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The FundBook February 2011

The state of federal funding for fire, police and EMS departments p.10

Federal fire grants interview with Rep. LoBiondo p.24

Upcoming grants timeline p.30

View from the capitol: New year, new cuts p.8

Helping communities find the federal funding they need.


Articles

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Grants News in Brief

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View from the Capitol New year, new cuts

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Perspective from the Agency FEMA’s staff discuss assistance programs for firefighters

Transportation Roundup Keeping tabs on the new highway bill’s progress On the Docket Federal legislation affecting grants

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Grants in Focus: Build America Bonds Expire

Perspective from the Hill Congressman Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ) on AFG Finance Corner Local Government Financing Opportunities

NEA Our Town Applications Grants (p.57) Due: Mar 1, 2011

Featured grants:

This program provides funds for creative placemaking projects that contribute toward the livability of communities and help transform them into lively, beautiful, and sustainable places with the arts at their core.


February to-do list: Evaluate what federal assistance is available for police, fire, and EMS departments Visit our Legislative Desk to determine your next step towards working with your delegation (p.16) Review grants section to see if any current opportunities match your needs (p.30-60)

Features

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The state of federal funding for fire, police and EMS departments

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By the Numbers: Federal emergency programs

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The February Legislative Desk

Timeline of currently available grants for local governments

Anti-gang Strategies and Programs Grants (p.50) Due: Mar 11, 2011

The program provides funds for localities to support coordinated federal, state, and local partnerships to implement primary prevention, secondary prevention, gang intervention, and targeted gang enforcement.

Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grants (p.46) Due: Apr 21, 2011

This program provides funds to community colleges and other eligible institutions of higher education with funds to expand and improve their ability to deliver education and career training programs.


Foreword Dear Reader, Well, better late than never! This month we look forward to seeing Congress complete its final work on the FY11 appropriations process. With a complete budget in hand and programmatic funding levels set in stone, the federal agencies will soon begin opening up more of their grant programs for applications. Additionally, shutting the door on the FY11 budget will allow Congress to turn to a growing list of other pressing domestic tasks. It is our continuing goal to provide you with the information to make effective decisions, and prioritize your efforts to seek federal funding. Our work aggregating and analyzing many sources of data for you comes together in this February 2011 issue as the most comprehensive source of information you need regarding federal funding for local governments. In this month’s issue of the FundBook, our staff analyzes the major federal funding programs that support local police, fire, and EMS services. In “The state of federal funding for police, fire and EMS departments,” we address what future discretionary spending cuts will mean to the programs local governments have come to rely upon. Additionally, in Part 3 of an ongoing By the Numbers series we examine various emergency-related federal assistance programs and how their mechanisms of funding distribution are likely to change without the presence of earmarks. We are also excited to unveil two important new features of the FundBook. The first is a section called Transportation Roundup devoted to the upcoming surface transportation and aviation reauthorization bills. Secondly, and just as important, the Finance Corner, a section that discusses the changing landscape for municipal financing and loan programs. This month we have set a new FundBook record by providing the latest information on over 60 federal opportunities currently available to local governments and other community-based organizations. Some of the new additions this month are the Drug Free Communities Support Program, the National Endowment for the Arts’ Our Town grants, and various Office of Violence Against Women grant programs. We promise that our articles will be clear, concise, and informative, and we look forward to assisting you now and in the future.

Sincerely, Toby Hicks, Editor


Helping communities secure the federal funding they need The FundBook bridges the gap between your needs and those sources of federal funding available to your community. With a list of features that is growing each month, the FundBook can help you… • Stay Organized – User-friendly features help you sort through the federal funding quagmire and locate quality grants. • Gain Access – Expert insights into the federal assistance programs that matter to you. • Prioritize Effectively – Tools to help your community navigate the federal funding process.

How We Help:

Hundreds of communities across the nation are using the FundBook to navigate an increasing array of federal funding opportunities available to cities and counties each year. Designed to give local government leaders a commanding view of the federal funding process, each issue promotes and educates a do-it-yourself approach to pursuing assistance in Washington, D.C. and working with the federal agencies. The FundBook is designed to be the most userfriendly federal funding resource for all sizes of local government.

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Why Us?

Unlike other news magazines or government relations products designed for local governments, the FundBook endeavors to provide specific, actionable advice rather than general news and policy information. Drawing upon the grant and appropriations experience of our staff and contributors, we strive to give our readers the tools needed to stay on top of the federal funding process every step of the way.

