a plain background,

and to make the lines glow we’ll use one of Elements’ layer styles. Once we have a couple of different lines we can add them to our portrait. We won’t need to make every line from scratch, as we can copy one line multiple times, and then use the Transform controls to skew each copy into a different shape that wraps around the dancing figure. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Neon Effects

step by step get creative with layer styles Create glowing lines, then duplicate and transform them to build up the neon effect

resizing the lines

01 Make a tapered line

02 Curl and copy

03 Add a glow

04 Copy and skew

05 Build it up

06 Wrap around the arm

Open the black starting image (or simply create a new plain black image). Select the Line tool, then go to the Tool Options and set the Colour to white, Width 10px, Arrow Head: At the End, W: 100%, L: 5000%. Drag a line from left to right, then go to Layer>Simplify Layer.

Use the Eraser tool to erase the half of the line you don’t need. Target the layer below and do the same. Target the top layer and press Ctrl+E to merge. Go to Layer>Layer Style>Style Settings. Check Glow, then Outer Glow. Pick a blue and set Size 13, Opacity 100.

Duplicate lines and transform them in different ways to build up the effect, making the lines wrap around the dancer’s arms and body. To make a glow more intense, duplicate the layer, then go to the Layers panel and set the blending mode to Linear Light. The Canon Magazine

Go to Filter>Distort>Polar Coordinates, set Rectangular to Polar and click OK. Press Ctrl+J, take the Move tool and check Show Bounding Box. Rightclick, select Flip Layer Vertical, then Flip Horizontal. Position the copy layer so the inflection points meet.

Make two more lines, then open the portrait. Use the Move tool to drag the lines on to the portrait. Position the first line. Press Ctrl+J to duplicate it. Rotate and resize the second line so it looks different. Drag the corner points while holding Ctrl to skew the shape.

To make lines appear as though they’re wrapping round the arms or body, select the Eraser tool and remove the parts of the lines that should be hidden. To vary the colours of the lines, press Ctrl+U to bring up Hue/Saturation, and adjust the Hue slider.

To create the impression of depth for a real 3D effect, make sure that you create some thicker lines that appear to be in the foreground of the scene, and thinner lines that are further back and behind the dancer – drag a corner handle on the Transform box to make a line longer and thicker, or shorter and thinner.

Quick Tip!

When the Move tool isn’t selected, you can bring up the Free Transform box and controls at any time by pressing Ctrl+T

Next month FaceBook cover images 63


Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_7

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photoshop cc

The Mission Use Photoshop’s Camera Raw plugin to convert images to black and white Time needed 10 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Photoshop CC

Download project files to your computer from: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp108.zip

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Master monochrome in Adobe Camera Raw James Paterson shows you how a novel workflow in Adobe Camera Raw gives you precise control over the look of your black-and-white images

S

tripping the colour from an image enables us to emphasise different aspects of the photo, such as the play of light, the contrast between light and dark objects, and different textures. In portraits it puts the expression front and centre, while in landscapes areas of light and shade take the eyes on a journey through the scene. Images that work best in mono tend to be ones that have strong contrast between the subject and

its surroundings, as with the castle against the bright sky here. But choosing whether to go for colour or mono usually involves some experimentation, and this is where the Camera Raw controls, and the near-identical tools in Lightroom’s Develop Module, come into their own. By utilizing presets we can set up different black-and-white ‘recipes’ that can be applied with a single click, making experimentation easier. Camera Raw’s mono controls are just as good as anything in the

main Photoshop editor, and with the workflow we’ll explain here you can make subtle changes to the look of your mono image by adjusting colour saturation and luminance, and white balance settings. Using colour controls to fine-tune a black-and-white image may sound odd, but it’s key to the best mono conversion methods: we use the colour information to control the brightness of the corresponding grayscale tones, and effective black and white is all about variations in tonality. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Camera Raw monochrome

Step by step Mono magic in minutes How to use Camera Raw’s colour controls to produce stunning mono conversions

Quick Tip!

For precise mono adjustments set the Targeted Adjustment tool to Grayscale Mix, and click and drag on tones to lighten or darken 01 remove the colour

Right-click the start image in Bridge and choose Open in Camera Raw. Click the HSL/Grayscale tab, then click the Saturation tab and drag all eight Saturation sliders left to -100: this removes all the colour, but the underlying colour information is still available to us.

02 Adjust selected tones

Click the Luminance tab, and use the sliders to lighten or darken tones in the image. You can also use the Targeted Adjustment tool – see the Quick Tip. Darken the sky, and lift the grayscale tones corresponding to the yellows and greens in the landscape.

Mono conversions with Silver Efex Pro

03 Play with white balance

04 add a grad effect

05 Dodge and burn

06 save a preset

Go to the Basic panel, and experiment with the Temperature and Tint sliders to see how they affect the tones. Next, play with Vibrance and Saturation, and use the other sliders to fine-tune global and local contrast – a boost in Clarity works wonders here.

Take the Adjustment Brush, click the ‘–’ button to the left of the Exposure slider, set a high Feather value and paint around the lower-left edge to darken it slightly. Press N to add a new mask, click the ‘+’ Exposure button, and paint to lighten the water and cliffs. The Canon Magazine

Select the Graduated Filter tool from the toolbar, click the ‘+’ symbol to the right of the Temperature slider, then drag down from the sky to darken it for an ND grad filter effect. Experiment with the Temperature and Tint sliders to change the look of the sky.

We can save our edits as a preset, then apply this to other images. Click the Zoom tool to return to the Basic panel, then click the Presets tab. Click the New Preset icon, name the preset and check the relevant boxes: White Balance, Saturation and HSL here.

Nik Silver Efex Pro enjoys an unrivalled reputation with black and white aficionados. Among the host of presets are replica film stocks, ready-made retro effects and splittoning treatments. You can also make selective adjustments with control points, and download presets created by other users. It works as a plugin for Photoshop (accessible via the Filter menu) or with both Lightroom and Elements. A 15-day free trial is available at www. google.com/nikcollection/ products/silver-efex-pro.

Next month surreal portrait effects 65


Before

After The Mission Learn Lightroom essentials, from fixing colours to enhancing tones, cropping and sharpening. Time needed 15 minutes Skill level Easy Kit needed Lightroom

Download project files to your computer from: http://downloads. photoplusmag.com/pp108.zip

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Master essential Lightroom edits Whatever you choose to shoot, there are certain Lightroom tools and options that will prove indispensable, as James Paterson explains

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ust like a camera that’s crammed with lots of features and settings, we like our image-editing software to come with a multitude of tools. But one of the biggest stumbling blocks for beginners, whether learning about new gear or new software, is figuring out which features are vital from the get-go, and which can be left to explore another day. As a case in point, take the Lightroom Import Dialog. After conducting research, Adobe found it to be a big stumbling block for beginners, so it recently released an update that simplified the

Import experience. The changes were met with outrage from seasoned users, who dubbed it ‘Lightroom for Dummies’ because many tools and settings they used daily had either been removed or hidden behind sub-menus. Such was the vitriol that – after a grovelling apology – Adobe promptly performed a U-turn and restored the old settings. The point is that pros and experienced users love Lightroom and all its intricacies for the way they integrate with their own particular workflow. But for beginners, all those tools and settings that seasoned users find

so useful can crowd out more basic and essential features. So here we’ll cover just the essentials: those indispensable Lightroom editing features you’ll need to use for practically every image. The bulk of image editing in Lightroom is done in the Develop Module, so we’ll focus on that here. We’ll guide you through the process of importing an image, fixing white balance, applying essential tonal tweaks, cropping, sharpening and exporting. This is a workflow that, regardless of the image content, you’ll find is the backbone of most Lightroom image-editing tasks. www.digitalcameraworld.com


ideo view the v

Video also online http://bit.ly/pp_108_8

Lightroom essentials lightroom

Step by step Essential Develop Module edits Master the essential Lightroom workflow that will benefit almost every image

Quick Tip!

01 Download and import

Go to the Library Module and click Import. Navigate to your image or images. If they’re already copied to your hard drive set File Handling to Add, but if they’re on a memory card you may want to set File Handling to Copy, and choose a destination folder. Hit Import.

02 Fix the white balance

For a before/after view of a slider’s effect, alternate between a single and double click on the slider without moving the cursor

Choose the image you want to edit, then click the Develop Module. Go to the Basic panel and start by fixing the colours. Click the Eyedropper tool that’s beside the Temperature slider and click on an area that should be neutral, like the grey bit of the wall here.

The Catalog

03 Set white and black points

04 Non-destructive cropping

05 Sharpen the details

06 Presets and export

Work down the sliders to adjust the exposure and contrast, then set the white and black points: hold Shift and double-click on Whites and Blacks to do this automatically. To boost colours either use Saturation, or increase Vibrance to target just the paler colours.

To sharpen an image, go to the Detail panel (for a tidier interface, right-click any panel name and enable Solo Mode – all the other panels will auto-collapse). Amount controls the strength of the sharpening, and Radius the width of the edges that are sharpened. The Canon Magazine

Take the Crop tool from the toolbar. A menu will appear below the toolbar where you can choose an aspect ratio for the crop. As with all Lightroom edits the crop isn’t set in stone, so you can go back and tweak the crop at any time by selecting the Crop tool.

Presets enable you to save settings you’ve applied to one image for use on others. Open the Preset panel, and click the ‘+’ icon to add a preset. Finally, to save a new version of an image, go to File>Export, choose a destination and file format, then hit Export.

When you import an image into Lightroom its location on your hard drive is logged in the catalog, which is why Lightroom struggles to find images if you move them around your drive or rename them later. And remember that when you adjust an image you’re not altering its pixels – you’re simply changing the way Lightroom displays the image, with your edits stored as additional data in the Lightroom catalog. Beginners may be confused into thinking the catalog is an image library, but it’s not (the file size is usually not more than a gigabyte); it’s simply a log of where images are, and what has been altered.

Next month presets and virtual copies 67


TheCanonconversation

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


Andy rouse

ANDY ROUSE

Andy Rouse is one of the biggest names in wildlife photography, he speaks to Andrew James on his love of wildlife and shooting with his Canon kit, his favourite nature subjects and locations, and being a dad at 50 years old…

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ndy Rouse is an Essex-boy made good. Although a relative late starter, not turning professional until his early 30s, he made up for lost time by quickly establishing himself as one of the world’s best wildlife photographers. Now 50 and recently becoming a father for the first time, he’s showing absolutely no appetite for slowing down and settling for slippers and a pipe! Although Andy has switched very publicly from Canon to Nikon and then back again to Canon, he’s now a Canon Explorer and loves nothing better than putting his EOS-1D X through its paces in some of the harshest environments on the planet. Photographer, author, showman and businessman, Andy’s ability to create a brand around his natural talent for wildlife photography is certainly one of the keys to his enduring success. But above all else he regards himself as an unashamed animal hugger and admits that, even if he didn’t have a camera to shoot with, he’d still go and watch animals in the wild. We asked him to look 01 P  ENGUIN PATROL

Fresh from the surf on a beautiful sunny day in the Falkland Islands, a gentoo penguin marches comically across the wet sand. Andy lies in wait with his EOS 7D Mk II, snapping focus on the bird’s head

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS USM

Exposure

1/350 sec, f/4, ISO800

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amazed I am still doing stuff and trying new things with my photography. So you didn’t start in photography with a game plan, then? Absolutely not. I just knew that corporate life wasn’t for me, as I was probably too disruptive for it! But I was lucky that I was trained in business and was motivated to be a good businessman. I really didn’t know I would succeed but thought that I could probably build a different career in IT if it all went wrong. I was divorced at the time so it didn’t matter if it didn’t work out because I had nobody else depending on me. You have a more cavalier attitude when you are young!

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back on the last two decades and assess where he is in his life and career… You’re the UK’s highest profile wildlife photographer, would the young Rouse just starting out have predicted this?

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No, I thought it was going to be a complete disaster and I’d have to go back to strawberry picking! The current ‘older’ Rouse is constantly amazed that he has managed to reinvent himself, when many of the others working when he started out have just disappeared. To be honest, I’m

Looking back on your career, what would you have done differently? I probably wouldn’t have burned so many bridges so early in my career. The way I was trained in IT was to be confident and dominant and just to go for it, no matter what. Unfortunately wildlife clients don’t always appreciate this approach. I’m not the kind of guy who is prepared to suck up to someone just to get images published. I know I’d be more published in certain international wildlife www.digitalcameraworld.com


02 SPARRING CUBS

A quiet and misty morning on assignment in Ranthambore National Park in India is brought to life when these two 11-monthold bengal tigers start play fighting

Lens

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1/500 sec, f/5.6, ISO800

03 BIG EARS

An inquisitive hare pops his head up above the grass as Andy lies as low as possible, while balancing his long lens on his leg

Lens

Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS USM + Extender EF 1.4x

Exposure

1/100 sec, f/5.6, ISO800

04 BACKLIT LEMUR

A ring-tailed lemur is beautifully backlit in the jungles of Madagascar as Andy dials in -3 stops of exposure compensation

Lens

Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM

Exposure

1/100 sec, f/2.8, ISO400

magazines if I hadn’t told them I didn’t want to travel so much or I’d sucked up to them more. I think it has held me back only in terms of credibility. You’ve attracted some personal criticism over the years. Why? I think it’s because some people have regarded me as arrogant and very direct. But I don’t think this is really true. I’m just a bloke from London who takes good pictures. It’s interesting because more recently I have been less afraid to say that I take good pictures because, in the past, I’d get slated on various forums because people think they can say what they like to me or about me! But I don’t see why I should accept rudeness, criticism or stories made up about me just because I am a good photographer. I get sick of all that. I am always willing to help people who ask in a decent and nice way. If I don’t get that, then they don’t get anything back. Where did the initial interest in wildlife come from? It chose me. I tried tennis first, getting a press pass for a couple of tournaments, and then I also photographed The Style Council at the Albert Hall. But it was an encounter with some urban foxes in Basildon that inspired me. I took lots of shots, learned fieldcraft and really loved it! I started to photograph badgers, too, and realized that I was good at it. For me, shooting wildlife felt very natural. By the age of 20 I’d won an award with the Wildlife Photographer of the Year The Canon Magazine

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competition for a picture of one of those urban foxes with a gnome! Photography is changing – have you changed with it? My style probably hasn’t changed much. A shot must have a purpose; it must be special light or behaviour, otherwise I’ll delete it. In fact I am now more aggressive with my editing and that’s a recognition that my peers are shooting some fantastic work. My ethics in processing haven’t changed either. It’s about being honest, so it’s yes to retouching but no to altering the elements of the photo. But if I’d been a pro in the ’70s I’d have retired by now because selling stock images made a lot of money back then. In the ’90s it became difficult to maintain a living just from stock so I’ve had to diversify. Although

I still feel that I have to make a good proportion of my living by selling images of wildlife to call myself a professional. You are a Canon Explorer, how did that come about and does it bring any responsibility with the role? Quite simply I was asked when I changed back to Canon from Nikon. In terms of

I am willing to help people who ask in a decent way. If I don’t get that, then they don’t get anything back 71


TheCanonconversation

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responsibility, you have to be careful what you say. For example, if I had something negative to say about a Canon camera – not that I do – I would say it directly to Canon and not publicly. I think it’s also essential to be ethical in what you do and behave in the right way, and then there is the responsibility of still being great at what you do. They don’t have people who aren’t generating great images as Explorers. That certainly adds a bit of pressure. What gear are you using now? I have a Canon EOS-1D X with the Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM, new EF 100-400mm f/4-5.6L IS II USM or EF 500mm f/4 IS II USM. I’m currently

I am an animal hugger. It’s that simple. If I wasn’t a photographer I’d still go and watch animals 72

shooting less wide-angle stuff, but this is just down to opportunity rather than specific intent. I use the 1D X because I can shoot into the animal’s activity period of dawn and dusk. That’s when I am generally stalking and not on a tripod, so I need to shoot high ISO for the shutter speed and the 1D X provides the best high ISO performance you can get. I can shoot up to ISO3200 without giving it a second thought. Of course, the 1D X also takes everything that I throw at it and survives. I also beta-tested the Canon EOS 7D II. I saw the potential in it as a lighter setup for wildlife. For example, when I am climbing mountains, as I’m not as young as I used to be! When you are crawling on all fours to get a shot you don’t always want a big, heavy camera slowing you down. I see the 7D II as a sort of shrunken 1D X. Its ISO performance is very good. I recently shot a lot in Africa with it at ISO 1600. I don’t actually like images without any noise in them. To me it gives structure and atmosphere. If a young Andy Rouse had walked up to a seasoned pro and plucked up courage to ask advice, what

would’ve been your first question? Why do you do it? Why are you a pro? I would have been interested in their motivation. It’s a very lonely profession, and you have to self-motivate and be able to keep yourself positive and confident. If they’d answered ‘because I love animals, Andy’ that’s also what I would have wanted to hear. If they’d just said it was because they wanted to make money, that’s not what I’d have wanted to hear. Of course, we all need to make money, but I do it because I like to spend time with animals. So why do you do it? I am an animal hugger. It’s that simple. I’m not a photographer first. I am an animal lover first. If I wasn’t a photographer I’d still go and watch animals. It’s the difference between being purely commercial and doing wildlife photography because it’s a calling. You have a reputation for being uncompromising and unrelenting in pursuit of a shot, is that fair? No it’s not. That implies I’ll do anything to get a shot, which I won’t. I’ll only get the www.digitalcameraworld.com


Andy rouse 05 GLORIOUS MUD

A young elephant enjoys sliding around on the muddy ground as a sudden late afternoon storm drenches a patch of the Masai Mara in Kenya

Lens

Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/4, 1SO1600

06 PANDA EYES

A adult giant panda scales a tree in China’s Chengdu Giant Panda Research Base

Lens

Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/8, ISO800

Story BEHIND THE SHOT

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shot if I think it’s okay for the animal. I wouldn’t go to any length to get a photograph. On the other hand I am determined, skilful and resilient. If I have a picture in my mind, I’ll do a lot to try and get it. If I don’t succeed I will beat myself up about it! If I am honest, I’m hopeless at a totally planned shot anyway, but in my element when I have to make decisions in a nanosecond as things unfold. It’s often like this on safari shoots. I like this urgency and spontaneity; the sense that if you miss it it’s gone and it won’t happen again is what really drives me. If I see something and have just ten seconds to get it I come alive. Does photographing wildlife still put fire in the belly? Totally, as does getting pictures published. Today I saw some recently taken elephant shots of mine published in the Daily Mail. That always makes me happy because lots of people will see the images and perhaps change their opinion of elephants. I might influence one person who makes a difference to the future of elephants or another species. That thought puts fire in my belly. The Canon Magazine

Much of your award-winning work is based on overseas species from Africa and both polar regions. Where is your absolute favourite place to be with a camera? Rwanda and Svalbard in the Arctic. For me it’s all about wilderness and the individual species that appeals. When you encounter a polar bear on ice there is nothing like it. You are seeing this living creature in a wilderness where you can’t even comprehend surviving yourself. It’s simply amazing. The gorilla is so close to us as a species. When you look at a gorilla you can see 90 per cent of our DNA looking back at you. I love being close to them; the smell of them; and simply watching their behaviour. Gorillas are a real challenge to photograph too, whereas polar bears are relatively easy. There is a time pressure as you only have one hour with them and often the light can be dull. You have to get your technique and composition spot on. You also have to constantly think about the gorilla’s welfare. Am I staring too much at the silverback? Am I too close to this baby? Of course, I generally have clients with me too and I have to help them as well,

Rival Kings Andy Rouse explains what he likes the best about his most famous shot “My Rival Kings image is of two penguins in the Falkland Islands slapping each other. It’s won awards and sold a lot of prints. If I’m honest, I barely look at it, but when I do it makes me smile and brings back the memory of the day. Right now I am sitting looking at a polar bear shot that I took on a fisheye lens so the ice field beyond is curved. I can remember the whole scenario – who I was with, what was being said, and the emotion of the moment. I don’t look at old images and think that I should have shot them differently as I trust in my ability at the time. Instead, they bring back the memories associated with the trip and who I was with. I hate being alone. I like being social and sharing all these experiences with other people.”

