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STOKE THE FIRE 12

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How to wet your whistle as the weather warms

The inimitable PAT T I S M I T H shares work from her collaboration with dear friend S T E V E N

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Purple Rain with G E O RG I A F RO S T and C L A R A PAG E T

Photography by Emma Tempest

SEBR I NG

Not to be missed in New York

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Music of the moment comes from J O N S I of S I G U R RÓ S , T H E F E AT U R E S , D I SA P P E A R S , E L P E R RO D E L M A R , and T U N E Y A R D S

HOT SS10 FASHION

[HE]ART AFLAME

P R I N T E D M AT T E R

White Heat featuring

specializes in

M AC K E N Z I E H A M I LT O N

artist books

Photography by Harley Weir

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Japanese art collective K AT H Y claws at FutureClaw

118

All Forgotten Yesterdays with J AC O B C O U P E and I SA B E L L E

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Beijing econ guy M I C H A E L P E T T I S and his love of the underground 62

FutureClaw explores Antarctica 98

channels Alice in Wonderland through muse

PR ICE

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Photographer E M I L L E D U B U I S S O N isn’t such a sad guy

Photography by Leon Mark

130

Can’t Buy Me Lowe featuring

56 S H E L LY VO O R H E E S 66

Nobody claws at the future harder than S Y D M E A D

PA M H O G G

DA I S Y L OW E

paints ghosts

Photography by Ben Rayner

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You’re a Woman I’m a Machine Photography by Motohiko Hasui

A LICE DELL A L 80 114

Paris has a bright light and her name is E M A N U E L L E S E I G N E R

R Y A N MC G I N L E Y and S TA N L E Y W H I T N E Y converse in words and

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Rain Supreme featuring ASH ST Y M EST

images with a feature curated by

Photography by Simon Harris

T E A M GA L L E R Y 128 K I NG K R A SH

crashes into the

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Start Again featuring

denim scene

VA L E R I A D M I T R I E N KO Photography by JAM

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UK icon of urban st yle M I C H A E L

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KO P P E L M A N

Concealing the Queen featuring WA N E S SA M I L H O M E N

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The success of LY D I A H E A R S T isn’t genetic

Photography by Nicholas Routzen

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Paid in Full

Photography by Willem Jaspert

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FutureClaw chats with a few designers

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Gotta have a B OY T OY Photography by Simon Harris

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New York Fashion Week is on


FU T U R ECL A W ISSUE 4

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Contributors

A lice Dellal photographed by Julia Kennedy

Ash St ymest photographed by Simon Harris

Lydia Hearst photographed by Justin Hyte

Daisy Lowe photographed by Ben Rayner

a!r creative, nacho alegre, signoret austin, michael becker, claudia behnke, chris benns, daniel benson, robin black, shawn brackbill, jenny cho, arabelle cicardi, adrian clark, greg comollo, sandra cooke, ror y daigle, emile dubuisson, ebaro, josh f inder, megan freilich, james frew, lena griff in, seth gudmunson, mark hampton, amy hancock, donwan harrell, simon harris, johanna hedborg, pam hogg, henr y holland, sophy holland, elizabeth hsieh, justin hyte, jam, willem jaspert, julia kennedy, masahiko koguchi, catherine krudy, andrew leo, patricia lewis, irene manicone, leon mark, eric marten, annette masterman, kazuya matsumoto, lulu mcallister, r yan mcginley, paul mclean, syd mead, charlie le mindu, natasha mygdal, yoshiaki nakada, natsumi, matthew niederhauser, byron o’neill, ruairi oneill, chris partelow, chad pickard, chrissy piper, gareth pritchard, svetlana prodanic, levi pudding, sam ranger, ben rayner, clare read, santi rodriquez, nicholas routzen, richard scorer, steven sebring, greg simpson, patti smith, kenneth soh, gerardo somoza, christopher starbody, gillian stippa, bronw yn stippa, elizabeth sulcer, masaya takagi, liz taw, team galler y, emma tempest, aaron tilley, martha violante, shelly voorhees, harley weir, kristiina wilson, tom winchester, tom wheeler, and stanley whitney


THIS IS FUTURECLAW Issue #4. We are especially excited to introduce this issue. Through our amazing staff ’s unyielding work, we present to you art stories contributed by legendary cultural icons Ryan McGinley, Patti Smith, and Syd Mead, among others. We’ve worked directly with over 150 fashion brands of an international scope to feature beautiful fashion photography with some of the world’s most gorgeous people. I’m finding that the process of putting together the issue, along with the FutureClaw brand, has been exhilarating. The benefit of publishing a periodical vs. a one-off art book is that it’s continuous - every issue brings more amazing contributors and fascinating stories. We forget the past, don’t know what the future brings, but each issue keeps us alive in the moment. Enjoy.

BOBB Y MOZ U M DE R


SPRING DRINK PHOTOGRAPHY gillian stippa - TEXT bronwyn stippa

2

3

6

4

1 5

( 1 ) RAFFAULT CHINON

( 2 ) TRIMBACH GEWURTZTRAMINER

( 3 ) MANNI NOSSING KERNER

Chinon is made from Cabernet Franc, a grape that makes multifaceted and highly underutilized red wines. While it can be quite fullbodied, here it’s light and elegant with a pleasantly herbaceous nose and palate of violets, red raspberr y and black cherr y with touched of black currant, briars and dark chocolate. It makes a super warm-weather wine, since you can slightly chill it without being considered faux pas. Bright acidit y makes it super food friendly. It’s a classic with herb-driven French dishes but equally great with spicy American fare and even some Indian curries. $

Once a wine avoided like the plague for fear of mispronunciation, gah-vertz-truh-meener has f inally become mainstream in the U.S. market. Generally considered a love-or-hate wine, when it’s done right it’s hard to resist. It has a f loral nose of lychee nut and honeysuckle and lust y body offset by a balanced acidit y. The palate sings of vanilla, grapefruit, stony mineralit y with a hint of spice on the totally dr y f inish. The best of the best comes from A lsace, where Trimbach has it down pat. A lthough it’s been lauded for being the perfect thanksgiving wine, it is surprisingly versatile for such a f lamboyant wine. Gewurtztraminer is an invariable go-to for Chinese takeout. $$

Kerner is bizarre hybrid grape named after a 19th centur y drinking song. In the high region where Italy meets Germany Manni Nossing has turned this nameless cyborg into a goddess of a wine in his hand-picked, tiny production. This wine has all that is precise and essential about wine. The palate is electric with bursts of lime zest, fresh green apples and lemon buttercream. It has the riveting mineralit y of cold wet pebbles, yet it’s so lush and concentrated that it’s almost tr ying to be a red wine. A lthough the pairing options for Kerner are a foodie’s veritable wet dream, the most f itting accompaniment for a wine like this is a qualit y glass and, if you’re feeling generous, a good friend. $$$

( 4 ) CASA MARTELLETTI VERMOUTH CLASSICO

( 5 ) GABRIEL BOUDIER SAFFRON INFUSED GIN

( 6 ) MAROLO CAMOMILE GRAPPA

Herbal aperitifs ar making a comeback. This vermouth classico made in the traditional Italian method has over 20 herbs and spices including macerated wild absinth f lowers, myrrh, Chinese rhubarb and bitter orange. It most certainly over delivers for the price. Nice as a mid-afternoon drink if you’re feeling european; other wise tr y it pre-dinner. Sip it straight and well chilled. $

Though the color of this gin is reminiscent of toxic waste, it is actually smooth and almost delicate, which is a breath of fresh air from the harsh and astringent London dr y gins that have dominated the market. For his saffron gin, Gabriel Boudier revived (and ref ined) an old French colonial recipe from the height of the European obsession with India. In addition to saffron, recipe includes juniper, coriander, orange peel, angelica seeds, iris and fennel. For a cocktail tr y an ‘Arg y Bhaji:’ Mix 50 ml saffron gin, 25 ml cinnamon syrup, and 1 crushed pear. Other wise, it’s stellar on the rocks or with tonic. $$

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This is a stellar liqueur made from Camomile f lowers infused in Nebbiolo grappa. It makes a good introduction to grappa for the fainthearted, as the subtley-sweet, f loral character of camomile smoothes and offsets the powerful alcoholic punch inherent in grappa. Marolo’s recipe was traditionally used for its medicinal properties and there is no question that quaffing this will calm the ner ves. $$$


PENTATONIC MUSIC SHOP

(NYC)

Pentatonic resulted from the yearnings of Seth Founds and Kerry Martinez to provide Greenpoint, Brooklyn’s many musicians with a shop that had what they wanted. The pair teamed up with William Burnett and Pete Kress to create a place that stocks, repairs, and sets up instruments of all shapes and vintages. They have both generic and hard-to-find guitars, harmonicas, accordians, keyboards, drum machines, samplers, effects, books, and records. In-house luthier Domigos Fialho has thirt y years of experience to invest in the stringing of your guitar or the repair of your tube amp. Pentatonic even has a sound system that they would love to rent you for your next band practice or dance part y. Beware, though, the owners are music aficionados themselves so don’t be surprised if the best stuff has already been picked over. 1 3 9 F ra n kl i n S t . B r o o kly n , N Y 1 1 2 2 2 347.599 .2576

Photo by Shawn Brackbill.

ACE HOTEL

(NYC)

Many great things have been said about the Ace Hotel group’s recently opened New York location, and we want to help spread the good word. Our stay there this past fall confirmed all that we had heard about the establishment’s sophisticated marriage of superb hospitalit y and signature st yle. The expansive and beautifully designed lobby’s constant buzz makes it feel at once both a speakeasy and intersection of some sort: not only has Ace trucked in the coolest design details, but it has also managed to reign in the cit y’s cultural elite, too. This all makes for a grand entrance your first time through the doors, but the real moment of appreciation arrives when you step into a room that almost seems like it was made just for you. 2 0 We s t 2 9 t h S t . Ne w Yo rk , N Y 212.679.2222

Photos courtesy Ace Hotel New York.


MUSIC

SIGUR RÓS FRONTMAN JONSI GATHERS HIS WITS AND GOES SOLO PHOTO willem jaspert - TEXT ruairi oneill

for reframing the way we look at modern music. They engineered a st yle soaked in traditional Nordic f lavours and even invented a new language, Vo l e n s k a, to accompany their eerie mix of indulgent and eccentric sound creation. S I G U R RÓ S H AV E B E E N R E S P O N S I B L E

Now, the experimental mind behind the Icelandic supergroup is preparing to release a nine track solo album simply titled, ‘G o ’. The pioneer of audio science and Hopelandic lyricism, Jónsi Birgisson, is set to release one of the most groundbreaking works of 2010. Having just released the instrumental art-piece R i c e b oy S l e e p s (2009) with co-producer, band-mate and long-term partner Alex Somers, the pair decided to expand on Birgisson’s acoustic waff lings and dedicate their time and efforts into solo excess. “I’ve never been so stressed, unsure and worried in my life,” says Jónsi. “In Sigur Rós you are in four-person cocoon, a safe environment with people to bounce ideas off. But now I suddenly have to know what’s best totally on my own, and that’s been a new and very interesting experience for me. Fear is a big beast. It’s powerful stuff and you have to tame it and overcome it.” Jónsi initially thought he would be making a low-key album until, as he says, “somewhere along the line, it just sort of exploded.” That explosion resulted in a barrage of harmonious aural fireworks. What had started out as a tamed acoustic creature evolved into a multi-dimensional musical behemoth. “I have written many, many songs over the years that didn’t fit the band, and I put them away in different folders – electronic, acoustic, ambient, pop – for future projects. If I’ d known this album was going to end up the way it has I might have drawn from some more categories,” says Jónsi. His aptitude for free spirited musicology is overseen by Producer Peter Katis (Interpol, The National, Tok yo Police Club, Fanfarlo) and intensified by the world renowned contemporary composer, Nico Muhly, who has more recently worked alongside Bjork, Anthony & The Johnsons and Grizzly Bear. “Nico and I met and in the first night we came up with five separate arrangements. We just talked about a song – “ build a fairytale garden full of birds and animals” - Nico plays some chords and something amazing happens. He is

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free and spontaneous and unafraid of throwing stuff away, which I really like” says Birgisson. The protégé of art music pioneer Philip Glass, arranges all of the songs on ‘Go’, and is responsible for incorporating strings, brass and woodwind into the playful realm of Jónsi’s mystical soundscapes. Birgisson’s manager claims that Muhly, an ”Icelander-by-prox y”, bolsters the ingenuit y of a man that has set the bar for experimental composition and profound creativit y in the last ten years. Their combined inventiveness and giddying f lamboyance is also supported by the percussive genius of Samuli Kosminen, a close friend from experimental Icelandic group Mum, who Jónsi had heard playing with Somers in Nordic art-collective, Kira Kira. Recently via the Jónsi Birgisson website, mailing list subscribers have been granted free downloads of B oy Li l i k o i , the first scheduled single release from the impending album. It’s stacked with layers of oddball sampling techniques that reveal swarms of bees, chimes, percussion, wind and string sections, synth, thigh slapping, heav y panting and banging suitcases. It has the intense yet carefree sound associated with a Disney epic, with Birgisson’s breathtaking vocals and distinctive falsetto providing a magical momentum. The single conforms to the albums organised yet progressive chaos and is just as diverse and unpredictable - delivered with the same modern grace and lateral thinking. Put simply, life without Sigur Rós and Jónsi Birgisson would be a dreary abyss, a bland canvas devoid of the wide-eyed wonder and electronic ambience that has permeated the souls of music lovers around the globe. G o is an effortless extension of his incalculable talent and crazed initiative plus it’s translated into English to encompass all. It is an immeasurable sonic mayhem that can only be produced by a man who throws shoes at bins to achieve ‘that’ sound. It simply cannot arrive quickly enough. JONSI - GO IS AVAILABLE WORLDWIDE.


MUSIC

NASHVILLE’S THE FEATURES DELIVER THEIR OWN UNIQUE BRAND OF AMERICANA PHOTO rory daigle TEXT ruairi oneill

adroit bands that have broken the old-timey Tennessee cliché. No plaid, no Stetson or dependence on lap-steel. Since forming in the late nineties, the band has been pushing their eclectic sounds to anyone that will listen. Now it seems, people are beginning to take notice… T H E F E AT U R E S A R E O N E O F T H O S E

A national tour of the United States supporting the Kings of Leon catapulted The Features into the American consciousness, enabling them to showcase their vast catalogue of tracks. “We do what we do..” says Matt Pelham - frontman of the Murfreesboro rock band, “and the Kings liked the sound…”. Pelham is referring to the decision made by the Followill siblings to sign The Features as the first band on their new record imprint, 429 Records. With roots predominantly in the Nashville rock ’n’roll scene, The Features urgent mix of Tennessee strings and Americana make it near impossible to characterise them by one particular genre. Put quite simply, they can play them all. Years of gigging, travelling, personal strife and exposure to world music have moulded their exclusive st yle of dynamic song craft, lyric writing and effervescent composition into one of the most exciting sounds to cross the North Atlantic in some time. The four-piece originate from an area born into country and western, yet their latest collection of tracks from new album, S o m e K i n d of S a l v a t i o n, touch on everything from Blues to Indie. “I think it’s because we all had a prett y diverse listening experience growing up” says Pelham. “We combine our ideas to get the sound, it’s no one person’s choice, it’s a mix of everything we grew up on and enjoy listening to”. The absence of a major label when recording meant the release could be uninhibited and bold. Ideas could be bounced

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FU T U R ECL A W M A G A ZIN E I S S U E 4

around and all the eclectic tastes and f lair for distinct changes could be added unabashed. The collection pinches curious ears and sends images of The Shins, Placebo, The Jam and Cold War Kids all huddled together on a studio project. The opening track W h a t e v e r g e t s yo u b y welcomes listeners with Gypsy chants, unmistakeable traces of folk, components of Jazz, rock and shoe-gaze, which leads into F o u n d a t i o n s c ra c k e d , a heartfelt dizzying sing-along that crashes into piano laced bedlam. It is playful and sophisticated in its approach but certainly not clean shaven. Dramatic horn breakdowns support deft piano climbs and synthesizers feed into acoustic guitar. “We kinda threw in all these ideas, all our tastes and this is what you get” states Pelham. For this reason, S o m e K i n d of S a l v a t i o n is an authentic bar-room sound that smells of tobacco and is bourbon kissed. It morphs from classic to electric and traces the British Indie scene with a crooked finger. “ The Nashville Indie music scene has been getting larger and larger over the past few years, and qualit y was scattered as the attraction to play in Nashville got stronger. We did our thing, finished the recording of the album in a friend’s house, then we got a call to re-release it with 429”. The rest as they say is history. Pelham’s lyricism and dramatic delivery force the sound forward, whilst the magnificent Rollum Haas on drums, the sublime bass play of Roger Dabbs and spontaneous keystrokes of Mark Bond provide essential direction, feeding those pop hungry heads with subtly t weaked opuses. It’s the young sound of the southern states with a healthy side-serving of industry sav v y prowess. Out of the mass of wanton starlets emerging from this burgeoning underground setting, The Features’ layered and distinguished sound may well be the beginning of a legacy.


THE LAWLESS SOUND OF DISAPPEARS PHOTO greg simpson TEXT ruairi oneill

The Rainbo Club, a well known local bar on a windy Chicago night back in 2007. Since then, frontman Brian Case of The Pony’s and Graeme Gibson (drums) of BOAS have been developing ideas with Damon Carruesco (bass) and Jonathan van Herik (guitar) in a bid to engineer an uncomplicated and straightforward sound. D I SA P P E A R S W E R E B O R N A B OV E

It hasn’t taken them long to secure a place on the rock radar as Krank y Records are due to release their new album Lu x in April 2010. “We can’t wait to get the new material out as there’s a lot of new songs and a lot of new versions of tracks taken from Li v e o v e r Th e R a i n b o s e s s i o n s. We never intended the Rainbo sessions to be an official release. We just recorded it to sell at shows and it kind of took off from there,” says Case. Morbid tremolos provide the podium for Case’s dramatic vocal st yle, effortlessly f lexing his oversized punk glands whilst sharing a stage presence comparable to the indomitable and dashing Ian Curtis. The band share a mindset of t wisted simplicit y and unleash a dark tirade of post-punk garage riffs like a mob of moody dissenters armed with guitars. Stumbling onto Ma g i c s (from the Rainbo Live sessions) provides a perfect example of their rebellious sound. The lawless tone, hypnotic rhythmic distortion and warped ampery animates their 2009 LP with a riotous fist. As does No O t h e r, a track that takes a crude and simple approach; rough and unadulterated. No obvious or calculated routine, no gimmicks, and not one single element of Pop. “It’s minimal rock music” says Case, “totally kraut inf luenced. We focus on keeping it simple so it’s unintentionally physical, especially when we play live.” The disorder unearthed by Krank y Records opened the doors to a diverse live arena for Disappears, thus exposing them to a whole new audience. Turn on the television, buy an issue of NME or Rolling Stone to see youthful tribes mimicking their leaders, but the hordes of young commercial listeners, who strive to look, listen and conduct themselves relative to their musical tastes is at an all time high. A grittier, punk fuelled salute is required to rouse these docile conformers and the Disappears music, explains Brian Case, is open to anyone

who wants to listen. “We don’t care about who likes our band and who doesn’t - ultimately we do it for us and if people are into it that’s great.  We do this for everyone.  That’s how you survive.” The crowds who immerse themselves in angst may find this sound far too visceral to connect with but whether the cool kids like them is a complete “non-issue” and they make a concerted effort to provide for all listeners. They keep their loyal online followers happy with limited releases completely free of charge. “Downloading is a fact of life, time to adapt”, says Case, “ because the songs aren’t complete until everyone gives their input and creates their parts. Especially the fans. The genesis of the songs stems from many places.” It’s this unified effort that enables Disappears to deliver an exceptionally roguish live performance too, relying on a jam mentalit y to set the foundations of their dirt y rock. Their compositions are simpler than a stick, and boldly arousing compared to the 2D noise that seems to lubricate every earlobe in the mainstream market. We love the sound of the Disappears. We adore their awkward boasting and feedback tomfoolery, their drawn out solo’s and experimental edge. We’re besotted with their musical imagery and how it conjures scenes of Trashy Heroin Chic without the prett y smoke-screen. The minimalist approach, the industrial sounds, the harsh lyrical tones and st ylishly way ward demeanour accompanying the reverb-heav y wall of sound are certainly going to inject something into the veins of listeners every where. They play coal-mining rock, ‘alone time’ music for the one and only Arthur Scargill. DISAPPEARS - LUX IS OUT NOW.