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Grants news in brief Postal Service to close 2,000 locations nationwide Weighed down by a crippling multibilliondollar deficit, the United States Postal Service is shrinking its operations and post offices across the country are finding themselves on the chopping block. As reported in the Washington Post last month, the U.S. Postal Service plans to close or consolidate 2,000 mostly small, rural retail locations in what could be the single largest consolidation in Postal Service history. An additional 500 sites are slated to close by June. If plans succeed, the Postal Service could halve its infrastructure by 2020. The agency is now relying on a computerized system that enables officials to review and determine a location’s fate in no more than five months. If an unprofitable site employs fewer than five people, is open

fewer than eight hours a day and is within 15 to 20 miles of a larger location, it is very likely to be closed. § EPA to administer $10 Million in BEACH grants In FY11, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will provide almost $10 million in grants to 37 states to help protect the swimmers and beachgoers of America’s beaches. The grants will help local authorities monitor beach water quality and notify the public of conditions that may be unsafe for swimming. This is the 11th year that EPA is providing beach grant funds, bringing the total amount EPA has made available to nearly $102 million since Congress passed the Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health (BEACH) Act of 2000. Through this funding, the number of moni-

p. ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

tored beaches has almost quadrupled from about 1,000 in 1997 to more than 3,800 in 2009. BEACH grants are distributed to all eligible states and territories that apply based on an allocation formula which considers three factors: 1) beach season length, 2) total miles of shoreline, and 3) coastal county population.

More information on this annual grant program can be found in this PDF: http://goo.gl/IlEWr § National Trust for Historic Preservation releases best practices manual The National Trust for Historic Preservation last month released its Best Practices Manual. The manual, complete with over 50 pages on Sustainable Practices at existing and historic buildings, is a reference for staff at National Trust Historic Sites to answer questions and respond to issues that frequently arise regard-

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ing the care of structures and landscapes.

This document can be a real boon to those communities seeking historic preservation funding. You can find the PDF online at http://goo.gl/ FL3Iw § Special education grant loses support With House Republicans pledging to cut billion of dollars from the federal budget, a grant program for special education is facing significant fiscal pressures. The law (PL 91-230), which requires local districts to provide a free public education “in the least restrictive environment” to students with disabilities, created a permanently authorized grant program to provide federal funding to states. The federal government paid up to 40 percent of a state’s annual excess cost of educating children with disabilities. But since the law was enacted 35 years ago, the program has never been fully funded. The latest


authorization of the law (PL 108-446) expires this year. However, two GOP chairmen are pledging to champion one service: special education. Denny Rehberg of Montana, the chairman of the LaborHHS-Education Appropriations Subcommittee, said he will use his post to make it a priority to fund the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which guarantees services to disabled children. Rehberg argues that the lack of government funding forces states to tap resources that would normally be used for other school programs to meet the disability mandates within the law, short-changing traditional education programs as well. Reauthorization of IDEA traditionally has been a product of bipartisan efforts, and many lawmakers argue that the continuous shortfall puts a strain on state and local districts that are forced to make up the difference. Still, House Repub-

licans, and freshmen in particular, are looking to roll back government spending to 2008 levels, which would make it nearly impossible for any domestic program to get a substantial increase in funding. §

funds released are in addition to the basic LIHEAP funding made available to states under the continuing resolutions since October 1 totaling $3.9 billion for FY11.

Individuals in your community who may be interested in applying for energy assistance should HHS releases contact the state LIHEAP emergency funds agency. For more inforto states for energy mation, go to http://goo. assistance The Department of gl/9vXvs § Health and Human Services late last month released $200 million in emergency contingency funding to help eligible low-income homeowners and renters meet home energy costs. These LowIncome Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) funds will provide states with additional assistance to pay heating and other home energy costs. LIHEAP helps eligible families pay for home heating, cooling and other energy costs, as well as helping to weatherize eligible families’ homes. The $200 million in emergency contingency

NLC offers free community policing training program NLC and the Fred Rogers Company invite cities to apply for a no-cost training program that enhances community policing efforts and public safety by improving police interactions with children and teens. Developed in collaboration with the Boston, New Haven, and Pittsburgh police departments, the National Center for Children Exposed to Violence, and the Child Witness to Violence Project, the Connecting Cops

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& Kids training program gives officers the tools they need to build trust among children and families in the communities they serve; increases their safety and effectiveness while on patrol; helps them promote greater cooperation and reporting of criminal activity; strengthens partnerships with social service agencies that work with the same youth whom officers encounter on a daily basis; and enhances officers’ ability to improve public safety. In recognition of the program’s impact in Greater Pittsburgh, where it has been extensively piloted, the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing is supporting a series of local training sessions in communities across the nation. Trainings will be held at 14 sites, as well as online, at no cost to participating cities or their police departments and officers. The deadline to apply is February 21. §

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.