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07 Running owl

Looking permanently grumpy, a little owl marches across the ground in search of worms to eat. Photographed during a project to capture the life cycle of the little owl for a book

Lens

Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS USM

Exposure

1/2000 sec, f/4, ISO800

08 BOXING DAY

After scrambling up the snowy hillside in the Cairngorms, a pair of mountain hares decided to have a territorial dispute right in front of Andy’s position. With light levels low, he needed to keep the shutter speed high to avoid a frenzied blur!

Lens

Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x

Exposure

1/500 sec, f/4, ISO3200

09 Red stag

A red stag bellows in the evening light in South Wales. This image was taken while Andy was beta-testing the 7D Mk II

Lens

Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM

Exposure

1/250 sec, f/5.6, ISO800

It is very tough for photographers to make a decent living and you have to realize you can’t do it all one way as it’s my job to make sure they make the most of the experience. You recently became a dad at 50! Has that changed your perspective on life and career at all? Well it’s not going to stop me travelling as I have to be where I have to be. But I am travelling less. There has to be some compromise. Already it’s replacing this feeling I have that I should be shooting every day. Being here all summer since Sabrina was born and doing almost no photography has been okay because, when I do get out, I am very, very keen. What do you regard as success? Profit? Winning competitions? Helping others achieve lifelong photographic goals? It’s mainly about how I feel and how positive I feel in life. If I feel good and motivated that means I am successful. I have a good balance in my life. Success means that I can combine two worlds of family and friends and still being a

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practicing wildlife photographer. It’s important to remain current. Commercial success comes and goes. You can’t plan that, just roll with it! What’s the most difficult aspect of being a wildlife photographer and what’s the best bit? The toughest thing is the conflict inside of me about being away or being at home living a normal life. That’ll never change. The best bit is that I do what I love and I am good at it. You’ve developed a love of aviation photography. Where’s this come from and what’s the plan? It comes from being a kid and going to every air show in the UK with my parents. I also tried to join the RAF to become a pilot. I’ve always loved aviation stuff but life became to busy to pursue it. But with

the birth of my daughter I decided to start it up because, with aviation photography I can go away for just a day, get some great images and then go home. I have to say I’ve met some lovely people doing it and the top pros are really great. I think it’s a different string to my bow and helps me to resolve part of the homeversus-work conflict inside of me. I’ve no grand plan with it. I am at the bottom of the pile and I am looking up at these seasoned pros. I am going to see how it all develops. My style is a bit different as I come from a wildlife background but there is no doubt that I am good at it. It’s very much like the wildlife in that it’s very quick and reactive and you have to be fast and good at composition. My image processing has had to improve, however, as aviation images are very uncompromising. I regard it as a new challenge and a way to keep myself fresh. www.digitalcameraworld.com


Andy rouse

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Profile

Andy Rouse Wildlife photographer

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What’s the most bizarre place you’ve seen one of your images displayed and what was your reaction to it? I saw one of my gorilla shots at the airport in Rwanda. It was in the business lounge and I managed to muscle my way in to look at it. It was about 30ft across, over the whole wall! And after convincing the staff there that I had taken the picture by showing them it on my phone, I had my picture taken with me standing next to it. Apart from that, I don’t see many of my images being used at all. I only know it has been sold three months afterwards. You shoot images, do theatre shows, run trips across the world, have created your own online photography community – why do you do so many different things? It keeps me interested and motivated. The Canon Magazine

Also, for commercial reasons it’s not good to put all your eggs in one basket. These days it is very tough for photographers to make a decent living and you have to realize that you can’t do it all one way. It’s a matter of being practical about these things. A lot of people say it must put a lot of pressure on me but I run all these different facets of my business with friends. All the people I work with have to be friends so I can trust them. What’s next in the pipeline? I don’t honestly know. I’ll be busy doing overseas tours next year and I want to keep growing the online photograph community FotoBuzz because it’s a great place for keen photographers to learn and share their hobby with others like them. But I’m not a great planner these days. On the photography side of things I am just taking things as they come…

Andy’s public profile was enhanced early in his career when, in 2000, he fronted a TV show – Wildlife Photographer – for Channel 5 on his exploits in the field. Since then he has gone onto establish himself as a prolific and talented photographer, with his images published all over the world. He is now based in Cardiff but travels to many of the world’s most distant places in search of amazing animal encounters, often leading groups of enthusiast wildlife photographers to places such as the Arctic, the Falkland Islands, South Georgia, Madagascar, Kenya and Rwanda. He has published 15 books, covering species, ecosystems and photographic technique, and won many awards over the years in the prestigious BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year Competition, including the Gerald Durrell Award for Endangered Species. With over 72,000 followers on Facebook, he also flies the flag for wildlife conservation. His books on tigers and gorillas have help raise over £10,000 to further the conservation of these two iconic but endangered species.

Next issue: Polar photographer and environmentalist Sebastian Copeland

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PHOTOSTORIES Photo essays from PhotoPlus readers and up-and-coming pro photographers

Get £50 for every photo story we publish!

Join in the fun! One of the great things about photography is being able to share your view of the world. This issue, a reader heads to the picturesque ruins of Dorset’s Corfe Castle for a sunset shoot, another gets a bird’s eye view of seabirds by shooting from high up on the cliffs, while another sets his alarm clock to get up close and personal with butterflies and dragonflies before they’ve had a chance to wake up properly…

PROJECT INFO

Evening in ruins

We want your photos and stories! We’ll pay you £50 for every project we publish. Please send them to… Email photoplus@futurenet.com Online www.facebook.com/photoplusmag www.twitter.com/photoplusmag Post PhotoPlus: The Canon Mag Future The Ambury Bath BA1 1UA UK

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The location is stunning… now all that’s needed is perfect timing, weather and position of the setting sun

Name: Glenn Cresser AGE: 42 Location: Corfe Castle, Dorset Mission: To capture great landscapes at sunset with beautiful and dramatic skies Kit: Canon EOS 7D Mark II, Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM, Lee Filters soft grad set, Manfrotto 055 tripod, remote release, soft kneeling pad www.cresserphotography.co.uk

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have always loved landscapes, especially in the golden hour. Since getting back into photography 15 months ago (after an 18-year break) I have concentrated on this genre within the digital age. My job takes me around the country, so the opportunity to shoot new areas is always just around the corner! Although it’s sometimes a case of being in the right place at the right time, there is a certain amount of planning involved.

I had previously visited this location and, after climbing the very steep hill (and realizing just how unfit I really am), I could see the potential for some great images. Unfortunately, on that visit the light wasn’t great and the sun was setting too far over to the right. On checking the position and times of the sunset and the weather for when I was next in the area, I decided to return in the hope of capturing some decent shots. I packed light so that www.digitalcameraworld.com


YOUR PHOTO STORIES

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Although it’s a case of being in the right place at the right time, there is a certain amount of planning involved I could cope with the climb and quickly found a suitable viewpoint around the side of the hill. Just as I got in position and set up my tripod, which was a little tricky on the side of a steep hill, I noticed the golden evening sun illuminating the village to my left. I was coming from behind the castle, so in order to capture the whole scene in detail I decided to shoot for a panoramic composite. As the evening went on, the sky, light and clouds were forever changing, so I decided to bracket some shots by two stops each way to create some HDR images. After composing The Canon Magazine

and focusing using Live View I fired off the shots in quick succession, using a remote release and Continuous drive. The last shot of the evening was another panorama, this time made up of seven shots zoomed in to concentrate on the village, castle and sky only, just as the sun went down behind the distant hill. Despite standing in the same spot for nearly an hour and a half, I was really pleased with the variation of the final results. Processing was kept to a minimum, with the usual vibrance, levels and curves adjustments, together with a few other minor tweaks.

01 Golden Village

A six-shot panoramic to include the village and castle

Lens

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM

Exposure

0.8 sec, f/16, ISO100

02 Corfe Castle

As the golden light and clouds combined to produce such an interesting sky, it was time for another panorama

Lens

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM

Exposure

1.6 secs, f/14, ISO100

03 Last of the sun

The clouds and sun were moving fast, so I shot with HDR in mind

Lens

Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM

Exposure

1/4 – 4 secs, f/14, ISO100

feedback

of planning is I n order to capture a landscape at its best, a lot urable. A number favo required to find out when the conditions will be s (http:// meri Ephe of apps can help, such as The Photographer’s g). photoephemeris.com) and SunCalc (www.suncalc.or , and may well be The light can change so quickly in the golden hour d you, so keep looking dramatically lighting the landscape and sky behin variety of shots. around to see what else you can capture for a

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Your Photo stories

PROJECT INFO 01

Gannets at Bempton Capturing wild birds requires patience and practice Name: Ronnie Webber AGE: 64 Location: East Yorkshire Mission: To capture striking images of wild birds in flight, in their natural environment and displaying typical behaviour Kit: Canon EOS 7D, Canon EF 70300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM, Giottos MTL 9351B tripod with ball head

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here are several occasions, when photographing birds, that I know I could have benefited from using a longer focal length. But not on a short visit to Bridlington, towards the end of the summer holidays. I took the family to Bempton Cliffs to see the wild seabirds. I knew that it was rather late for puffins, but went to see what

birds were there at the time. I was fortunate to find the gannets in residence. As we approached the viewing area I could see the gannets soaring up over the tops of the cliffs. They were very close and, with their two-metre wingspan, filled my viewfinder diagonally. One consequence of this was that I had very little time to react. I have one of my Custom settings set up with good defaults for wildlife, so I had this option selected. It includes using the central AF zone for focusing with AI Focus and 01 G  annet gliding

A gannet glides gracefully beneath the cliffs

Lens

Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM

Exposure

1/1000 sec, f/5.6, ISO160

02 G  reeting ritual

A classic shot of the gannets crossing their beaks as part of the greeting ritual

The Canon Magazine

Lens

Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM

Exposure

1/1000 sec, f/6.3, ISO400

the slow burst rate set. My default shutter speed is 1/1000 sec. I also have back-button focusing set. I grabbed a number of shots before moving on to gannets gliding and flying lower down the cliffs. I finished up with shots of birds nesting on cliff ledges. I was fortunate to capture a burst of a gannet returning to its nest, followed by the beak-crossing greeting ritual of the species.

feedback

 aving your favourite settings H saved to a Custom mode will increase your chances of bagging a successful shot if you have a small window of opportunity.

Make sure you have plenty of spare memory cards; firing off lots of shots in burst mode will eat up memory very quickly.

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PhotoStories 01

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PROJECT INFO

Early-morning macro

A summer project on capturing insects at the break of dawn, in super-close up detail to show their intricate details

Name: Oliver Wright AGE: 43 Location: Near Leeds, Yorkshire Mission: To capture the insects at first light, whilst they’re still dormant and covered in dew Kit: Canon EOS 5DS, Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM, Kenko extension tubes, tripod, remote release www.oliverwright photography.com

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hen I first started to shoot macro I used to go out during the day and sometimes got frustrated when the insects just wouldn’t stay still. It wasn’t until later on my photographic journey that I realized that early morning, before the sun’s up, is the best time to photograph insects. There are three reasons for this. First, your subject is much less likely to move while it’s still cold. Second, insects are more likely to be covered

in dew, which can make for some very interesting subjects. Third, the light can be beautiful and soft as the sun begins to rise. I purchased a Canon EOS 5DS this summer and wanted to use it for a project, so I decided to do a whole series on early-morning macro. There are a couple of sites that are very close to home and have good populations of butterflies and dragonflies, so I combined the morning dog walk with a macro photo shoot. It helps that I know these sites well as one of the

difficulties of early-morning macro is finding your subjects before it gets too light and warm. I also find that different sites are better at different times in the year as populations go up and down. All these images have been focus-stacked – composites made from multiple photographs where I have changed the focus point slightly. The camera was fixed to a tripod and I manually set the focus to the frontmost point that I want to be in focus, took a shot, then moved the focus point slightly www.digitalcameraworld.com


Your Photo stories

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03 01  Bluebottle

A bluebottle covered in dew, made up of 16 stacked images

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/30 sec, f/4, ISO800

02 Damselfly perched

Six images stacked of a damselfly perched on a leaf

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/10 sec, f/9, ISO800

03 Common Darter

A common darter dragonfly covered in dew, 21 stacked images

Lens

backwards, took another shot, and repeated this process until I had a number of images covering everything I needed to be in focus. Why do I bother stacking the images? I wanted to use natural light for this series and, therefore, to get shutter speeds fast enough I was having to use wide apertures, which meant that I wasn’t getting much depth of field. The other bonus of using the wide aperture is all of that

grass background becomes a lovely creamy blur. The difficult part is movement, whether it’s the wind or the insect starting to awaken, so it’s best to do this on days with no wind and to move quickly. Taking the images in the field is only the start; the photos have to processed. Luckily, stacking is fairly easy in the newer versions of Photoshop, and can also been done in dedicated focusstacking software packages.

One of the difficulties of earlymorning macro is finding your subjects before it gets too light and warm The Canon Magazine

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/60 sec, f/5.6, ISO800

04 Marbled White Butterfly

A marbled white butterfly, comprising 14 stacked images

Lens

Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM

Exposure

1/50 sec, f/4.5, ISO400

feedback set period of time, I t’s a good idea to set yourself a project over a focus on like Oliver did. It gives you the opportunity to really r understanding of the something quite specific in order to gain a bette a great way to subject. With lots of practice and persistence, it’s improve your shooting technique. of field can be reduced When shooting extreme macro close ups, depth wide apertures. using when to a fraction of a millimetre, especially pest parts of each shar the g Focus stacking gets around this by takin . ware soft in shot and automatically combining them 81


FocusPoint

We’d love to hear your thoughts on the new-look mag and all things photographic! Email us at photoplus@futurenet.com Shot of The Month

Slater Bridge, Lake District I recently went on a photographic course in the Lake District and, after the professional who was leading the course had shown us some shots taken at this location on his laptop, I was so impressed that I thought I would find out where it was, at my first opportunity, and spend maybe a few days in the area taking some shots. This is one of my shots I was quite pleased with. It was taken on my Canon EOS 700D using my EF-S 18-55mm IS STM lens at 18mm, f/22, 0.3 sec, and ISO100. To save any other readers who fancy shooting the scene the trouble of finding it, the location is Slater Bridge, Little Langdale Valley in the Lake District.

Over the moon

Back issues

This autumn provided several opportunities to take pictures of the moon, which I have been hankering to do for many years. This is the result I achieved, taking the picture from my back garden, using my Canon EOS 40D with a 30-year-old Sigma 600mm fixed f/8 mirror lens that has an Olympus OM fit, so I use a cheap (£23) adapter ring. It is amazing how fast the moon moves, so after a lot of trial and error in Manual mode I shot at 1/125 sec and ISO100 to get a relatively sharp shot – tripod, wireless remote and mirror lockup included. I focused on the edge to get the craters as sharp as conditions allowed, and slightly tweaked it in Lightroom for colour and sharpness, and cropped to enlarge further. It makes a great wallpaper on my laptop! Andy Mason, Bristol

I am trying to find the September 2015 issue of PhotoPlus: The Canon Magazine, with your free Video Disc, in South Africa, but the stockists are advising that all back copies have now been returned. Please advise if we can still purchase it online in print, or via digital download? Anne Louw, Cape Town You can buy a selection of recent past print magazines – we stock the last six months or so – from: http://bit.ly/ppprint. Alternatively, you can buy a digital edition of all our issues since we started creating them around five years ago! The Apple iOS versions have pop-out video, while the Android (and PC) versions link to videos on the web, and both will give you access to the project files. Details at http://bit.ly/ppdigi

George Wood, Stockport

Every month we invite you to send in your best images, along with around 100 words on the ‘story’ behind each shot (include Canon DSLR and lens used, plus exposure settings). Email photoplus@futurenet.com with Shot of the Month in the subject header. Good luck!

WIN A TRAINING DVD!

Each issue, the photographer behind our Shot of the Month wins an Experience Seminars EOS training DVD. More details on EOS Training Academy and their workshops, training downloads and DVDs at www.eostrainingacademy.co.uk

The moon on a memory stick – photographed with a 30-year-old Olympus-fit lens…

write to us by emailing photoplus@futurenet.com using the subject Focus Point, or write to us at Photo Plus: The Canon Magazine, Contact us at... YouFuturecanPublishing, The Ambury, Bath, BA1 1UA UK. We reserve the right to edit your letters and queries for clarity or brevity.

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


your views

The Social Network The most-popular stories found on the web this month

1200mm monster lens!

Monster spotted by banks of the Hudson. Canon 1200mm… All yours for $180,000 — at B&H Photo Video Pro Audio, NYC. www.facebook.com/PhotoPlusMag

Portrait comes together Recently I have become more and more interested in making composites in Photoshop. In the Photoshop Elements project in the October issue (PhotoPlus #105), James Paterson worked through an exercise to create a surreal portrait by blending graphic effects. I couldn’t resist having a go and here is the result (pictured above).

I have been a subscriber to PhotoPlus for about three years and have seen the magazine evolve to where it is today, which is a very informative and educational publication. Keep it up! Garry Hodgson, Birkenhead It’s always gratifying to see that our projects have inspired you to give something new a go. Well done on your handy Photoshop work, Garry!

If you’ve been inspired our projects then please share your work with us!

Join our PhotoClub! See page 28

The month in numbers

1/200 80 10 167.80 63 1.4 sec – flash sync speed of most Canon DSLRs

fps high-speed burst rate on 7D Mk II

great gift ideas for Christmas in our big gear guide (page 109)

million EOS cameras produced to date

Food & props bill (in £s) for our Apprentice shoot

The widest aperture on Canon new’s EF 35mm f/1.4L II lens (page 118)

Follow us on... The Canon Magazine

7 daily exercises…

...that will make you a better photographer. The saying ‘practice makes perfect’ is as valid for photography as any other activity, so in their latest guest blog post the photo management experts at Photoventure put together a collection of exercises that will help you become a better photographer. http://bit.ly/7_daily

Online poll: What do want for Christmas?