MUSIC

EL PERRO DEL MAR TACKLES A NEW COLLABORATION PHOTO johanna hedborg - INTERVIEW lulu mcallister

with Sarah Assbring: she’s beautiful, she makes beautiful music, and she’s not afraid to be v ulnerable. Frequently compared to fellow Swedish pop songstress Lykke Li, Assbring explores prett y pop melodies—but with a seasoned balance of wide-eyed playfulness, sultry soul sensibilit y, and mellif luous heartbreak. The demure chanteuse, who goes by El Perro del Mar (Spanish for “ The Dog from the Sea”), has already produced a small body of work, including a limited-release early split single with Jens Lekman and a widely well-received self-titled second studio album. Now, for her fourth full-length album, L o v e i s No t P o p, Assbring opens her studio doors to Rasmus Hägg of experimental Swedish group Studio. While on break from preparing for her U.S. fall tour, we shot the breeze electronically about this blissfully congruous musical union and the album that resulted.   L U L U - You’ve been writing, producing, and playing music for the better part of the decade. How has your creative approach in the studio changed during that time? I T I S E A S Y T O FA L L I N L OV E

It’s a l l b e e n a c c o r d i n g to a s t e a dy e v o l v i n g m o v e m e n t . I fe e l l i k e e v e r y t i m e I ’ v e s p e n t a w ay f r o m my s t u d i o a n d re t u r n e d , I ’ v e b r o u g h t s o m e t h i n g n e w to i t : n e w i d e a s , n e w re a c t i o n s to h o w I d i d t h i n g s p re v i o u s ly, n e w i n s t r u m e n t s , n e w w ays of a p p r o a c h i n g s o n g - w r i t i n g . Wi t h t h i s , my l a t e s t a l b u m , t h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t t h i n g I c o u l d d o w a s to b r i n g a n o t h e r p e rs o n i n to my w o rl d , my s a fe e n v i r o n m e n t . I h a v e n’ t fe l t re a dy u n t i l n o w, a n d I t h i n k t h a t’s t h e m a i n re a s o n i t w o rk e d o u t s o w e l l . SA R A H -

So for your first studio collaboration with another artist you chose to work with Rasmus Hägg of Studio. Hägg has also collaborated with Rubies, Kylie Minogue, Love is LU LU -

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All, A Mountain of One, Windsurf, and the Shout Out Louds, among other artists. What was it like working with him? It w a s a n e x t ra o rd i n a r i ly g re a t e x p e r i e n c e . Wo rki n g w i t h R a s m u s fe l t v e r y n a t u ra l a n d i n t u i t i v e — I g u e s s i t h a s to d o w i t h u s b e i n g qu i t e s i m i l a r. We’ re b o t h p e r fe c t i o ni s t s a n d u s e d to w o rki n g a l o n e , b u t w e b o t h fe l t w e h a d to c h a l l e n g e o u rs e l v e s n o w. I s o m e t i m e s fe l t l i k e I w a s l o o ki n g a t mys e l f i n t h e m i r r o r s e e i n g h i m s i t t i n g fo r h o u rs a n d h o u rs e d i t i n g a s o u n d . It w a s s w e e t a n d g a v e m e a p e rs p e c t i v e o n t h i n g s , to o . SA R A H -

Have you added any new quirks to your own creative process based on your experience working with Hägg? LU LU -

O n e of my g re a t e s t fe a rs a b o u t c ol l a b o ra t i n g w i t h o t h e r p e o p l e h a s b e e n a b o u t c o m m u n i c a t i n g a n d l o s i n g my i n i t i a l v i s i o n s a l o n g t h e w ay. In R a s m u s’ c o m p a ny I fe l t s a fe e n o u g h t h a t I e v e n w a n t e d to l o s e mys e l f a l o n g t h e w ay. No w I fe e l l i k e t h a t v e r y t h i n g i s o n e of t h e g re a t e s t a s p e c t s a b o u t a c re a t i v e p r o c e s s: n o t w a n t i n g to c o n t r ol i t . SA R A H -

The songs you create seem to dive tonally into different layers of emotion. This st yle seems especially present on Love is Not Pop, which treads into retro pout y ennui, chaotic laugher, melancholy chords, etc. Do you find it cathartic to produce such diversely moody music? LU LU -

I g u e s s s o , b u t I g u e s s I a l s o d o n’ t re a l ly t h i n k of i t l i k e t h a t a ny m o re . I ju s t kn o w I d o h a v e to w r i te a n d m a k e m u s i c to b e h a p p y. It’s n o t l i k e I c o n s c i o u s ly w r i t e m u s i c a s t h e ra p y. D o i n g i t h a s to f i l l a n a r t i s t i c a n d a e s t h e t i c p u r p o s e , to o . SA R A H -


TALKIN WITH TUNE YARDS PHOTO chrissy piper INTERVIEW drew stock

Is your music about something? I think it’s about your voice — it’s incredible. DR EW -

Th a t’s n i c e of yo u to s ay. I s u p p o s e i t m i g h t b e a b o u t f i n d i n g my v o i c e ... I s t a r t e d t h e a l b u m wh e n I w a s n’ t v e r y u s e d to s i n g i n g i n p u b l i c , b u t o v e r t h e t w o a n d a h a l f ye a rs i t to o k f r o m f i rs t s o n g to l a s t , t h a t h a d re a l ly c h a n g e d f r o m to u r i n g a l o t a n d a l s o f r o m g r o w i n g m o re c o n f i d e n t i n my re c o r d i n g s a n d s o n g s . MERRILL -

I l i k e to l e a v e i n t e r p re t a t i o n s of t u n e - ya rd s m u s i c to t h e l i s t e n e r b u t i f I h a d to s u m i t u p , I ’ d s ay t h a t my m u s i c i s a b o u t W h e re i s t h e i n t e rs e c t i o n of my p e rs o n a l e x p e r i e n c e w i t h t h e re s t of t h e w o rl d ? Ho w d o my p e rs o n a l c h o i c e s a n d e x p e r i e n c e s i m p a c t o t h e rs o r a f fe c t t h e w o rl d ? A n d wh a t d o I d o w i t h t h a t kn o wl e d g e ?   D R E W - You’ve been touring a lot this year. You seem like the t ype of band that focuses more on playing live than recording. I g u e s s t h a t’s h o w i t s e e m s n o w, e h? No w w e d o p l ay l i v e m o re t h a n w e re c o r d , a b s ol u t e ly. B u t o n c e u p o n a t i m e i t w a s ju s t m e i n a t i ny r o o m m a ki n g re c o rd i n g s . S o t u n e - ya r d s b e g a n a s a re c o r d i n g p r oje c t , a n d i t to o k m e a w h i l e to f i n d t h e l o o p i n g p e d a l a n d t h e o t h e r e l e m e n t s t h a t make the live show intriguing. MERRILL -

We p l ay l i v e s o m u c h t h a t i t’s h a r d to s e e h o w to g e t b a c k to re c o rd i n g u n l e s s w e m a k e a l i v e a l b u m , wh i c h m a ny p e o p l e s u g g e s t . B u t I fe e l t h a t re c o r d i n g i s a p e r fo r m a n c e u n to i ts e l f — t h e w ay I l i k e to re c o r d i n v o l v e s a l o t of i m p r o v i s a t i o n , s p l i t- s e c o n d d e c i s i o n- m a k i n g , a n d s i n gl e - t a k e v o c a l s a n d o t h e r p a r t s . Ho p e f u l ly I ’ l l s t a r t to fo c u s o n t h a t ki n d of p e r fo r m a n c e a g a i n , s o o n .   D R E W - Do you like being on the road? No p e , n o t r i g h t n o w . I d i d fo r a l o n g t i m e . I l i k e m e e t i n g p e o p l e , I l o v e s e e i n g n e w c i t i e s a n d to w n s , I l o v e , e v e n , s e e i n g Io w a a n d K a n s a s p a s s b y my w i n d o w. B u t I ’ v e b e e n o n t h e r o a d fo r t h e m a j o r i t y of t h e l a s t fo u r ye a rs of my l i fe . I ju s t fo u n d a h o m e i n C a l i fo r n i a . I w i l l l o v e to u r i n g a s s o o n a s I g e t o u t t h e re a g a i n b e c a u s e I fe e l m o s t mys e l f w h e n I ’ m p e r fo r m i n g , b u t r i g h t n o w, s i t t i n g a t my MERRILL -

ki tc h e n t a b l e , I fe e l l i k e i t m i g h t b e n i c e to s t ay h e re fo r a v e r y, v e r y, v e r y, l o n g t i m e . To s l o w d o w n a n d s i n k i n fo r a t i m e . B u t I t h i n k I ’ l l h a v e to w a i t u n t i l I ’ m 4 0 fo r t h a t .   D R E W - The recordings that you have done seem to have that Ariel Pink t ype lo-fi aesthetic. What’re you striving to get with it? Imperfection? I ’ v e n e v e r h e a rd A r i e l P i n k b u t I t h i n k I c a n i m a g i n e . L a t e ly I ’ v e t h o u g h t a l o t a b o u t t h i s qu e s t i o n b e c a u s e I ’ m t r y i n g to d e c i d e h o w to re c o rd t h i n g s fo r a f u t u re a l b u m , a n d t h e qu e s t i o n i s , d o I t a k e a l o t of m o n e y f r o m a re c o rd c o m p a ny to g o i n to a s t u d i o , o r d o I d o i t mys e l f fo r n o t h i n g? Th e re a re p r o s a n d c o n s o n b o t h s i d e s . D o i n g i t yo u rs e l f i s a b i g - o p a i n i n t h e a s s . B u t d o i n g i t fo r s o m e o n e e l s e , wh i c h i s wh a t i t fe e l s l i k e wh e n yo u t a k e m o n e y, s e e m s w r o n g i n s o m e w ays , o r a t t h e v e r y l e a s t , u n i n s p i r i n g . MERRILL -

I d o a d o re a s e n s e of i m p e r fe c t i o n . I c o n s i d e r mys e l f e x t re m e ly i m p e r fe c t , a n d I t h i n k s h o w i n g o n e’s i m p e r fe c t i o n to o t h e rs g i v e s t h e m f re e d o m to b e e x a c t ly wh o t h e y a re , f l a w s a n d a l l . R e c o rd i n g w i t h o u t d e v i c e s t h a t p e r fe c t a m us i c i a n’s e f fo r t s l e a d s to w o rk t h a t fe e l s m o re h u m a n , a n d p e rh a p s m o re p e rs o n a l , m o re u p - c l o s e . I a l s o fe e l t h a t i t’s i m p o r t a n t to b e a b l e to c re a t e w i t h o u t n e e d i n g a wh ol e l o t of m o n e y ; a t l e a s t fo r m e t h a t’s i m p o r t a n t . Mo n e y i s f i n e , a n d re c o rd i n g e n g i n e e rs a n d p r o d u c e rs d e s e r v e m o n e y fo r t h e i r w o rk , b u t I d o n’ t t h i n k a nyo n e s h o u l d w a i t fo r m o n e y o r g o i n to d e b t to m a k e m u s i c . S o m e of t h e b e s t m u s i c i n t h e w o rl d h a p p e n s fo r f re e . Mu s i c i s f re e .   D R E W - I am really glad you make music, Merrill. Hearing you live at The Monkey House in Winooski, Vermont was a special night. Do you remember it at all?   M E R R I L L - O f c o u rs e , I re m e m b e r i t! W h o c o u l d fo r g e t a to w n w i t h t h e n a m e Wi n o o s ki? P l u s I l i v e d i n Ve r m o n t fo r a l o n g t i m e s o a l l V T s h o w s a re s p e c i a l to m e . We w a l k e d d o w n b y t h e w a t e r b e fo re t h e s h o w a n d I w a s v e r y s u r p r i s e d wh e n m o re t h a n f i v e p e o p l e s h o w e d u p . I ’ m gl a d yo u w e re t h e re ! MERRILL GARBUS IS TUNE YARDS.


P h ot o g r a ph s & A r t work b y PATTI SMITH & STEVEN SEBRING I nt e r v i e w b y JULIE BOBEK I nt r o d u c t i on b y DREW STOCK 22

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PAT T I SM I T H is a national treasure. Though best

known for her contributions as a musician, Patti is also a distinguished visual artist, poet, and social activist whose efforts have had a profound inf luence on contemporary American culture. In 1996 she met photographer ST E V E N SE BR I NG at a shoot and the two became fast friends. Steven, exhausted by the commercial world of fashion, proposed documenting Patti’s tour with Bob Dylan set to begin that same year. Patti agreed and the two began a collaboration that would eventually evolve into an intense examination and celebration of Patti’s exceptional life through film. The project recently culminated with the release of a full length documentary entitled DR E A M OF L I F E some eleven years after the pair began working together. Patti and Steven’s extended period of extreme closeness has also yielded a travelling joint exhibition which includes photographs they have taken of eachother, personal artifacts, and other artworks. Some of those images are presented here.

JULIE SPEAKS TO PATTI

Steven filmed you for eleven years to make the documentary Dream of Life. The film has received awards from both the Durban International Film Festival and the Sundance Film Festival. Through Steven’s camera lens you have shared your life as a multi-talented female artist, poet, musician and mother. How would you describe the experience of making the film? Why eleven years? JULIE -

To me the eleven years was based on friendship. He shot me intermittently when he had film and when he could af ford to. The eleven years have been filmed with friendship. PAT T I -

The film includes everything from the back yard scenes with your dog to an entertaining conversation on the beach with the musician Flea. Do you have any favorite scenes? JULIE -

I think seeing my mother and father, since both my parents have passed away. This is the only footage of my mother and father toward the end of their lives. Steven captured them both so well. I feel really lucky to have the footage... Seeing my children grow.

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Visiting the town that Arthur Rimbaud was born and buried in. I think the footage for that scene was beautiful. On Jan.5th, you and Steven celebrated the opening of your “Objects of Life” exhibit at the Robert Miller Gallery in New York. The show was filled with many photographs and personal artifacts. Can you tell us a little bit about what these Objects of Life are and what they mean. JULIE -

It’s a personal thing. It could be something as humble as my father’s cof fee cup, which I cherish. Or it could be something quite valuable and old. For example, I travel with an expensive Russian ikon. Or some of my children’s books which are valuable and rare because I read and cherished them as a child, too. Therefore, these books are both valuable and old. My dress that I wore as a little girl. Sometimes it is just a stone that I picked up in a special place. All these objects have meaning. Precious things may be meaningless to another person but have a great value to another. We all have Objects of Life. PAT T I -


Your new book Just Kids was also released in January. I have yet to read it and was hoping you could tell me a little bit about it. JULIE -

The book focuses on our youth and the magic of youth. The book encompasses a little of our childhood, a little of Robert [Mapplethorpe] and I living in Brooklyn near Pratt Institute, and then some about how we moved to the Chelsea Hotel in 1969 and then on to the world. The photo on the book cover has great sentimental value. I think Robert and I were 22 or 23 years. It was our second anniversary together. We went to Coney Island to celebrate. An old man with a box camera took our picture. We were on the boardwalk and paid someone to take our picture. We were very happy that day. PAT T I -

Since moving to New York Cit y in 1969, you have become part of the history of CBGB, Max’s Kansas Cit y, and the Chelsea Hotel. How has New York changed the most since your early years in the cit y? Or is everything still the same? JULIE -

It is a lot more expensive now. It was easier to find a cheap apartment and get a job in the bookstore and not only survive but excel. It was easier to build an artistic community because it was more af fordable. New York might be a little more touristy now. In the past it was more artist friendly. New York is a great city but has lost a little of its charm. PAT T I -

After watching you paint with Robert in Dream of Life and seeing the art work you produced with collaborators at Robert Miller, I began to wonder how you came to drawing and painting. Has it always been there for you or did it come after you found an identit y as a musician? JULIE -

I was quite young I started painting and drawing. I was in high school and I learned from Robert. When Robert and I lived together, he inspired me to continue to paint and draw. We did a lot of work together. I learned from working, painting and drawing. I studied several other artists’ work and visited museums. I don’t have any formal training but I really studied and learned from others. PAT T I -

When you began working on the album Horses with John Cale after Clive Davis signed you to Arista records, did you ever imagine that it would become one of the 100 best albums of all time? JULIE -

No. When we recorded Horses in 1975 I imagined it appealing to the disenfranchised or to people like myself... or more mavericks... or those outside society. I never dreamed it would have such a life. It’s a beautiful thing. It seems to resonate even now. It’s a compliment that new generations find it inspiring and are listening to it. PAT T I -

JULIE -

Are you going to produce a new album?

Yes, I am recording right now. However, I am also working on several other projects. I started recording and hope to finish a new album later this spring. PAT T I -

In Dream of Life you reference several musicians: Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Janis Joplin, Mick Jagger, and Jim Morrison. Have all these figures been equally inf luential to you? JULIE -

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Bob Dylan was my biggest influenced me from those listed because he influenced in many ways: everything from his image to the way he dressed to his body language to his mergence of poetry to his rock’n’roll to his sense of being aware of the world around him. Oh, and his humanistic aspects…. his sense of humor. PAT T I -

Several of your pictures at Robert Miller were taken with a Polaroid Land 250 camera. Do you still have it and use it? JULIE -

Oh yes, I still have and use my Polaroid. I stockpiled the film. I am sure someone like Fuji will continue producing the film. I think Fuji is trying to make a type of instant film camera. But of course, there’s nothing like Polaroid. PAT T I -

Many photographers these day are using digital cameras. Have you tried one or do you still like to use your trust y Polaroid? JULIE -

I haven’t used a digital camera yet. I have used my iPhone for my website and it works quite well. I suppose in the near future I will use a digital camera. But for right now, I am still using my Polaroid. I feel really grateful to shoot with film. But film is not very environmentally friendly. There are reasons to change. So maybe I should try something new. PAT T I -

There is a scene in Dream of Life where you wonder aloud what is in a Prada bag. Do you wear Prada? Who is your favorite designer? JULIE -

It wasn’t my Prada bag in the movie. But I did joke around in the movie and had a little fun. I do like Prada, but my favorite designer is Ann Demeulemeester. PAT T I -

Are there three words that describe your friend and collaborator Steven Sebring? JULIE -

PAT T I -

A good brother.