View from the Capitol New year, new cuts

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he House of Representatives returned to work last month with Republicans prepared to aggressively pursue their agenda of cutting spending, and voting on a repeal of last year’s health care law.

Spending cuts ahead

As reported previously, last year the 111th Congress passed a short-term Continuing Resolution that funded the federal government through March 4, 2011. A new spending bill will have to be passed in the next six weeks in order to provide funding for the remainder of FY11. The next spending bill will mark the beginning of what many expect to be the largest series of spending cuts in recent history. To that end, the House last month adopted a resolution calling for non-security discretionary spending to be cut to FY08 levels or less for the last seven months of FY11. Seventeen Democrats, including many members of the fiscally conservative Blue Dog Caucus, joined Republicans in supporting the measure (H.Res. 38). The resolution also gives the new House Budget Committee Chairman, Representative Paul Ryan (R-WI), broad authority to set a new spending cap for the remainder of the year. House Republicans will now move to unveil and vote on a number of spending cuts as part of the stopgap measure in mid-February. This, of course, will all occur right around the time President Obama sends his FY12 budget to Capitol Hill. Though GOP leaders have provided few details on what federal program they anticipate cutting, Speaker of the House John Boehner and Republican Majority Leader Eric Cantor previously asked every House member to submit proposals for reducing government spending to the House Appropriations p. ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Committee for consideration. In response to this solicitation, the Republican Study Committee (RSC) released its list of recommendations for cutting $80 billion out of the remaining FY11 budget year. Included in their proposed Spending Reduction Act of 2011 were also recommendations of specified cuts to over 100 programs in non-defense discretionary spending: http://goo.gl/oUNzY The RSC is comprised of the most fiscally conservative Republican Members of Congress and it is no surprise that its members have proposed some of the most extensive cuts to federal spending that have been suggested. It is important to note that while the RSC makes up a majority of the Republicans in Congress, the budget cuts it has proposed are not an indication that a majority of Republicans support every proposed reduction in spending.

Earmarking in FY12?

As Congress tries to wrap up the FY11 budget process, work on the FY12 spending bills is already underway. But while February and March are usually a time when members are busy soliciting appropriations requests from their constituents, new earmark rules are effectively preventing that. In the past, lawmakers from both parties have used these months to set spending priorities through earmarks, responding to many constituent funding requests for local universities, sewer projects, military bases, you name it. This year, however, we face a new dynamic. With President Obama and most Republicans opposed to earmarking, congressional earmarks in appropriations bills will now prevent them from being passed. In his State of the Union speech last week, President Obama made such a point painfully clear: “Because the American people

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deserve to know that special interests aren’t larding up legislation with pet projects, both parties in Congress should know this: if a bill comes to my desk with earmarks inside, I will veto it.” Many Democrats (and a few outspoken Republican appropriators) in the House and Senate are clearly not happy about this new dynamic. Some Senate Republicans have made it clear they will make earmarks requests for projects they consider essential to their states. And after Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) reversed course last November

and backed a two-year earmark moratorium favored by his House GOP colleagues, Democrats in the Senate insisted that they were still going to move forward with funding their projects. Even after the State of the Union, Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), who ran her reelection campaign last year on her ability to bring home federal dollars, contended that she wouldn’t stop fighting for projects, regardless of what the president said.

February

March

February is traditionally an important month because it marks the start of the annual federal budget process. As required by the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974, President Obama will present his FY12 budget proposal to Congress the week of Feb 14. The president’s budget proposal serves as a starting point for Congress to consider. While Congress is under no obligation to adopt any or all of the President’s budget, and does often makes significant changes, Congress is often reluctant to completely ignore the funding priorities in the President’s budget because of his veto power. Also important this month, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing Feb 16 on the FY10 budget request for the Department of Energy. The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman John Mica (R-FL) will conduct listening sessions around the country this month. See p.20 for the schedule.