5%

new photo editing

32%

new canon eos dslr

8%

new laptop

1%

new tablet

3%

new printer Facebook www.facebook.com/PhotoPlusMag

51%

new lens

In our next poll, tell us which Canon EOS 5D you’d prefer at http:bit.ly/poll109

Twitter www.twitter.com/PhotoPlusMag

Become a star photographer

Learn the best camera settings for astrophotography. Our series of pre-shot checklists comes to a close with a look at the best camera settings for astrophotography. http://bit.ly/astro_photos

Digital camera world www.digitalcameraworld.com

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TheKit Canon conversation My Professional photographers reveal their top six tools of the trade they couldn’t shoot without

I wore a pedometer at Le Mans and walked over 100 miles in seven days

What do I do?

Drew Gibson

Motorsports photographer Drew explains why he favours the quality of primes over the flexibility of zooms, and the importance of a decent pair of sneakers…

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he majority of my work is at race circuits, but I also shoot for motoring magazines and car manufacturers. I travel a great deal, and have to carry equipment around the circuits. I envy studio photographers with shelves full of lenses, but that’s not an option when one’s office is trackside in far-flung corners of the globe. I only carry prime lenses, as I like the quality and they complement my style of shooting. Typically at races I take Canon 14mm f/2.8,

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24mm f/1.4, 50mm f/1.2, 85mm f/1.2, 200mm f/1.8, and 600mm f/4 lenses, plus two Canon 1Ds Mk IIIs, a flashgun, cable release, monopod, reflector and polarising filters. I also always wear earplugs, so my hearing has some chance of making it past my 40s. I also bring fireproof overalls for shooting in the pits, and a tripod to night races for shooting long exposures and light trails. Road car photography requires a bit more gear. In addition to my race equipment I take a Canon 17-40mm f/4

lens and various suckers and mounts to clamp cameras to cars. I may also take my Elinchrom studio lights and a bucket and sponge, as you never know how dirty the cars are going to get with the unpredictable British weather. I never head to a shoot without comfy trainers – this year at Le Mans I wore a pedometer and walked over 100 miles in seven days. My iPod is never far away for when the chaos in the press room gets too much, or I get the seat next to a crying baby on a 14-hour flight.

Drew Gibson www.drew-gibson.co.uk I’ve been shooting motorsports since 2001. After working for a London-based motorsports agency, I went freelance in 2012 and now work for number of race teams, manufacturers and publications shooting sports cars, Formula One, rally – and many other race series. I also photograph road cars for manufacturers and magazines. I shoot in a creative way, aiming to appeal just as much to people who don’t know about the motoring industry as those that do.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


canon Pros & their Kit IN Drew’s BAG

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Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM

Manfrotto monopod

Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Domke pouches

Apple Macbook Pro

Canon EF 200mm f/1.8L USM

Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: £8895/$11,499

A pretty standard piece of equipment in any professional sports photographer’s kit bag, it’s essential, especially at the modern safer tracks, where the run-off areas are huge and photographers end up a long way from the action. My 600mm is wrapped in tape to offer a some additional protection; despite its high value it often gets unceremoniously dumped on the floor between lens changes.

The Canon Magazine

Web: www.manfrotto.co.uk

This was the first monopod I bought, it has taken plenty of abuse but is still up to the job, I use it with my 600mm lens. It’s a Manfrotto, but I can’t tell you what model as the writing rubbed off a long time ago! Due to the twisting motion of panning with cars, I wore through the original foot long ago, and it now has a walking stick rubber on the bottom, which has lasted longer than the original…

Web: www.canon.co.uk Price: £995/$1399

If I could only take one lens to a race, the 50mm would be it. It’s great for shooting in the garage, where I’m often working in low light, and the f/1.2 aperture helps throw background distractions out of focus. It’s also perfect for capturing the whole scene, and not just the cars on track.

Web: www.domkebags.co.uk

I use these to carry my shorter lenses, as well as spare memory cards, filters, and a couple of chamois cloths in case of unexpected rain. When working trackside and in the team garages, it is important to be able to move quickly, react to one’s surroundings and have the ability to change lenses in a jiffy. It would be difficult to do this with a traditional camera bag.

Web: www.apple.com Price: £1599/$1999

I process all my images myself, and having the ability to deliver the highestquality pictures from an event within the timescale that my clients demand is an important part of my job. My 15-inch Macbook Pro is vital for this, as well as for planning flights, hotels, visas, and accreditation for upcoming races while away working.

Web: www.canon.co.uk

This is my oldest serving lens, I bought it in 2007, it’s so sharp, great for on-track and portraiture. It fell out of a locker a few years ago and the parts were no longer available to fix it as it’s discontinued, so I bought a broken lens to take the parts from and keep this one going. It also has a homemade lens hood pin, as the supplied one kept on breaking.

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Canon HDbooks Competition

See your photos in HD with a Canon hdbook Win one of ten 24-page A4 Canon hdbooks! Plus 20% discount for all UK readers

WIN! O

ne of ten Canon HDBooks, each worth

£60

D

igital photos can be shared in seconds, but there’s nothing like getting your hands on a highquality photo book to display your best shots in their full glory. A professional photo book is a great way to showcase your own photography skills and promote your business to potential clients. Or it can take pride of place on your bookshelf to show off special memories. Whether you’re an amateur, enthusiast or professional photographer, the quality of those printed images is just as important as the shots themselves. With Canon’s hdbooks your photos are really brought to life and given the quality they deserve. They’re professionally printed and bound on a state-of-the-art Canon DreamLabo 5000 printer with a combination of Canon inks, specially coated photo papers and a range of customizable options and sizes. Photos are beautifully detailed, with natural skin The Canon Magazine

tones and true-to-life colour reproduction. Colour photos will appear so vivid they jump right off the page, while black-andwhite images will have smooth gradation for a classy look. There are also lots of personalization options, including bespoke front cover and photo captions, so you can truly make it your own. With hdbooks your photos will last for 300 years, so you can be confident that your personal photo book can be enjoyed by generations to come. We’ve teamed up with Canon to offer a 20% discount off your next hdbook from www.canon.co.uk/hdbook, use discount code: CANONHDBOOK20 Plus, enter our great giveaway to win one of ten hdbooks, details on the right…

HOW TO ENTER

To win one of ten 24-page A4 Canon hdbooks, each worth £60, go to www.futurecomps.co.uk/hdbooks and answer this simple question: How long will a Canon hdbook last? A. 300 minutes B. 300 months C. 300 years

Entries must be received by 5 January 2016. UK only. The expiry date on all discount and winning codes is 31 May 2016. The winner will be selected at random from all correct entries received by 5 January 2016. The prize is as stated: no alternatives, cash or otherwise, are available. For full terms and conditions please visit www.futuretcs.com

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Your ultimate photographic reference guide to the complete Canon EOS DSLR system DIGITAL SLR ESSENTIALS 

PAGE 90

Understanding the EOS flash system

Marcus Hawkins Photo expert

Using your pop-up flash or slot-in Speedlite isn’t just for when it’s too dark to get a decent exposure; it can be a fantastic creative tool in bright conditions too. Marcus explains how a blip of fill flash can make subjects stand out against bright skies, and switching to rear-curtain sync can add convincing movement blur.

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS 

Marcus has been passionate about photography for more than 25 years. A former editor of our sister publication Digital Camera, he has written about photography for Canon and Jessops, and uses a Canon EOS 5D Mk III.

PAGE 96

Learn to master Canon’s free suite of software

Need a question answered or a problem solved? If you have a problem… if no one else can help… and if you can find him… maybe you can hire… The B-Team. Yes, oneman Canon crusader Brian is here to troubleshoot all those tricky camera challenges that have been niggling away at you and driving you to your wits’ end.

The Canon Magazine

WITH

George Cairns Editing expert

Photo-editing guru George shows how you can use Canon’s free Digital Photo Professional software to correct lens imperfections, such as barrel and pincushion distortion, vignetting, and chromatic aberrations. He also looks at how the latest EOS DSLRs can make these corrections in-camera.

EOS S.O.S 

WITH

George Cairns has been writing image-editing tutorials for PhotoPlus since our first very issue, back in 2007. He uses a Canon EOS 650D and 70D, and writes for the Canon Professional Network newsletter.

PAGE 101

WITH

BRIAN WORLEY Camera expert Brian has unrivalled EOS DSLR knowledge after working for Canon for over 15 years. He now works as a freelance photographer and photo tutor in Oxfordshire.

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CANONSCHOOL

DIGITAL SLR ESSENTIALS This issue, we turn the spotlight to the thorny subject of flash, from your DSLR’s pop-up module to fully fledged Speedlites

Marcus Hawkins Photo expert Marcus has been passionate about photography for more than 25 years. A former editor of our sister publication Digital Camera, he has written about photography and cameras for a wide range of clients, including Canon and Jessops, and uses a Canon EOS 5D Mk III.

Understanding flash

Get to grips with the basics of flash photography and how E-TTL II works

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lash is an aspect of photography that’s easy to put off until another day – after all, there’s enough to think about without having to factor in flash modes, sync speeds, shooting distance and other complications. But knowing how to control flash gives you more creative ammo, as well as helping to solve tricky lighting problems. Canon offers two main flash modes: E-TTL II and Manual. E-TTL (Evaluative Through The Lens) flash is an automatic mode where the camera takes care of the exposure for you. Here, the camera fires a pre-flash just before the main flash. This pre-flash light is reflected by the subject and the camera’s metering system then determines the optimum power for the main flash exposure. All of this happens

so quickly that the pre-flash and the main flash are usually indistinguishable. The advantage is that, as the camera measures the light entering the lens, it not only adjusts the flash power according to the brightness, size and subject distance, it also adapts to any changes you make to the aperture or ISO and takes filters or diffusers into account, too. With Manual flash, you’re essentially on your own when it comes to exposure. You need to know the Guide Number (the maximum power) of the flash to work out the aperture to use or the distance you need to place the flash to deliver a good exposure. You’ll also need to take into account diffusers and filters. The advantage of Manual flash is that the flash will provide a consistent, predictable amount of illumination.

Ambient light E-TTL II includes the ambient light reading in its exposure calculation

Size and brightness Areas of extreme contrast are ignored

Pre-flash The flash fires a burst of light before the exposure begins, to set the flash exposure How far? Distance is taken into account, although it’s discounted if you use the flash off-camera

The elements of exposure How aperture, shutter speed and ISO affect the flash exposure

ISO

WB SET

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AF

Shutter speed

Aperture

ISO

The burst of light from a flash is so short that the shutter speed makes no difference to the flash exposure; use it to control the exposure for ambient light instead. The fastest shutter speed at which flash can be used is around 1/200 to 1/250 sec.

The aperture controls the flash exposure. The wider the aperture (or the lower the f-number), the brighter the flash exposure, while narrower apertures (higher f-numbers) reduce the flash exposure. Larger apertures also make the flash reach farther.

Making changes to the ISO sensitivity affects the exposure of both the flash and the background. In E-TTL II flash mode, the camera will compensate for changes you make, although set it too high and you risk the flash exposure being overexposed. www.digitalcameraworld.com


All about Flash Pop-up flash

Flip up your flash

Understand the limitations of a camera’s built-in flash any Canon DSLRs have a pop-up flash that is triggered automatically by low light levels or a backlit subject, and which can be manually suppressed or activated in most exposure modes. It’s more convenient than an external Speedlite because it’s always available and

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doesn’t add any weight. Built-in flash does have its drawbacks though, the first of which is power. Built-in flashes are tiny and lack the punch of an external flashgun. Flash power is important: the greater the maximum output, the farther it will reach. The other key difference is that pop-up flash is in a fixed position, which can create

ugly shadows and lead to red-eye. An external flashgun can be used off-camera, giving you more options for creative lighting and allowing you to achieve a more flattering quality of light that’s easier to blend with any ambient light.

A pop-up flash is handy, but is weak and in a fixed position

Exposure modes and flash

How pop-up flash works depending on your chosen shooting mode

Basic Zone In the majority of automatic shooting modes the camera will decide whether a pop-up flash needs to be activated or not.

Creative Zone If you’re using a camera with built-in flash, you can activate it at any time when you’re using one of the Creative Zone modes by simply pressing the Flash button.

SCN: Special Scene Mode

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Kids – Automatic Food – Flash off (can be switched on) Candlelight – Flash always off Night Portrait – Automatic (cannot be changed) Handheld Night Scene – Flash off (can be switched on) HDR Backlight Control – Flash always off

Remember that the aperture controls the flash exposure and the shutter speed controls the ambient light exposure.

SCN

Close-up

Automatic

Landscape

Flash always off Automatic Automatic

The Canon Magazine

Tv Shutter Priority

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Portrait Creative Auto

If the shutter speed blinks in the viewfinder, it means the image will be too bright: choose a smaller aperture or a lower ISO setting.

If the lens’s largest f-stop flashes in the viewfinder, the image will be too bright: choose a faster shutter speed or a lower ISO. If the smallest f-stop flashes, the image will be too dark: choose a slower shutter speed or a higher ISO.

Sports

Flash always off

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Flash always off

Scene Intelligent Auto

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The camera automatically sets the aperture and shutter speed, although it will always set a minimum shutter speed of 1/60 sec when the flash is activated. 91


CANONSCHOOL

Flashgun features

Speedlites

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Use a Speedlite for extra power and more options

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anon’s range of Speedlites can be attached directly to the camera’s hotshoe or used off-camera with a compatible cable or wireless transmitter. All current EOS DSLRs give you control over a Speedlite’s settings via the camera’s flash menu, although the available settings change according to the flashgun. Here are some common flashgun features…

In low light, a Speedlite will fire a red beam of light to help the camera’s autofocus system lock onto the subject. Some flashguns will also fire the flash, but you may be able to disable this function.

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Not only can you direct the flash where you need it, you can bounce the light from a wall or ceiling to disperse the light and achieve a softer result with fewer shadows. This is also useful for ensuring the flashgun sensors are pointed towards each other when shooting wirelessly.

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some Speedlites have a pull-out fresnel panel that spreads the light wider for ultra-wide lens coverage – up to 14mm in the case of the 600EX-RT. A bounce panel is also stored in this slot, enabling you to add a catchlight to people’s eyes when bouncing the flash.

This indicates the maximum power output of a flash. Handily, the Canon Speedlite name references its Guide Number, so the 600EX-RT has a Guide Number of 60 (metres, ISO100), the 270EX II has a Guide Number of 27 (metres, ISO100).

Higher-end Speedlites have an information panel at the back that enables you to quickly check settings and make adjustments. Most useful is a distance scale, showing the range the flash will cover as you change the aperture, ISO or flash power.

each other or be in a position where they can pick up the signal as it bounces off walls and other surfaces. Canon’s latest ‘RT’ Speedlites use a radio signal to trigger them remotely instead of a light, meaning

that you don’t need line of sight. This provides much more flexibility over where you position them, and gives you a much greater range as well – the 600EX-RT can be fired from up to 30 metres away.

The majority of flashguns use a motorized zoom head that widens or narrows the beam of light to match the lens, enabling the flash to reach farther with longer lenses, and can also be used to create a spotlit effect with wider lenses.

Rear screen

Off-camera flash Taking your Speedlite off-camera will give you complete control over where the shadows fall Despite your camera’s hotshoe being the obvious place to put a Speedlite, it gives a very evident ‘flashed’ look, so off-camera is the way to go if you want to blend the light from the flash more effectively with ambient light. The traditional way of taking a flashgun off-camera is to use an off-camera cord attached to the flashgun’s accessory shoe and the hotshoe on the camera. This maintains an electronic contact between the two, allowing you to use the E-TTL II functions of your flash. However, Canon’s standard OC-E3 cord is relatively short, meaning that

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it’s only really suitable for use in close-up work. Wireless triggering is now becoming the norm. All current EX Speedlites offer remote triggering, allowing them to be fired without the need for cables. To do this, you need a ‘master’ unit and a ‘slave’ unit. The master unit – either a compatible flashgun or a camera with a built-in or accessory Speedlite controller, such as the 760D or 70D – sends an optical signal to one or more slave flashguns in order to fire them. This requires ‘line of sight’, meaning that the sensors on each unit have to face

www.digitalcameraworld.com


All about Flash Night And Day

How to use flash in daylight Use flash when it’s sunny to reduce harsh contrast he key thing to remember when using flash in daylight is that you can’t exceed the camera’s flash sync speed, and that may restrict the range of

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aperture settings that you can use. The sync speed is relatively slow, so if you’re shooting in very bright light then you may have to choose a narrower aperture to give you a shutter speed slow enough to

to make is whether the flash is going to be used as ‘fill’ (to reveal details in the shadows and brighten up colours) or the flash is going to be the dominant light source, with ambient light acting as fill.

Ambient as fill

Flash as fill

E-TTL II flash was used to fill in the shadows in this backlit image. Note the flash catchlight in the eye.

use flash. An alternative is to use a compatible flashgun’s High-speed sync mode, which allows you to choose any shutter speed at the expense of flash power. The other important decision you need

1. Without flash, Evaluative metering struggles to find an acceptable balance for this high-contrast subject.

Flash in the low light

2. By taking a meter reading from the sky and underexposing it, we create a much darker background.

3. The flash exposure is unaffected – it overpowers the daylight, creating this more dramatic effect.

Too dark

Well exposed

Shot at f/8, 1/200 sec, ISO400: the model appears too dark, and the background is so under exposed it’s almost black

Shot at f/5.6, 1/80 sec, ISO1600: The wider aperture, slow shutter speed, and high ISO’s brightened up the model and background

Use slow shutter speeds with flash to reveal detail

lash sync speed is usually no problem when you’re shooting in low light, as you’ll typically be working with much slower shutter speeds. Program mode can pose problems, as the camera might select a fast shutter speed around 1/200 sec and this may be too fast to record any background detail. One option is to dial in a higher ISO speed, although there is a risk of overexposing the main subject here. Or switch to Aperture Priority (Av) mode.

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The Canon Magazine

This mode always works in ‘slow sync’ mode, balancing the exposure of the background with the flash-lit main subject using a slower shutter speed. You’ll need to keep an eye on the shutter speed in the viewfinder if you’re shooting handheld though; it may become too slow to get sharp results. Some EOS cameras enable you to set the minimum ‘safe’ shutter speed for the Auto ISO setting, although this is of limited use with a flash attached as the Auto ISO setting will be restricted to ISO400 or lower.

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CANONSCHOOL Flash modes

Changing the synchronization You can choose when you want the flash to fire during an exposure he imaging sensor in a Canon DSLR is shielded from light by a pair of shutter curtains. These open and close in succession to start and end an exposure. By default, the flash fires just after the first curtain opens, known as

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‘first-curtain synchronization’. However, you’ll find other shutter synchronization options: second-curtain and high-speed. The second-curtain synchronization option fires the flash just before the second curtain closes. This can be

First-curtain sync Pre-flash: A preflash fires between the mirror lifting and shutter opening

Shutter opens: The first curtain moves out of the way to expose the sensor

Second-curtain sync Pre-flash: The pre-flash still occurs before the shutter curtains open to start the exposure

High-speed sync Shutter speed: At fast shutter speeds, the second curtain starts to close before the first has finished opening 94

useful for photographing moving objects, as any motion blur recorded by a longer exposure will appear behind the flash-lit object; with first-curtain synchronization, any blur is recorded in front of the moving object, making it look as if it’s reversing!