JULIE SPEAKS TO STEVEN

How would you describe the experience of following Patti around for eleven years to make your Dream of Life documentary? JULIE -

I wasn’t really out to make a movie about Patti. Most of the time I was out with Patti and I didn’t have a movie camera. I was learning about her first. I was building trust and a relationship. When I started, it was an organic process that just happened. Then we started thinking maybe we should make a movie out of this. I got a great editor and finished it. There was never a crew. Nothing was preset. We just hung out. I never asked Patti any questions. If she wanted to tell me something, she would. STE V EN -

JULIE -

Would you repeat the process?

No, I wouldn’t do it again unless that person was interesting. Patti really captured my heart. Now that I have done my first full-length film, I am more interested in doing a fictional film. I am not into making documentary films. You have to give a documentary at least five years and revisit that person. I don’t know, maybe I would… the person would have to be pretty extraordinary. STE V EN -


JULIE -

What are your fondest scenes?

I love those with her mom and dad who have passed away and those of the dog and the house. The Rimbaud scene is very magical. It just fell into place. There isn’t just one scene that I love. All the scenes are so dif ferent. I love the war-protesting scene. I love the Israel scene. But the Rimbaud scene is the most poetic. STE V EN -

You have collaborated with Patti again for the “Objects of Life” exhibit. How did you and Patti decide to work together on the on it? Who had the idea? JULIE -

I had the idea. When I was filming her in her bedroom during the editing process, Patti was talking to me about pieces, which I call artifacts. I was getting to know the stories about these objects. It was really cool to me because I could actually touch and feel the pieces. And with all my still life work in the past, I wanted to take pictures of the artifacts, so I asked Patti if I could. She said the pictures were so badass. So we took them to the premiere of Sundance, then to Berlin and Australia. Finally we made it to New York and did it on a grand scale at the Robert Miller Gallery. The show is a lot more full. The exhibit is a complete story here in New York, which is what Patti and I envisioned. STE V EN -

JULIE -

What do you think gives objects like these meaning?

Objects have a story behind them. Seeing these things in that context and putting them behind glass makes them more precious. I find this interesting and people are intrigued by this… STE V EN -

JULIE -

So is there an object in the show that you cherish

most? I don’t necessarily cherish the objects. But I do like Patti’s childhood dress and the camera and her suitcase. I can’t just pick one. At our event last night, we talked about the pieces, everyone liked something dif ferent which makes this even more interesting to me. STE V EN -

making has been the most rewarding because of Patti. I like doing portrait work and abstract nudes. I am looking to do more books and shows. I take fashion very serious and I take my art very seriously. JULIE -

My fashion career started when I was in Italy and I was shooting men’s stories. Then I moved to New York and started shooting for Ralph Lauren and then women’s campaigns and celebrity portraits. Then I met Patti... and I started shooting short films with dialogue: DKNY and New York Stories. The Fashion industry is behind the times. I started making these short stories many years ago. People are trying to catch up to this part of fashion and film, still no one is doing this. No one wants to see another behind scenes of fashion show. I say take the responsibility and be new... do something bigger. Now we have the vehicle of the Internet. It wasn’t easy trying to stream those short films before. Now it is easy. I saw the opportunity to make a movie years ago. I also like to be diverse and make art installations and books. Companies have to start thinking on this level. STE V EN -

Do you own the same camera as Patti, a Polaroid Land 250? JULIE -

Yes, I do. I have a bunch of them. I supply film to Patti. I used to shoot a lot of Polaroid. Fuji still makes film for the Polaroid. I am going to shoot Patti again and use Polaroid again. STE V EN -

Patti is obviously a very special person in your life: a dear friend, a collaborator, and even your son’s godmother. Through the years you have spent with her, how has Patti inf luenced your life? JULIE -

I have learned so much from her. She has introduced me to poets like Rimbaud and Blake. She is politically outspoken. I love her as an artist and she keeps true to herself and the things she does. STE V EN -

JULIE -

Your photography book Bygone Days was a collaboration with your great, great uncle John Penor. How did your experience working with him inf luence Objects of Life?

How exactly did your photography career start?

What three words describe Patti?

JULIE -

Well, actually, Objects of Life has influenced my next project, which I have incorporated Bygone Days into. When Johnny passed away a few years ago, I inherited all the land, horses and the house. At the beginning of Dream of Life, the horses that were running were actually Johnny’s horses. They are Arabians. Johnny lived in that house ‘til the day he died. It’s an archeological site. When I had to go back to the house to secure it I had moments when I thought, “Am I doing this right? Where are my gloves?” I was looking up the objects from the book. Now I am working on a full traveling exhibit of Bygone Days. I hope to get the Smithsonian involved. It’s American history. I am doing a series of large format pictures of all the photos John took and plan to include pictures of his artifacts. STE V EN -

Photography and filmmaking are clearly a strong part of your life. Do you feel like one is more rewarding than the other? JULIE -

STE V EN -

It depends on the type of pictures I am taking, but film-

STE V EN -

Soulful, beautiful, inspiring.


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MICHAEL PETTIS & D-22 PHOTOGRAPHY matthew niederhauser - INTERVIEW drew stock

M IC H A E L PE T T I S first came to Beijing in 2002 af-

ter leaving a distinguished career on Wall Street to teach business at one of China’s most prominent universities. During his early explorations of the city he encountered a number of Chinese musicians who were beginning to internalize the legacy of western avant-garde – something that had been made newly available to them by way of the internet. Invigorated by their sound, he opened D - 2 2 , a club and venue that has since become a fixture in China’s underground music community. In between teaching (he is now at Peiking University’s Guanghua School of Business), running D-22 and its offshoot record label, and serving as a Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Michael has established himself as one of the world’s most respected voices on China’s role in the international economy with his blog mpettis.com. I understand a teaching post at Tsinghua Universit y brought you to Beijing. At what point did you realize you wanted to open D-22 and what all went into making it happen? DR EW -

From the start of my stay in Beijing eight years ago I followed the music scene and attended performances of local underground and experimental musicians. The music was interesting but, with a few exceptions, not especially strong. But it was clear to me that there was real potential. Around 2004 I met Shouwang (who subsequently formed Carsick Cars and White), who was just starting to get involved in making music, and through him I met an extraordinary group of young musicians who had banded together under the name “No Beijing.” I basically decided to open the club because I thought these were likely to be very interesting musicians and I was concerned (as were they) that they would not be given much of an opportunity to perform the kinds of music they were interested. M ICH A EL -

As a foreigner has it been challenging to open a small business in China? I'm guessing you had to pair up with a local partner? DR EW -

Technically, the owner of the club is one of my Chinese students, but since we are not really a money-making institution (we lose money every single month), the issues we face are fairly dif ferent from those of others. M ICH A EL -

DR EW -

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Prior to coming to China were you involved with the

FU T U R ECL A W M A G A ZIN E I S S U E 4

underground music scene in your previous locale? Has it always been an interest for you? I come from a family that has always taken music very seriously, and for me music has always been of central importance. In the early 1980s while I was at gradschool I was very involved with the East Village music scene in New York. I ran a club on Avenue C and also curated shows at a number of places, including the Kitchen. I also started a music label, Purge/SoundLeague, that released LPs for several local bands. M ICH A EL -

Can you explain a little about what’s happening with underground music in Beijing and China at large? DR EW -

In a sense, China is going through its version of the 1960s. Chinese mainstream culture for the most part is fairly conformist and materialistic, like that of the US in the early 1960s, and for most people music consists either of a very saccharine pop or of a brutally middle-class canon of acceptable music. Faced with this seemingly unalterable cultural stagnation, a number of Chinese artists more or less gave up on ever participating in the mainstream culture, dropped out, and moved to Beijing – just as our own artists moved to Greenwich Village or Haight-Ashbury in the 1960s. They were generally pretty pessimistic about mainstream culture ever changing, but on the contrary in the past few years youth culture has been moving rapidly in their direction. The change in youth culture is driven by a generation gap, between those who experienced the uncertainties of the Cultural Revolution and those who were born in the relative prosperity M ICH A EL -


t o p :: Guai Li performing at D -22. b o t t o m :: P-Town performing at D -22.


PK14 performing at D -22.

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and materialism of the late 1980s and 1990s, as great as the American generation gap of the 1960s.

musical influences, referred to Phil Ochs, Steve Reich and Sonic Youth. How often would you hear a response like this in the West?

Significantly enough, among very hip, young urban Chinese books like "On the Road" and "Catcher in the Rye" are widely read and extremely influential in intermediating the way smart and alienated young people in China approach their culture. In my opinion, these artists, who think of themselves almost as ‘rejects’ from the mainstream, are increasingly going to find themselves at the center of an explosion in Chinese cultural activity, and what was once marginal is quickly becoming central to the way intelligent, young urban Chinese think of themselves.

DR EW -

Allied to this huge change taking place within China is the rise of China as an economic and political power. Although I am a lot more skeptical than most people seem to be about some of the more feverish claims made by the American media about China’s rise, I think nonetheless that just as the 20th Century can be discussed largely in terms of the economic, political, social, cultural axis between the US and Europe, the 21st Century will be defined by a US-China axis. This means that Chinese culture will become increasingly central to the world just as Chinese artists are finding their voices and cultural self-confidence, so we are almost without doubt witnessing in Beijing what will become an important part of the history of 21st Century art. Do you think Chinese Communist Part y policies have a visible effect on the country's creative culture? Does what you and the bands you support do feel subversive? DR EW -

Probably not much more so than the way US policies af fected the development of US culture in the 1960s. Most artists I know do notsee themselves as in support or in opposition to the dominant political structure. They simply feel that it is irrelevant to them. Remember that people like Jack Kerouac and Bob Dylan, for all the way their writings were subsequently politicized, always insisted that they had no interest in mainstream politics and nothing to say about it. Their opting out may subsequently seem to have been of political importance, but it was not their intention to satisfy the political ambitions of their followers. In the same way, it is unfair to put on Chinese artists the burden of Western expectations about what kind of political stance is currently fashionable among artists. Chinese artists are exploring what it means to be Chinese in such a rapidly changing society, and it seems to me that for the most part they don’t want to be political in the way we insist that they be. M ICH A EL -

I remember that the only access I had to music from outside China when I was living there in 2002 came via bootleg CDs... a lot of cult favorites like Pavement, Sonic Youth, etc. were available but very little of anything more back water than that. It seems like the internet and tools like Myspace have probably opened up a broader pool of inf luence to Chinese musicians and artists. At the same time those inf luences are so new and so out of their original context that they must be producing some prett y interesting results? DR EW -

That is one of the most exciting things about the Beijing scene. You have to understand that in less than ten years Chinese artists suddenly found the last sixty years of Western avant garde and underground music accessible in a nearly overwhelming way, and for them there is a joyfulness about the way they have approached this incredible resource – a little like that of letting a kid loose in a vast toy store. One of the great strengths of the Beijing scene is the way that artists have been able to play with and explore a wide variety of genres with very few limitations and no rules about what kind of music is appropriate. PK14’s Yang Haisong, in response to a question from a journalist about his M ICH A EL -

How has Beijing been able to win out over other Chinese cities like Shanghai and Hong Kong as the artistic center of China? Beijing has always been the artistic center of China, at least in the past couple of decades, but in the past four years as the excitement of the Beijing musical scene accelerated, and as news of the Beijing scene spread, we also saw a huge influx of musicians and artists from elsewhere in China, including Taiwan and Hong Kong, which of course increased Beijing’s lead. I have high hopes that Shanghai – a city I think more like New York in personality and character than any other in the world – will one day become a cultural center to rival and surpass Beijing, but this is certainly not in the cards for the near future. M ICH A EL -

DR EW -

What're your thoughts on President Obama's visit to

China? I was a little surprised about the bad press it got in the US. I think Obama’s approach has been very constructive and likely to improve the relationship between the two giants in a way that is in the best interest of the US. M ICH A EL -

So the Chinese gov't is continuing to invest heavily in production despite a sharp decline in foreign demand for Chinese goods over the past year. Isn't that a bit bone headed? Is it nearsightedness or what that's driving that kind of decision making? Or is there an element of pragmatism to it that is just harder to see? DR EW -

There is a big debate about this, but it is pretty clear to me that China has responded to the crisis by exacerbating the underlying imbalances, and so we haven’t really sorted out the basic problems. If we don’t get a major recovery in US demand over the next three years – and I don’t think we will – China is going to have a real problem adjusting to a world of much tighter demand for their massive overcapacity. M ICH A EL -


ONE SMALL MOMENT TO REFLECT WORDS and PHOTO arabelle cicardi

I love old people. I love old people more than young people. Always have, always will. They are the old world travelers; they are just like us, but multiplied by the decades they’ve lived through and the experiences we’ ll never have. They don’t bullshit through life anymore, and when they see us doing it, no matter how old we may be – thirty three or thirteen – they tell us off even if we’re complete strangers to them. A lot of the time they’re in the background: as a culture we keep them tucked into “care facilities” and “clinics” so they can live quietly. But damn, my grandmother always lived loud, and the prospect of her living in a quiet daycare facility makes me laugh. My grandmother’s personality could be pinned down to maybe four main things: sarcasm, hair spray, f loor length gowns and purple lipstick. She was fantastic and brittle, had a photo album of her cats, and gave me bedazzled pens she purchased through mail-order. In short: she was the quintessential crazy cat lady and didn’t give a damn. She is the old lady we all know in some version or another. I miss her, and I miss and her style. It was refreshing, sometimes grating, and always amusing. She played dress up for 90 years of her life. I don’t think it’s a coincidence, now that she’s gone, that I’ve become more and more obsessed with older people and their style. Somewhere in the passage of time, I think, the exuberance found in dressing up can get lost in “practicality”. And then, after a while – a very long awhile, when we’re old, if we’re luck y, that childish exuberance slips back into a wardrobe and a personality. And we’ ll dress for ourselves, and we won’t care, and our wardrobes will be a time capsule of our lives and experiences, and we’ ll order bedazzled pens from catalogs.

ARABELLE’S FASHION BLOG IS:

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My grandmother


ART BOOKS AT PRINTED MATTER PHOTOGRAPHY bobby mozumder - TEXT catherine krudy

Since its humble beginnings as an alternative art space back in 1976, New York ’s PR I N T E D M AT T E R has gone on to become the contemporary art world’s leading authority on artist books. C AT H E R I N E K RU DY , the organization’s Director, shares here a few selections from their collection. discussion on the future of magazines where Olivier Zahm said that print magazines would never disappear because touching the pages provides such a sensual experience; the glossy paper becomes skin. Artist’s books also offer these intimate material, programmatic experiences and the current f low of new titles in a range of printing processes beg to be handled. I ONC E W E N T T O A PA N E L

Carol Bove’s PL A N T S A N D M A M M A L S is a book within a book as well as housing semi-precious inserts, giving the impression of a book with a past life on other people’s shelves. Tucked inside a brick and Pepto Bismol pink slipcase, the accordion fold, Twentieth Century Narcissus presents a survey of the t ypes of Daffodils as compiled from bulb catalogs. I find this collection of blossoms in their imperfect cutouts imparts an almost obsessive activit y as filtered through an academic taxonomy. Bove’s sculptures often incorporate old books and PL A N T S A N D M A M M A L S somehow captures some of those hard-to-describe reasons that I find myself magnetically drawn to used books. Printed and bound material in books acts like a cat with nine lives. But there is something almost perverse about making art using newspaper, a material that embodies ephemeralit y and the transience of information. It’s like an inversion of the ancient Greek maxim, “art is long, life is short.” In Ryan Foerster’s R AT S I N T H E H A L LWAY , surveillance video stills of rats soak into the newsprint, f lattening the grainy images further and inducing a grimy presentation from the black ink. Interspersed with the rats, photographs of underground punk shows turn up the energy level of the documentation of subterranean activities. The paper cutouts and collages appearing in the pages of A SL IGH T LY- PR E GNA N T M A N exhibit an atmosphere opposite to Rats in the Hallway but share a similar transformation in the nature of ink on the absorbent newsprint. Layered shapes merge into all-over patterns while the punchy colors become pleasingly muted. David Sandlin’s T H E AV E NGE L IS T employs newsprint for a comic whose hero-driven, anti-moralit y play takes on the urgency of current events while the throw-away qualit y of newsprint becomes counteracted by Sandlin’s silk-screened folio cover. Edie Fake also uses silkscreen to jazz up the covers of the GAY L OR D PHOE N I X series. Fake’s drawings reveal a fantastical world, where the inhabitants physical embraces often explode into bursts of lines and patterns, morphing the intense psycho-physical experiences into visually enjoyable compositions. Imagined universes of mystical characters also play a central part in Joshua Vrysen’s W H E E L OF D O OM / W E L OV E D O OM . Delicately rendered, the figures populating the pages share a visual kinship with ancient pictograms.

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Vrysen wraps his book in a tan felt, a tactile experience that provides a parallel akin to a pelt covered book. Keegan McHargue’s F OI BL E S contains a series of drawings that show a kinship with surrealism but have their roots in the artist’s school notebooks. The families of google-eyed “ foibles” excrete strange f luids and make facial exclamations while appearing with shapes and mark making filtered through an art historical prism. Graphite and colored-marker are printed faithfully and given luxurious foldout pages, making a strong argument for the transformative qualities of industrial printing to unique drawings. Rather than creating individual worlds, some zines let viewers into a shared communit y. Tim Lokiec and Donna Chung create zines that compile their drawings along with the whimsical drawings of their friends. The drawings are weird and wonderful and provide that satisf ying pleasure of looking at the possibilities of line. The collaborative nature of the zines fosters an unexpected rhythm and it also gives a real sense of a group of people who are compelled to draw and enjoy this connection amongst themselves. The best part of Lokiec’s and Chung’s zines is that they go back and hand-color them using colored pencils, crayons and watercolors. This extra bit of attention lovingly transforms the photocopied pages into keepsake gems. Beyond photocopiers, other artists have started their own presses in order to publish their own books and those of their compatriots. The astoundingly prolific painter Josh Smith started 38th Street books with his friend Todd Amicon and has published a dozen of books by Smith as well as books by Seth Price, Terry Winters, and Richard Hell. Smith’s N E W YOR K DE AT H T R I P 4 contains a cloudy voyage through a cit y undercut with destruction, built up by marker drawings bleeding through the pages. The silkscreen studio run by Kayrock and Wolf y has started a series of artist’s books that share a petite but elegant format. Working within the series format, artists like Scott Hug and Mike Paré use the saturated inks to explore the visual patterns of subjects such as ethnic textiles, NASA telescope photos, and gay porn. Amazingly, the communit y of artist’s publications keeps expanding at an exponential rate. This year’s NY Art Book Fair (organized by Printed Matter) had over 200 exhibitors of all kind and over 12,000 visitors. The very nature of a book might offer a limited set of possibilities, but judging by the newest artist’s books, the permutations of those possibilities are far from exhausted.


b e l o w :: Carol Bove. P l a n t s & M a m m a l s. 100 p., 21 x 14 cm., Paperback, accordion, slipcase, offset-printed, color, edition of 1000, . New York, NY: Horticultural Societ y of New York, 2009.

a b o v e :: Ryan Foerster. F o e rs t e r. Rats in the Hallway #4 [35] p., 26.5 x 20 cm., Paperback, staple bound, offset-printed, black-and-white, edition of unknown size, . New York, NY: Ryan Foerster, 2007.

a b o v e & r i g h t :: Evren Tekinoktay. A S l i g h t ly P r e g n a n t M a n. 48 p., 37 x 26 cm., Paperback, staple bound, offset-printed, color, edition of 500, . Copenhagen, Denmark: E. Tekinoktay, 2008.

b e l o w & l e f t :: Edie Fake. G a yl o r d P h o e n i x. [2009 reprint] Issue 4 [unpaginated], 22 x 14 cm., Paperback, staple bound, photocopy, monochrome on colored paper, edition of unknown, . Brooklyn, NY: E. Fake, 2006.


a b o v e & t o p l e f t :: Liz Luisada, Tim Lokiec... [et al.]. Ve g e t a b l e. No. 3, April 2008 [40] p., 21.5 x 14 cm., Paperback, staple bound, other, photocopy, black-andwhite, edition of unknown, . Brooklyn, NY: T. Lokiec, 2008.

l e f t :: Keegan McHargue. F o i b l e s. 20 p., 35.5 x 26 cm., Paperback, glue bound, offset-printed, mixed, edition of 500, . San Francisco, CA: Seems, 2009.

b e l o w & r i g h t :: Donna Chung, guest editor. Ha n g i n g a S w o r d . [40] p., 21.5 x 17.5 cm., Paperback, staple bound, photocopy, black-and-white, edition of unknown, . Brooklyn, NY: T. Lokiec, 2008.

