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d&ad awards is the industry event still relevant to designers?

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design matters

arts

type technologies Typeface studio Dalton Maag reveals its secrets create a storybook get animated with new digital and craft skills

start your own business win the clients you want and produce work you’re passionate about in 2019


C O V E R A RTI S T

march 2019

Making the cover

Left and above: Tom’s eye-catching promo, starring Earl and Walrus.

The cover of a magazine is still the single most important factor in its success on newsstand, and choosing the right illustrator to create the cover is often a long, time-consuming task. Dozens of potential cover illustrators will be sifted through, from highly acclaimed big-name artists to less-established, newer talents who may only have just started out on their career and have pitched us a CV and a design portfolio. Status is not a factor, just quality and originality. For this issue, we had the unique (and delightful) synchronicity of a mailshot by Tom Redfern literally landing on the CA art desk as the cover idea was being pitched by the editor. Redfern’s lavish, beautifully illustrated (and designed) promo took the form of a small storybook — Earl and Walrus Journey Inwards — which instantly demonstrated Redfern’s illustration skills, visual wit and strong marketing savvy. Playful yet stylish, fun but detailed, his book showed us how effectively his illustrations could be combined with type. From a loose brief, Redfern knew exactly what he wanted to achieve. “The illustration needed to visualise a journey,” Redfern explains. “To tell the story of doing your own thing. What is required to run your own business in 2019? Creative, interconnected, data driven and innovative. From inception to execution, the circle signifying the ever-evolving nature of the creative industries. An energetic, complex and vibrant world where anything is possible.” We made few revisions to Redfern’s first draft, where everything was worked out by hand, scanned in and brought to digital life in Illustrator and Photoshop. We even took the interconnected horizontal lines of the cover illustration through to the feature itself, a touch inspired by Redfern’s great promo.

Tom Redfern A Bristol-based Illustrator and art director, inspired by pop culture, sci-fi and geometry, Tom has worked with a diverse range of clients in a wide variety of industries including print, product and animation. www.tomredfern.net c o mputera rts.creati vebloq.com -3-

Below: The smooth evolution of the cover, from detailed drawing to full-colour illustration.


w el c om e

march 2019

Editor’s letter Awards season is just around the corner, what with Computer Arts’ Brand Impact Awards call for entries opening on 18 February, and D&AD’s entries closing on the 20th. It’s an important time of the year to take stock and appreciate some of the great work created by the many talented people working hard in the industry… but is design getting fair praise? That’s something we investigate on page 66 in relation to the industry stalwart D&AD Awards. Nobody’s suggesting that the not-for-profit is in any way not totally awesome — a look at its New Blood Shift initiative makes that clear, not to mention all money made from the annual awards goes back into the industry. It’s just that Design doesn’t seem to get as many coveted Pencil awards, or as much hype, as the AD part of D&AD. In the feature, we explore whether this is a good thing, the nature of the design industry compared to advertising, and whether, as one anonymous contributor told us for the piece, a younger generation is finding the awards less desirable compared to the mutual support found in the social media world, where ‘I’ll like your work if you like mine’ replaces genuine innovation. It’s a tricky one. Surely, looking at some of the young designers that feature in the second part of our 15 Game Changers feature, over on page 50, any fear that standards are doomed in the hands of the Instagram generation is a bit of an overstatement. But then, don’t awards remain essential as a platform for the established voice of the industry to bring in the innovators of tomorrow? I don’t know! But I do want to hear what you think. Have a read of the feature and then get in touch by emailing me.

Featuring

craig oldham Craig Oldham goes in-depth on his new, prop-centric book series for Rough Trade on page 10 — the first of which centres on John Carpenter’s cult film They Live. www.craigoldham.co.uk

Ewa Lefmann On page 16, freelance designer and musician Ewa Lefmann explains her ability to balance two creative outlets without letting client work fall behind. www.ewalefmann.com

Mark Bonner Former D&AD president and GBH creative director Mark Bonner is just one of the insiders shedding light on the notfor-profit awards show on page 66. www.gbh.london

Bianca Berning On page 82 Dalton Maag’s creative director, Bianca Berning, reveals how the typeface design studio continues to make inroads with modern type in 2019. www.daltonmaag.com

paul woods

Beren Neale Editor beren.neale@futurenet.com

Paul Woods is the author of a new book titled How to Do Great Work Without Being An Asshole, and over on page 98, he offers an insight into his thinking. www.paulthedesigner.ie

Keep in touch with…

@computerarts

/computerarts

@computerarts

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march 2019

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Meet the team

INTERNATIONAL

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Beren Neale editor

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Beren (French: Beren) has been both sad and happy this month. Sad as he’ll be saying goodbye to prod god Mr Potter, happy because he knows Aaron will have an awesome time on his new magazine.

Circulation

mark wynne

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Production

Art editor Seeking climes befitting his Siberian soul, Mark visited Austria over Christmas. And there he found solace in the biting winds and gelid snow that both mocked and mimicked his wintry thoughts... Happy New Year!

Mark Constance Head of production, US/UK Clare Scott Production project manager Joanne Crosby Advertising project manager Jason Hudson Digital editions controller Steve Wright Digital edition coordinator Vivienne Calvert Production manager

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Aaron potter

SENIOR MANAGEMENT

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MANAGEMENT

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production Editor The time has sadly arrived for the sun to set on Aaron’s Computer Arts tenure, as he swaps comic sans for comic books by beaming himself over to SFX. He’ll miss his CA brothers, though, if only for the Bing Bong chat.