Flash fires: Using the info from the pre-flash, the camera determines the flash power

Exposure begins: The exposure for the ambient light begins

Subject movement: Any movement lit by ambient light will be recorded in front of the subject

Flash fires: Because the flash fires at the end of the overall exposure, any blur is recorded behind the subject

High-speed synchronization lets you use faster shutter speeds than you ordinarily could when using flash. This is useful for outdoor portraits, as you can use wide apertures to blur the background without the risk of getting an overexposed picture.

Shutter closes: The second curtain closes in front of the imaging sensor to end the exposure

Shutter closes: It can be hard to predict where the subject will be when the exposure ends

Rolling exposure: The imaging sensor is essentially exposed through a rolling slit; at no point is the entire surface of the sensor exposed Flash bursts: The flash is pulsed in time with the gap between the shutter curtains. To achieve this, the flash is reduced in power, so won’t reach as far; the faster the shutter speed, the more reduced the flash range www.digitalcameraworld.com


All about Flash Modifying the light

Better flash exposures

Soften the flash light and control its output using FEC and FEL flash head is a relatively small light source, and the light it produces can be unflattering. Spreading the light wider, by bouncing the flash off a white wall or ceiling – or using a clip-on diffuser, umbrella or softbox – is a great solution. With E-TTL II flash, the camera will, as far as it can,

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adapt to any devices in front of the flash, and any changes you make to the aperture or ISO to maintain a consistent exposure. But that exposure may be wrong. For instance, if there are lots of white or reflective objects in the frame then the flash may be cut off too early, resulting in an underexposed image. To correct for any errors, the

easiest option is to use Flash Exposure Compensation (FEC): press the FEC button and use the dial or buttons to move the indicator towards the ‘+’ end of the scale to make the flash exposure brighter, or towards the ‘-’ end to make it less bright. FEC only affects the flash exposure, not the exposure for any ambient light – to change

this, you’ll need to use the camera’s regular Exposure Compensation function. Flash Exposure Lock (FEL) allows you to take a flash reading from the main subject before recomposing your shot. It’s particularly useful when you’re shooting against a reflective object, such as a window, or against a very bright background.

Direct Flash Direct flash casts sharp, ugly shadows; bouncing it off a white surface (the ceiling here) gives a much softer, wider spread of light, and therefore a more flattering look

Bounce Flash

School tip: E-TTL II metering Specify the way you want your camera to meter for flash ISO

When you opt for E-TTL II flash mode, you also have the option to select the flash metering pattern: Evaluative or Average. You can do this in the camera’s flash menu or in its Custom Functions. If you’re looking to use flash as fill light in shots taken outdoors, then The Canon Magazine

we’d recommend sticking with Evaluative metering as the results will be more subtle. However, we’d switch to Average metering when you’re working indoors and flash is the dominant light source, as otherwise the images may come out too dark.

WB SET

AF

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CANONSCHOOL

SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS Get to grips with Canon’s free Raw image organizing, editing and sharing software – Digital Photo Professional 4

george cairns Imaging expert George Cairns has been writing image-editing tutorials for PhotoPlus since our first very issue, back in 2007. He uses a Canon EOS 650D and 70D, and writes for the Canon Professional Network – a newsletter for Canon pro kit users.

Correct lens distortions

Quickly fix distortions such as barrelling, vignetting and chromatic aberration in DPP 4

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hat you see through your Canon DSLR’s viewfinder isn’t always what you get when you view the photo you’ve taken of the same scene. This is partly due to artefacts that are introduced by the lens you’re using. When light enters a lens it’s focused onto the imaging sensor. In some cases different wavelengths of light aren’t

quite focused on the same spot, causing fringes of colour to cling to contrasting edges – the technical term for this is chromatic aberration. The lens can also cause light to be bent, resulting in a subject’s horizontal and vertical lines bulging outwards (barrel distortion) or being ‘pinched’ inwards (pincushion distortion). These geometric distortions affect most images; in many cases they’re barely

noticeable, but they can be a problem in architectural shots or other images containing prominent straight lines. Most lenses are designed so that the maximum amount of light is captured in the central area of the image, with the light falling off towards the edges of the frame. At wide apertures in particular this can result in peripheral illumination, or vignetting, with the edges of the frame

appearing darker than the rest of the image – this can spoil at shot with a blue sky like ours. Newer EOS DSLRs enable you to correct lens distortions in-camera (see page 99) and you’ll find similar options in Digital Photo Professional 4. On the facing page we’ll show you the key tools for fixing distortions in DPP 4, and below we’ll show you how to use a lens profile to banish multiple distortions.

STEP BY STEP Import and use a lens profile DPP can find out which lens was used to capture a shot, and tailor corrections to match

01 Search for your lens

Open the start image in DPP 4 and click Edit Image. Click the Perform Image Lens Correction tab, then click Add Lens Data. DPP checks the metadata to see which lens was used to capture the image – it’ll be highlighted in bold.

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02 Download the lens profile

Tick the box next to the profile for that lens – the word Add will appear in brackets. Click the Start button. DPP 4 will download the lens profile – when the update is complete, click Close to dismiss the dialog.

03 Apply the corrections

Click the Digital Lens Optimizer button to apply the profile. The shot will look sharper (even if you don’t tick the Sharpness box). Tick Distortion to fix the barrelling, and tick Peripheral Illumination to correct the vignetting. www.digitalcameraworld.com


view the video VIDEO also online

Lens corrections

http://bit.ly/pp_108_9 Canon DPP 4

HOW IT WORKS lens corrections panel Use DPP’s powerful tools to correct geometric distortions, colour fringing and vignetting

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01

03 05 06

07 08 09 02

01

04

07

VIGNETTING

LENS Corrections PANEL

Correct vignetting

Peripheral illumination distortion, or vignetting, appears as darkening at the edges of the frame. It’s especially noticeable in images that contain large areas of even tones, such as the sky in this shot.

This tab gives you access to a range of lens correction tools that are designed to quickly and easily help you counteract geometric distortion, vignetting and chromatic aberration.

02

05

geometric distortions

SUB WINDOW

Some lenses can cause straight lines to appear curved. At shorter focal lengths the image will bulge outwards (barrel distortion), while at longer focal lengths the opposite effect can become apparent (pincushion distortion). 03

Tick this box to correct vignetting by lightening darkened edges for an even exposure. You can use the adjacent slider to fine-tune the correction manually. 08

fix colour fringing

The sub window gives you a magnified look at any part of your picture. To choose which area you want to magnify, click this button. Move the cursor over the target area on the photo and click to select it. Here we’re viewing the targeted area at a magnification of 1:2 so that we can spot any colour fringes.

Drag the R or B sliders to the right to remove red or blue colour fringes, or chromatic aberration. If you apply a lens profile, as we’ve done in this example, the Chromatic Aberration box and sliders will be unavailable – this is because the Digital Lens Optimizer has removed the fringing automatically, using the imported lens profile.

CHROMATIC ABERRATION

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09

ADD LENS DATA

banish barrelling

You may notice red, purple or blue fringes clinging to high-contrast edges in your shots. This is known as chromatic aberration, and it’s more of a problem with cheaper lenses.

Click this button to import a lens profile that will enable DPP 4 to correct the distortions produced by a particular lens. See our walkthrough on the facing page for more.

Tick this box to automatically correct barrel or pincushion distortion in shots of buildings. You can use the slider to fine-tune the amount of geometric correction that’s applied.

The Canon Magazine

JARGON BUSTER PERSPECTIVE DISTORTION This refers to the converging vertical lines produced when you shoot a tall building from low down. DPP 4 can’t correct this type of distortion. GEOMETRIC DISTORTION When light passes through a lens it is curved towards the camera’s sensor. This can cause straight lines to become warped.

Can I use DPP 4? DPP 4 is available to owners of all current Canon EOS DSLRs – 1200D, 100D, 700D, 750D, 760D, 70D, 6D, 7D Mk II, 5D Mk III, 5DS/R and 1D X – plus the 1D Mk IV, 5D Mk II, 7D and 60D. Download it from http://bit. ly/get_dpp (you’ll need your serial number). Check the website to see if your DSLR is supported.

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view the video VIDEO also online

in-camera corrections

http://bit.ly/pp_108_10 canon eos utility

Correct lens distortions in-camera

Fix lens aberrations and distortions the easy way – at the moment you take a shot with your EOS DSLR ome of the artefacts that can spoil your shots are impossible to avoid, as they’re caused by your lens rather than by the wrong camera settings or poor composition. In our DPP 4 tutorial on page 96 we saw how Canon’s free software enables you to fix these lens-related artefacts – chromatic aberration (or colour fringing), peripheral illumination (vignetting) and geometric distortions. We also

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03

NARROW THE SELECTION

CHOOSE LENSES

02

Tick the box next to each lens that you own so that the appropriate lens profiles can be sent to your Canon.

DSLR. And, if correction information for a Canon lens you’re using isn’t available on your DSLR we’ll also show you how to use Canon’s EOS Lens Registration Tool, which is included in the free EOS Utility software that comes with your camera, to add a profile for that lens to your camera so that in-camera corrections are supported.

02

eos lens Registration Tool Click on lens categories (such as Zoom and Ultra Wide) to help you locate the lenses you own quickly.

lens distortions in-camera, as soon as it captures a photo. Several recent EOS cameras offer in-camera corrections for peripheral illumination and chromatic aberration, and some model, such as the 760D and 7D Mk II, also enable you to correct geometric distortions. In this tutorial we’ll show you how to enable the in-camera correction settings on your

looked at how Digital Photo Professional 4 enables you to download and install a lens profile, so that you can use the controls in its Digital Lens Optimizer panel to correct distortions with a single click. While it’s easy to apply these corrections to a Raw file during post-production, either in DPP or Adobe Camera Raw, you can save yourself even more time and effort by setting up your EOS DSLR to correct

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03

04

SELECT L-SERIES

SEND PROFILE TO CAMERA

To narrow down the list of lenses even more you can tick this box to display only Canon L-series lenses.

Once you’ve chosen a lens (or lenses), click OK to send the profiles to your USB- or Wi-Fi-connected DSLR.

04

STEP BY STEP IN-camera corrections Here’s how to set up in-camera corrections – and how to add lens data if it’s not initially available

01 Go to the MENU

Press the Menu button on your Canon and go to the Settings menu. Browse to the Lens aberration correction option, and press Set to access it. The Canon Magazine

02 CORRECTION optionS You can enable corrections on this screen. If correction data for a lens isn’t available you’ll need to add the lens using the EOS Lens Registration Tool.

03 CHOOSE YOUR LENS

Connect your DLSR to your computer and launch the EOS Lens Registration Tool. Find you lens – see above – and send the profile to the camera.

04 enable corrections

Now when you go to the Lens aberration correction menu you’ll find that correction data for all corrections supported by the camera is available.

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CANONSCHOOL

EOSS.O.S Our technical guru is here to help. No Canon conundrum is too big or small. Get in touch today at EOSSOS@futurenet.com

BRIAN WORLEY Canon Pro Brian is a freelance photographer and photo tutor, based in Oxfordshire. He has unrivalled EOS DSLR knowledge, after working for Canon for over 15 years, and is on hand to answer all your EOS and photographic queries

The instructions for my Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM says there’s a chance my EOS 650D will stop operating if I’m not using firmware 1.0.4. How do I upgrade the firmware, I have 1.0.1?

Keith Pallister, Horsham, West Sussex Brian says… Cameras, like computers, get updates to improve operation or fix problems and, from time to time, Canon provides firmware updates to download from their website. It’s good practice to keep your camera’s firmware up to date. Download the firmware and copy the firmware file to the top level folder of a memory card that has been formatted in the camera. Put a fully charged battery in the camera and the memory card

with firmware. Navigate to the firmware menu, then select the firmware on the card and perform the update. Don’t press any buttons on the camera while the update is in progress. Firmware updates typically take a few minutes to complete. Once the update is done, switch the camera off then on again and confirm the version of firmware on the camera LCD screen. You can download the EOS 650D firmware update from http://bit.ly/650dfirmware Flash exposure compensation can be set on the flashgun much more quickly than by hunting through menus, or customize the Set button

My EOS 50D had a button to access flash exposure compensation but it’s not on my EOS 6D and it’s hard to find in the menu. Is there an easier way to set it?

James Crispin, West Midlands

It is good practice to keep your camera firmware updated to the very latest version, and it only takes a few minutes to complete the upgrade

The Canon Magazine

Brian says… One of the simplest options is to dial in the flash exposure compensation on the flashgun itself, particularly if you’re using a flash with a scroll dial on the back, like the 580EX/600EX models. If you want to do it on the camera body, then you can press the

Q button to get the setting on the Quick Control Screen. It is also possible to use the custom controls to assign flash exposure compensation to the Set button. Once done, a press of the Set button brings up the flash exposure compensation option, ready to change quickly.

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CANONSCHOOL

How do I capture time-lapse with an EOS 70D? Raw images taken with the Monochrome picture style are reprocessed by Lightroom on import and subsequently displayed in colour

I set my camera to shoot black-andwhite photos using the Monochrome picture style. They are black and white on the camera’s LCD, but why do they show up as colour in Adobe Lightroom?

Jo-Ann Czyrko, Harrow

Brian says… Your EOS camera creates a small-sized JPEG image to display on the camera LCD, this JPEG is embedded in the Raw file. When you import pictures into Lightroom the software first looks at the Raw file and actually displays the small embedded thumbnail – you might see the black-and-white thumbnail briefly. Lightroom then builds its own preview of the Raw. Unless you automatically apply a black-and-white preset on import, the preview images from the Raw pictures are colour.

Is it possible to use back-button focus with Live View? When I try, my 5D Mk III sounds like it is taking a photo but doesn’t record anything.

Kevin Tyler, Kent

BRIAN SAYS… There are three different focus modes when using Live View on the EOS 5D Mark III: Live AF, Live AF with Face Detection and Quick AF. I think you have the camera set to Quick AF mode. Here, engaging backbutton focus causes the mirror to drop down so that the normal AF sensor can be used for focus. Once focus is achieved the mirror returns up and the Live View continues. The camera sounds like it took a picture, but actually was just raising and lowering the mirror. To focus in Live View, select one of the Live AF modes.

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Peter MacDonald, Edinburgh

Brian says… You need to use an external timer to trigger the shutter. Since the EOS 70D has an E3 type connector then you’ll need a third party controller, like the Hähnel Giga T Pro II. If you are shooting using your laptop, you could also use the interval shooting feature in EOS Utility.

When would the Super Precision Matte Eh-S focusing screen be useful on my EOS 7D Mk II?

Stopping the AF hunting is often necessary when photographing birds against a plain sky

When is my camera’s function to stop hunting for focus most useful?

Jane Tunley, Oban

Brian says… When photographing birds against the sky it can be difficult to keep the AF point on the bird. If the AF moves off the subject then focus is suddenly lost and the camera starts to drive the lens to find focus. This AF setting stops the hunting. If you need to reacquire a new subject at a different subject distance you need to release the shutter or back button, then press it again to start the AF.

Malcolm Wenman, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

Brian says… Super Precision Matte focusing screens are ideal if you use f/2.8 or faster lenses with manual focus as they give a sharper transition between the focused part of the picture and the out-offocus part. However, they make viewfinders a little darker with slower lenses.

Why does my 750D’s Flash Settings menu appear when I use a Speedlite?

Compression, resolution and format depends on how the movie will be used post-shoot

My EOS 7D Mk II has a bewildering range of settings to record movies, what should I use?

Tim Smith, Birmingham

Mark Regler, Northants

Brian says… Pressing the Flash button on the 750D (and 760D/7D Mk II) raises the pop-up flash. If it’s already up, or there’s a Speedlite in the hotshoe, it will jump directly to the Flash Settings menu to make changing flash settings simple.

Brian says… Full HD 1920x1080 resolution and ALL-I compression is best if you plan to edit your movies; IPB is more efficient, but requires more intensive processing. Use the MOV file type if editing; MP4 is better for playback and creates smaller files. Select the frame rate appropriate for the final use of the film; 25fps is the best choice in Europe, 30fps in the US.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Close-up photography Options for Close-ups Small flowers and insects are popular macro subjects that require the camera to focus closer to magnify the subject

Ask Brian!

Confused with your Canon DSLR? Email EOSSOS@ futurenet.com

Macro lenses are one way to capture close-ups of tiny subjects, but certainly not the only option

Up close and personal What are the options for making small subjects appear to be larger in your photographs? ’m sure that I’m not alone in sometimes wishing my lenses would let me focus that bit closer. Sometimes, with small subjects, I keep moving closer, until the lens cannot focus any closer. So how can you get the subjects bigger? An inexpensive option is a set of extension tubes. These are basically hollow tubes that move the lens further from the image sensor. The effect is that the lens can focus much closer than normal, but will no longer focus at infinity. Extension tubes work well with standard to medium telephoto lenses, but wide-angle lenses have the point of focus shifted so close that it can actually be inside the lens itself! Furthermore, extension tubes cut the amount of light reaching the sensor too, so watch your shutter speed. If you want to get surprisingly close, then a reversed manual focus lens is an

I

The Canon Magazine

option. Finding an old 28mm or 50mm manual focus, manual aperture lens is quite simple and inexpensive, and can be attached to your camera backwards by using a reversing ring – an adapter that fits onto the camera lens mount and screws into the lens filter thread, allowing the reversed lens to be fitted to your camera. You need to get pretty close to the subject, mind. There are also magnifying lenses that screw onto the filter thread on the lens. There’s no loss of brightness, and the magnification can be quite significant. Check the power of the magnifying lens, usually specified in terms of dioptre. Note that Canon magnifying lenses express the dioptre differently; the 500D lens is +2 and the 250D lens is more powerful at +4. You will need a magnification lens that fits the lens filter thread, and a 72mm size, for example, is much more expensive

than a 58mm one – you might consider a macro lens instead. True macro means life-size – or 1:1 – magnification. A 24x36mm subject fills the frame exactly on a full-frame camera. On screen or in print the subject appears much larger than life. There are a wide choice of macro lenses available, and prices start at around £300; the Sigma 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM was the top choice in our macro lens group test in issue 102. Longer focal length macro lenses, like the Sigma and Canon 180mm models, can achieve life-size magnification farther away from the subject, so are useful for subjects like butterflies and insects that might otherwise be scared off. Often, the longer working range helps with more depth of field too. Whatever method you choose to get close, there’s a whole world to shoot when you look at the smallest subjects.

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CANONSCHOOL I am considering getting the Speedlite 430EX III-RT to use with my EOS 60D, what do I need to make it work off-camera?