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a b o v e & r i g h t :: Mike ParĂŠ. Ve h i c l e s o f t h e A n c i e n t s. [16] p., 15.5 x 11 cm., Paperback, staple bound, screenprint, black-and-white, edition of 100, . Brooklyn, NY: Kayrock Screenprinting, 2008.

a b o v e & l e f t :: Scott Hug. U n t i t l e d. [20] p., 15.5 x 12 cm., Paperback, staple bound, screenprint, monochrome on colored paper, edition of 100, . Brooklyn, NY: Kayrock Screenprinting, 2008.


Everything is under surveillance of KATH Y. Orders are constantly issued by KATH Y, and the three are due to get their duties done.

KATH Y is a Japanese three-girl Variegation performance unit,

breaking boundaries of dance by collaborating with numerous art galleries, museums, and fashion brands worldwide.

PHOTOGRAPHY masaya takagi FASHION EDITOR naoko watanabe MODELS kathy @ www.zzkathyzz.com PHOTO ASSISTANTS masahiko koguchi & yoshiaki nakada

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l e f t :: Black vest and polo neck by SAC A I . A H N S O O N . Shoes by N O Z O M I I S H I G U RO .

Skirt by H A N

One piece dress by H A N A H N S O O N . Inner long dress by N O Z O M I I S H I G U RO . Fur stole hat by Y U D L E G . c e n t e r ::

r i g h t ::

White fur and knit gilet by SAC A I . Shoes by T O GA .


l e f t :: Shirt by A N R E A L AG E . Inner polo I S H I G U RO . Chain necklace by B I J O U R . I . r i g h t ::

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Shirt by A N R E A L AG E .

neck by N O Z O M I


a l l ::

Dress by MO T O N A R I O N O . Shoes by G .V.G .V.


Polo neck by N O Z O M I I S H I G U RO . Belt by N U D E : M A SA H I KO M A RU Y A M A . Skirt by N E A R . N I P P O N . Fur glove by T O GA .

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All items by T O GA .


Black goat fur gilet and long leg cover by G .V.G .V . Skirt by H I S U I . t o p ::

m i d d l e :: Knit dress, short pants, and neck piece L A S T I N G S P RO U T . Tops by N O Z O M I I S H I G U RO . b o t t o m :: SA K A B E .

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by E V E R -

Tops by N O Z O M I I S H I G U RO . Dress by M I K I O Necklace by GA L A X X X Y .


l e f t ::

Cotton dress by S L A D K Y . Neckpiece by H I S U I .

c e n t e r a n d r i g h t :: Tops L A S T I N G S P RO U T .

by S L A D K Y . Knit pants by E V E R -


EMILE HYPERION DUBUISSON INTERVIEW tom wheeler

French photographer and cinematographer E M I L E DU BU I S SON ’s images have a grittiness that makes one wonder if their subject matter is a ref lection of the artist’s own depression. He surprised me with his upbeatness, however, when we finally got a chance to converse about how his personal life informs his remarkable visual sense. Emile’s talent is the sort that’s easy to identify but harder to describe with real clarity. When taking in his pictures I am reminded that beauty, much like salvation, is often animated by the very demons taken to task. What are you wearing right now, specifically what brand is each clothing item and what color is it? TOM -

White Zurrick leather shoes, Levis skinny blue jeans, a white Hanes t-shirt, a green Cheap Monday jacket, and a black hat. EMILE -

TOM -

What have you had to eat today in chronological order?

- ( 1 ) Breakfast: Toast with butter and jam; cof fee. ( 2 ) Lunch: Slice of Pizza; Coke.( 3 ) Dinner: Homemade pasta with tomato sauce. EMILE

How do you earn a living? Is photography your sole source of income or do you have another job? TOM -

This weekend I am selling Christmas trees. This past week I was a cinematographer for a French production. Since I am in New York, I am used to having a lot of dif ferent gigs. Some are much related to image making, some very far from. EMILE -

FutureClaw! I’ ll let you know how it works! You are from Paris. Can you compare French and American pornographic films and what cultural differences may contribute, assuming there are some? The generalization I'm making is that the French films are more romantic and the American films are just shameless fucking. TOM -

I am not a big consumer of porn movies. My girlfriend and I rarely watch them. EMILE -

When I masturbate, I usually put a sock over the tip of my penis right before ejaculation. It is really useful in keeping everything contained! Do you have helpful suggestions for our readers in regards to this? TOM -

What do you with your socks after? Someone told me that it’s good to use it as a body face lotion when it’s fresh. Is that true? EMILE -

I throw them beside my bed. A few years back, there was a patriotic effort after September 11th to begin labeling French fries as Freedom Fries. Does it offend you that Americans would want to claim French cuisine as their own? TOM -

When was the last time you cried and why were you crying? TOM -

EMILE -

die!

I lost a friend last month in a car accident. So young to EMILE -

I lost my virginit y in college and felt like I was falling behind my peers. I lied to people about it because I was insecure. When did you lose your virginit y and did you lie to anyone about it? TOM -

We are all fighting for freedom.

Two stereot ypes about French people: ( A ) They are extremely arrogant ( B ) They never brush their teeth. Agree or Disagree? TOM -

( A ) If you think that waiters in France suck, I totally agree with you! French are a little bit rude, they should travel more to see how people are dif ferent! ( B ) Agree. EMILE -

I did not lie to my buddies when I was showing them a picture of this beautiful Russian girl I went with! No need! Aha, we did it in the hold of a boat; it was so romantic and hot! EMILE -

TOM -

What is currently happening with your sex life and has it changed at all since becoming a well regarded photographer?

What are your plans for the rest of the day, Emile?

TOM -

Has something changed? I don’t know! We are always are trying to impressed them! Right? I hope that they are going to read EMILE -

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EMILE -

Maybe I will call my ex to hang out!


Seletions from Emile’s series S i b e r i a , T h e F a r N o r t h


is a painter who works and lives in Burlington, Vermont. Her ghostly, beautifully rendered pictures hint at melancholy and old world nostalgia while simultaneously challenging the notion that capturing a moment requires stripping it of all movement. With shows at both Art Basel Miami and Red Dot New York this year, Shelly is definitely an emerging talent to keep an eye on. SH E L LY VOOR H E E S

P h ot o g r a ph y b y GREG COMOLLO

I nt e r v i e w b y ALLISON ROSS & DARREN HIGGINS

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UNTITLED 6

BLU E

[ M i xed Media - 3 6” x 48” ]

[ M i x e d M e d i a - 3 6 ” x 3 0” ]


UNTITLED 4 [ A c r y l i c a n d I n k - 1 8 ” x 2 4” ]

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ON E N ESS [ M i x e d M e d i a - 2” x 2” ]

When did you know you wanted to be an artist? A L LISON -

I don’t think it was something I decided; it has always been a part of me. I didn’t start speaking until I was three, so I spent a lot of my time drawing to express myself. At age four I… started making art. That’s when I vividly remember being able draw what I see and create from my imagination. S H E L LY -

Do you still create from your imagination? Where do you find inspiration for your art today? A L LISON -

Most of the art starts with my imagination. I’ve been trying to express a connection between the conscious and subconscious layers of my existence… I have to start with an idea or a theme S H E L LY -

and, often, inspiration will come out of the process of making the work. I’ ll have a plan, and while building up the art with dif ferent mediums, the design will change, sometimes changing even the storyline. For some of my sources of inspiration, I’ ll generate pictorial scenes from self-portraits as visual references, along with using photographically generated images that I’ ll find in mass media. Your art depicts women only. Why, and who are they?

had to play multiple roles in each other’s lives. We had to be strong when we felt vulnerable. This real dynamic between us plays a large part in the duality of the figures in my “Apparitions” series. These female interactions of struggles and strengths are often from memories, coming from beneath the surface of my consciousness; they emerge and are released from my psyche into the art.

A L LISON -

I paint women because I find them beautiful and I understand their emotions through my own emotional experiences. My mother was my entire family, and I was hers…It has been an intensely fueled relationship; often we S H E L LY -

Would you say that a lot of your personal experiences go into your paintings? A L LISON -

Yes. I find these paintings to be psychological portraits. They are emotional memories of experiences that S H E L LY -


SISTERS [ M i x e d M e d i a - 3 6 ” x 6 4” ]

made an imprint on me, that made me feel something…Many of the memories and ideas are not clear or concrete, and when I’m working with my art they take on more…detail. Often, my art looks distorted; this is from my recollections and dreams, the kind I can’t quite remember and I’m trying to keep together, but they are altered now. The visions are distorted. A L LISON -

Do you have an art idol?

Yes. Secretly, I’m a sculptor who is becoming a painter…For me, the process of discovery and playing with dif ferent mediums is exciting.It’s the mixture of mediums that becomes the unifier for the art, making the exploration of textures and material as vital to the art as the theme and composition. I believe layering sculptural elements adds to the emotional complexities and depth of my art. S H E L LY -

How do you reenergize in bet ween projects? Do you ever take a break from painting? A L LISON -

I have to say Kiki Smith. She is both a great painter and sculptor. She creates art that is complicated and layered with meaning. You can’t help but feel something when you see her art; the art is emotionally charged. I attended her retrospective at the Whitney Museum, which is where I personally got to speak with her about art. She is a true inspiration—a strong, successful, dynamic woman who’s living and fully exploring art. S H E L LY -

In addition to painting, sculpture is passion of yours, correct? A L LISON -

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Of course, you have to take breaks. I often will take time of f between series of work. I find it’s the breaks that allow me the space to generate new ideas…Often, I plan a vacation a week or so after an exhibition to reenergize and reconnect with myself. Lately, I have been doing back-to-back shows, giving me little or no time for breaks. This can be exhausting, because with each show I’ ll try to add something new. S H E L LY -

A L L I S O N - I know this year has been really busy and exciting for you. It seems like you are gaining so much momentum and have accomplished so much.

It really has been a great year! I’ve been working really hard on creating and exhibiting my “Apparitions” series. I’ve shown this exhibit five times this year, including three solo shows. There has been a great deal of transporting and traveling to each event. I’m working in larger scale now; this has me renting sixteen-foot trucks just to deliver art. This side of the art business can be a bit crazy! S H E L LY -

A L LISON -

Amazing! What’s next for

you? Fortunately, “Apparitions” is receiving great press. From the reviews, I’ve gained gallery representation, with an invitation to show at the Red Dot Art Fair in New York in March 2010. S H E L LY -


S E R I E S O F M I N I AT U R E S [ M i x e d M e d i a - 2� x 2� ]

Your studio space is inside your amazing historic home in Burlington, Vermont. Are you hoping to stay rooted in Vermont for a while? A L LISON -

Yes, I really love Burlington as a home base. I moved here to create a life with my designer boyfriend and start a boutique hotel downtown. The hotel is meant to be a place to make artistic connections and share in art and architecture. Designing an artistic space in an 1881 historic home has been interesting, challenging, and fun. The name of the hotel is The 204, after the street address. It will of ficially open sometime in the first few months of 2010. S H E L LY -

FOR MORE INFORMATION REGARDING SHELLY AND HER WORK, PLEASE VISIT

w w w.shelly voorhees.com


ANTARCTICA

TRAVELOGUE

PHOTOGRAPHY & TEXT michael becker

I lived in a tent for three months in Antarctica. As a three-person team in a remote field camp of the Dry Valleys, we researched glacial streams while enduring harsh 24-hour sunlight, barely freezing temperatures, and bacon and peanut butter sandwiches. The Dry Valleys are the largest ice-free area of the continent (0.03%, or a little smaller than Delaware) and few people who come to Antarctica ever get to step foot on the soil itself with its rock, lakes, and rivers. The Valleys are located next to the immensely long Trans-Antarctic Mountain Range that divides the entire continent in half. The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is the world’s largest piece of ice and the Trans-Antarctic Range prevents this sheet from moving into the valleys, keeping the Dry Valleys relatively free of ice. Science is why our presence there exists. The National Science Foundation oversees the US Antarctic Program that encompasses all US research stations. McMurdo (under New Zealand), Palmer (under South America), and the South Pole (under the world) act as staging and support centers for scientists in remote field camps. Every job, every building, every person is down there to support science directly or indirectly. Nearly everyone is interested in it – the helicopter pilots chat up researchers about the details of their work, the carpenters who build field camps are well versed in climate variations, and science lectures are packed – def ying the real world norm. Divers, engineers, cooks, janitors, mechanics, electricians, and a medical doctor are all there for the purpose of supporting science: an amazing array of skills and people come together for a common goal. And everyone is interested in it. What enamors me about this continent is how little of it is known and how much remains to be discovered: whole mountain ranges, lakes, and rivers are known to be trapped under the 2-kilometer thick ice of East Antarctica. Most of what I learned about Antarctica was from the people I encountered. The stories, the history, and even the scientific and geographic details of the continent are housed within the memories of seasoned residents. There is no Wikipedia page for many of the places I’ve been and the only source of information were facts passed from person to person. Indeed, many of the most interesting stories aren’t written in any books, making it difficult to check their validit y. For instance, during World War II the Nazis had f lown over the continent and dropped f lags as a statement of military prowess. Even stranger, there’s an old abandoned Soviet base at a place called the “Pole of Inaccessibilit y” covered by snow, where a statue of Lenin pokes out of the ice as the last remnant of past inhabitants.

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Antarctica conjures up images of rugged explorers in tattered clothes battling the elements in an attempt to survive. Or, the continent evokes the thrill-seeking imagery of the “Man vs. ContrivedScenario” television show. My lifest yle was as far from that as you could imagine. I lived incredibly comfortably for the most part. I ate. I was generally warm. I slept (occasionally). In truth, other than wanting to share my sleeping bag with someone I had everything I’ d ever need. And logically, I didn’t unnecessarily brave the elements. When strong katabatic winds came ripping down the valley my helicopter f lights were cancelled, I’ d unlace my hiking boots, and I’ d stay sheltered in my field camp. Weather there didn’t have a background existence; it controlled absolutely everything I did. Living remotely is about mitigating as many potential dangers as you can predict. Despite these efforts there were always inherent risks of being out there, though I’ d start my mornings generally confident that I wouldn’t die. My experience was one of relative comfort in a polar desert, devoid of dramatic Antarctic wildlife. The Valleys are one of the driest places on Earth, an irony hard to grasp given my daily work with rivers and streams. However, the area was littered with the corpses of dead animals. Seals and penguins would wander lost for upwards of 20 kilometers over sharp rock only to die of exhaustion and starvation. In the field I would encounter centuries-old carcasses, mummified because the cold, dry air prevents the f lesh from rotting. I’m only left to imagine what else lies outside my glimpse of the continent. My last night in the Valleys I stayed up late to enjoy some peace and quiet as the others slept. It was a windless night as I sat out in the 4 am sun. The silence of that evening was unique to that part of the world. No humans were awake, no cars or planes or generators were running to disturb the night. The valley had no birds or insects to create a droning hum. It was in that stillness, the lack of everything, that I could hear the Earth move. Candle ice shifted with the faint sound of breaking glass. The glacier creaked and groaned as its weight shifted. Sand would slide softly down the hill. But as the temperature cooled, signif ying the coming winter, the thick lake ice cracked like a gunshot and the boom echoed across the valley. SEE MICHAEL’S ANTARCTICA BLOG AT: HTTP://THEDRYVALLEYS.WORDPRESS.COM


Researchers headed to remote field camps attend safet y training during a t wo day course known as ‘Happy Camper’ - the coldest night they’ ll spend in Antarctica. m i d d l e :: Lake Hoare field camp next to the massive Canada Glacier in Taylor Valley the main staging area for scientists in the Dry Valleys. Photo taken during the warm 4am light. b o t t o m :: One of our teammates tries to establish radio communication during our hike back to camp. As a polar desert, the Dry Valleys generally get very little precipitation. An unexpected snow storm provides a unique perspective of the valley. t o p ::


Left over scraps of food and supplies lay out for inspection in Robert F. Scott’s Discovery Hut on Ross Island, Antarctica. Built for his 1901- 04 Discovery expedition, the hut was used as a storeroom and shelter for the early explorers. l e f t ::

In addition to the nationalistic pride of discovering new lands, there were many successful and involved experiments that documented the 7th continent. Some of the most harrowing events of the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration occurred in the name of science. b o t t o m ::

Around the coast of Antarctica there are many areas where the permanent ice shelves of the continent meet the winter sea ice of the ocean. Pressure ridges form during the repeated heating and cooling of the surface of the ice. The meeting of the continental ice shelves and the sea ice is the perfect breeding ground for these jagged ridges. o p p o s i t e ::

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A Ret rospective

I nt e r v i e w b y DREW STOCK

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S I LV E R C OAC H , 1 9 8 3 [ G o a u c h e - 3 0” x 3 0” ]

“ This depicts the arrival of t wo ‘silver coaches’ at a robot valet tended plaza. The vehicles are self-directed. The background shows an elaborate vertical cit y fading off into golden light.”


S Y D M E A D has created many distinct visions of the

future over the course of his career, but his strong personality pervades them all. Few have been able to string together superb draftsmanship, plausibility, zany artistry, and engineering prowess to create such comprehensive and enthralling conceptions of what tomorrow will look like. Syd’s iconic designs have transformed movies like BL A DE RU N N E R and T RON into cult classics, and his unwavering forward movement has inspired several generations of creatives to be ambitious when it comes to dreaming.

You mentioned in earlier conversations that you’re interested in fashion. I wasn’t aware of that. Would you mind explaining a bit? DR EW -

Do you feel like the Information Age has changed anything about the fundamentals of design? DR EW -

Global instantaneous information exchange and accessibility creates a global awareness market. Of course it influences design. One must be aware of multi-cultural, multi-lingual, multisocio/economics to consistently create stuf f that appeals across a wide spectrum of acceptance. In ef fect, a ‘ world brand.’ SYD -

I’ve been imagining and illustrating ‘ future’ scenarios from an early age. Every world, story, scenario needs all the stuf f that we have in our ‘real’ world. So, being interested in fashion is simply creating character costume as part of whatever world I’m imagining at the time. SYD -

DR EW -

You also talked about how Terry Gilliam’s Brazil and Blade Runner are t wo of your favorite films.

