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NON-RECYCLABLE DISPOSABLE COFFEE CUPS

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Take away coffee culture is widely spread and popular in all countries, not exceptionally Lithuania. It was counted that about 40 million paper hot drink cups are consumed in Lithuania yearly. Major USA player in coffeeshop business discarded an estimated more than 3 billion paper cups and 1 billion plastic cups each year in USA only, which brought the company under intense scrutiny. Nearly 80% of the paper cups ended up in landfills or as litter. It is important to know that coffee cups made of combined materials are produced from non-renewable resources, although after one use they are not recycled, but simply discarded and are landfilled.

Problem identification Coffee cups are produced from 95 percent of cardboard and 5 percent of plastic; thus, this combination is a challenge for recycling. The same problem is with other combined packaging such as Tetra-pack. The problem could be solved from several perspectives: coffee cups producers, coffee drinkers and waste users.


Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

WASTE OF USED TIRES

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Context of the problem Used tires are among the most problematic and challenging sources of solid waste. This is due to their large volume, their resilience, and the fact that they contain components that pose a  threat to the environment  and to the people. While tire rubber includes natural rubber from rubber trees, it also contains chemicals, volatile organic compounds, heavy metals. In Lithuania, about 20  000 - 23  000 tons of tires are imported each year and about 18  000 tons of used tires are collected. Only a part of these tires are reused and recycled and the rest are stored or exported to other countries for storage. Additionally, there are voluminous amounts of old tires dropped as garbage in the forests, yards and roadsides.

Problem identification Usually worn out tires are stored in open air thus over time results in leaking of some hazardous substances in to the soil, surface or ground water. Additionally, tire piles are in a big risk to be set on fire. The problem could be solved by creating recycling or reusing system, including creation of motivation system for end users to dispose old tires properly.


EXCESSIVE USE OF PLASTIC BAGS

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Products with more than 350 000 tons of packaging are being sold in Lithuanian market each year, with only 60% of the packaging being collected and reused. Top 3 most collected packaging are carton, metal and glass. According to research made by Ministry of Environment each Lithuanian uses about 40 shopping plastic bags and about 200 thin plastic bags per year. Lithuanian habits are such that most people use plastic bags even when they do not need them, as for banana bunch or dairy products that are already packed. Most of such packaging (plastic bags) still ends up in landfills, that is about 10 percent of total waste, small part is collected and another part is released into the environment. Problem identification The problem arises from two sides: producers still use not optional amount of packaging or not reliable packaging (customers still want to use secondary packaging) and customers that use extra packaging because it is free, they are used to do that and “they will use it for the second time�. The problem could be solved either from the producer or shopper perspective, when their habits can make influence to the market.


HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS IN CASH RECEIPTS

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Bisphenol A (BPA, 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane) is an industrial chemical, which has recently been the subject of debate due to its endocrine modulating activity and related health effects. BPA is mainly used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, but it is also used in many other applications, including thermal papers. Thermal papers are used in, e.g., cash receipts, airline tickets, tickets for transportation and lottery tickets. BPA acts  as a color developer in thermal papers. Contrary to many other applications, in thermal papers, BPA is in its free form.  Each receipt contained 1–2% by weight of the paper of BPA.  Thermal receipt paper is a potential source of occupational exposure to BPA. The European Commission has adopted the regulation concerning the limits of BPA in cash receipts that will come into force in 2019. Problem identification There is more than 30 000 of cash registers in Lithuania, though there is no exact number on thermal paper used. The problem could be solved by develop ing an alternative to cash receipts as they are harmful to health and environment.


NEGATIVE IMPACT OF TOURISM

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Tourism may positively impact country, city or region in terms of economic advantages, however, it may also put pressure on the environment. Lithuania has a huge potential for sustainable tourism development – natural territories, protected areas, local farming, eco and biodynamic farming, local food producers, sustainable restaurants, green hotels. There is no national sustainable tourism scheme, thought “Create for Lithuania” participants have developed the pilot strategy and most likely the national policy of tourism will take sustainability as a main principle for future developments. Today, sustainable tourist, visiting Lithuania, or local traveller faces the problem in identifying the sustainable tourism objects or services. Problem identification Sustainable tourism is the concept of visiting a place as a tourist and trying to make only a positive impact on the environment, society and economy. Tourism can involve primary transportation to the general location, local transportation, accommodations, entertainment, recreation, nourishment and shopping. There is now broad consensus that tourism development should be sustainable; however, the question of how to achieve this remains an object of debate.


Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

GLOBAL WASTE OF FOOD

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Context of the problem Roughly one third of the food produced in the world for the human consumption (~1.3 billion tons every year) gets lost or wasted. Every year, consumers in rich countries waste almost as much food (222 million tons) as the entire net food production of sub-Saharan Africa (230 million tons). Study carried out by Eurostat showed that the majority of food waste (49 %) was thrown away by consumers. Lithuania is not an exception - each year Lithuanians throw away more than 100 thousand tons of food waste that counts for 10 % of total waste disposed at landfills.

Problem identification Food waste is not only a missed opportunity to feed the hungry. It also represents a substantial loss of other resources such as land, water, energy and labor. The problem rises from several perspectives: people do not have good meal planning skills, as they buy too much; grocery stores offers food in bulky packages or makes “great deal� tempting shoppers to buy more than they need.


LOW AWARENESS ON FOOD WASTE SEPARATION

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Waste creates huge environmental problems and recycling is a method to responsibly deal with it. The goal of recycling is to separate waste products into two major categories: Biodegradable and Nonbiodegradable. Bio-waste is defined as biodegradable garden and park waste, food and kitchen waste from households, restaurants, caterers and retail premises, and comparable waste from food processing plants. It does not include forestry or agricultural residues, manure, sewage sludge, or other biodegradable waste such as natural textiles, paper or processed wood. 1,3 M tons of food and kitchen waste is produced in Lithuania annually. According to National waste management plan in 2019 Lithuania should create a system for food waste collection from different sources. Problem identification Personal kitchen waste might be composted on site right in the kitchen, although there is very low awareness on food waste separation. The problem could be solved by finding a way to communicate it to different groups (kids, adults, retired people) and to analyse different existing solutions of composting in apartment kitchen, to develop the best solution for local situation.


SLOW IMPLEMENTATION OF GREEN PROCUREMENT

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Green Public Procurement (GPP) is defined by EU as "a process whereby public authorities seek to procure goods, services and works with a reduced environmental impact throughout their life cycle when compared to goods, services and works with the same primary function that would otherwise be procured.” The targets for Green Public Procurement were established in Lithuania for the 2016-2020. According to them all contracting authorities that perform public procurement must apply Green Public Procurement criteria (in 2018 contracting authorities should achieve not less than 45 % of public procurement for which environmental criteria are established as green). There are environmental criteria for 30 products groups . The implementation of Green Procurement is rather slow and it is difficult for buyers to identify the green producers or service providers. Problem identification There is a need to develop the online trading platform that would bring green buyers and sellers together. The platform could be used by both - private and public sector who has interest in green supply chain.


NEGATIVE IMPACT OF INVASIVE SPECIES

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Round Goby (Neogobius melanostomus) – is one of the most wide-ranging invasive fish on Earth. This fairly small fish used to live in the Black and Caspian seas. However, during last decades round gobies were observed in Baltic sea. Consequently, invasion in this region took a rapid speed. It will negatively impact native fish populations in the Baltic see. Scientists state, that economic and societal effects (positive/ negative) of round gobies in the future could be commercially exploited. In the Baltic sea, fishermen sometimes catch huge quantities of round gobies, as by-catch. The population size would allow the start of commercial exploitation, but lack of market for this fish prevents it. Round goby is the main catch of near shore. Problem identification Invasive species can have a number of negative impacts on the areas that they invade., i.e. the widespread loss of the habitat. Though Round Goby looks ugly, it tastes like perch. There is a possibility to introduce round gobies to local food supplies and to propose to restaurants to contribute to the restoration of the Baltic sea habitat.


UNSUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEM

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem The 100% community based farm represents a completely new way to organize food production in contrast to the present market-based agricultural system which often does not take very good care of the farmer, the land, or the eaters. When a group of eaters/prosumers come together and pool money to support the operating budget of a particular, local, diversified farm, and then share in eating the food that is produced, a stable economic basis is achieved which often cannot be achieved through the market system. In effect, the community of people eating from the farm are not buying food, but rather partnering with the farmer in creating and operating the farm. The members of the farm share in the natural risks and benefits of the harvest and secure the development and future of local farms. Problem identification As the food quality becomes an issue and the need becomes more acute to get local food production and a local food system up and running, there is a need to develop new ways of creating and operating farms. The problem could be solved by developing an initiative in Lithuania for promoting development of local Community Based Farms.


RARE APPLICATION OF LOCAL EXCHANGE

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem A local exchange trading system  is a locally initiated, democratically organised, not-for-profit community enterprise that provides a community information service and records transactions of members exchanging goods and services by using locally created currency. It allows people to negotiate the value of their own hours or services (it might be time exchange, direct exchange, barter, swapping, gifting and sharing). Keeping track of who receives what from whom, people can focus on providing and requesting what is really needed instead of chasing after money. Alternative currency system has two benefits: it provides variety of services and people get to know their neighbours. For instance in Finland ~3,000 members had registered to the Helsinki Timebank, and more than one-third had participated in at least one exchange. Problem identification Local exchange trading system has not been applied widely in Lithuania. The self-help system could be used as a tool for ethical entrepreneurs to share common resources and gain relative autonomy from markets. This would help the new economy strengthen commons and reduce dependence.


UNSUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING OF URBAN SPACES

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Green urban spaces are often decorated with flowerbeds and large flower-pots, that give us impression of colour and beautify the typical grey cityscapes. Very often the annual plants are used for decorating – that means they are planted in early spring in large greenhouse facilities, grown to acceptable size, replanted, grown a bit more and then, in spring time, when the temperature is right, they are transported and planted in the city. In some cases, they are planted just at the start of blooming and discarded right after the blooming ceases to be replaced with other blooming plants. Sometimes as many as three rotations can be done each year. Better case is when perennial plants are grown and at the end of season they are collected by companies that take care of green urban spaces, stored in warehouses over the winter and replanted in the spring again. Problem identification The “flux” of plants is very unsustainable as it requires a lot of resource consumption that is unnecessary. Energy consumption in growing facilities, fertiliser use, fuel for transportation, intensive maintenance and discarding all contribute to global carbon footprint.


HUGE AMOUNTS OF WASTE IN CEMETERIES

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem There are 7835 cemeteries with the area of 3830 ha in Lithuania. According to the tradition grave visitors lit the candles in the plastic or glass cups, leave plastic or natural flowers. It is estimated that in November, during preparation for All Saints day monthly amounts of cemetery waste increases by 100 tons. Later everything gets into waste containers without sorting. The biodegradable waste is mixed with recyclable waste (metal, plastic, wood, textile). There are special sites and posters for visitors, however, the waste management companies do not see progress in this field in recent years.

Problem identification Waste managers are experiencing difficulties in organising waste separation in cemeteries. It is expected to develop an idea on how to keep the t r a d i t i o n a n d p re v e n t w a s t e i n c e m e t e r i e s (biodegradable cups for the candles, reuse of candle cups etc).


INEFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF CEMETERY LAND USE

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability Context of the problem Funerals have seen different changes in post-modern society though Lithuanian burial traditions are still kept. The area occupied by the cemetery is becoming an increasingly important problem, especially for larger cities. Today's city cemetery is being built or transferred outside the city, but because of ageing population, the geographic location of the cemeteries has become a big problem. The problem of cemetery sites in Lithuania is also relevant. There are 52 cemeteries, covering an area of 258 ha in Vilnius and its surroundings. At present there are 7835 cemeteries with the area of 3830 ha in Lithuania. The 20th century tradition to build a stone monument inevitably increased the area of the cemetery. Today, the municipalities of major cities of Lithuania are forced to buy new land for graveyards. The exact number of the graves in the country is not available. Problem identification The biggest problem is the land use. Cemeteries and columbaria can’t be allowed to grow. The problem could be solved by proposing a concept that would reflect local traditions, decrease environmental impact and save urban space.


NEGATIVE EFFECT OF PRODUCING AND SELLING BOTTLED WATER

Impact on Economy Society Environment

Progress level Easy Moderate Challenge

Expected solution Building sustainable value chain Creating good ecofriendly systems The right tool(s) built for energy use Joint industry collaboration Access to data initiated

Problem owners

Main SDG(s)

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Context of the problem Most European cities provide safe, high-quality and good tasting tap water. Yet most restaurants serve bottled water, still or sparkling, often originating from the same sources that tap water is drawn from. In The Netherlands, Made Blue Foundation has successfully introduced Made Blue Water: bars, restaurants & hotels are being equipped with hardware that filters, chills and carbonates tap water, enabling them to serve guests locally bottled cold and sparkling water with a great taste. With each bottle served, Made Blue Foundation ensures 1.000 times as much clean water being made available in developing countries. That not only ensures a more sustainable business over here, but also provides measurable impact elsewhere on the planet. As Made Blue Water is rather profitable for the restaurant owner as well, it is named the best water for guests, restaurants and the planet! Problem identification Using bottled water instead of tap water results in needless pollution due to energy consumption, plastic waste and transportation. How can we introduce Made Blue Water to Lithuania and the Baltics?


ZERO-CLICK BANKING

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Problem owners


BANKING FOR IOT

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Problem owners


FROM DIGITAL BANK TO YOUR FINANCIAL ECOSYSTEM

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Problem owners


PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF NEURAL NETWORKS (AI) AT BANKING

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Problem owners


INVOICES AS A FRICTION POINT: GET RID OF THEM

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Problem owners


SEAMLESS DIGITAL AUTHENTICATION & AUTHORISATION

Futurepreneurs Identified need of sustainability

Problem owners

Futurepreneurs 2018 - Problem cases  
Futurepreneurs 2018 - Problem cases  
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