Frank Mason, Lisbon, Portugal

Brian says… Optical wireless is straightforward to use as you will be able to use the built-in flash on your camera as the Speedlite master to control the 430EX III-RT as an optical slave. From the camera LCD menu, find the menu for Speedlite settings to set up the built-in flash as a transmitter, then set the 430EX III-RT as an optical slave flash, making sure that the channel set on the flash and camera match. I frequently suggest that photographers avoid Channel 1 to avoid interference from other photographers as all the devices leave the factory on Channel 1. Optical wireless will allow you to choose either automatic or manual flash exposure from the camera. The distance between the camera and slave flash can be up to 10 metres indoors, but in bright sunshine it is usually much less. The Speedlite 430EX III-RT can also work as a radio master or radio slave flash. However, you will need another 430EX III-RT or the Speedlite Transmitter

Lens

Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

Exposure

1/320, f/4, ISO100

Radio control enabled the flash to be used out of the line of sight and behind a tree for this action picture

ST-E3-RT to control radio slave flashes. Yongnuo and other companies have inexpensive alternatives to the Canon flashes; you might want to consider them as they also work with Canon’s radio flash system. Radio flash might seem like an unnecessary step, but from my experience with the Speedlite 600EX-RT flashguns, it makes using lights on location so much easier, especially in daylight.

The Speedlite 430EX III-RT can be configured as a radio master, a radio slave or an optical slave, as shown in the image above

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Rate my photo

Get critiqued!

The Old Man of Lahij by Yevgeniy Tuzov Yevgeniy says… I live in Baku, Azerbaijan, and have been an avid reader of PhotoPlus for the past three years. I took this picture of an old man in the streets of Lahij, a remote mountain village in Azerbaijan. I was drawn to this stone-paved street when the old man walked slowly past with his sticks. I chose to process the picture with a sepia tone effect as it just seemed to be ideally matched to the old man and the timeless street scene. Brian says… Yevgeniy’s picture really caught my eye this month; I was drawn to the old-world look of the

Email photos to EOSSOS@ futurenet.com with the subject ‘Rate My Photo’

shot, which is enhanced by the sepia tone effect. The composition works for me, with the old man walking towards the brighter lit section of the street in the distance. The 40mm focal length on the crop sensor camera gives a natural perspective to the shot that keeps the picture anchored in the past. I like the way that the exposure on the back of the old man still keeps a degree of detail and is not just full of black shadows. Personally, I would crop the top of the frame a little to remove the lighter coloured section of the upper parts of the building.

www.digitalcameraworld.com


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Celebrate the ten-year anniversary of the Canon EOS 5D series with a rebate of £250 on the EOS 5D Mark III

H

ard to believe, isn’t it? It’s a little over ten years since the iconic EOS 5D was introduced. The original 12.8-megapixel camera, launched in 2005, defined a new class of DSLR. It was the first advanced enthusiast model to incorporate a full-frame CMOS sensor, bringing stunning image quality and pro-level creative tools within reach of a whole new audience. In 2008, the EOS 5D’s successor was announced. In addition to being the

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world’s first full-frame DSLR to offer Full HD 1080p movie recording, the EOS 5D Mark II showcased further Canon innovations, including a higher-resolution 21.1-megapixel CMOS sensor, a DIGIC 4 image processor, a microphone jack for external stereo audio recording, and exposure simulation while shooting stills and movies with Live View. The EOS 5D Mark II was the camera of choice for discerning enthusiast and professional photographers alike. Once again, Canon helped to define a new class www.digitalcameraworld.com


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For more precise tracking of moving subjects, the 61-point autofocus array includes 41 cross-type points, five of which are highly-sensitive double-cross type. AI Servo focusing can be optimized for different subjects and conditions by selecting one of the six preset Case settings, each of which can be fine-tuned to suit your style of photography.

The EOS 5D Mark III benefits from a sensitivity range that runs from ISO100-25,600, extendable up to ISO102,400. This provides plenty of flexibility for handheld photography in low-light, particularly when you’re equipped with one of Canon’s Image Stabilizer lenses. The large, 3.2-inch ClearView II screen makes it easy to compose and focus shots when the lights go down, too.

of DSLR: the ‘HDSLR’. So appealing were the EOS 5D Mark II’s signature high-end video features, it was eagerly adopted by television crews and big-budget film companies, being used on productions such as House, Marvel’s The Avengers, ParaNorman and many more. Four years later, the Canon EOS 5D Mark III debuted. A professional, weathersealed workhorse, capable of delivering detailed 22.3Mp images day in, day out – and at night, too – it remains Canon’s flagship all-rounder. Refinements over its popular predecessor include dual memory The Canon Magazine

Extensive manual controls, twinned with the incredible 22.3MP full-frame sensor and comprehensive range of EF lenses, give videos a truly cinematic quality. High-end features include the option of recording uncompressed HDMI at Full HD to an external recorder, while manual control over audio level, along with mic and headphone sockets, ensures footage sounds as good as it looks.

Key controls are easily accessible on the durable, weather-sealed body, enabling you to adjust settings without having to remove your eye from the viewfinder. Handling can be improved further with the addition of a BG-E11 Battery Grip. This mirrors the main control features on the main body, as well as extending the battery life, with two LP-E6 batteries.

card slots, a headphone-out jack to monitor audio when recording video, DIGIC 5+ processing and a native sensitivity range of ISO100-25,600, extendable up to ISO102,400. Notably, it shares a similar 61-point AF system as the range-topping EOS-1D X. When combined with its comprehensive array of autofocus configuration options, scintillating six-frames-per-second shooting speed and exceptional high ISO performance, this means that the EOS 5D Mark III is just as at home in the sports and news photographer’s kit bag as it

*Purchase of a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and a BG-E11 Battery Grip between 14 October 2015 and 13 January 2016. Full terms and conditions apply, see: canon.co.uk/promotions/ batterygrip-rebate

is as part of a landscape or portrait photographer’s line-up. If you’ve yet to experience the difference the 5D Mark III can make to your photography, now is the perfect time to upgrade. To mark ten years of innovation with the EOS 5D system, Canon is offering a handsome £250 rebate when you buy a Canon EOS 5D Mark III and battery grip, which you can take advantage of until 13 January, 2016. To find out more about the Canon EOS 5D Mark III, visit www.canon.co.uk and type ‘eos 5d’ into the search box.

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This thrifty fifty is a steal thanks to its slick autofocus system. £99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 58923

Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM An old-timer, but it’ll still produce quality images for modest money. £250 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 46313

Tamron SP AF 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Ansmann PhotoCam Vario

Streamline your study with this universal camera battery charger. £29.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 30510 The Canon Magazine

Manfrotto Off Road Hiker 20L

There’s space for your Canon kit and trip essentials in this hiking pack. £129.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 16431

Tamron nails it here as this lens excels in all areas. £679 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 23243

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xmasgearguide

Hähnel Captur

Peak Design Capture Pro Camera Clip

A wireless shutter release and remote flash trigger in one. £59.99 / $89.95 www.hahnel.ie

Carry your camera from a belt or bag strap with this neat clip. £59.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 25841

Canon PowerShot SX60 HS

Think Tank Retrospective 20 Pinestone

This compact camera gets you closer to the action with its 65x optical zoom. £299 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 77196

Canon SpeedLite 600EX-RT

With its built-in radio trigger, this flashgun is ready for anything. £449 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 96906

Benro Gimbal Head GH1P

A casual camera bag that doesn’t shout about its contents. £136 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 1460

One of the cheapest gimbals available, yet it’s still super-sturdy. £190 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 82756

Hoya Variable Density 3-400 52mm-82mm

Lastolite Reflector Sunlite / Soft Silver 50CM 2028

special! offer MeFOTO WalkAbout Monopod

It’s strong, stylish and well priced: the ideal monopod for sharper shots. £50 (£10 off code: GG05) at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 35519

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One filter to rule them all, or at least get beautiful long exposures. From £114.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 41068

Add a neutral or warming glow for more flattering portrait photos. £26 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 95685

www.digitalcameraworld.com


In association with

Six of the best DSLR supports Manfrotto MT190CXPRO3

Carbon construction keeps this no-compromise tripod strong yet light. £229 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 96164

Manfrotto Pixi Evo Joby UltraFit Sling Strap

Get sleek style and comfort with this ergonomically-designed sling. £39.99 at ww.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 7416

Cooph Photo Glove Original

Get a grip with these luxurious, touch screen-compatible gloves. £99 / $150 http://store.cooph.com

Less is more with this micro tripod, as it’ll support a small DSLR. £44.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 58132

Gitzo Traveler Tripod GT2545T

It’s a pricey set of legs, but the best rarely comes cheap. £719.95 (Up to £70 cashback) at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 79933

Benro FTA28AB1 Travel Angel Series 2 Aluminum Tripod with B1 Ball Head Orbis Ringflash Adapter

Transforms harsh flashgun light into stunning, shadowless illumination. £99.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 46136

Peak Design Slide SL1

Slide works as a sling, shoulder or neck strap and is built to last. £44.99 / $59.95 www.peakdesign.com

This combined tripod and monopod with ball head offers great value. £220 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 5352

Giottos Silk Road GTYTL8254-5011N

With its Y-shaped centre column, tripods don’t come much slimmer. £149.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 71991

Vanguard VEO 265CB

Elinchrom Quadra ELB 400 One Pro Head To Go Kit Portable flash systems don’t get much more convenient than this. £1269 / $1699 www.elinchrom.com

The Canon Magazine

Samsung Pro SDXC 64GB

Blistering 90MB/s performance backed up by maximum reliability. £79.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 67953

A featherweight travel tripod ideal for a small Canon DSLR. £250 / $280 www.vanguardworld.co.uk

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xmasgearguide

Peak Design Capture Pro Camera Clip Carry your camera from a belt or bag strap with this neat clip. £59.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 25841

Joby Action Clamp & Locking Arm

It’s tough, versatile and will clamp your Canon to almost anything. £33 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 44757

Lowepro Tahoe BP 150 Black

Think Tank Pixel Pocket Rocket

A customizable daypack that’s packed with versatility and value. £52 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 63511

Store 10 Compact Flash or XQD cards in this ultra-compact wallet. £15.50 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 71622

Rode VideoMic Pro-R

Camlink Close-Up Flash LED Ring Light 80

Broadcast-quality audio that’ll do justice to your Canon HD videos. £179 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 88869

Incredible value for a dimmable continuous ring light with flash. £99.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 85899

special! offer CeWe Wilkinson Prints & Photo Gifts

Show off your shots with stunning print quality at a reasonable price. Save 25% code: WILKINSON25 http://photo.wilkinson.co.uk

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Cooph Photo Glove Original & Beanie Winter Stay warm whilst looking cool this winter with photo-orientated apparel. £127 / $192 http://store.cooph.com

Wacom Intuos Photo CTH490PK

A graphics tablet like this can work wonders with Photoshop. £74.99 / $99.95 www.wacom.com www.digitalcameraworld.com


In association with

Six of the best photography books The Art of Sports Photography by Marc Aspland

Times sports photographer and PhotoPlus contributor Marc Aspland reveals an incredible collection of sports photos. £30 www.prestel.com

B-Grip Evo

Don’t let your Canon be a pain in the neck: carry it on your waist. £36.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 71622

Canon PIXMA Pro-100S

Professional quality A3+ printing with Wi-Fi and cloud connectivity. £350 (Now with £50 cashback) at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 48878

The Complete Book of Photography by Chris Gatcum

This comprehensive handbook covers every aspect of photography, from capture through to output. £30 (£5 off code: GG02) at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 65540

Wildlife Photographer of the Year Portfolio 25

This powerful collection of wildlife pictures features all the winning photographs from the 2015 competition. £25 www.nhmshop.co.uk

Dictionary of Photography by Nathalie Herschdorfer X-Rite ColorChecker Passport

Now there’s no excuse for inaccurate colours or iffy white balance. £69 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 92507

Manfrotto Lumie Art

Highly portable LED lighting that’s ready for any occasion. £69 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 45299

Encompassing the history, art and science of photography. With over 300 photos and diagrams. £65 www.thamesandhudson.com

Schude by Ryan Schude

Showcases prolific LA photographer Ryan Schude’s pop art colour schemes, startling portraits and mischievous tableaus. £40 www.roads.co/books

The Ultimate Canon SLR Handbook Vol 4 Profoto B2 250 AirTTL To-Go Kit

Here’s a comprehensive portable flash kit for on-the-go lighting. £1495 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 53538 The Canon Magazine

Cactus Wireless Flash RF60

Inside this flashgun is a wireless receiver for easy remote triggering. £129.99 at www.wilkinson.co.uk Enter 15431

Expert advice to help you take your Canon skills to the next level. Free disc with 60 mins of video. £14.99 http://bit.ly/mfmphoto

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MINiTEST

LED continuous light panels In need of constant illumination for stills or video? A mini LED lamp can light up your life lashguns are compact, convenient and pack a punch when it comes to output power. However, they’re no use whatsoever if you’re shooting video. They can also be problematic for close-up stills photography, where they might overpower the subject or cause harsh shadows. The main alternative is to use a constant lamp. Unfortunately, constant lamps can be large, relatively heavy and cumbersome. They generally also require mains power and can run extremely

F

hot. But it doesn’t have to be that way. The six constant lamps featured in this test are small, lightweight affairs. They run on batteries yet deliver useful output power, thanks to their arrays of high-efficiency LEDs. But let’s not get carried away. The lamps on test are handy, but not miraculous. They’re no substitute for a flashgun when you need sufficient power to cover any distance. However, at close range, they’re a smart option for portraits, still-lifes and video, plus more besides.

FIVE THINGS TO LOOK OUT for A variety of features and functions may be on offer, so make sure your prospective purchase ticks the right boxes 01

Size matters

Sizes of the panels on test range from 45mm in diameter for the Manfrotto Lumie Muse to 145x75mm for the Limelite Mosaic Solo. 02

Getting attached

Apart from the Riftlabs Kick, all these lamps come with sockets and adaptors for mounting on tripods or a camera’s hotshoe. The Kick combines a tripod socket with an iPhone mounting plate. 03

Power supply

Most lamps run on standard AA or AAA batteries. The Lumie Muse and Kick have internal rechargeable Li-ion cells. 04

Power output

We measured the maximum output of each lamp with an incident light meter at a distance of one metre. Values shown are in EV (Exposure Value) and the aperture required for a correct exposure at a shutter speed of 1/60 sec and ISO100. 05

Colour balance

All lamps on test give a daylight-balanced colour temperature. This can often be modified with filters. The Riftlabs Kick is the only lamp to enable lighting colour adjustment without filters.

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Hama 40 LED Photo/Video Slim Panel £69/$150 www.hama.com This lamp consists of two parts joined together by a flexible 30cm gooseneck. The base includes the battery chamber (three AAA batteries required) and a hotshoe foot with tripod socket, while the small 80x50mm panel houses 40 LEDs, plus a dimmer knob. In practice the gooseneck feels awkward, and the label that warns against twisting the head or base doesn’t inspire confidence. Clip-on panels are included for diffusion and tungsten colour balancing. Hama doesn’t quote a beam angle, but in our tests there was little to choose between this and other lamps, while maximum output power was slightly above average at 8.1EV, corresponding to an aperture of f/2.

VERDICT Pros: Lightweight, above-average maximum output Cons: Gooseneck feels quite fragile and flimsy We say: Decent performance, but build quality feels lacking

Metz Mecalight LED-480 £75/$125 www.metzflash.co.uk Similar in design to the Limelite Mosaic Solo, this Metz lamp is smaller and lighter at 115x70x48mm and 250g, and the active light panel area containing 72 LEDs is downsized to 85x45mm. The supplied diffuser and tungsten filter attach via a neat magnetic system, while – around the back – there’s a simple rotary on/off and power-control knob. The Metz runs on four AA batteries and also has a DC input socket for an (optional) external power pack. There are three tripod sockets, one at the bottom and one at each side. A tripod/ hotshoe adaptor is supplied and there’s the option of attaching two additional Metz LED-160 lamps, either directly at each side or via goosenecks. Maximum output is lower than some of the competition, at 7.2EV and f/1.6.

VERDICT Pros: Easily expandable, optional external power socket Cons: Maximum output power is a little underwhelming We say: It works a treat but it’s not the most powerful on test www.digitalcameraworld.com


LED Continuous Light panels

Limelite Mosaic Solo On-Camera LED

Manfrotto Lumie Muse £100/$120 www.manfrotto.com

£69/$130 www.limelite.uk.com Engineered by Bowens, this is the chunkiest and heaviest lamp on test, at 171x75x42mm and 450g. It has the joint-highest number of 72 LEDs, but they’re in a larger grid, giving a 145x75mm illumination area. The wide 70-degree beam angle is tailored to widescreen movie capture, and dimming is steplessly variable. The lamp is powered by eight AA cells or an optional AC adaptor. Useful features consist of a slot-in diffusion panel and tungsten colour-balance filter, plus a tripod/hotshoe mounting bracket with mini-ball head, which you can attach to the bottom or side of the lamp. It’s top of the class for tested maximum output, at 8.5EV and f/2.2.

VERDICT Pros: Upmarket build quality, relatively powerful output Cons Not as ultra-compact as some lamps in the group We say: Excellent performance, build and price (in the UK)

Riftlabs Kick

The Canon Magazine

VERDICT Pros: Very compact and light, good output for eight LEDs Cons: Can’t be used during recharging; tiny light source We say: Wonderfully small, but recharging can be a pain

Rotolight RL-48 LED Creative Colour Kit V2

£130/$150 www.riftlabs.com The Kick uses 48 LEDs in an array that has a similar surface area to that of the 72-LED Metz, and it has a fixed internal battery like the Manfrotto, recharged via a USB socket. However, it’s more at home attached to an iPhone than to a camera. Indeed, there’s an iPhone bay at the back and a tripod socket at the side, but no hotshoe adaptor. Basic controls for output power and lighting colour are built-in, but the Wi-Fi-enabled Kick has broader options when controlled from a smartphone using the free iOS or Android app, where a wider range of lighting colours is available, along with special effects for video shooting, such as flickering candle or lightning storm. The maximum power output is the joint-lowest in the group, along with the Rotolight, at 6.8EV and f/1.2.

Manfrotto has concentrated on miniaturization for the pocket-sized Lumie Muse. It measures just 86x59x28mm and weighs a mere 175g. The lamp is based on just eight LEDs with a circular light aperture diameter of just 45mm. A similarly petite tripod/hotshoe adaptor is supplied, along with a diffuser and two warming filters. The lamp is powered by an internal Li-ion cell, which is charged via a USB socket. The battery should last at least an hour, even when the lamp is used at full power, but a full recharge can take two hours or more, and you can’t use the lamp while it’s charging. Four different output levels are available via successive presses of the single operating switch, and the maximum output is respectable at 7.7EV and f/1.8.

£100/$100 www.rotolight.com

VERDICT Pros: Smartphone control, special effects for video Cons: Can’t be used while recharging built-in battery We say: It’s a cool gadget with plenty of features

This 48-LED lamp looks like the constant lighting equivalent of a conventional ring flash. Just like a ring flash it can produce halo catch-lights in the eyes, but with an internal diameter of just 37mm it definitely won’t fit over any of your lenses. The hole in the middle is intended to fit over a shotgun mic for video shooting, or for attaching the supplied hotshoe/tripod-mounting stand. This one has no dimmer switch or knob, so it can only be used at maximum power. Instead, the lamp is supplied with a range of neutral density filters, as well as colour correction and diffusion filters, made by none other than Lee Filters. It’s powered by three AA batteries, which gave a relatively meagre maximum power output of 6.8EV and f/1.2.