How does that effect the day-to-day of what you do?

DR EW -

I mean, it is Ridley Scott’s adroit sense that brought Blade Runner together under daunting circumstances. SYD -

Yeah, I’ve heard Blade Runner was a particularly trying project. Did you enjoy working on it, though? DR EW -

Blade Runner was the second film I’ d ever worked on (Star Trek The Motion Picture with Robert Wise directing was the first). So, I didn’t really know about working on films. For me, it was another account involving all the same things I’ d been doing for the prior twenty two years. I enjoyed solving several problems involving inventing a socio-, economic, architectural design format that fit the script and Ridley’s quite precise visual direction. I enjoyed the process very much. I was not on studio staf f as a day-to-day presence. I would show my sketches to Ridley or Lawrence Paul when Ridley was back in London or busy. Then I would drive back to Orange County to my then beach house to get ready for the next ‘show and tell’ date. SYD -

I’ve always created scenarios in which my designs ‘ live’ as used objects. I’ve illustrated arabic palaces, worked with the Philips design staf f in Eindhoven, Holland for twelve years on a several times a year consultant engagement, worked with the Raymond Lowely Studio in Paris, worked with the Volvo Design Team in Goteborg, Sweden, worked with Giugiaro’s Italdesign in Torino, Italy, and contributed to a lot of Japanese projects. This exposure on a global scale influences my design ‘style’ a lot. I realize that with a global design market, cultural sensibilities influence response to design and illustrated concepts. SYD -

Has there ever been an overtly or covertly political element to your work? DR EW -

Perceived, perhaps. Anyone who resents a brilliant, synchronic and egalitarian future probably doesn’t like what I do. For instance, those mired in ancient ritual and proscriptions; who hand over their daily existence to some defunct, pretentious and outrageously vapid, rigidly enforced belief system. SYD -

Is there anyone of the current generation whose ideas about or vision of the future excites you? DR EW -

Do you feel like anything about the present is representative of what you had envisioned for the future in movies like Blade Runner and Star Trek? DR EW -

I’ve been commissioned to depict ‘customized’ futures for corporate promotion, magazine articles, themed entertainment, night clubs, movies and television. In the course of inventing those illustrated futures I’ve visually predicted flexible RGB screens, personal transcript devices, personal communication wands and wearable electronics. I think my automobile designs I created over forty years ago look current. SYD -

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The prospect of cooperative artificial intelligence and what this means for successfully unscrambling the ‘mystery’ of life, why we are and how to solve the problems we have created for ourselves. If we can promote intelligent inquiry as opposed to enforced ignorance, we might just make it. SYD -

The way you emphasize the social dimension of your futurism reminds me a lot of Buckminster Fuller. Has he inf luenced you at all? DR EW -


SYD -

I admire the inventive breadth of Fuller. Of course I don’t begin to understand the mathematics behind his exotic design accomplishments, but his logic is unassailable. I wouldn’t say he’s influenced me but his genius inspires.

use of red and other warm colors in some of your more recent pieces suggest a sexual turn in your work… I’m thinking of some of the Hypervan images included in the series we are presenting in the issue.

What kind of work are you most interested in pursuing at this point in your career?

SYD -

DR EW -

Creating response to challenge. Two areas of design I have been unlucky in: designing a super yacht that gets into the water and an entertainment venue that I would label with the eponymous ‘Mead World.’ I know that sounds ambitious. I almost had that chance with Michael Jackson, two times. SYD -

You almost worked with Michael Jackson t wice? What happened? DR EW -

Our American culture is a devastating pairing of almost Victorian horror at ‘nakedness’ with a blatant bombardment of ‘sexual’ innuendo in merchandising, movies, television series, and associated media. I think it is rather silly to read or listen to some of the pompous rants of mega-church poseurs and other selfappointed monitors of ‘moral standards’ . I have often thought that a constant barrage of rhetoric by these preposterous paragons of self-announced ‘ virtue’ reflects nothing less than a psychosis that is fascinated by what they’re not supposed to be titillated by. A kind of bi-polar desire to watch ‘sex’ stuf f and denounce it as moral degradation. How do you cope with the fact that the future never really arrives?

Michael Jackson was a fan of mine, honestly. He flew me and my partner, Roger Servick, to Hawaii for his History Tour show as his personal guest. He had all of my books because he liked to cruise through bookstores, particularly Hennessey and Ingalls in Santa Monica. He found my books there and I had meetings with him on several occassions: once in Hawaii after that show, once in Hollywood, once in Bahrain, and, most recently, once at the Hotel Bel Air just before his unsolved death. All these meetings were about consultant possibilities, which went through pre-production stages but were never finished. Nevertheless, Michael would call me personally for my opinion and he is the single Hollywood celebrity to ever make personal contact. I miss his friendship very much.

DR EW -

How do you feel about whimsy and absurdit y? Some of your designs really def y physical logic and I get the sense that you like to incorporate a little bit of comedy.

SYD -

SYD -

DR EW -

Well, I never thought about it that way. Whimsy is interesting as long as it does not get naively ‘cheesy’ . There is a humorous charm in deliberately creating an inventive send-up to kitsche: I invented a ‘ whimsical’ name for the style in Blade Runner; I called it ‘trash-chic’ . I do draw cartoons often as a relief from executing tight design illustration. SYD -

DR EW -

Also, those naked figures combined with the heav y

The future arrives in bits and pieces, constantly. The future doesn’t start from zero, it starts with the entire accumulation that is represented by ‘now.’ What we do now actually invents the future. If we celebrate crap, guess what? I strive to depict my futures as bright, functional, well conceived and consistently elegant. At least, I can say that I didn’t contribute to everything going to hell. SYD -

DR EW -

Do you think we will ever sufficiently imagine the

future? The future sort of makes itself as a result of the total flow of events that are caused by all of us. Virulent, psychotic anomalies that force punitive rule systems down people’s craws insults intelligence. As I said before, if we can assist intelligence in triumphing over enforced stupidity, we might just make it to a workable and enjoyable future.


A S T E RO I D FAC I L I T Y, 2 0 0 3 - o p p o s i t e [ G o u a c h e - 1 0” x 1 5” ]

“ This depicts a future mining activit y facilit y on the surface of a planetoid. A cargo ship carrying raw mineral material is in the foreground.”

C H I N AT OW N , 1 9 8 0 - a b o v e [ G o u a c h e - 1 5” x 1 0” ]

“ This depicts a proposed painting for the C H I N AT OW N set of B L A D E RU N N E R . Sebastian’s truck vehicle is parked at right. The street plan follows Warner Brothers’ back lot configuration. The street was never dressed expressly for the scene where D E C K A R D (Harrison Ford) is eating sushi.”

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D I F I N I T I V DAY, 1 9 9 4 [ G o a u c h e - 2 0” x 3 0” ]

“ This is my design for a super yacht designed for the T E N C A R A yacht yard in Venice, Italy.”


H Y P E R VA N N I T E , 2 0 04 [ G o a u c h e - 2 0” x 3 0” ]

“ This depicts a H Y P E R VA N arriving at an entertainment venue with C Y B O RG valets, androids and electronic pets. Patrons dine au fresco across the arrival driveway.”

H Y P E R VA N , 2 0 0 2 [ G o a u c h e - 2 0” x 3 0” ]

“ This depicts a H Y P E R VA N vehicle parked in a neo-classical court yard as a hunt is ready to start.”

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PA N E L T WO, 2 0 0 0 [ G o a u c h e - 2 0” x 3 0” ]

“ This is panel t wo ( middle ) of a tript ych painted as guest artist for the 2 0 0 0 P E B B L E B E AC H C O N C O U R S E D’ E L E GA N C E . It depicts a ‘concourse’ of the future. A J T O ( jump to orbit ) t wo place vehicle is at center with hatch open. In background are various vehicles of the near future in a late afternoon setting.”

H Y P E R VA N O N C R I M S O N P L A Z A , 2 0 0 1 [ G o a u c h e - 2 0” x 3 0” ]

“ This depicts a H Y P E R VA N parked on a C R I M S O N P L A Z A paved with red-stained rosé marble. In background are large, chrome-plated sculptures, stanchions and foliage.”


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N IGH T TR A FFIC, 1982 [ G o u a c h e - 2 5” x 2 5” ]

“A rendering of futuristic traffic scene in downtown LA.”


S PAC E WO R L D, 1 9 8 2 - o p p o s i t e [ G o u a c h e - 2 5” x 2 5” ]

“ This depicts a view of the interior of a rotating space world. It was painted for N AT I O N A L G E O G R A P H I C .”

PA L M S P R I N G S FA N TA S Y, 2 0 0 7 - a b o v e [ G o u a c h e - 2 0” x 3 0” ]

“ The painting depicts an future afternoon gala at the PA L M S P R I N G S C O N V E N T I O N C E N T E R . The architecture and the mountain view are all accurate at that location. Anti-gravit y coaches arrive with their costumed passengers. In middle background is a collectible ‘antique’ classic 1 9 6 1 L I N C O L N C O N T I N E N TA L four-door convertible.”

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C u r a t e d b y TEAM GALLERY, NEW YORK

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RYA N MC GI N L E Y and STA N L E Y W H I T N E Y are both artists represented by T E A M GA L L E RY . Their

work was recently presented together in Team’s booth at Art Basel Miami and both Stanley and Ryan will have solo shows at the gallery in 2010. The artists interviewed eachother via email.

RYAN MCGINLEY TO STANLEY WHITNEY:

Does your love of color transfer over into everyday life? Do you pick a bar of soap for its color? If you buy a variet y pack of boxers would you buy it for one pair with a good color? RYA N -

Of course. I love to watch people in the street to see what colors they are wearing - mostly women. S TA N L E Y -

I feel like the term color field is very important for both of us. I approach my photographic locations based on their fields of color. One of my favorite places to shoot is in the white sands of New Mexico because all I’m working with is white sand and blue sk y. I approach color by using wheat fields for yellow, magic hour for deep blue sk y, bonfires for reds, sunsets for oranges and pinks. Can you explain what color fields mean to you? RYA N -

I don’t approach color field as landscape. When I hear color field I immediately think of color field painting and it’s something I saw a lot of as a young painter in New York. Although I loved the color, I found the drawing and the space weak. So, it’s something I reacted against. As far as color field landscape, give me the color of the southwest. S TA N L E Y -

You taught for 30 years. In the movie Indiana Jones one of his students draws on her eyelids “Love You” and every time she blinks he sees it. Has anything like this ever happened to you? RYA N -

S TA N L E Y -

I married her.

What’s your favorite part of the supermarket?

Did you see the Robert Frank show at the Met and what do you think of that work?

RYA N -

S TA N L E Y -

None. I can’t stand the supermarket. There’s no food.

RYA N -

S TA N L E Y -

Do you think taking drugs is important for artists? When I look at your paintings it makes me think of many experiences I’ve had on acid. Did you do a lot of acid? RYA N -

S TA N L E Y -

Drugs saved my life.

If you were gay what man would you be attracted to? Please name a movie star or musician. RYA N -

S TA N L E Y -

Miles Davis.

I did and I love Robert Frank’s work. The Americans is like the bible. He changed everything. Robert is not a fan of mine. I once went to take his portrait at his house on Bleecker Street and he didn’t like how many photos I took of him. I investigate people with my camera. I shoot quite a lot and I think the sound of my shutter drove him crazy. He eventually lost it and told me it was time to leave. He’s from a dif ferent school of photography than I am. He takes quite a long time to click the shutter, the decisive moment. It’s not the way I work. My camera is my hand and I have a conversation with the person and am constantly shooting the entire time.

STANLEY WHITNEY TO RYAN MCGINLEY:

What are some of your favorite TV programs and movies and do they inf luence your work?

If you received a very generous gift certificate to a high-end designer clothing boutique, who would it be? And what would you get?

R Y A N - At the moment I love Mad Med. Over

RYA N -

S TA N L E Y S TA N L E Y -

the last few years definitely The Wire, Sex & The City, and Curb Your Enthusiasm. I’ve seen every episode of Seinfeld. When I watch DVDs it’s often on my computer. I like to take screen grabs of scenes that inspire me. I don’t think TV shows influence my work. I buy a lot of DVDs for the commentary and special features. I learn a lot about the production of the film and how they executed certain scenes. I find that influential. I also always bring a pen and pad with me to the movie theatre. I feel very inspired watching movies and have lots of ideas that flow freely through my mind. I truly believe the faintest ink is better than the best memory.

It would be Martin Margiela and I would get a suit. He makes the best suits. Have you ever dreamt an image before you’ve made it? Do you dream in color? S TA N L E Y -

I do dream in color. I’ve never gotten an idea from a dream. I do find I feel most inspired right before I fall asleep. I heard if you dream in black and white that means your dead. RYA N -

w w w.teamgaller y.com


W E S ( S C A R L E T S P L I T ) b y R Y A N MC G I N L E Y, 2 0 0 9 - o p p o s i t e [ c - p r i n t - 45” x 3 0” ]

W H I T M A N ’ S WA L K b y S TA N L E Y W H I T N E Y, 2 0 0 7 - a b o v e [ o i l o n l i n e n - 4 0” x 4 0” ]

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F I R S T M I N U T E O F A D R E A M b y S TA N L E Y W H I T N E Y, 2 0 0 9 - o p p o s i t e [ o i l o n l i n e n - 7 2” x 7 2” ]

J A K E ( C OW B OY S L A N T ) b y R Y A N MC G I N L E Y, 2 0 0 8/2 0 0 9 - a b o v e [ c - p r n t - 45” x 3 0” ]

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L OV E RO O T b y S TA N L E Y W H I T N E Y, 2 0 0 8 - o p p o s i t e [ o i l o n l i n e n - 4 0” x 4 0” ]

I C I C L E S B L U E b y R Y A N MC G I N L E Y, 2 0 0 9 - a b o v e [ c - p r n t - 2 0” x 1 3” ]


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I N D I A ( G Y P S U M B U R S T ) b y R Y A N MC G I N L E Y, 2 0 0 8/2 0 0 9 - o p p o s i t e [ c - p r i n t - 4 8 ” x 7 2” ]

04 - 2 0 0 9 b y S TA N L E Y W H I T N E Y, 2 0 0 9 - a b o v e [ o i l o n l i n e n - 1 2” x 1 2” ]


J O N A S ( MO LT E N ) b y R Y A N MC G I N L E Y, 2 0 0 9 - o p p o s i t e [ c - p r i n t - 1 1 0” x 7 2” ]

L I G H T N I N b y S TA N L E Y W H I T N E Y, 2 0 0 9 - a b o v e [ o i l o n l i n e n - 4 0” x 4 0” ]

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PHOTOGRAPHY emma tempest MAKEUP kenneth soh using MAC PRO & ALPHA H HAIR charlie le mindu using FUDGE STYLING svetlana prodanic RETOUCHING gareth pritchard MODELS clara @ NEXT & georgia @ SELECT


GO ASK ALICE

BY PAM HOGG

PHOTOGRAPHY julia kennedy - MODEL alice dellal FASHION pam hogg - HAIR liz taw MAKEUP clare read - PHOTO ASSISTANT andrew leo

Although I style all my own shows its not quite the same as the intimacy of a photographic shoot. Choosing just one model and a handful of outfits offered a way to see my work through fresh eyes. I realized I’d selected all the more delicate pieces and therefore felt it should be shot with a fairy tale like beauty not often associated with my work. The A L IC E I N WON DE RL A N D theme was perfect and all the more poignant when I chose A L IC E DE L L A L with her newly bleached blond tresses, as my model. The story has been an inspiration throughout my life. My second catwalk collection in the mid eighties was called WON DE R L A N D , inspired by a fusion of the surrealist Dali’s erotic drawings and Alice. I designed fine embroiderylike prints that could have easily betrayed the eye into thinking they were as soft and enchanting as the ‘Dalice’ outfits I adorned, but close inspection revealed a print of decaying old men and women in the throws of fetishism. My Spring / Summer 2010 collection is called G ODDE S S AT WA R . I started with the title and wove the collection through it. My work thrives on the conf lict of opposites, but I found myself lost in a world more of beauty than war. It seemed to invade my work without consent. I used black but in a very delicate manner: one outfit consists entirely of see-through ribbons and bows. The ribbon is, however, of an open weave and rough on the skin, symbolic of barbed wire and the harshness of war. The finale dress at first looks like a fairy tale wedding dress until your eye catches the black armband, and as she passes, the back train reveals the words ‘War Bride’ splattered in blood, and huge bones tied with delicate silk bows trail behind like tin cans tied to a crashed honeymoon car. My favourite photo for the shoot is the close up of Alice in the black ribboned hat and delicate bunny cupped in her hand. Beauty versus beauty. No conf lict there.

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PHOTOGRAPHY harley weir STYLING jem goulding MAKEUP elizabeth hsieh using NARS MODEL mackenzie hamilton @ MODELS 1 thanks to TAVISTOCK HOTEL BOWLING ALLIES

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Bra by A N T O N I O B E R A R D I . Skirt by D I SAY A .


Dress by I OA N N I S D I M I T RO U S I S . Harlequin mask by T O M B I N N S .


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o p p o s i t e :: Bodysuit by B R YC E A I M E . t h i s p a g e :: Top by C H A R L I E L E M I N D U . Bikini by M A R L I E S D E K K E R S .


Dress by B O R A A K S U . Sunglasses are vintage MO S C H I N O .


o p p o s i t e :: Top and skirt by A Z Z E D I N E A L A Ï A . t h i s p a g e :: Vest by A N N D E M E U L E M E E S T E R . Pants by A Z Z E D I N E A L A Ï A .


Dress by R E E M AC R A .


THE UNDERSTATED MYSTERY OF A REAL FEMME FATALE PHOTOGRAPHY nacho alegre - TEXT & FASHION jem goulding

Paris is one of the great tragedies, a city with art, culture, style and architecture beyond compare, but a place with no heartbeat. A friend once said to me that everytime he goes to Paris, he searches for Paris, but the city is dead. I often think of those words when I trail its beautiful but empty streets in evening. A Paris with more E M M A N U E L L E SE IG N E R S would be a better Paris, but then maybe that’s what makes her all the more amazing. She breaks every stereotype going, and, unlike so many screen sirens, in person she doesn’t disappoint. Far from it, she’s better, and she inspires you into states of blissed out amor leaving you unsure whether you want to be her, marry her or simply paint her. Seigner has to be one of the coolest women in the world. She redefines the idea of effortless sex appeal, and she is so naturally beautiful that things seem to move in slow motion when she enters a space. Her wit and ability to laugh at herself are signs not only of intelligence, but warm humility that is all but lost in Paris, the breathtaking, but soul-less city in which she resides. Yes, she’s French, and yes yes she sings, and yes yes yes she can act (you must see her in BI T T E R MOON ) but when you meet her, you realise, she exudes a kind of charm that could break your heart into a million pieces, even without these exotic traits. This lady would look and probably even smell good wrapped up in a bin bag.

o p p o s i t e :: Cardigan st ylist’s own. n e x t s p r e a d :: Jacket by BA L LY . Trousers

by M A R N I . T-shirt Emmanuelle’s own.