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Garrick Webster, Tom May, Emily Gosling, Tanya Combrinck, Nick Carson, Lai TS, Ewa Lefmann, Alex Shifrin, Jason Nye, Gianluca Alla, Paul Woods, Bill Strohacker, Dalton Maag, Twentytwo, Koto, Tapocketa All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected.

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nick carson Freelance writer Nick has been enjoying the rollercoaster existence of working from home with a three-month-old, balancing dad duties alongside copywriting. He also found time to dig deeper into D&AD – see page 66.

Next issue on sale 01 March 2019

rosie hilder

Want to work for Future? Visit www.futurenet.com/jobs

operations editor, creative bloq Rosie celebrated turning 32 by eating a lot and going to the cinema. Now she’s a ‘real grownup’, she can fully enjoy her presents, which included a blender, cushions and a pair of slippers. Wild night out pending.

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Contents

ISSUE 289 m a rch 20 19

culture

Insight

20

 Essay Bill Strohacker on why the industry should rethink how design is taught

22

 design matters What’s the most creative way you’ve won a commission?

23

 column Alex Shifrin reveals why autism is a strength, not a weakness, in design

24

 The British Academy rebrand Three creatives discuss Only’s new look for the respected UK authority

18

 new ventures The ethos behind a new book series seeking to replicate hero props from movies they appeared in. First up, the magazine from 1988’s They Live

14

my space Twentytwo Digital’s co-director Jason Nye shows us around the team’s studio, located in Coventry’s historic grade II listed canal warehouse

16

fresh eyes Part muscian, part graphic designer, Ewa Lefmann reveals how she fuses her two creative passions

18

 inspiration feed How letterform designer Gianluca Alla is breaking new ground with fonts and typography

Projects

c o mputera rts.creati vebloq.com -8-

82

 T ype design secrets Dalton Magg reveals how it is repeatedly able to create type equipped for 2019 and beyond

88

 vr illustration Illustrator Lai TS on how to engage viewers using 360-degree artwork in virtual reality

92

 making a digital storybook How animation studio Tapocketa created an award-winning animated storybook


c o n te n ts

sPECIAL REPORT

industry insight

66 T oo few pencils in design?

42 start your business in 2019

Have a lucrative side hustle or business idea that you want to fully invest in? Creatives weigh in on how to not fumble your first design business

D&AD insiders discuss what makes the award show’s Pencils so coveted, as well as the type of design work that warrants a deserved win

showcase

26

showcase We run through the hottest new design, illustration and motion work from the global design scene

special report

50 The 15 game c hangers of design (part 2) The concluding half of our celebration surrounding notable creatives includes graphic design practical jokers and music-infused surrealists

SUBSCRIBE AND SAVE UP TO 67%

Never miss an issue of Computer Arts! Subscribe today for pro advice and practical insight for a year and save up to 67% off the cover price! See page 40 for more details

c o mputera rts.creati vebloq.com -9-

REGUL ARS

98

 design inspiration Edenspiekermann’s Paul Woods bids goodbye to the egomaniacs of old


c u ltu r e

c o mputera rts.creati vebloq.com - 10 -


ne w v e nt ur e s

march 2019

n ew v en tures

live and let live Brace yourself as Craig Oldham sheds new light on the '80s cult-classic. ho says print is dead? Books and magazines have always had a transformative effect on readers, and few films illustrate this as brilliantly as John Carpenter’s 1988 cult-classic, They Live. And now the film — famed for its scene where leading man Roddy Piper dons a pair of sunglasses and has an epiphany while reading a magazine — is finding new life in the latest project by British designer Craig Oldham. They Live: A Visual and Cultural Awakening is the first in a new series of books from Rough Trade

W

Above: Oldham wants this book to feel like you’ve reached into the cinema and returned with the magazine in hand. c o mputera m putera rts.creati vebloq.com - 11 -


9000

cu lt u r e

This page: Carpenter’s respect for his audience is why Odham thinks his films endure. “Cult films never get missed. Like radiation, they never really go away.”

march 2019

Fairey, comments by the radical philosopher Slavoj Žižek, and pieces by the subversive collective Brandalism, and more. A foreword from the director John Carpenter himself tops off the collection. Just like Carpenter’s films themselves, They Live: A Visual and Cultural Awakening has been perfectly calibrated to make sure the artistry doesn’t get in the way of the message being presented. “One of the many things I love about books, especially making them, is their quietness. In a world where you can tweet at, comment on, share, push, and connect, books operate in a much more quiet and dedicated space. A book can be a single point of view on a single topic, and, as well as that being quite refreshing in some senses, it’s also quite a political act.” They Live: A Visual and Cultural Awakening is out now: http://bit.ly/ca-theylive

that turns hero props into a physical reality. And for Oldham, it was a chance to work on his favourite John Carpenter film. Having forced the film on a friend back in 2012, Oldham was struck by the idea of realising fictional books, and leveraging all of the unique creative possibilities they offer. “I want these books to be experienced as an artefact from their respective ‘world’,” he explains. “I wanted to explore the film's ideas and ideas the film has continued to spawn for 30 years. What influences the film drew on, and the influences it made on others. I want readers to pick up this book, and have their own epiphanies about its ideas in addition to their own.” Cleverly designed to be an exact replica of the magazine prop from They Live, the book includes contributions from other creators with a love of the film, including artwork by street artist Shepard c o mputera rts.creati vebloq.com - 12 -

Profile for Future PLC

Computer Arts 289 (Sampler)  

You can subscribe to this magazine @ www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk

Computer Arts 289 (Sampler)  

You can subscribe to this magazine @ www.myfavouritemagazines.co.uk