VERDICT Pros: Good range of filters, makes interesting catch-lights Cons: Power isn’t adjustable, relatively poor value in the UK We say: Well made on the whole, and a good buy in the USA

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LENSTEST 05

02

07

03 06

Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM

The exceptional optical properties will make the most of the new 5DS’s 50Mp sensor

What price perfection? Matthew Richards puts the ‘reassuringly expensive’ new Canon wide prime to the test

C

anon has thrown its full technological might into the new Mk II edition of its 35mm f/1.4 L-series lens. It’s noticeably bigger and heavier than the 17-year-old original edition that it replaces, has a completely new optical design and adds weather-seals. The big news, however, is that it’s the first lens to boast Canon’s newly developed BR (Blue spectrum Refractive) optics. The lens comes at a hefty price, especially in the UK, where it costs about the same as all three of Sigma’s excellent 24mm, 35mm and 50mm f/1.4 ‘Art’ lenses, and is about twice as much as the original 35mm f/1.4L USM, although pricing is more reasonable in the States, with a matching pound/dollar price tag of £1800/$1800. So, what do you get for your money?

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Build quality is excellent and, apart from being weather-sealed, the lens is constructed to withstand the rigours of professional reportage photography, for which a moderately wide-angle and fast 35mm f/1.4 lens is ideal. Fluorine coatings are applied to repel dirt

and moisture, and to make the front element easier to clean. The optical design is based on 14 elements in 11 groups, with a nine-blade diaphragm enabling a well rounded aperture, at least at the wider end of its f/1.4 to f/22 range. Ring-type ultrasonic autofocus is both very fast and very quiet and, as you’d expect at

Specifications It’s bigger than its predecessor, both physically and in terms of price

Full-frame compatible Yes Effective focal length With APS-C sensor:56mm With full-frame sensor: 35mm Image Stabilizer No Minimum focus distance 0.28m Max magnification factor 0.21x Manual focus override Full-time Focus limit switches No Internal zoom N/A Internal focus Yes Filter size 72mm Iris blades 9 Weather seals Yes Supplied accessories Caps, hood (EW-77B), pouch Dimensions (dia x length) 80x106mm Weight 760g Price £1800/$1800

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L II USM

01

Sharpness

FEATURES 2500

01 2000

Centre

A ‘subwavelength structure coating’ boosts contrast and effectively combats ghosting and flare.

1500 1000 500

02

The comfortably large manual focus ring is silky-smooth and very precise.

DoF markings are applied to the focus distance scale, for f/11 and f/22. 04

04

the price, the lens comes complete with a hood and soft pouch. Getting back to its main claim to fame, let’s take a closer look at those BR optics. Canon bills the technology as a ‘new pioneering development’, in which organic optical material is engineered at molecular level. This is integrated into a compound element within the lens, the aims being to refract blue light, to significantly reduce chromatic aberrations and to produce greater sharpness and contrast in images. Canon’s timing is good, considering the recent launch of the ultra-high-resolution 5DS and 5DS R, enabling the full potential of the lens to be realized.

Performance

True to its claims, sharpness is extremely impressive across the whole frame, even when shooting at the widest f/1.4 aperture. Better still, bokeh is smooth and creamy when using wide apertures although, considering the 35mm focal length, you have to get close to foreground objects if you want to throw the background out of focus. Colour fringing is superbly well controlled. Vignetting is only really noticeable at apertures wider than f/2, and resistance to ghosting and flare is excellent, even when shooting into the sun. Ultimately, all aspects of image quality and performance are exemplary.

35mm at f/11

Sharpness is fabulous, and there’s essentially no fringing, even around tree branches towards edges The Canon Magazine

BR optics reduce fringing more than UD (Ultra-low Dispersion), Super UD or fluorite glass.

f/2.8

f/4

f/5.6

f/8

f/11

f/16

f/22

f/4

f/2.8

f/4

f/5.6

f/8

f/11

f/16

f/22

2000

Edge

03

f/4 2500

1500 1000 500

Even at wide apertures, sharpness is excellent, right into the extreme corners

Fringing (at Edge)

05

The fully internal focusing moves the smaller rear elements for faster AF performance. 06

The nine-blade diaphragm ensures a well-rounded aperture.

0

0.25

f/4 f/8

0.5

0.75

1

f/2.8 f/11

1.25

1.5

f/4 f/16

1.75

2

2.25

2.5

2.75

f/5.6 f/22

Chromatic aberrations are a non-issue, even around high-contrast edges

Distortion

07

A rubber ring around the mount is part of the full set of weather-seals.

-1.5

–1.25

–1

-0.75

-0.5

-0.25

0

0.25

0.5

0.75

Barrel distortion is remarkably low and hard to spot, even in architectural shots

VERDICT

35mm at f/1.4

The new Canon 35mm is solidly built and a spectacular performer. However, image quality improvements over the much less expensive Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art lens are minimal at best, making the Canon look relatively poor value, especially in the UK.

Contrast and sharpness are well maintained at f/1.4, enabling a tight depth of field for close-ups

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall

NEXT ISSUE: Photoshop Elements 14

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SUPERTest The contenders

Canon EOS 760D/ Rebel T6s £650/$850

Canon EOS 70D £730/$1200

Canon EOS 6D £1130/$1400

Canon EOS 7D Mk II £1300/$1600

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www.digitalcameraworld.com


Enthusiast DSLRs

Enthusiast

DSLRs Want something more advanced than an entry-level camera, without spending over the odds on a pro-grade body? Here are your top options from Canon’s lineup

H

ead over to Canon’s website and you’ll find EOS digital SLRs neatly divided into three groups, for beginners, enthusiasts and professionals. You may feel sufficiently serious about your photography that entry-level cameras don’t quite give you the creative freedom you desire, nor the easy access to advanced shooting settings. Indeed, some advanced settings aren’t available at all in basic cameras like the 1200D. At the other end of the scale, Canon’s professional-grade bodies range from the EOS 5D Mk III to the 1D X, which cost between £2250/$2800 and £4400/$5300. That’s roughly two to three times the price of anything in the ‘enthusiast’ sector, and you might well feel that the price is hard to justify. Occupying the middle ground are three highly advanced, well-built and sensibly priced bodies in the shape of the 70D, 6D and 7D Mk II. The 6D is relatively old, announced back in September 2012. It’s the least innovative of the three and some of its specifications look positively antiquated. However, it’s Canon’s only ‘enthusiast’ camera to feature a full-frame image sensor, rather than being APS-C format, which will automatically make it more alluring to many photographers. We’ve also included the 760D/Rebel T6s in this round-up. Technically, Canon classes this as a beginners’ camera but we feel that its relatively advanced features, specifications and handling make it equally suitable for enthusiasts. The Canon Magazine

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SUPERTest 01

Canon EOS 760D

(Rebel T6s)

Refreshingly compact and lightweight, the 760D still packs in some advanced, high-tech camera features

S

ome say the best things come in small packages. The 760D is certainly diminutive compared with all of the other cameras on test, and it’s only about two-thirds the weight of the 70D and 6D. It’s certainly not light on features, though, and outclasses every other camera in the group for megapixel count. Not only that, but its 24.2Mp image sensor is coupled with the latest-generation DIGIC 6 processor, matched only by the 7D Mk II (which actually has dual DIGIC 6 processors). The 760D matches the 70D in terms of its 19-point autofocus module, all of the AF points being cross-type, able to resolve detail in both horizontal and vertical planes. In this respect the 6D looks a very poor relation. The maximum burst rate of the 760D is a respectable 5fps and, while the 70D stretches to 7fps, the 760D’s memory buffer can accommodate up to 940 JPEG

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images in continuous shooting rather than the 70D’s 65 shots. Another similarity, shared only with the 70D on test, is that the rear LCD screen is both fully articulated and is a touchscreen.

Build and handling

Despite the 760D’s lightness in weight, it feels reasonably well put together, although it’s not a

weather-sealed design. Switches, buttons, levers and dials all feel responsive and, like other cameras in the group, the shooting mode dial has a locking button to avoid accidental rotation. The main on/ off lever can be a bit more accidentprone, however, as it’s easy to go straight past the ‘On’ position, which puts the camera into movie capture mode. Two notable additions that make the camera feel more of an ‘enthusiast’ level offering than

The 760D may be small, but it’s big on features and offers the highest megapixel count

NFC (Near Field Communication) and Wi-Fi on the 760D makes it easier to connect and share your photos instantly

Specifications

06

Sensor 24.2Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) Image processor DIGIC 6 AF points 19 (all cross-type) ISO range 100-12,800 (25,600 exp) Metering zones 63 HD video 1080p at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% Memory card 1x SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD 3in, 1,040k, vari-angle, touchscreen Max burst 940 JPEG or 8 raw at 5fps Wi-Fi/NFC/GPS Wi-Fi/NFC Shutter speeds 30-1/4000 sec, bulb Size (WxHxD) 132x101x78mm Weight 565g Price (body) £650/$850

05

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Enthusiast DSLRs

760D lab tests

FEATURES

Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

04

02

The shooting mode dial’s SCN position enables access to extra scene modes like Candlelight, Food and HDR. 03

Up on top, the mono LCD info screen is comparatively small, but very useful nonetheless. 04 03

Canon’s typical beginners’ cameras are the secondary info LCD on the top panel, and the addition of a ‘Quick Control Dial’ at the rear, ideal for applying exposure compensation or for altering the aperture in Manual shooting mode. Unlike all the other cameras in the group, the viewfinder is a low-budget pentamirror unit, rather than a pentaprism module, but at least it has ‘intelligent’ display options that include an electronic level, grid display and flicker detection.

Performance

Image quality is very good overall, with colour rendition and contrast

that’s comparable to all the other cameras in this test. Retention of fine detail is very good at low ISO settings, making the most of the image sensor’s additional megapixel count, while levels of image noise at high ISO settings isn’t noticeably worse than that found in the 70D. In our tests, autofocus and metering proved to be very accurate and reliable in regular shooting modes. Canon’s new-generation Hybrid CMOS AF III system also enables fairly fast autofocusing for Live View and movies, but it’s not quite as quick as the Dual Pixel AF system found in the 70D and 7D Mk II.

Day: ISO200

Handy buttons just behind the shutter release give quick access to AF point selection and ISO. 05

The fully articulated touchscreen is great for shooting from tricky angles, and navigating menus.

50 40 30 20 10 Canon eos 760D ISO100

200

Night: ISO12,800

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Despite its higher density of photosites on the sensor, the 760D matches the 70D for signal-to-noise performance

Raw* dynamic range 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 ISO100

Canon eos 760D 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Dynamic range isn’t quite as good as from other cameras in the group, but it’s only slightly behind the 70D

Raw* resolution (at ISO200) Canon EOS 760D

30

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

The 760D edges ahead of the 70D and 6D for resolution scores but, despite more megapixels, doesn’t beat the 7D Mk II

06

Small but handy, the Quick Control Dial is a notable addition, usually reserved for enthusiast-level cameras.

400

Colour error Canon EOS 760D

% (closer to 0 is better)

8.2

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

10

Colour rendition is typically natural for a Canon DSLR, and very similar to the other enthusiast cameras on test

VERDICT Bridging the gap between beginner and enthusiast models, the 760D combines good handling and advanced features with impressive image quality, wrapped up in a small and lightweight package.

Detail in highlights and low-lights isn’t retained quite as well as the other cameras, but there’s little in it The Canon Magazine

Image noise is suppressed well, even under very low light at the maximum standard sensitivity setting

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 123

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

02

Dynamic range (EV)

Comfortable to use for a small DSLR, the 760D has well sculpted finger and thumb grip areas.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

01


SUPERTest 01

Canon EOS 70D

Something of a groundbreaker when it was launched a couple of years ago, it still remains a great buy

C

anon’s much vaunted Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus system made its first appearance on the 70D. Unlike the Hybrid CMOS AF system used on the 760D, the ‘dual pixel’ arrangement consists of a pair of photo-diodes for each pixel, across almost the whole sensor. This enables fast and extremely accurate autofocus in Live View and movie shooting modes. But there’s much more to the 70D than just flashy autofocus. It feels much more a full-sized and fully grown enthusiast’s camera than the 760D. Indeed, it’s considerably larger and weightier than the new pretender, and feels much better balanced when mounted with high-quality, hefty lenses, ranging from fast primes to chunky telephotos. Little extras, like the AF-On button, full-sized top-panel LCD and larger Quick Control Dial will be welcomed by enthusiasts. The 70D also nails its

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colours to the mast by consigning all scene modes to a single SCN position on the mode dial, which makes room for dedicated Bulb and Custom (user-defined) positions. The maximum burst rate is second fastest in the whole group, at a speedy 7fps, despite the DIGIC 5+ image processor being a generation older than that in the 760D and 7D Mk II. The

A Dual Pixel AF system enables fast and accurate focus in Live View and video shooting

pentaprism viewfinder is bigger and brighter than the pentamirror unit of the 760D, with 98 instead of 95 per cent frame coverage.

Build and handling

There’s a good degree of weathersealing in the 70D’s body. And while it still uses a reinforced polycarbonate shell, rather than magnesium alloy, it feels more substantial and rigid than the 760D. Again, handling benefits The 70D has Wi-Fi, like the 760D and 6D, so you can control it remotely via the Canon app on smartphones 05

06

Specifications Sensor 20.2Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) Image processor DIGIC 5+ AF points 19 (all cross-type) ISO range 100-12,800 (25,600 exp) Metering zones 63 HD video 1080p at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder Pentaprism, 0.95x, 98% Memory card 1x SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD 3in, 1,040k, vari-angle, touchscreen Max burst 65 JPEG or 16 Raw at 7fps Wi-Fi/NFC/GPS Wi-Fi Shutter speeds 30-1/8000 sec, bulb Size (WxHxD) 139x104x79mm Weight 755g Web www.canon.co.uk Price (body) £730/$1200

04

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Enthusiast DSLRs

70D lab tests

FEATURES

Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

03

Enthusiast-friendly, the mode dial includes Bulb and Custom positions, and demotes scene modes to a single position. 03

The layout of AF, drive, ISO and metering buttons is identical to that of the 6D. 04

02

from the same vari-angle touchscreen that’s fitted to the 760D, which is particularly useful for selecting and adjusting shooting parameters in the Quick Control screen, or for selecting an autofocus region in Live View. There are twice as many control buttons in a strip along the front of the top-panel LCD, compared with the 760D. This gives instant access to autofocus, metering and drive modes, as well as ISO settings. Overall, the design makes for easy and intuitive handling

Performance

Performance advantages over the 760D include a faster 7fps frame

rate in Continuous drive mode, slightly quicker autofocus in Live View mode, and slightly better dynamic range for greater retention of highlights and low-lights in images. High-end functions, such as autofocus fine-tuning, also help to achieve better results. In other respects, performance boosts over the 760D are harder to spot, and the 760D can actually resolve slightly more fine detail at low to medium sensitivity settings. Both cameras deliver similarly clean, low-noise images under low lighting conditions at high ISO settings. On balance, the 70D feels the more enthusiast-friendly DSLR.

Day: ISO200

The responsive touchscreen has full articulation for easy Live View and movie shooting. 05

Many experienced photographers prefer to activate autofocus with an AF-On button, and the 70D obliges.

50 40 30 20 10 Canon eos 70d ISO100

Night: ISO12,800

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Raw signal-to-noise data is practically identical to the 760D, despite the 70D having a lower megapixel count

Raw* dynamic range 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 ISO100

Canon eos 70D 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

The 70D outstrips the 760D at low ISO settings, although the 760D catches up at medium to high sensitivities

Raw* resolution (at ISO200) Canon EOS 70D

26

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

It loses out to the 760D at ISO100-1600, draws level at ISO3200-6400 and edges ahead at ISO12,800

Colour error

06

The full-sized Quick Control Dial is easier to operate than on the 760D, but lacks direct access to shooting settings.

200

Canon EOS 70D

% (closer to 0 is better)

4.8

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

10

There’s little visual difference in images but the 70D scores closest to perfection in lab tests for colour accuracy

VERDICT Differences in image quality between the 760D and 70D is marginal, and both have Wi-Fi, but the larger 70D body has more refined handling for enthusiasts, and is great value at the current price.

Rich saturation and good detail in bright highlights and dark shadows make for great landscape images The Canon Magazine

Image quality remains impressive and shots are relatively clean, even at super-high ISO settings

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 125

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

02

Dynamic range (EV)

The wider, deeper build, with its larger grip, makes for more assured handling.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

01


SUPERTest

01

Canon EOS 6D

It’s full-frame but hardly full-cream, with a more semi-skimmed set of features and specifications

T

ime hasn’t been kind to the 6D. After more than three years on sale, its starting to look a bit inadequate next to some of Canon’s more recent and relatively supercharged cameras. For example, the autofocus system has a mere 11 AF points in total, of which only the central, single point is cross-type. Live View autofocus is painfully slow and, unlike every other camera in this test group, continuous autofocus isn’t available when shooting movies. Back in stills mode, the 6D has the slowest burst rate of just 4.5fps. On the plus side, the full-frame nature of the beast opens the door to using a huge range of top-quality wide-angle and standard focal length lenses as nature (or at least Canon) intended. Without the crop factor, wide lenses stay wide and standard lenses don’t stray into telephoto territory. The flip side is that you’ll need relatively big and

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heavy lenses to achieve long telephoto reach. Compared with some of the latest full-frame cameras, the 6D’s image sensor has a fairly modest megapixel count of 20.2Mp, which exactly matches the APS-C format 70D. The upside is that the 6D’s photosites are larger and less

The 6D is Canon’s only ‘enthusiast’ level camera with a full-frame sensor

densely packed, and so have greater light-gathering abilities, which should reduce image noise. Other bonuses include built-in Wi-Fi and GPS for geotagging images, but there’s no pop-up flash.

Build and handling

The 6D is extremely similar to the 70D in size, weight and the layout of controls, which is no bad thing. Minor improvements include an additional Custom (user-defined)

The control layout is very similar to that on the 70D, but the fixed LCD isn’t touch-screen

Specifications 06

Sensor 20.2Mp full-frame CMOS Image processor DIGIC 5+ AF points 11 (1 cross-type) ISO range 100-25,600 (50-102,400 exp) Metering zones 63 HD video 1080p at 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder Pentaprism, 0.71x, 97% Memory card 1x SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD 3in, 1,040k, fixed Max burst 1250 JPEG or 17 raw at 4.5fps Wi-Fi/NFC/GPS Wi-Fi/GPS Shutter speeds 30-1/4000 sec, bulb Size (WxHxD) 145x111x71mm Weight 755g Web www.canon.co.uk Price (body) £1130/$1400

04

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Enthusiast DSLRs

6d lab tests

FEATURES

Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

There’s no pop-up flash module, which would have been useful for triggering remote flashguns. 03

03

The shooting mode dial includes two Custom positions for user-defined settings. 04 05

position on the shooting mode dial, and a magnification button for instantly checking the sharpness of shots, which works both at the preview stage in Live View shooting and at the review stage after taking a shot. The LCD is fixed and lacks both vari-angle and touchscreen facilities, so it’s basic if compared with 70D and 760D. Build quality is slightly superior to that of the 70D and a significant step up from the 760D. Instead of a fully polycarbonate shell, the 6D combines magnesium alloy front and rear body sections with a polycarbonate top panel. Like the 70D, the 6D includes weather-seals but, overall, it feels a little tougher.