EMMANUELLE’S ALBUM DINGUE IS IN STORES NOW. HER LATEST FILM CHICAS WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY YASMINA REZA, IS ON NATIONWIDE RELEASE IN FRANCE FROM MARCH 16TH BEFORE LATER SHOWING IN SELECTED ART HOUSE CINEMAS IN THE US AND AND EUROPE FROM JUNE. 116

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Mais tu combien je t’aime Et si tu m’aimes autant...


Tant pis si quand bien même L’un de nous est perdant J’aime autant qu’on se laisse... 118

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Cent mille fois comme avant Qu’on se blame qu’on se blesse Qu’on se tue tant et tant


PHOTOGRAPHY leon mark STYLING santi rodriguez MAKEUP elizabeth hsieh using NARS

MODELS jacob coupe and isabelle price @ MODELS 1 thanks to TAVISTOCK HOTEL BOWLING ALLIES


t o p :: Isabelle wears dress by B E T S E Y J O H N S O N , cardigan by P R I N G L E O F S C O T L A N D . Jacob wears top by J A M E S L O N G . b o t t o m :: Jacob wears top and trousers by K S U B I , vest by A M E R I C A N A P PA R E L , boots st ylist’s own. Isabelle wears jacket by L E V I´S , dress by V E R SAC E , tights and shoes from vintage selection in B E YO N D R E T RO .


Isabelle wears dress by B O R A A K S U , tights and shoes from a vintage sellection in B E YO N D R E T RO . Jacob wears jacket by MC Q , top by C H RO N I C L E S O F N E V E R , jeans by AC N E , boots st ylist’s own.


Jacob wears vintage leather jacket by L E V I´S .


Isabelle wears dress by E L L I O T AT K I N S O N , cardigan, tights and shoes from B E YO N D R E T RO . Jacob wears leather jacket by M A RG I E L A , vest A M E R I C A N A P PA R E L . o p p o s i t e :: Jacob wears t-shirt by J E A N PAU L GAU LT I E R , jacket by J A M E S L O N G . Isabelle wears top by B L U M A R I N E . n e x t p a g e :: Isabelle wears dress by E L L I O T AT K I N S O N . a b o v e ::


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b o t h p a g e s :: Isabelle wears dress by M A R I A F R A N C E S C A P E P E . Jacob wears vest by A M E R I C A N A P PA R E L , trousers by B U R B E R R Y , vintage A R M A N I belt.


GANG RELATED DENIM ARCHIVAL PHOTOS COURTESY king krash - TEXT levi pudding

DON WA N H A R R E L L’s designs for K I NG K R A SH DE N I M gravi-

tate towards the creative manifestation of the rebel. He takes inspiration from New York in the 70’s: sex, drugs, street gangs, disco divas, politicians, illegal street racing, homeless, celebrities, musicians, hookers, and other characters in the city’s vibrant mosaic of cultures. Of all these, though, the street gangs captivate him the most. Back then Manhattan was home to the Viceroys, Satan Spades, Savage Samurais, Passiac street racers, Dynamite Brothers, and La West Side Familia. The Bronx had the Ching-A-Ling Nomads MC, Savage Skulls, Savage Nomads, Seven Immortals, Bachelors and Black Spades. And Brooklyn was run by the Tomahawks, Dirty Ones, Devil’s Rebels and Filthy Mad Dogs. Certain groups, like The Black Panthers and The Young Lords, fought for social justice while others were utterly lawless. Inf luenced by the Hell’s Angels’ style and attitude, many wore customized outfits advertising their club’s name and emblem. This style was usually expressed in cut-off denim vests, leather jackets, and matchining jeans with f lourishes like patches, foxtails, safety pins, military regalia, studs, and different embroideries that denoted affiliation. In effect, there outfits became uniforms, a source of a great pride and self-empowerment. By channeling the creativity and energy of these young outsiders from another time, Harrell has found his key to combatting stagnation: just as they worked with what they were stuck with and f lipped their situation into something they loved, so too is he able to constantly reinvent, rethink, and reedit his work.

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CREATIVE DIRECTION & STYLING jem goulding PHOTOGRAPHY ben rayner FEATURING daisy lowe MAKEUP & BODYPAINTING clare read HAIR richard scorer FASHION ASSISTANT patricia lewis PHOTO ASSISTANT daniel benson

special thanks to SHOREDITCH STUDIOS

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Vest by N AT H A N J E N D E N . Garland st ylist’s own.


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Sunglasses by B E R N H A R D W I L L H E L M . Dress by VA L E N T I N O . o p p o s i t e :: Body piece by LUC Y H U TCH I NG S. a b o v e ::


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Top by P RO E N Z A S C H O U L E R .


a b o v e :: Shirt by RO B E R T O C AVA L L I . Belt by E M I L I O P U C C I . Hotpants by M I S S O N I . Bikini top by H I L DA M A H A . o p p o s i t e :: Top by R I C H A R D N I C O L L . Hotpants by RO B E R T O C AVA L L I . Boots by E M I L I O P U C C I .


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a b o v e :: Dress by L O U I S E G O L D I N . Shoes by E M I L I O P U C C I . Garland st ylist’s own. o p p o s i t e :: Cape by J O H N RO C H A .


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Dress by H I L DA M A H A .


PHOTOGRAPHY motohiko hasui @ femme FASHION EDITOR naoko watanabe

HAIR kazuya matsumoto @ femme - MAKEUP ebara @ miyabi RETOUCHING shinji uezumi @ adums inc. MODEL jun @ image models


See-through by N I N A R I C C I . Jewelries by V I V I E N N E W E S T WO O D AC C E S S O R I E S .


:: Jacket by A . F. VA N D E VO R S T . Leather pants by MC Q - A L E X A N D E R MC Q U E E N . Short boots by C H L O E S E V I G N Y F O R O P E N I N G C E R E MO N Y . this page

o p p o s i t e :: Necklace by A S SA D MO U N S E R . V I V I E N N E W E S T WO O D AC C E S S O R I E S .

Ring by


t h i s p a g e :: See-through by N I N A R I C C I . Fur stole by M I U M I U . Leather pants by MC Q - A L E X A N D E R MC Q U E E N .

Polo neck by P E AC H E S F O R P P Q . Leather pant and belt by MC Q - A L E X A N D E R MC Q U E E N . Lace coat by N O Z O M I I S H I G U RO H AU T E C O U T U R E . Leather boots by A . F. VA N D E VO R S T . Gloves by V I V I E N N E W E S T WO O D AC C E S S O R I E S . o p p o s i t e ::


Leather jacket and boots by N I N A R I C C I . Jewelries by V I V I E N N E W E S T WO O D AC C E S O R I E S . Silk skirt by M A I S O N M A R T I N M A RG I E L A .


MICHAEL KOPPELMAN PHOTOGRAPHY chad pickard & paul mclean - TEXT jem goulding FASHION chris benns - FASHION ASSISTANT amy hancock

M IC H A E L KOPPE L M A N is a respected urban icon who is responsible for introducing labels such as ST Ü S S Y and H Y ST E RIC GL A MOU R to the United Kingdom. What began as an in-

tense love for Hip-Hop and the records that followed quickly grew into an obsession with a culture that was inclusive of not only music, but clothes and people. After spending much of the early 1980's tapping into American streetwear and Japanese urban subculture through DJing, Koppelman saw the opportunity to introduce a new standard and style to London's youth. Tailing the punk generation, adventurous youngsters were looking to the Mod revival and the New Romantic aesthetic for a new identity. But Koppelman, taking note of New York's community-driven club scene and the nostalgic collective ways of Japanese youth, felt that there was an opening for a uniquely English urban street culture. Always inspired by the work of his friend California-based designer SH AW N ST U S S Y , Koppelman approached him about expanding into the UK. Getting the green light, Stüssy would become one of the many labels ushered into Europe through the late eighties as Koppelman cultivated a high-end street culture. Creating his own distribution company GI M M E5 , Koppelman sought to introduce labels not interested in turning out the next trend, but who paid respect to urban classics. In a culture of excess, the labels that have become synonymous with Michael Koppelman are not about fashion, but a culture – a way of life. In this same sense, it was in part to Koppelman's insistence on reintroducing vintage L E V I'S to the UK that salvage denim became a popular staple among the streetwear culture. Today, Koppelman's London Soho store, T H E H I DEOU T , which opened in 1998 has become a second home to a culture dedicated to maintaining a pure aesthetic that thrives on tradition and longevity.

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t o p :: Tommy wears bomber by W TA P S Circa 1992. b o t t o m :: Tommy wears shirt by S T Ü S S Y Circa 1998. Denim jacket by L E V I ’ S Circa 1995. Shorts by S T Ü S S Y Circa 2008. Sam wears denim jacket by F R E N C H C O N N E C T I O N Circa 1991.


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o p p o s i t e :: Sam wears shirt by S T Ü S S Y D E L U X E 2010. r i g h t :: Tommy wears t-shirt by C O M M E D E S GA RÇ O N S Circa 1990. Stone wash jeans by L E V I ’ S Circa 1999. b e l o w :: Sam wears chain model ’s own. Jeans by L E V I ’ S R E D Circa 1992.


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PHOTOGRAPHY simon harris STYLE & ART DIRECTOR jem goulding FASHION ASSISTANT josh finder MODEL ash stymest


o p p o s i t e :: Visor by A S H I S H . Shirt and pants by J C / D C . Jacket, shorts, and shoes by B I L L I O N A I R E B OY S C L U B . Socks by P R A DA . Glasses by N E I G H B O R H O O D . t h i s p a g e :: T-shirt by C A S S E T T E P L AY A . Shorts are R A F B Y R A F S I MO N S .


o p p o s i t e :: t h i s p a g e ::

Top by S T Ăœ S S Y . Sunglasses by K A R L L AG E R F E L D .


Jacket by J C / D C . Top by PAU L S M I T H . Layered over top by C H R I S T O P H E R S H A N N O N . Jeans by T RU S SA R D I 1 9 1 1 . Socks by M A R N I . Shoes by N E I L BA R R E T T .


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:: Sweater is R A F B Y R A F S I M MO N S . Pants by C A S S E T T E P L AY A . Socks by P R A DA . Shoes by B I L L I O N A I R E B OY S C L U B . t h i s p a g e :: Top by Y MC . Trousers by C O M M E D E S GA RÇ O N S . Glasses by C A Z A L . opposite


o p p o s i t e :: Jacket by K E N Z O . Shirt by PAU L S M I T H . Trousers by T I M S OA R . t h i s p a g e :: Coat by A L E X A N D E R MC Q U E E N . Shirt by U N I V E R SA L WO R K S .


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o p p o s i t e :: Pendant by T O M B I N N S . Shirt by S U P R E M E . Shorts by B I L L I O N A I R E B OY S C L U B . Scarf by U N I Q L O . t h i s p a g e :: Top by RO B E R T O C AVA L L I . Trousers by T I M S OA R . Shoes by T RU S SA R D I 1 9 1 1 .


o p p o s i t e :: Jacket by RO B E R T O C AVA L L I . Shirt by B U R B E R R Y P RO R S U M . t h i s p a g e :: Top by 3 . 1 P H I L L I P L I M . Bumbag by A S H I S H . Jeans by A L E X A N D E R MC Q U E E N .


Bra by L A P E R L A . Ruff le panties and Pique lace garder belt by AG E N T P ROVO C AT E U R . Fishnet lace thigh highs by F O GA L . Heels by C E SA R E PAC I O T T I for O H N E T I T E L . Veil by K L E I N F E L D B R I DA L . Lace gloves by C H A N E L .


PHOTOGRAPHY jam STYLING elizabeth sulcer MAKEUP robin black HAIR jenny cho

MODEL valeria dmitrienko @ WOMEN PHOTO ASSISTANT seth gudmunson STYLING ASSISTANT megan freilich special thanks to ali @ WOMEN


b o t h p a g e s :: Bra by L A P E R L A . White corset by H& M . White silk gown by E M I L I O P U C C I . Veil by K L E I N F E L D B R I DA L . Lace gloves by C H A N E L . Crystal ring by S WA ROV S K I .


Bra by L A P E R L A . Ruff le panties and Pique lace garder belt by AG E N T P ROVO C AT E U R . Fishnet lace thigh highs by F O GA L . Heels by C E SA R E PAC I O T T I for O H N E T I T E L . Veil by K L E I N F E L D B R I DA L . Lace gloves by C H A N E L . o p p o s i t e :: White lace bodysuit by T O P S H O P. Crystal necklaces by S WA R VO S K I C O U T U R E C O L L E C T I O N . Custom diamond headpiece by S U L C E R . Bracelet by S WA R VO S K I . Silver bangles by H& M . a b o v e ::


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Silver swimsuit by H E R V E L E G E R B Y M A X A Z R I A . Silver harness by M A X A Z R I A . White textured skirt by P R E E N . Mesh hoop skirt by J I L L S T UA R T . Heels by C H R I S T O P H E R K A N E for T O P S H O P.


a b o v e :: Swimsuit by A L A I A . Sequin bra by T O P S H O P. Sequin jacket by M A I S O N M A R T I N M A RG I E L A . Bandage skirt by H O U S E O F F I E L D . Stilettos by D I E G O D O L C I N I . o p p o s i t e :: Pink ruff le dress by B C B G M A X A Z R I A . White chubby by A Z Z A R RO . Pink corset by J E A N PAU L GAU LT I E R . Sunglasses by G U Y L A RO C H E .


Pink lace-up pants by H O U S E O F F I E L D . Gold Chanel logo and pearl necklaces by C H A N E L . Crystal and black stone bracelets and earrings by L A N V I N . Silver bangles by H& M . Gold bangle by A L E X I S B I T TA R . o p p o s i t e :: Mirrored mesh dress by C H R I S T O P H E R K A N E for T O P S H O P. Gown and corset by D O L C E & GA B BA N A . Lace thigh highs by WO L F O R D . Stiletto booties by B R I A N AT WO O D . a b o v e ::


LYDIA HEARST PHOTOGRAPHY justin hyte - INTRODUCTION bobby mozumder - INTERVIEW maria giraldo

There is nothing subtle about LY DI A H E A R ST ’s status as the gorgeous supermodel, scion to an historic publishing empire, and daughter of famous kidnap victim PAT R IC I A H E A R ST. Lydia’s mere existence represents a conf luence of several media canon representing fame and fortune. I checked if she would agree to a photo-shoot and interview. Surprisingly, she happily agreed. The unreachable icon suddenly became accessible and I was left with an impression of a young woman who realizes that contributing significantly to public service is equally if not more important than developing a career as both a model and an actress.

Is charit y work a permanent activit y for you?  What led you to choose to work with O p e ra t i o n S m i l e ? FC -

b o o k s , I a c t u a l ly c ol l e c t ra re o r i g i n a l p r i n t . You’re a “slash” celebrit y - actress/writer/model/activist and so on. As you continue to grow and move from your fashion-modeling phase what do you want your next role to be? FC -

Operation Smile i s   a n o n- g o v e r n m e n t a l o r g a n i z a t i o n t h a t w o rk s to p r o v i d e s u r g e r y to c h i l d re n s u f fe r i n g f r o m c l e f t p a l a t e s a n d o t h e r d e b i l i t a t i n g m e d i c a l c o n d it i o n s i n d e v e l o p i n g c o u n t r i e s . Un d e r n o c i rc u m s t a n c e s w o u l d I c a t e g o r i z e t h i s m i s s i o n a s h a v i n g b e e n e a s y, n o r fo r t h e fa i n t of h e a r t . B u t t ra v e l i n g to a fo re i g n c o u n t r y to w o rk w i t h p e o p l e f r o m a r o u n d t h e g l o b e a n d w a t c h i n g t h e m s e t a s i d e t h e i r d i f fe re n c e s i n t h e n a m e of s a v i n g t h e l i v e s of t h o s e l e s s fo r t u n a t e w a s o n e of t h e m o s t re w a r d i n g e x p e r ie n c e s of my l i fe . LY D I A -

E a c h p e rs o n w i t h w h o m I c a m e i n to c o n t a c t l e f t a l a s t i n g i m p re s s i o n o n my h e a r t . E v e r y qu i rk y d e t a i l a n d s e l f l e s s a c t u n i t e d u s to b e c o m e a n e f f i c i e n t t e a m of v o l u n t e e rs a n d p r ofe s s i o n a l s a l i k e .

I ’ m n o t o n e to b e s u m m e d u p o r c a t e g o r i z e d to o e a s i ly. Th e re’s t h i s ‘ i d e a’ a b o u t wh o I a m t h a t i s a u to m a t i c a l ly p r oje c t e d o n to m e , p e o p l e h a v e m e c o n f u s e d w i t h a s t e re o t y p e . By n a t u re I a m a w o rkh o rs e a n d t h i s l a s t ye a r h a s b e e n a wh i rl w i n d . I h a v e a l w ays b e e n e x t re m e ly fo r t u n a t e i n my c a re e r. Th i s l a s t ye a r h a s b e e n v e r y s u c c e s s f u l w i t h w o rk a n d t ra v e l .  F a m e i s s u b je c t i v e , b u t I a m t r u ly g ra te f u l fo r t h e re c o g n i t i o n of my w o rk . I h o n e s t ly w a n t to l i v e my l i fe to t h e f u l l e s t a n d l i v e w i t h o u t re g re t s . I l o v e e v e r y t h i n g t h a t I d o , a n d I h o p e to c o n t i n u e fo r a s l o n g a s I p o s s i b ly c a n , b u t I d o h o p e to s e t t l e d o w n a n d h a v e a fa m i ly. LY D I A -

Your first cover was shot by Steven Meisel for Vo g u e It al i a. You have worked with many photographers; one of them is Terry Richardson. You mentioned once that Richardson is a gentleman and very serious at the set (something surprising due to his controversial work). What is the main difference bet ween working with these t wo photographers? FC -

S a v i n g t h e l i v e s of c h i l d re n i s t h e u l t i m a t e g o a l of Operation Smile, a n d I b e l i e v e w e w e re m o re t h a n s u c c e s s f u l i n e x e c u t i n g t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n’s m i s s i o n .  F o r t h o s e of u s w o rk i n g i n fa s h i o n , i t i s v e r y e a s y to a d d yo u r n a m e to a c o m m i t t e e l i s t , w a l k a re d c a r p e t a n d c l a i m to c a re . B u t t a k i n g t a n g i b l e , h a n d s - o n s t e p s to c re a t e c h a n g e s p e a k s v o l u m e s .  And what about fashion editorials? Do you think paper will disappear? How would that affect models? How do you imagine an editorial in 2020? FC -

F a s h i o n a n d e n t e r t a i n m e n t i s a l w ays c h a n g i n g a n d e x p a n d i n g .  I h o n e s t ly d o n o t kn o w w h a t w i l l h a p p e n i n t h e u p c o m i n g ye a rs , b u t I ’ m o p t i m i s t i c a b o u t t h e f u t u re . I l o v e LY D I A -

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E v e r yo n e I h a v e e v e r w o rk e d w i t h i s e x t re m e ly p r o fe s s i o n a l .  Te r r y i s a n i n c re d i b l e p h o to g ra p h e r a n d o n e of my c l o s e t s f r i e n d s , I l o v e h i m . Th e re i s s o m u c h a b o u t h i s c re a t i v e p r o c e s s t h a t i s i m p o s s i b l e to e x p l a i n to s o m e o n e wh o h a s n o t b e e n t h e re . It i s g re a t b e i n g a b l e to w o rk a n d s p e n d t i m e w i t h h i m . I o w e my c a re e r to S t e v e n . I b e g a n w o rki n g i n A p r i l 2 0 0 4 w i t h a c o v e r a n d e d i to r i a l of Vogue Italia b y S t e v e n Me i s e l a n d h a v e b e e n w o rki n g a l m o s t e v e r y d ay s i n c e . He i s t h e o n e wh o d i s c o v e re d m e a n d l a u n c h e d LY D I A -


Lydia wears bodysuit by V I C T O R D E S O U Z A . Bracelets by PA M E L A L OV E . Shoes and thigh-highs by A F VA N D E R VO R S T .