Performance

Autofocus accuracy using off-centre AF points is less impressive than with any other camera on test, and AI Servo autofocus is less effective for tracking moving objects. Indeed, with its sluggish maximum drive rate, the 6D isn’t a great choice for action sports. However, compared with all the APS-C format cameras, it enables a tighter depth of field at any actual vs ‘effective’ focal length, making it more ideal for portraiture and still-life photography. It also bats all the APS-C cameras out of the park for noise-free images at ultra-high ISO settings. In this respect, the 6D is simply phenomenal.

Day: ISO200

The LCD is the same size and resolution as in the 70D and 760D, but lacks vari-angle or touchscreen facilities. 05

Where in the world did you take that shot? Built-in GPS is on hand to geo-tag your images. 06

The zoom button is handy for instantly checking the sharpness of your shots.

Night: ISO12,800

50 40 30 20 10 Canon eos 6d ISO100

200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

The 6D reigns supreme for signal-tonoise ratio, delivering squeaky-clean images at ridiculously high ISO settings

Raw* dynamic range 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 ISO100

Canon eos 6D 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Dynamic range is another strong point of the 6D. It retains outstanding levels of detail in highlights and shadows alike

Raw* resolution (at ISO200) Canon EOS 6D

28

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

Resolution scores are merely average at low to medium ISOs, but beat those of competing cameras at ISO3200 or above

Colour error Canon EOS 6D

% (closer to 0 is better)

6.3

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

10

The lab score for colour accuracy matches the 7D Mk II and the treatment of colour generally looks identical

VERDICT The only full-frame camera in Canon’s current ‘enthusiast’ lineup, the 6D is capable of delivering gorgeous images, even at ultra-high ISO settings in near darkness, but it’s overdue an update.

Landscapes benefit from glorious colour rendition and the 6D is particularly good for dynamic range The Canon Magazine

The 6D is capable of producing incredibly low-noise images even at ISO12,800 shot in near darkness

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 127

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

02

Dynamic range (EV)

02

Front and back body panels are built from magnesium alloy, rather than reinforced polycarbonate.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

01


SUPERTest

01

Canon EOS 7D Mk II Highly sophisticated and a real speed demon, the 7D Mk II puts a few pro-grade cameras in the shade

C

anon classes the 7D Mk II as an ‘enthusiast’ rather than ‘professional’ camera but, in many ways, it’s more like a pro-grade DSLR that happens to have an APS-C format image sensor. The update to the original 7D was certainly a long time coming but it’s well worth the wait. Feature highlights include a 20.2Mp Dual Pixel CMOS image sensor, as used in the 70D, but this time teamed up with dual, latergeneration DIGIC 6 processors. There’s a mighty 65-point autofocus module in which all points are cross-type. The centre point is actually dual-cross-type for even greater accuracy and works even with a widest available aperture of f/8, making autofocus possible when using an f/4 telephoto lens with a 2x extender (teleconverter). Metering also gets an upgrade compared with all the other cameras on test, with the

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frame being divided into 252 individual zones instead of just 63. Another high-speed attraction is the 10fps continuous drive rate, which is more than twice as fast as in the 6D. The standard sensitivity range also stretches a little higher than in the 760D and 70D, to ISO16,000, and the 7D Mk II is the only camera in the group in which the viewfinder gives full, 100 per

It’s simply the best enthusiast DSLR Canon makes – if you can forgo a full-frame sensor

Build and handling

The build is remarkably similar to the pro-grade 5D Mk III full-frame camera, in terms of size, weight and the use of a full magnesium alloy body shell. The layout of controls is also pretty much

Specifications

The 7D Mk II’s build quality and control layout is similar to the pro-level 5D Mk III

06

05

cent frame coverage. What you see is what you get. Curiously, Canon hasn’t built Wi-Fi connectivity into the camera, but it does feature GPS for geo-tagging images.

06

Sensor 20.2Mp APS-C CMOS (1.6x crop) Image processor DIGIC 6 AF points 65 (all cross-type) ISO range 100-16,000 (51,200 exp) Metering zones 252 HD video 1080p at 60, 50, 30, 25, 24fps Viewfinder Pentaprism, 1.0x, 100% Memory card 1x CF, 1x SD/SDHC/SDXC LCD 3in, 1,040k, fixed Max burst Infinite JPEG, 31 Raw at 10fps Wi-Fi/NFC/GPS GPS Shutter speeds 30-1/8000 sec, bulb Size (WxHxD) 149x112x78mm Weight 910g Web www.canon.co.uk Price (body) £1300/$1600

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Enthusiast DSLRs

7d mk ii lab tests Raw* signal-to-noise ratio

The full magnesium alloy build of the body makes it tough and durable. 02 04

A notable difference from the 6D and 5D Mk III is that this camera includes a pop-up flash.

Signal-to-noise ratio (dB)

01

50 40 30 20 10 Canon eos 7d mk ii ISO100

04

02

identical, further adding to the ‘pro’ feel of the 7D Mk II. Another similarity is the provision of dual memory card slots, to accommodate both CF and SD cards. It’s particularly useful for creating instant backups of images as you shoot, or can be configured to save Raw and JPEG files to separate memory cards. Yet another pro-oriented feature, or perhaps lack of it, is that the 7D Mk II has no scene modes. Instead, the more streamlined shooting mode dial includes three separate Custom positions, for storing favoured banks of shooting settings. Around the back, the separately positioned Quick

Control Dial and multiway controller are more in line with the layout of Canon’s pro cameras, rather than the concentric controllers featured in the 760D, 70D and 6D.

Performance

Performance is epic. Autofocus is unerringly accurate, metering is fool-proof, and continuous drive feels blisteringly fast. Retention of ultra-fine detail and texture is a close match for the 760D, despite the 7D II’s lower megapixel count. Images are cleaner at ultra-high sensitivity settings than from the 760D or 70D but, in this respect, it still can’t hold a candle to the 6D.

Day: ISO200

In front of the top LCD are dualfunction buttons for white balance/ metering, drive/AF and flash exposure compensation/ISO.

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

Raw* dynamic range Dynamic range (EV)

There aren’t any scene modes on the shooting mode dial. Instead, you get three Custom positions.

400

At high ISO settings, image noise is noticeably less than from the 760D or 70D, but much more evident than the 6D

03 03

200

13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 ISO100

Canon eos 7d mk ii 200

400

800

1600

3200

6400 12800

The 7D Mk II puts in better performance for dynamic range than the 760D and 70D, but falls short of the full-frame 6D

Raw* resolution (at ISO200) Canon 7D Mk II

30

05

The left-hand button strip is unique in this group, and again is more like the layout of the 5D Mk III.

Line widths per 0 picture height x100

Night: ISO12,800

10

15

20

25

30

35

Despite losing out to the 760D in the megapixel count, resolution scores are equal throughout the sensitivity range

Colour error

06

As in pro-grade Canon DSLRs, the Quick Control Dial and joypad-like multi-controller are placed separately.

5

Canon 7D Mk II

% (closer to 0 is better)

6.3

-4

-2

0

2

4

6

8

10

There’s no difference in colour accuracy between any of the cameras really, and the 7D Mk II is almost identical to the 6D

VERDICT It’s perhaps surprising that Canon’s most sophisticated and expensive ‘enthusiast’ camera is APS-C rather than full-frame, but the 7D Mk II offers the best build quality and performance.

Dynamic range is better than from the other APS-C test, with greater highlight and low-light detail The Canon Magazine

Noise is amazingly well controlled for an APS-C format camera, but it can’t match the full-frame 6D

Features Build & handling Image quality Value Overall 129

*Raw files are converted to TIFF using Canon’s Digital Photo Professional software

FEATURES


SUPERTest The winner is... Canon EOS 7d Mk II For build quality and overall performance, the 7D Mk II wins our Super Test he 7D Mk II is the best DSLR in Canon’s ‘enthusiast’ lineup. Sure, it’s ‘only’ an APS-C format, rather than a full-frame, camera, but its autofocus and metering systems make the 6D look something of a relic. It’s super-fast as well, with a 10fps burst rate fuelled by two latest-generation DIGIC 6 processors. Build quality is a cut above everything else, with a magnesium alloy body and a control layout that’s almost identical to the pro-grade 5D Mk III.

T

The 6D is the oldest camera in the group and, while it’s overdue a refresh, it delivers fabulous images and rules the roost for low-light photography at very high ISO settings. Meanwhile, the 760D is the newest camera on test and, while not officially an ‘enthusiast’ level camera, it has more than enough direct shooting controls and up-market features to qualify as such. Even so, we prefer the older 70D which, despite costing a little extra, offers the best outright value.

What’s your best option? The 7D Mk II may be best in class, but the 70D still offers a fast 7fps continuous drive rate, has an advanced AF system and is a great all-rounder. It’s the most versatile camera at the keenest possible price. Unlike previous entry-level cameras, the new 760D boasts enthusiast-level extras, like a top-panel LCD and rearmounted Quick Control Dial, which improve handling and make it more responsive. We’d strongly recommend it as a lightweight travel camera.

The 6D looks a bit outdated, features-wise. Even so, it’s the best for portraiture and other scenarios in which you want a tight depth of field for creative effect. There’s no getting away from the full-frame advantage in this respect. Similarly, it has better dynamic range than any of the APS-C cameras, and the cleanliness of its high-ISO images under low lighting is astonishing. As an ‘enthusiast’ camera, there’s still a strong argument to say it’s the most attractive camera in the group.

Luxury lenses Watch the costs when upgrading your lenses to suit your new enthusiast DSLR When stepping up from a beginner-level camera to an enthusiast model, there’s something to be said for sticking with the APS-C format. All your existing lenses will fit your new camera and you may even consider keeping your old body as a backup. However, if you switch from an APS-C camera to a full-frame body, you’ll also have to upgrade some of, or maybe all, your lenses. You may have an extensive collection of Canon’s EF-S range of lenses, or third-party equivalents specifically for APS-C format cameras, but sadly, none of them will be compatible with a full-frame body. Not only is the image circle produced by these lenses

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too small to cover a full-frame image sensor, but EF-S lenses physically can’t be mounted on a full-frame body. The situation isn’t usually as bad as it might seem. Photographers with APS-C format bodies often buy EF-S lenses for their wide-angle and standard zoom optics. But are also likely to buy full-frame compatible lenses when splashing out on macro optics, standard primes, or telephoto prime and zoom lenses. Canon’s finest-quality lenses have an L (Luxury) designation. It’s worth noting that Canon has never made an L-series EF-S lens for exclusive use on APS-C format DSLRs.

Canon’s top-grade L-series lenses don’t come cheap. The EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM is arguably the world’s finest full-frame-compatible standard zoom, but it costs around £1400/$1900

www.digitalcameraworld.com


BUYERS’ GUIDE

quid to With prices ranging from a couple of hundred ryone, several thousand, Canon has a DSLR to suit eve pro… from the complete beginner to most demanding

What to look for Canon EOS DSLRs Canon splits its EOS lineup into entry-level, enthusiast and professional ranges, and the fewer digits the more upmarket the camera; so the 1200D is the most basic, the 750D/760D for intermediates, while the 1D X is strictly for pros or those with deep pockets. Expect greater ease of use (with thumboperated scrollwheels replacing cumbersome cursor keys), more robust build quality (with weather-sealing and tough magnesiumalloy shells), more advanced functionality, and full-frame (rather than smaller APS-C) image sensors with more expensive EOS models. DSLR/CSC prices quoted are body-only unless stated

Canon EOS 1200D (Rebel T5) An ideal starter camera, it keeps things simple yet covers all the basics, including an 18Mp sensor. A handy companion app is available for free download, serving as an interactive shooting guide. However, the low-res LCD screen lacks touch or vari-angle facilities.

Canon EOS 100D (Rebel SL1) It’s smaller than any other Canon DSLR but is big on features and is something of a step up in sophistication from the 1200D, with a newergeneration image processor, high-res touchscreen and ‘hybrid CMOS AF’ for effective continuous autofocus during movie capture.

Entry level

Canon EOS 700D (Rebel T5i) With a faster continuous drive rate than the 100D, better AF and the bonus of a vari-angle touchscreen, the 700D is more versatile for shooting from extreme angles or around corners. It’s a lovely lightweight camera but is now outclassed by the newer 750D.

Canon EOS 750D (Rebel T6i) Headline attractions include a new 24.2Mp high-resolution image sensor and DIGIC 6 processor, plus a 19-point autofocus system. It beats the older 700D in all these respects, and adds Wi-Fi and NFC connectivity for easy image sharing and printing.

Canon EOS 760D (Rebel T6s) Building on the impressive features of the 750D, the 760D adds a secondary info LCD on the top and Quick Control Dial on the rear. This improves handling and makes it feel more like an ‘enthusiast’ model, rather than an entry-level DSLR, and is worth the extra outlay.

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Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £229/$320 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.8x, 95% 100-6400 (12,800 expanded) 9-point (1 cross-type) 3in, 460K dots 3fps (6 Raw/69 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £279/$399 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.87x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 9-point (1 cross-type) 3in touchscreen, 1040K dots 4fps (7 Raw/28 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £389/$649 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.85x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 9-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (6 Raw/22 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 105 Price: £486/$749 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (8 Raw/940 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 75 Price Tested In ISSUE 108 Price: £649/$849 Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) Pentamirror, 0.82x, 95% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 5fps (8 Raw/940 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

www.digitalcameraworld.com


Buyers’ Guide CAMERAS Canon EOS m10

Canon EOS m3

Sensor ISO AF

Tested In ISSUE 102 Price: £429/$579 Sensor ISO AF

18Mp, APS-C (5184x3456 pixels) 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) Hybrid CMOS AF II & 49 AF points

Canon EOS 70D

Tested In ISSUE 108 Price: £729/$999 A breakthrough DSLR, the 70D delivers fast and smooth autofocus in Live View and movie modes, thanks to its revolutionary ‘Dual Pixel CMOS AF’ image sensor, backed up by DIGIC 5+ processing. The 7fps continuous drive rate is quick and it has built-in Wi-Fi.

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, APS-C (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 0.95x, 98% 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) 19-point (all cross-type) 3in touchscreen vari-angle, 1040K dots 7fps (16 Raw/65 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 108 Price: £1299/$1499 Here’s the king of action-packed APS-C format cameras. A long-overdue revamp of the original 7D, it has 65-point AF with advanced tracking, 10fps continuous drive, dual DIGIC 6 processors and GPS, all wrapped up in a tough, weathersealed magnesium alloy shell.

Canon EOS 6D

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, APS-C (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 1.0x, 100% 100-16,000 (51,200 expanded) 65-point (all cross-type) 3in, 1040K dots 10fps (31 Raw/unlimited JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

Enthusiast

Canon EOS 7D Mk II

Tested In ISSUE 108 Price: £1132/$1399 Amazingly good value for a full-frame EOS DSLR in a medium-sized body, the 6D combines a respectable 20.2Mp sensor with super-high sensitivities of up to ISO102,400. Image quality is excellent and there’s built-in Wi-Fi and GPS, but the 6D has a fairly basic AF system.

Canon EOS 5D Mk III

Sensor Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

20.2Mp, full-frame (5472x3648 pixels) Pentaprism, 0.71x, 97% 100-25,600 (50-102,400 expanded) 11-point (1 cross-type) 3in, 1040K dots 4.5fps (17 Raw/1250 JPEG) SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 61 Price: £2249/$2499 Remarkably compact and lightweight for a fully pro and weather-sealed full-frame body, the 22Mp 5D Mk III boasts the same top-notch AF system as the 1D X and delivers stunning image quality, even under very low lighting. The big, bright viewfinder is brilliant.

Sensor

22.3Mp, full-frame (5760x3840 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.71x, 100% 100-25,600 (50-102,400 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 6fps (18 Raw/16,270 JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 103 Prices: £2999/$3399 (£3199/$3599)

The world’s first 50Mp full-frame DSLR delivers huge and amazingly detailed hi-res images. The higher-cost 5DS R adds a ‘low-pass cancellation filter’ for marginally sharper shots. As expected with such a high-res sensor, max ISO and drive rate are lower than with the 5D Mk III.

Canon EOS 1D X

Sensor

50.6Mp, full-frame (8688x5792 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.71x, 100% 100-6400 (50-12,800 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 5fps (14 Raw/510 JPEG) CompactFlash + SD/SDHC/SDXC

Tested In ISSUE 66 Price: £4399/$4599 Canon’s flagship full-frame professional camera boasts ultra-fast 14fps shooting and super-high ISO, along with sublime handling in its large EOS body. Build quality is rock-solid, yet image resolution is relatively modest, especially compared with the 5DS and 5DS R.

Sensor

18.1Mp, full-frame (5184x3456 pixels)

Viewfinder ISO AF LCD Max burst (buffer) Memory card

Pentaprism, 0.76x, 100% 100-51,200 (50-204,800 expanded) 61-point (41 cross-type, 5 dual-cross) 3.2in, 1040K dots 12–14fps (38 Raw/180 JPEG) 2x CompactFlash

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Professional

() Canon EOS 5DS (5DS R)

The Canon Magazine

24.2Mp, APS-C (6000x4000 pixels) 100-12,800 (25,600 expanded) Hybrid CMOS AF III & 49 AF points

CSC

Tested N/A Price : £309/$499


BUYERS’ GUIDE

Choosing lenses Key factors to watch out for The main factors to consider in a lens are its focal length, maximum aperture, and whether or not it’s full-frame compatible. We’ve categorized lenses by focal length range – from wide-angle to telephoto. The larger a lens’s maximum aperture, the ‘faster’ it’s considered to be – allowing you to control depth of field more, and offering better options in low light. Zooms are more flexible than primes, but tend not to have such fast maximum apertures. Full-frame lenses will also work with ‘crop-sensor’ EOS D-SLRs, but crop-sensor lenses aren’t compatible with full-frame cameras. n

d

ti o

we

7 7 6 9 7 9 7 7 7

90 104 104 101 104 104 74 104 104

Sigma 10-20mm f/4-5.6 EX DC HSM Sigma 12-24mm f/4.5-5.6 II DG HSM Sigma 24-35mm f/2 DG HSM A Tamron SP AF 10-24mm f/3.5-4.5 Di II LD Tamron SP 15-30mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tokina 10-17mm f/3.5-4.5 AT-X DX Fisheye Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO DX II Tokina 12-28mm f/4 AT-X Pro DX Tokina 16-28mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO FX Tokina 17-35mm f/4 AT-X PRO FX

£300/$350 £600/$950 £950/$1000 £360/$500 £900/$1200 £450/$485 £360/$400 £495/$450 £550/$590 £420/$450

No Yes Yes No Yes No No No Yes Yes

2.0x 2.0x 1.5x 2.4x 2.0x 1.7x 1.5x 2.3x 1.8x 2.1x

No No No No Yes No No No No No

f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/2 f/3.5-4.5 f/2.8 f/3.5-4.5 f/2.8 f/4 f/2.8 f/4

465g 670g 940g 406g 1100g 350g 550g 530g 950g 600g

0.24m 0.28m 0.28m 0.24m 0.28m 0.14m 0.3m 0.25m 0.28m 0.28m

0.15x 0.16x 0.23x 0.2x 0.2x 0.39x 0.09x 0.2x 0.19x 0.21x

77mm None 82mm 77mm None None 77mm 77mm None 82mm

6 6 9 7 9 6 9 9 9 9

74 104 107 87 104 87 87 87

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£975/$1350 £805/$1200 £440/$650 £370/$650 £900/$1350 £1120/$1400 £190/$200 £220/$180 £1150/$1400 £2000/$2200 £8600/$11,000 £320/$240 £800/$1510 £800/$1200 £100/$170

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2.9x 2.9x 2.9x 4.3x 4.3x 4.3x 4.0x 4.0x 4.0x 4.0x 2.8x 2.0x 10.0x 2.9x 4.3x

No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No

f/2.8 f/4 f/4 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4.5-5.6 f/4 f/8-16 f/4.5-6.3 f/2.8 f/4-5.6

1310g 760g 705g 630g 1050g 720g 480g 480g 1380g 1640g 3620g 2000g 1970g 1430g 545g

1.5m 1.2m 1.2m 1.5m 1.2m 1.4m 1.5m 1.5m 1.8m 0.98m 2.0m 5.0m 0.5-1.8m 1.4m 0.95m

0.16x 0.21x 0.21x 0.26x 0.21x 0.19x 0.25x 0.25x 0.2x 0.31x 0.15x 0.2x 0.32x 0.13x 0.5x

77mm 67mm 67mm 58mm 67mm 58mm 58mm 58mm 77mm 77mm 52mm 95mm 95mm 77mm 58mm

8 8 8 8 8 6 7 7 5 9 9 0 9 9 9

64 107 96 107 107 90 15 70 94 100 77 94 107 96

Sigma APO 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro

£150/$150

Yes

4.3x

No

f/4-5.6

550g

0.95m

0.5x

58mm

9

96

Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM S Sigma APO 150-500mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM S Sigma 200-500mm f/2.8 EX DG Sigma 300-800mm f/5.6 EX DG HSM Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di LD (IF) Macro Tamron SP AF 70-200mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tamron AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di LD Macro

£2600/$3600 £570/$680 £1450/$2000 £12,700/$26,000 £5500/$8000 £475/$770 £930/$1500 £100/$150

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

2.5x 3.3x 4.0x 2.5x 2.7x 2.9x 2.9x 4.3x

Yes Yes Yes No No No Yes No

f/2.8 f/5-6.3 f/5-6.3 f/2.8 f/5.6 f/2.8 f/2.8 f/4-5.6

3390g 1780g 2860g 15,700g 5880g 1320g 1470g 458g

1.5-2.5m 2.2m 2.6m 2.0-5.0m 6.0m 0.95m 1.3m 0.95m

0.12x 0.19x 0.2x 0.13x 0.14x 0.32x 0.13x 0.5x

105mm 86mm 105mm 72mm 46mm 77mm 77mm 62mm

9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

98 94 106

64 107 96

Tamron SP AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 Di VC USD

£240/$450

Yes

4.3x

Yes

f/4-5.6

765g

1.5m

0.25x

62mm

9

107

Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD

£850/$1090

Yes

4.0x

Yes

f/5-6.3

1951g

2.7m

0.2x

95mm

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TELEPHOTO zooms

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WIDE-angle zooms

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KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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Rs, With over 150 lenses available for Canon DSL Here’s picking the best for the job can be a minefield. glass the lowdown on all currently available EOS-fit

● ●

www.digitalcameraworld.com


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N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S N/S 0.16x 0.17x 0.22x 0.11x 0.26x 0.19x 0.34x 0.15x 0.19x N/S N/S N/S 0.11x 0.08x 0.2x 0.17x 0.21x 0.2x 0.19x

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WIDE-ANGLE PRIMES

£1650/$2100 £1600/$2150 £385/$540 £1220/$1550 £455/$600 £140/$150 £1480/$1900 £380/$510 £390/$470 £990/$1480 £1800/$180 £400/$600 £250/$215 £290/$290 £240/$260 £340/$430 £360/$500 £280/$320 £375/$360 £500/$530 £900/$800 £370/$420 £4980/$8300 £580/$900 £600/$900 £480/$600 £475/$560 £700/$850 £360/$430 £370/$500 £700/$900 £505/$500 £350/$480 £445/$450 £2050/$2650 £1000/$1195 £1300/$1545 £1190/$1500 £920/$1085 £1390/$1545 £750/$920

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The Canon Magazine

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£305/$550 £390/$700 £1795/$2450 £270/$400 £300/$350 £400/$580 £450/$630 £135/$200 £270/$450 £540/$850 £330/$400

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Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Canon EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM C Sigma 18-250mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Sigma 18-300mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM C Tamron 16-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Macro Tamron AF 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di II LD Macro Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 Di VC PZD Tamron AF 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 XR Di LD Macro

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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SUPERZOOMS

SUPERzooms

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0.21x 0.17x 0.2x 0.34x 0.36x 0.21x 0.7x 0.3x 0.23x 0.2x 0.36x 0.23x 0.19x 0.22x 0.21x 0.2x 0.26x

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0.35m 0.35m 0.35m 0.25m 0.25m 0.38m 0.38m 0.4m 0.45m 0.28m 0.22m 0.28m 0.38m 0.45m 0.29m 0.38m 0.33m

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£510/$700 £535/$830 £335/$300 £130/$200 £170/$250 £1400/$1900 £700/$1000 £375/$600 £640/$1000 £310/$470 £330/$400 £650/$800 £600/$800 £680/$900 £330/$650 £740/$1300 £320/$500

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Canon EF-S 15-85mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 17-55mm f/2.8 IS USM Canon EF-S 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 24-105mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4 DC Macro OS HSM C Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM A Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 IF EX DG HSM Sigma 24-105mm f/4 DG OS HSM A Tamron SP AF 17-50mm f/2.8 XR Di II VC Tamron SP AF 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD Tamron SP AF 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di

STANDARD ZOOMS

Standard zooms

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Contacts

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£205/$300 £320/$470 £850/$1050 £375/$530 £635/$900 £1050/$1400 £360/$450 £380/$770 £670/$1100 £1190/$1700 £320/$525 £290/$500 £380/$750 £700/$740 £370/$380 £920/$1085 £1300/$1545

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Canon EF 50mm f/2.5 Compact Macro Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro USM Canon MP-E65mm f/2.8 1-5x Macro Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM Canon EF 180mm f/3.5L Macro USM Sigma Macro 70mm f/2.8 EX DG Sigma Macro 105mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma APO Macro 150mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Sigma APO Macro 180mm f/2.8 EX DG OS HSM Tamron SP AF 60mm f/2 Di II LD (IF) Macro Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro Tamron SP AF 90mm f/2.8 Di Macro VC USD Tamron SP AF 180mm f/3.5 Di Macro Tokina 100mm f/2.8 AT-X PRO Macro Zeiss Makro Planar T* 50mm f/2 ZE Zeiss Makro Planar 100mm f/2 T* ZE

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£1500/$2000 £240/$370 £1125/$1400 £360/$500 £700/$1000 £4400/$5700 £570/$750 £4800/$6100 £960/$1350 £7700/$10,000 £7000/$6900 £920/$1250 £6900/$9000 £8900/$11,500 £9900/$13,000 £230/$270 £380/$550 £125/$150 £105/$110 £170/$190 £2805/$3180 £650/$970 £2280/$3400 £3760/$5000 £4300/$6700 £980/$985 £1650/$1825

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TELEPHOTO PRIMES

Telephoto primes Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM Canon EF 85mm f/1.8 USM Canon TS-E 90mm f/2.8 (tilt & shift) Canon EF 100mm f/2 USM Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM Canon EF 200mm f/2.8L II USM Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II USM Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS USM Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II USM Canon EF 400mm f/4 DO IS II USM Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM Canon EF 500mm f/4L IS II USM Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM Samyang 85mm f/1.4 IF MC Samyang 135mm f/2 ED UMC Samyang 500mm MC IF f/6.3 Mirror Samyang 500mm MC IF f/8 Mirror Samyang 800mm MC IF f/8 Mirror Schneider 90mm f/2.8 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 300mm f/2.8 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 500mm f/4.5 EX DG HSM Sigma APO 800mm f/5.6 EX DG HSM Zeiss Planar T* 85mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Apo Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 ZE

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

7 8 8 8 5 7 8 8 9 9 9 9

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52mm 72mm 72mm 58mm 52mm 49mm 77mm 90mm 77mm 77mm 58mm 77mm

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0.18x 0.16x 0.15x 0.15x 0.15x 0.21x N/S 0.11x 0.14x 0.18x 0.15x 0.15x

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0.3m 0.4m 0.45m 0.45m 0.45m 0.35m 0.45m 0.65m 0.5m 0.4m 0.45m 0.5m

sb

130g 645g 580g 290g 130g 160g 575g 1400g 520g 815g 380g 1030g

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD

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f/2.8 f/2.8 f/1.2 f/1.4 f/1.8 f/1.8 f/1.4 f/2.8 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.4 f/1.4

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£130/$150 £1100/$1400 £995/$1450 £240/$350 £90/$110 £100/$125 £360/$390 £2820/$3365 £300/$500 £700/$950 £520/$525 £2700/$3990

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Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Canon TS-E 45mm f/2.8 (tilt & shift) Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM Canon EF 50mm f/1.4 USM Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Samyang 50mm f/1.4 AS UMC Schneider 50mm f/2.8 PC-TS (tilt & shift) Sigma 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM Sigma 50mm f/1.4 DG HSM A Zeiss Planar T* 50mm f/1.4 ZE Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4

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Standard primes

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STANDARD PRIMES

KEY: ● BEST VALUE AWARD ● BEST ON TEST AWARD -fr a

Sigma www.sigma-imaging-uk.com Tamron www.tamron.co.uk Tokina www.tokinalens.com Voigtlander www.robertwhite.co.uk Zeiss www.zeiss.co.uk

Canon www.canon.co.uk Peleng www.digitaltoyshop.co.uk Samyang www.samyang-lens.co.uk Schneider www.linhofstudio.com

Iri

BUYERS’ GUIDE

●●

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backissues Catch up on what you’ve missed by buying a recent issue either in print or via digital download

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Back issues available on your tablet, phone, PC or in print

hether you’ve got an Apple iPad, iPhone or iPod Touch, or an Android, Kindle or Nook tablet, you can download PhotoPlus back issues. You can read them on your laptop or desktop computer as well. To see the full range of devices go to http://bit.ly/ppdigi A limited number of back issues of our print editions are available at http://bit.ly/ppprint Buy a binder! Prefer a printed magazine? Keep your copies of PhotoPlus together with our binder, which neatly holds a year’s issues www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk/photoplus-offers

Issue 107 December 2015

Issue 106 November 2015

Issue 105 October 2015

The Canon DSLR upgrader's guide l Apprentice: seascapes l Interview: Justin Reznick l Super Test: telephoto zooms l Mini Test: travel tripods l Full test: Sigma 24-35mm f/2 l Canon School: autofocus l My Kit: Grant Gunderson l David Noton: Scottish Highlands l Projects on: nighttime cityscapes, stroboscopic flash, winter portraits, silhouette portraits, tinfoil effects l Free landscapes ebook worth £10!

Learn from the pros l Apprentice: action sports photography l Interview: Howard Schatz l Super Test: flashguns l Mini Test: camera daypacks l Canon School: white balance l My Kit: Adam Gasson l David Noton: Switzerland l Projects on: multiplicity portraits, cityscape reflections, bokehrama, rainbow collages, sports portraits l Free wildlife photography ebook worth £7!

Make cash with your Canon l Apprentice: shooting waterfalls l Interview: Drew Gibson l Super Test: entry-level DSLRs l Mini Test: gimbal heads l Canon School: metering l My Kit: David Clapp l David Noton: Canadian Rockies l Projects on: fine art nudes, make your own pin-hole lens, shoot fine art stock shots, create a time-lapse movie l Free family portraits ebook worth £7!

Read your magazine on any device: 138

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Back Issues

Issue 104 September 2015

Issue 103 August 2015

Issue 102 July 2015

Issue 101 June 2015

Issue 100 May 2015

The A to Z of Canon DSLR modes l Apprentice: martial arts l Interview: Danny Green l Super Test: wide-angle zoom lenses l Mini Test: print labs l Canon School: ISO l My Kit: Andrea Denniss l David Noton: Umbria, Italy l Projects on: hyperfocal distance, shoot with an underwater housing, ND grad filters, abstract creative blur with vaseline, bird-in-flight photography l Free landscape photography ebook worth £7!

Canon 5D S/R full review l The fine art of black and white l Apprentice: street photography l Interview: Vincent Laforet l Super Test: portrait prime lenses l Mini Test: monopods l Canon School: shutter speeds l My Kit: Victoria Hillman l David Noton: Paris l Projects on: photographing festivals, watery reflections, multiple exposures, monochrome photography l Free B&W ebook worth £8!

canon challenge: manual vs auto settings l Apprentice: Great British countryside shots l Interview: Harry Borden l Super Test: macro lenses l Mini Test: variable ND filters l Canon School: aperture control l My Kit: Oliver Wright l David Noton: USA l Canon EOS M3 test l Projects on: panoramas, close-up flowers, high-key portraits, flash-pan action and the Harris Shutter effect l Portrait posing guide

Great shots, in any weather l Apprentice: fashion portraits l Interview: Tim Clayton l Super Test: printers vs labs l Mini Test: flash modifiers l Canon School: how to hold your camera l My Kit: Brett Harkness l David Noton: Iceland l Canon EOS 750D & 760D l Canon EF 11-24mm f/4L USM l Projects on: long exposures, composition, naturallight portraits, camera drag and still life l Portrait posing guide

The 100 best-ever Canon pro techniques l Apprentice: travel architecture l Interview: Art Wolfe l Super Test: wide-angle prime lenses l Mini Test: radio flash triggers l Canon School: exposure l My Kit: Alex Hyde l David Noton: Vietnam l Canon EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM l Projects on: in-camera HDR, polarizer filters, free lensing, bounce flash and understanding perspective l Free! Portrait posing guide

Issue 99 Spring 2015

Issue 98 April 2015

Issue 97 March 2015

Issue 96 February 2015

Issue 95 January 2015

Top Canon Secrets – 24 Canon tips declassified l Apprentice: white-water kayaking l Super test: studio lights l Macro photography eight-page guide l Help me buy… low-cost macro alternatives l Workshop: learn to use all the Canon metering modes l Masterclass: shoot magic mirror images l Free! 28-page Practical Photoshop digital magazine l Segmented landscape project

New Canon 50Mp EOS 5DS big preview guide l Lenses for wildlife – pros share the tricks of the trade l Apprentice: how to shoot epic landscape scenes l Super Test: fast telephoto zooms and primes l Hands-on previews: 750D and 760D l Workshop: Manual mode explained l Masterclass: create incredible time-stack images l Painting with light and smoke projects

Lenses for landscapes – learn new techniques to quickly transform your shots l Apprentice: take colourful close-up shots l Master movement eight-page guide l Super Test: sturdy tripods l Help me buy a… sensor cleaning kit l Workshop: how the histogram can help improve your images l Masterclass: take pro-looking portraits at home l Free! Home studio lighting guide

No more bad portraits! Camera and lens skills for great people pictures l Apprentice: the need for Speedlites l Buyers’ guide – the lowdown on all 152 currently available Canon-compatible lenses l Super Test: telephoto zooms from £100 l Help me buy a… canvas print l Workshop: get pin-sharp shots every time l Masterclass: moon-lit landscapes l Add motion blur with an ND filter

Learn to love black & white l Canon Gear of the Year – the very best Canon D-SLRs, lenses and photo accessories from 2014! l Apprentice: freeze snowboarders in action inside a snow centre l Xmas wish list buyers’ guide l Ultimate test: Canon 7D Mark II l Workshop: master long exposures l Masterclass: create great child portrait compilations l Create your own photo calendar

The Canon Magazine

139


don’t miss next issue Mark Hamblin

new canon techniques

winter wildlife

DSLR setup • Focusing techniques • Lens choice Shutter speed • Aperture • Composition

FREE VIDEOS! In the next Canon Skills chapter…

■ Starscapes ■ Minimalist landscapes ■ Spirograph light painting effects ■ Creative lens flare portraits ■ Photoshop Elements, CC, Lightroom & DPP tutorials

plus all this... ■C  ANON GEAR OF THE YEAR! The best EOS DSLRs, lenses and kit awards of 2015 ■T  he Apprentice: studio portrait techniques with pro Rory Lewis ■A  rctic explorer Sebastian Copeland and his incredible polar portfolio

ISSUE 109 ON SALE 5 January 

145


triviaquiz

next month don’t miss our next issue on sale 5 JANUARY

Chris George’s

CANONDRUM How much do you really know about Canon photography? Test yourself to the max every issue with our tricky trivia quiz!

08 When photographing snowy scenes, what can you do to ensure that the snow looks white and not a muddy grey? A Use Manual exposure B Use the mode with symbolized by a white mountain C Overexpose the scene by about one stop D Underexpose the scene by about one stop

01 Safety Shift is a custom function that can be invaluable if you are shooting in which exposure mode? A Manual B Tv C Program D ‘Green Square’ Auto 02 Which way do you turn the lens to release it from your Canon’s body? A To the left B To the right C Clockwise D Anticlockwise

09 Layers are an important feature in advanced image manipulation. Which of these well-known programs doesn’t provide this feature: A Photoshop CC B Lightroom C Photoshop Elements D GIMP

03 Do you have the right to take pictures of strangers? A Yes, but only if they are in a public space B No, people have a fundamental right to privacy C It depends on the law of the country you are in D Yes, but only if they are adults 04 Who is this Happy Days TV comedy actor turned director?

10 Which of these is useful for getting you closer to wildlife? A Bus shelter B Wheelie bin C Hide D Caravan

05 Where does the rule of thirds say we should place the horizon in our outdoor shots? A Halfway down B A third of the way down C A third of the way up D Either a third of the way up or down

146

How did you do? Answers

07 Which type of tripod head is particularly useful for supporting heavy supertelephoto lenses? A Geared head B Ball head C Pan/tilt head D Gimbal head

1.B, 2.D, 3.C, 4.Ron Howard, 5.D, 6.B, 7.D, 8.C, 9.B, 10.C

© Startraks Photo/REX Shutterstock

06 When is The Photography Show being held in Birmingham? A February B March C April D May

10 points 8–9 points 6-7 points 4-5 points 2-3 points 0-1 points

You’re a photography mastermind! Fantastic, you’re a brainiac Really good score Respectable, but no cigar We’ll keep your score secret Epic fail

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