Lydia wears corset by T H E B L O N D S .


Lydia wears horn antlers by A N D_ I . Gold body chain by B L I S S L AU . Harem pants by F R A N K T E L L .


m e a s a h i g h- fa s h i o n m o d e l . He i s a t r u e a r t i s t a n d v i s i o na r y, I l o v e b e i n g a b l e to c o n t i n u e w o rki n g w i t h h i m . The film Th e L a s t In t e r n a t i o n a l P l ayb oy was the beginning of an acting career? FC -

No . I h a v e d o n e s h o r t , i n d e p e n d e n t f i l m s a s w e l l a s c o m m e rc i a l s a n d w a s o n Gossip Girl. It w a s f u n to s t e p o u ts i d e of mys e l f a n d l i v e v i c a r i o u s ly t h r o u g h t h e a r t . Wo rki n g i n fa s h i o n t e a c h e s yo u h o w to d o w n p l ay t h e s e x u a l i t y of b e i n g n u d e .  LY D I A -

A n g e l i n a Jol i e’s c o m m i t m e n t to h e l p i n g o t h e r p e o p l e i s c o m p l e t e ly g e n u i n e . S h e re a l ly b r i n g s p ol i t i c a l a c t i v i s m i n to a wh ol e n e w l i g h t a n d i s n o t a b ra s i v e a b o u t i t .   F C - What have you learnt from your parents? S u c c e s s i s n’ t g e n e t i c . My fa m i ly i n s t i l l e d a g o o d w o rk- e t h i c a n d t h a t i s v e r y i m p o r t a n t to t h e s u c c e s s of a ny i n d i v i d u a l a l o n g w i t h t h e w i l l i n g n e s s to l e a r n a n d t a k e risks. LY D I A -

FC FC -

What is the thing you value most from a friend?

Are there any other upcoming acting projects? LY D I A -

LY D I A -

Ye s , b u t I c a n n o t g o i n to d e t a i l s . FC -

Model become actresses, actresses become advertising campaign models, actresses and models become “temporary” designers. From your experience and your knowledge of the industry why?

Ho n e s t y.

Do you let things happen or do you like to plan them?

FC -

LY D I A FC -

What was the last concert you went to?

I s e e n o re a s o n w hy I s h o u l d h a v e to c a t e g o r i z e my s e l f  a s o n e t h i n g o r a n o t h e r. I a d m i re p e o p l e l i k e Um a Th u r m a n a n d Mi l l a Jo v o v i c h w h o h a v e s u c c e s s f u l ly m a d e t h e t ra n s i t i o n f r o m s u p e r m o d e l to re s p e c t e d a c to r b u t a re s t i l l a b l e to c o n t i n u e w o rk i n g i n a l l a s p e c t s of t h e e n te r t a i n m e n t a n d fa s h i o n i n d u s t r i e s .

LY D I A -

Professionally speaking, do you have a bad side? And, regarding your character? 

FC -

LY D I A -

FC -

Rya n C a b re ra . I l i s te n to e v e r y t h i n g: r o c k , c o u n t r y, j a z z , ra p . FC -

What about the last book you read?

LY D I A -

LY D I A -

p hy.

As a model and public figure you had to start taking important career decisions much younger than most of the people. Has it been hard? Who has been your best consultant or friend in these aspects? Do you regret o would you change any professional decision you have taken?

FC -

FC -

Love and Other Disasters s t a r r i n g B r i t t a ny Mu r -

The last present you were given?

O r i g i n a l g i a n t P ol a r o i d p r i n t of S h a r o n Ta t e i n Valley of the Dolls. LY D I A -

FC -

I l o v e w h a t I d o a n d t h e d r i v i n g fo rc e b e h i n d t h a t i s my p a s s i o n fo r l i fe a n d t h e d e s i re to l e a r n . E v e r y d ay I t r y to g r o w a n d l e a r n s o m e t h i n g n e w . Th e c l o s e t s p e o p l e to m e i n my l i fe a re my fa m i ly a n d my f r i e n d s wh o I h a v e kn o w n s i n c e I w a s yo u n g .   I ’ m a l w ays c h a n g i n g a n d g r o w i n g w i t h e a c h d ay.   S t yl e i s a l l a fo r m of s e l f- e x p re s s i o n . It i s i m p o r t a n t to a l w ays s t ay t r u e to yo u rs e l f a n d re m a i n c o n f i d e n t w i t h w h o yo u a re a s a u n i qu e i n d i v i d u a l .

Into Thin Air b y Jo n K ra k a u e r.

And the last movie you watched and liked?

Th e t r u e s t a n d m o s t h o n e s t e ye s a re g re e n .

LY D I A -

It i s i m p o r t a n t fo r t h e re to b e a b a l a n c e .

The last present you have given to someone?

LY D I A -

FC -

Where do you feel at home?

I l i v e b e t w e e n Ne w Yo rk a n d L o s A n g e l e s . Ho m e w i l l a l w ays b e w i t h my fa m i ly. I l o v e h a v i n g fa m i ly p h o to s a n d a r t i n my h o m e . LY D I A -

If you had to move to a different country for a lifetime, where would you go? FC -

LY D I A -

P a r i s , F ra n c e .

Any past fashion icons (not models) beyond trends whose st yle inspires you? FC -

Im a n c h a l l e n g e d b e a u t y s t a n d a rd s a n d h a s d o n e s o m u c h a m a z i n g w o rk fo r h e r c h a r i t y Keep a Child Alive. LY D I A -

I a l w ays w a n t e d to b e a m o d e l a n d Tw i g g y w a s t h e f i rs t w h o i n s p i re d m e . S h e c h a n g e d t h e fa c e of fa s h i o n a n d w a s o n ly 5’ 6 (s a m e a s m e , a n d w e s h a re t h e s a m e b i r t h d ay).

LY D I A -

A d ra w i n g b y R e my Hol w i c k

FASHION EDITOR harold jay melvin ART DIRECTION & ILLUSTRATION sophy holland HAIR elsa for KERASTASE MAKEUP viktorija bowers for ILLAMASQUA FASHION ASSISTANTS lena griffin & signoret austin special thanks to FACTORY STUDIOS BROOKLYN


PHOTOGRAPHY nicholas routzen - STYLING claudia

behnke - HAIR natasha mygdal using shue uemura MAKEUP sandra cooke using giorgio armani - MODEL wanessa @ select - STYLING ASSISTANCE irene manicone - DIGITAL EQUIPMENT - a!r creative


Black dress by Z I A D G H A N E M . Black briefs by L A P E R L A .


:: Black corset by M A R KO M I TA N OV S K I . Bow tie by P R A DA . Shoes by G E O RG I N A G O O D M A N . Hat piece by P I E R S AT K I N S O N . this page

:: Black jacket by Z I A D G H A N E M . Black briefs by L A P E R L A . Shoes by C H R I S T I A N L O U B O U T I N @ M AT C H E S FA S H I O N .C O M . opposite


White jacket by M A R KO M I TA N OV S K I . White briefs by L A P E R L A . Black Boots by G I L C A R t h i s p a g e :: VA L H O o p p o s i t e :: Black pleated skirt by M A R KO M I TA N OV S K I . Boots by G E O RG I N A G O O D M A N . Necklace by L A N V I N @ M AT C H E S FA S H I O N .C O M .


White shoulder piece by P I E R R E GA R RO U D I . Trousers and shoes by J E A N - P I E R R E B R AGA N Z A . Feather head piece by P I E R S AT K I N S O N .


t h i s p a g e ::

White meshed top by P I E R R E GA R RO U D I .

:: White skirt by M A R KO M I TA N OV S K I . Headpiece by L O U I S M A R I E T T E . Shoes by N ATAC H A M A R RO . opposite


PHOTOGRAPHY willem jaspert STYLING sam ranger MAKEUP natsumi @ CAREN

HAIR adrian clark @ CLM using KIEHL’S PHOTO ASSISTANT james frew MODEL ylonka verheul thanks to duncan ord @ NEW YORK MODELS, henry holland and FILM PLUS STUDIO


Dress by DA N I E L L E S C U T T . Jacket by MC Q , pin by K AT I E H I L L I E R for H O U S E O F H O L L A N D . t h i s p a g e :: o p p o s i t e ::


t h i s p a g e :: Cropped leather shirt by H O U S E O F H O L L A N D , black pants by E R E S , sunglasses by M A RC J AC O B S . o p p o s i t e :: Jacket by H O U S E O F H O L L A N D for L E V I ’ S , dress by W I L L OW.


t h i s p a g e :: Shirt by J O S H G O O T , lace shorts by H O U S E O F H O L L A N D for P R E T T Y P O L LY , shoes by T.U. K . . o p p o s i t e :: Dress by J O N AT H A N SAU N D E R S .

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t h i s p a g e :: Dress by H O U S E O F H O L L A N D for L E V I ’ S . o p p o s i t e :: Jacket and skirt, vintage S T E P H E N S P RO U S E , bra by E R E S .


PHOTOGRAPHY simon harris STYLING

patricia lewis

MAKEUP

clare read

HAIR

mark hampton

MODELS

dioni tabbers and

alek alexeya @

SELECT

1

( 1 ) Alek wears bra top and pants by S T O L E N G I R L F R I E N D S C L U B . Dioni wears dress by D S Q UA R E D 2 . ( 2 ) Dioni wears dress by WO L F O R D . ( 3 ) Alek wears dress and boots by V E R SAC E . Dioni wears jacket and pants by J U L I E N M AC D O N A L D , skirt by V E R SAC E , and shoes by D S Q UA R E D 2 . ( 4 ) Alek wears top by S T O L E N G I R L F R I E N D S C L U B , and skirt by V E R SAC E ( 5 ) Alek wears jacket by E M I L I O D E L A MO R E N A , bra by L’AG E N C E , and pants are P R E E N B Y T H O R N T O N B R E GA Z Z I ( 6 ) Dioni wears dress by BA S S O A N D B RO O K E .

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2


3

4

5

6


NOTES ON SOME DESIGNERS Raphael Young INTERVIEW maria giraldo PHOTO christopher starbody STYLING martha violante MODEL jillian hoey @ trump

F C - You r na m e le a d s u s t o t h e f i r s t que s t ion D o you c on s ide r e d you r s e l f a R e na i s s a n c e ma n , w it h a n d e c le c t ic e duc a t ion on ph y s ic s , c on s t r uc t ion a n d f a s h ion?

a n g l e s a n d c u r v e s p r e c i s e ly w h e n I d o t h e u p p e r. T h e b e s t t a n n e r i e s i n t h e w o r l d a r e B o d i n -Jo ye u x i n France and Dean and Stephania in Tu s c a ny. 

R A PH A EL - I had never thought about it but that is a description that kind of suits me! I do have an eclectic education, having been b r o u g h t b y a fa m i ly m a d e o f e n g i n e e rs a n d c r a fs t m e n , w i t h t h e l a t e 7 0’s a n d t h e 8 0’s a s t h e b a c k g r o u n d - t h e g o l d e n a g e o f fa s h i o n , w h e n everything was invented.  

F C - W h ic h s h o e de s ig n e r i s you f a v ou r it e f r om a l l t i m e s?

F C - Wou ld you de f i n e you r s h o e s a s lu x u r y? W h y? W ha t i s n e c e s s a r y for s om e t h i ng t o b e b a p t i z e d a s “ lu x u r y ” ? R A P H A E L - L u x u r y i s n’ t o n ly s y n o ny m o u s o f e x p e n s i v e , u n a f fo r d able, elitist. Real luxury means e x c e p t i o n a l , t i m e l e s s , o n e - o f- a kind products, made with love and care, by pa ssionate individual s. T h a t’s w h a t I a i m fo r, s o ye s , yo u c o u l d d e f i n e my s h o e s a s l u x u r y. T h e f i rs t d e f i n i t i o n i s o n ly a c o n s e quence of the second. F C - You r f a v ou r it e le a t h e r t o work w it h c om e s f r om (w h ic h c ou nt r y a n d r e g ion)? R A P H A E L - It d e p e n d s o n w h a t k i n d o f s t yl e I ’ m w o r k i n g o n , b u t u s u a l ly n a p p a i s a g r e a t fa b r i c t o w o r k w i t h a s i t w r a p s p e r fe c t ly complex lasts and allows me to see

R A PH A E L - Andre Peru gia and R o g e r Vi v i e r. F C - I n f a s h ion , p e o ple c om e a n d g o. W ha t wou ld you s a y i s a n d w i l l b e you r b u s i n e s s s t r a t e g y i n or de r t o b e p a r t of t h i s i n du s t r y for a long a t i m e ? R A P H A E L - My t e a m a n d I h a v e the intention to build a mai son, not ju st another designer label. Shoes are the starting point, but we are working on ver y exciting other products that will be integrated to our collection season after season. We a r e t h i n k i n g t i m e l e s s c l a s s i c s , not seasonal hits. F C - W ha t i s t h e f i r s t f a s h ion s h ow do you r e m e mb e r wa t c h i ng? R A P H A E L - My u n c l e t o o k m e t o Y S L h a u t e c o u t u r e w h e n I w a s 14 . It c h a n g e d my l i fe . F C - W h e n a n d w h y d id you k n ow you we r e pr e p a r e d t o s t a r t you r ow n b u s i n e s s? R A P H A E L - I ’ d s a y t h a t 3 ye a rs a g o , a f t e r ye a rs o f f r e e - l a n c i n g

h e r e a n d t h e r e , I w a s f i n a l ly m a ture and the desire had grown in m e o f e x p r e s s i n g mys e l f w i t h o u t l i m i t a t i o n s . I fe l t i t d e e p i n s i d e my b e l ly. F C - O b v iou s l y you p a y a t t e nt ion t o f e e t . A r e s h o e s or f e e t t h e f i r s t t h i ng you s e e on a p e r s on? R A P H A E L - N o , a t f i rs t I l o o k a t t h e e x p r e s s i o n i n t h e e ye s a n d a f t e r the legs.

Philippe & David Blond INTERVIEW harold melvin PHOTO maricio padilha F C - W h o do you de s ig n for? W ha t t y p e of woma n we a r s you r pie c e s? B L O N D S - We d e s i g n fo r a nyo n e w h o w a n t s t o a d d s o m e e x t r e m e g l a m o u r t o a s p e c i a l o c c a s i o n . We h a v e i n c r e d i b l e i c o n s a n d a r c h t y p e s i n o u r h e a d s w h e n w e d e s i g n , s u c h a s M a r i ly n M o n r o e a n d M a r l e n e D i e t r i c h , a n d w h a t w o m a n d o e s n’ t w a n t t o e v o k e t h e v i s u a l p o w e r t h o s e t w o d i d ? F C - A r e a l l you r pie c e s c u s t om ma de t o or de r or do you a l s o ha v e r e a d y t o we a r? B L O N D S - R i g h t n o w i t i s a l l c u s t o m b u t w e l o o k fo r w a r d t o e x p a n d i n g w i t h a r e a dy t o w e a r l i n e o f c l o t h i n g a n d a c c e s s o r i e s . F C - We h e a r you ju s t won t h e E c c o D oma n i Fa s h ion Fou n d a t ion Gr a nt ? D e s c r ib e t h e c omp e t it ion? A n d w ha t it m e a n s t o you r c a r e e r B L O N D S - We’ r e v e r y g r a t e f u l t o E c c o D o m a n i a n d t h i s w i l l b e a h u g e t u r n i n g p o i n t fo r o u r b u s i n e s s . T h e g r a n t i s a l l o w i n g u s t o h o l d a fa s h i o n s h o w fo r o u r F a l l 2 0 1 0 c o l l e c t i o n , w h i c h w i t h o u t w e m a y n o t h a v e b e e n a b l e t o i n t h i s e c o n o my. F C - You’ v e b e e n p a r t of s om e m e m or a ble c ol l a b or a t ion f r om Ma c V I VA GL A M t o BA R BI E w ha t ha s b e e n you r f a v or it e ? B L O N D S - A g a i n , e v e r y e x p e r i e n c e i s r e w a r d i n g fo r t h e i r o w n i n d i v i d u a l challenges. Thi s i s an unan swerable question but what we can say i s that each collaboration helps u s grow and of ten find s their way into our main collection.

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PHOTOGRAPHER eliot lee hazel INTERVIEW & STYLING harold melvin HAIR aura friedman MAKE UP bijules

Bijules

F C - You we r e a DJ for a p e r io d of t i m e . W ha t k i n d of mu s ic d id you s pi n? D id b e i ng i nv ol v e d i n n ig ht l i f e c lut u r e h e lp s ha p e w h o you a r e a s a de s ig n e r? B I J U L E S - I p u t o n w h a t e v e r I w a n t e d . It n o r m a l ly h a d s o m e t h i n g t o d o w i t h e l e c t r i c a n d m i x i n g b e a t s s o h o w e v e r I w o u l d fe e l , b e i t G u r u t o o l d Ye a h Ye a h Ye a h s ... b e i n g i n t h e n i g h t l i fe w a s my e n t r y i n t o t h e c r e a t i v e v i c e s o f Ne w Yo r k . We o p e r a t e d o n f u n a n d s t yl e a n d w e s t i l l d o ! T h e p e e p s I d i d p a r t i e s w i t h c o n t i n u e t o d o t h e i r t h i n g a n d I a m p r o u d t o c l a i m t h e n i g h t l i fe a s p a r t o f my b e g i n n i n g s ! F C - Fr om t h e f e w t i m e s we ha v e m e t , you ha v e a s or t of d a rk , t w i s t e d g l a m ou r. W ha t i n for m s you r ide a of b e a ut y? B I J U L E S - B e i n g a Ne w Yo r k e r m e a n s b l a c k . I m e a n c o m e o n - w e l o o k g o o d i n b l a c k . I t h r o w i n b r i g h t f l a s h e s o f c o l o r a n d ye l l o w g o l d - e v e r y w h e r e ... I t h i n k t h e w a y I h o l d mys e l f i s t h e d a r k t w i s t e d t h i n g yo u a r e t a l k i n g a b o u t . I a m c o n f i d e n t o f mys e l f a n d my w o r k t h e r e fo r e I a m s o m e w h a t o f a n e x h i b i t i o n i s t . I n e e d p e o p l e t o n o t i c e w h a t I d o i n o r d e r fo r t h e m t o t a l k . o n c e t h e y a r e t a l k i n g , t h e n t h e y a r e a l s o c r e a t i n g . Ne w s s p r e a d s . Tr e n d s a r e d e v e l o p e d . B i j u l e s i s s o u g h t a n d u l t i m a t e ly b o u g h t . B e a u t y i s c l e a r ly i n t h e e ye s o f t h e b e h o l d e r ; Mi n e i s p e r p e t u a l ly p r e s e n t , I l e a v e w h e t h e r i s i t b e a u t i f u l o r n o t up to whomever i s looking at me. F C - I h e a r you ha v e a t w i n ? I s h e or s h e i n b u s i n e s s a s we l l? B I J U L E S - My t w i n , S a m , i s c e r t a i n ly i n b u s i n e s s . S h e h a s h e r o w n p r e p a r e d fo o d s l i n e c a l l e d “ s k i m k i m” . He r b l o g i s f u c k i n H I L A R I O U S .(h t t p://b l o g . s k i m k i m .c o m /). S h e o n c e d i s s e d S h e p a r d F a i r e y d e e p fo r r i p p i n g m e o f f a n d i t w a s a t e n d e r m o m e n t w h e n s h e r e fe r e n c e d M a s s e n g i l d o u c h e s ..

Rupert Sanderson

INTERVIEW maria giraldo PHOTO aaron tilley STYLING annette masterman

F C - You r bio g r a ph y s a y s t ha t b e for e you t u r n e d i nt o t h e f a s h ion b u s i n e s s you ha d a d i s a s t r ou s c a r e e r i n a d v e r t i s i ng. D e s pit e of t ha t you ha v e a l r e a d y b e e n a wa r de d a s A c c e s s or y D e s ig n e r of t h e Ye a r i n 2 0 0 8 a t t h e Br it i s h Fa s h ion Awa r d s a n d a ye a r a f t e r, i n 2 0 0 9 , a t t h e E l le St y le Awa r d s . I n a world w h e r e i ma g e i s a v e r y i mp or t a nt p a r t of t h e de a l , h ow ha v e you ma na g e d t o s e t R up e r t S a n de r s on a s a s y n ony m for L u x u r y a n d St y le ? RU P E R T - I ’ m a b r i l l i a n t s h o e d e s i g n e r a n d n o t a v e r y g o o d b u l l s h i t t e r… ! I t h i n k w i t h my d e s i g n s , I h a v e t r i e d t o s e t mys e l f a p a r t f r o m e v e r yo n e e l s e b y n e v e r c o m p r o m i s i n g o n q u a l i t y a n d s t yl e . O w n i n g my fa c t o r y i n It a ly r e a l ly m a k e s t h i s p o s s i b l e fo r m e . I design shoes to be worn by a woman and not the other way round – they have an understated chicness to them. . F C - You w r it e a we e k l y blo g for Vo g ue U K , w ha t ha v e you d i s c ov e r e d on t h i s m e d iu m? RU P E R T - T h a t 7 d a ys i s a n a w f u l ly s h o r t p e r i o d o f t i m e t o c o m e u p w i t h s o m e t h i n g b r e a t h l e s s ly e x c i t i n g fo r t h e g o o d r e a d e rs o f Vo g u e ! O n a s e r i o u s n o t e t h o u g h , I s e e w h a t a n i m p a c t t h e In t e r n e t h a s o n fo r m i n g a b r a n d n o w a d a ys , a n d i t’s s o m e t h i n g t h a t c a n n o t b e i g n o r e d a ny m o r e i f yo u w a n t t o b u i l d a s u c c e s s f u l b r a n d i m a g e a n d c o m p a ny. F C - A s a s h o e de s ig n e r a n d e nt r e pr e n e u r, w ha t i s you r r e l a t ion s h ip w it h I nt e r n e t ? RU P E R T - We a r e v e r y a w a r e o f i t a n d fo r o u r c o m p a ny s i z e , p r o b a b ly h a v e o n e o f t h e b e s t t r a n s a c t i o n a l s h o e s i t e s a r o u n d . I a l s o w r i t e a b l o g fo r Vo g u e (s e e a b o v e) a n d w e c o m m u n i c a t e v e r y w e l l w i t h o u r d a t a b a s e o f c u s t o m e rs o n l i n e . I a m v e r y a w a r e o f, a n d l i k e t o k e e p u p d a t e d w i t h a s m a ny fa s h i o n b l o g s a s p o s s i b l e – S u s a n n a L a u’s S t yl e B u b b l e i s o n e , a s w e l l a s Jo e Wo n g’s (h t t p:// 0 0 o 0 0 . b l o g s p o t .c o m) F C - L u x u r y n e e d s a le g a c y a n d h e r it a g e . You r br a n d i s on l y 7 ye a r s old , a lt h ou g h t h e c r a f t s m e n work i ng i n It a l y a r e p a r t of a long t r a d it ion . But you , a s a lu x u r y br a n d , h ow do you work w it h t h i s ide a of h e r it a g e ? O r do you t h i n k it i s n ot n e c e s sar y at all? RU P E R T - I ’ m w e d d e d t o M a d e i n It a ly – t h i s i s e v i d e n t i n my b u y i n g a c o n t r o l l i n g i n t e r e s t i n t h e fa c t o r y t o p r o t e c t t h e i n t e r e s t s o f t h e w o r k e rs a n d s a fe g u a r d t h e l o n g t e r m f u t u r e o f t h e b u s i n e s s . He r i t a g e i s n e c e s s a r y. F C - You t a l ke d a b out r oma nt ic i s m a n d It a l ia n DNA of you r s h o e s . But you r e f e r r e d b a s ic a l l y t o t h e wa y of u n de r s t a n d i ng t h e b u s i n e s s . C ou ld you e x pl a i n t h e r oma nt ic ide a a l it t le bit i n de p t h a n d h ow wou ld de s c r ib e you r s h o e s , you s a y you work w it h c le a n c u r v e d l i n e s b ut w ha t ide a do you r s h o e s t r a n s m it ? RU P E R T - I l o v e t h e w h o l e b u s i n e s s o f m a k i n g i n It a ly – I l i k e g e t t i n g o n t h e p l a n e t o go there, I like having lunch in the little restaurant in the village, I love the people that m a k e my s h o e s a n d h o s t a ‘ p i c c o l a fe s t a’ e v e r y s u m m e r i n t h e v i l l a g e s q u a r e fo r e v e r y o n e w h o i s i n v o l v e d w i t h t h e s h o e s . T h e s u n a l w a ys s h i n e s a n d p e o p l e b r i n g t h e l i t t l e specialities of the region to eat and drink. I worr y about the generation s of people who h a v e a n d w i l l w o r k i n t h e fa c t o r y. A l l t h i s i s b o t h v e r y g o o d b u s i n e s s p r a c t i c e a s w e l l a s h u g e ly r o m a n t i c a n d s u p p o r t s my p o s i t i o n i n g a s a M a d e In It a ly l u x u r y p r o d u c t .


WORDS bobby mozumder

New York Fashion Week Fall-Winter 2010 300+ fashion shows and presentations in the span of one week to introduce collections to a worldwide audience of journalists and buyers. Here are a few.

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Y-3 Lasers line the runway at the Adidas/Y-3 show, which included a stage martial arts fight between designer Yohji Yamamoto and his models. PHOTO bobby mozumder LOCATION new york armory


DIANE VON FURSTENBERG Celebrity stylist Rachel Zoe enters the Diane von Furstenberg show at the Bryant Park tents. PHOTO omar mozumder LOCATION the tent at bryant park

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BETSEY JOHNSON Heartbreak opened fashion week on word that designer Lee Alexander McQueen hung himself. Betsey Johnson paid a loving tribute to McQueen at the close of her show. PHOTO bobby mozumder LOCATION altman building


PETER SOM Designer Peter Som returned to the runway in top form with idyllic 70’s inspiration for his own line, and continued on as consultant for Tommy Hilfiger’s women’s wear. PHOTO bobby mozumder LOCATION milk studios

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DIESEL BLACK GOLD Model Constance Jablonski poses backstage at Diesel Black Gold for the debut collection by new creative director Sophia Kokosalaki. PHOTO eric martin LOCATION 115 west 41st street


UNITED BAMBOO Model Alana Zimmer awaits her exit onto the runway while model Lindsay Wixon prepares backstage. Gift bags await their owners at the front of house at United Bamboo. PHOTO kristiina wilson LOCATION altman building

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FU T U R ECL A W M A G A ZIN E I S S U E 4


DKNY Models await in line before exiting onto the runway at DKNY, 25 years after Donna Karan introduced her own label. PHOTO gerardo somoza LOCATION 711 greenwich St.


A.F. VANDEVORST - w w w.af vandevorst.be

COMME DES GARÇONS - w w w.doverstreetmarket.com

ACNE - w w w.acnestudios.com

DANIELLE SCUTT - w w w.daniellescutt.com

AGENT PROVOCATEUR - w w w.agentprovocateur.com

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG - w w w.dvf.com

ALEXANDER MCQUEEN - w w w.alexandermcqueen.com

DIEGO DOLCINI - w w w.diegodolcini.it

ALEXIS BITTAR - w w w.alexisbittar.com

DIESEL BLACK GOLD - w w w.diesel.com

AMERICAN APPAREL - w w w.americanapparel.net

DISAYA - w w w.disaya.com

AND_I - w w w.and-i.net

DOLCE & GABBANA - w w w.dolcegabbana.com

ANN DEMEULEMEESTER - w w w.anndemeulemeester.be

DKNY - w w w.dkny.com

ANREALAGE - w w w.anrealage.com

DSQUARED2 - w w w.dsquared2.com

ANTONIA BERARDI - w w w.antonioberardi.com

ELLIOT ATKINSON - w w w.elliotatkinson.co.uk

ARMANI - w w w.giorgioarmani.com

EMILIO DE LA MORENA - w w w.emiliodelamorena.com

ASHISH - w w w.ashish.co.uk

EMILIO PUCCI - w w w.emiliopucci.com

AZZARRO - w w w.azzaroparis.com

ERES - w w w.eresparis.com

AZZEDINE ALAÏA - w w w.doverstreetmarket.com

EVERLASTING SPROUT - w w w.everlasting-sprout.com

BALLY - w w w.bally.com

FOGAL - w w w.fogal.com

BASSO AND BROOKE - w w w.bassoandbrooke.com

FRANK TELL - w w w.frank-tell.com

BCBG MAX AZRIA - w w w.bcbg.com

FRENCH CONNECTION - w w w.frenchconnection.com

BERNHARD WILLHELM - w w w.totemfashion.com

G.V.G.V - w w w.g vg v.jp

BETSEY JOHNSON - w w w.betseyjohnson.com

GALAXXXY - gala x x x y.jugem.jp

BEYOND RETRO - w w w.beyondretro.com

GEORGINA GOODMAN - w w w.georginagoodman.com

BIJOU R.I. - w w w.bijoou.com

GIL CARVALHO - w w w.gilcarvalho.com

BIJULES - w w w.bijulesnyc.com

GUY LAROCHE - w w w.guylaroche.com

BILLIONAIRE BOYS CLUB - w w w.bbcicecream.com

H&M - w w w.hm.com

BLISS LAU - w w w.blisslau.com

HAN AHN SOON - w w w.hanahnsoon.com

THE BLONDS - w w w.theblondsnew york.com

HERVE LEGER BY MAX AZRIA - w w w.herveleger.com

BLUMARINE - w w w.blumarine.com

HILDA MAHA - w w w.hildamaha.com

BORA AKSU - w w w.boraaksu.com

HISUI - w w w.00s-s.com

BRIAN ATWOOD - w w w.brianat wood.com

HOUSE OF FIELD - w w w.patriciafield.com

BRYCE AIME - w w w.bryce-danice-aime.com

HOUSE OF HOLLAND - w w w.houseof holland.co.uk

BURBERRY PRORSUM - w w w.burberry.com

IOANNIS DIMITROUSIS - w w w.ioannisdimitrousis.com

CASSETTE PLAYA - w w w.cassetteplaya.com

JAMES LONG - w w w.jameslonguk.com

CAZAL - w w w.cazal-eyewear.com

JC/DC - w w w.jc-de-castelbajac.com

CESARE PACIOTTI - w w w.cesare-paciotti.com

JEAN PAUL GAULTIER - w w w.jeanpaulgaultier.com

CHANEL - w w w.chanel.com

JILL STUART - w w w.jillstuart.com

CHARLIE LE MINDU - w w w.charlielemindu.com

JOHN ROCHA - w w w.johnrocha.ie

CHLOE SEVIGNY FOR OPENING CEREMONY -

JONATHAN SAUNDERS - w w w.jonathan-saunders.com

JOSH GOOT - w w w.joshgoot.com

w w w.openingceremony.us

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN - w w w.christianlouboutin.com

JULIEN MACDONALD - w w w.julienmacdonald.com

CHRISTOPHER K ANE - w w w.topshop.com

K ATIE HILLIER - w w w.hillierlondon.com

CHRISTOPHER SHANNON - w w w.christophershannon.co.uk

K ARL LAGERFELD - w w w.karllagerfeld.com

CHRONICLES OF NEVER - w w w.chroniclesofnever.com

KENZO - w w w.kenzo.com

220

FU T U R ECL A W M A G A ZIN E I S S U E 4


KLEINFELD BRIDAL - w w w.k leinfeldbridal.com

PRADA - w w w.prada.com

KSUBI - w w w.ksubi.com

PREEN BY THORNTON BREGAZZI - w w w.preen.eu

L’AGENCE - lagencefashion.com

PRETTY POLLY - w w w.prett y polly.co.uk

LA PERLA - w w w.laperla.com

PRINGLE OF SCOTLAND - w w w.pringlescotland.com

LANVIN - w w w.lanvin.com

PROENZA SCHOULER - w w w.proenzaschouler.com

LEVI’S - w w w.levi.com

RAF BY RAF SIMONS - w w w.raf byrafsimons.com

LOUISE GOLDIN - louisegoldin.info

RAPHAEL YOUNG - w w w.raphaelyoung.com

LOUIS MARIETTE - w w w.louismariette.co.uk

REEM ACRA - w w w.reemacra.com

LUCY HUTCHINGS - w w w.lucyhutchings.com

RICHARD NICOLL - w w w.richardnicoll.com

MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA -

ROBERTO CAVALLI - w w w.robertocavalli.com

RUPERT SANDERSON - w w w.rupertsanderson.co.uk

w w w.maisonmartinmargiela.com

MARC JACOBS - w w w.marcjacobs.com

SACAI - +81(0)5428 - 6254

MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE - w w w.mfpepe.com

SLADKY - w w w.sladky.jp

MARKO MITANOVSKI - w w w.markomitanovski.com

STEPHEN SPROUSE - w w w.welovesprouse.com

MARLIES DEKKERS - w w w.marliesdek kers.nl

STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB -

MARNI - w w w.marni.com

MATCHESFAHSION.COM - w w w.matchesfashion.com

STREETS AHEAD - w w w.streetsaheadinc.com

MAX AZRIA - w w w.ma xazria.com

STÜSSY - w w w.stussy.com

MCQ - w w w.m-c-q.com

SUPREME - w w w.supremenew york.com

MIKIO SAK ABE - w w w.mikiosakabe.com

SWAROVSKI - w w w.swarovski.com

MISSONI - w w w.missoni.com

TIM SOAR - w w w.soar-london.com

MIU MIU - w w w.miumiu.com

TOGA - w w w.toga.jp

MOSCHINO - w w w.moschino.com

TOM BINNS - w w w.tombinnsdesign.com

MOTONARI ONO - w w w.motonari-ono.com

TOPSHOP - w w w.topshop.com

NEAR.NIPPON - w w w.near-nippon.com

T.U.K. - tukshoes.com

NATACHA MARRO - w w w.natachamarro.com

TRUSSARDI 1911 - w w w.trussardi1911.com

NATHAN JENDEN - w w w.nathanjenden.com

UNIQLO - w w w.uniqlo.com

NEIGHBORHOOD - w w w.neighborhood.jp

UNITED BAMBOO - w w w.unitedbamboo.com

NEIL BARRETT - w w w.neilbarrett.com

UNIVERSAL WORKS - w w w.universalworks.co.uk

NINA RICCI - w w w.ninaricci.com

VALENTINO - w w w.valentino.com

NOZOMI ISHIGURO - web.me.com/nozomi.ishiguro

VERSACE - w w w.versace.com

NUDE : MASAHIKO MARUYAMA - w w w.nudemm.com

VICTOR DE SOUZA - w w w.victordesouzany.com

OHNE TITEL - w w w.ohnetitel.com

VIVIENNE WESTWOOD - w w w.viviennewest wood.com

PAMELA HOGG - w w w.pamhogg.com

WILLOW - w w w.willowltd.com

PAMELA LOVE - w w w.pamelalovenyc.com

WOLFORD - w w w.wolford.com

PAUL SMITH - w w w.paulsmith.co.uk

WTAPS - w w w.w taps.com

PETER SOM - w w w.petersom.com

Y-3 - adidas.com/y-3

3.1 PHILLIP LIM - w w w.31philliplim.com

YMC - w w w.youmustcreate.com

PIERRE GARROUDI - w w w.pierregarroudi.com

YUDLEG (FLEA COMPANY) - w w w.f leastore.jp

PIERS ATKINSON - w w w.piersatkinson.com

ZIAD GHANEM - w w w.ziadghanem.co.uk

PEACHES FOR PPQ - ppqclothing.com

w w w.stolengirlfriendsclub.com


FINAL PAGE

HIPPIES LIE This heart was safe wrapped up in ice Until you reached into my sky And melt it with your zenith I wish I wanted to break this beautiful curse Be free of the love you cast out so willingly, like a spell But every minute in your light is like medicine Living therapy You I feel like this forest you’ve taken me to Whose trees would fall without you Humming through their leaves Like if you untangle our limbs You’ll uproot a lifeline and I’ll cease to be Guitar cradled in both arms Your blood starts to spill and for a while it’s sacred Especially when we pretend you only play like this for me These serenades are threads I want to tug at Unmask the thespian But don’t in case they snap altogether And I’m left alone with only echoes of us Sometimes I think you hear my heart beat and strum away in time Then I admit it’s my veins pulsing to your strings A metaphor for our dynamic Disguised in your performance Your peace makes me want war I want to pull the pin on your golden grenade See your soul dowse these walls Hurl your poetry promises across the floor like marbles Watch them shatter in pain But they won’t They’ll bounce out a melody that sounds of last summer Though you’ve no need for chimes to solstice These are your picnic days And it never rains in your realm Stop with your magic for a minute Your wizardry makes me mortal The next time you tell me what I want to hear I’ll dash a fatal blow to that angel face Only you’ve already closed your eyes Falling back through the air Arms out stretched Landing on my sheets in that irresistible crucifix Can’t help but take your photograph And climb your waist I want to breathe you in now Play yin and yang So I stare past your glistening neck Fixate with blurred vision on your ceiling Try to dissolve into the same trance you’re in Don’t leave me behind My stars could implode But I can’t purge the fear of losing you Even here I’m petrified with doubt Until the poncho we lay under falls away and I’m lost in your oasis Even after all the midnights of naked laughter All the hazy breakfasts and smoke misted noons There’s a stranger in my bed again I’m wearing his T-shirt And I gave up keeping up with your head when I realized You are not of this earth My heartbreaking, breathtaking alien. Tomorrow when we’re out in the world The masses They will swarm and fall And I remember It’ll always be this way for you Everyone loves a smiler. The agony is that I know who I have to be To keep you But can’t reverse the supernova That person got lost behind the moon The day you danced into my sky.

POEM jem goulding PHOTOGRAPH rj shaughnessy



FutureClaw Issue 4 Lydia Hearst cover