This month Congress will return to finally wrap up the FY11 appropriations process. With the President’s budget having been submitted, the House and Senate appropriations subcommittees will begin hearings on segments of the budget under their jurisdiction. These hearings will focus on the details of the agencies’ justifications primarily through obtaining testimony from agency officials. Because of debate over the health care bill last March, the budget process was delayed significantly. Many believe that this year appropriators will have more time to work on the annual spending bills. This is not to say that there won’t be hickups along the way - we anticipate fierce battles over spending allocations in the days ahead. The House Financial Services Committee will be holding a hearing March 2 on the FY12 budget request for the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

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The State of Federal Funding for Fire, Police and EMS Departments

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Management Agency (FEMA), the program has consistently received robust funding levels from Congress to provide federal grants directly to local fire departments. The Continuing Appropriations and Surface Transportation Extension Act of 2011, which keeps the federal government operating until March 4, funds the AFG program at the FY10 level ($390 million). Because AFG’s most recent authorization ended on September 30, 2009, the 112th Congress must soon begin work on reauthorizing the program. While AFG generally enjoys wide support from both political parties, a major issue surrounding AFG is whether the current distribution of fire grant funds should be altered. Under current law, the majority of funding goes to rural and volunteer fire departments because there are many more volunteer and rural fire departments than career and urban/suburban fire facilities. Debate over the AFG reauthorization has reflected competition for funding between career/urban/suburban departments and volunteer/rural departments. The urgency of this debate will certainly be heightened by the proposed reduction of overall federal funding expenditures, and the economic downturn leaving many communities increasingly hard pressed Assistance for Local Fire Departments Firefighting activities have traditionally been the to allocate funding for their local fire departments. responsibility of states and local communities. Because See Emergency p.12 of this, funding for fire departments is provided mostly by states and local governments. During the 1990s, however, state and local budget shortfalls led many in the fire community to call for additional financial support from the federal government. Although some federally funded training programs existed at the time (through the National Fire Academy and the Department of Justice) there was no dedicated program that provided federal money directly to local fire departments to help address equipment, training, and other shortfalls. hile local officials are usually reluctant to close fire stations or place emergency response units out of service, budget holes have left cities and counties across the nation with little choice. Organizations across the country are feeling the sting of reduced revenue at a time when federal policy makers are also looking for programmatic cuts wherever they can find them. Even President Obama, who came into office looking to increase federal funding for his priority programs, is searching for additional spending cuts to includes in his FY12 budget proposal. The simple fact is that Congress will soon be forced to make tough decisions affecting many federal agencies and their respective programs, including those that fund first responder initiatives. While it is tough to say exactly where and how hard the budget axe will fall, historic precedent does give us some idea of which programs might fare better under such circumstance. Let’s take a look at what major federal assistance programs are dedicated to supporting firefighter, police, and EMS departments and how these programs might fare in the days ahead.

Assistance to Firefighters Grants (AFG) The Assistance to Firefighters Grant (AFG) program, which was established under the FY01 National Defense Authorization Act, is now in its 10th year of existence. Administered by the Federal Emergency p.10 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

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Perspective from the Agency

Staff from FEMA’s Office of External Affairs discuss the agency’s assistance programs for firefighters Q: As demand for AFG, FP&S or SAFER grant fundQ: Do you foresee the application criteria for these ing is at an all-time high, what should communities and grant programs changing much in the months ahead? local fire departments be doing in order to make their That is, will FEMA be looking to fund the same types of applications more competitive? projects (or fire departments) that received grant awards A: There are several tools and resources available in 2010? to help fire departments develop more effective grant applications. Each year, the AFG Program holds free workshops in different locations around the country to help applicants prepare competitive grant applications. These workshops provide information about recent changes to the AFG Program, including any change to funding priorities and the eligibility AFG holds free criteria. Check the AFG website and workshops to help the AFG contacts asapplicants prepare signed to each FEMA competitive grant region for more inapplications. formation. The AFG website (www.firegrantsupport.com; soon to change to www. firegrantsupport.gov) also offers a wealth of resources, and new resources are being added all the time. For example, the website contains important information on AFG funding priorities and criteria, tips on writing a good application narrative statement, online tutorials with key information about completing the application, and grantee success stories.

A: The overall The Fire Station Construcgoal of the AFG tion Grants program was remains the same a one-time appropriation, from year to year, and all FY 2009 funds have but the specific been committed. funding criteria and priorities vary. For this reason it is critical for potential applicants to read the AFG website documents and information so that they understand the current funding priorities.

Q: What are some of the ways in which your office can assist a community seeking an AFG, FP&S or SAFER grant?

A: In addition to attending the AFG regional workshops or contacting the AFG representatives who work in their FEMA region, applicants should also feel free to contact the toll-free AFG Help Desk (1-866-274-0960 or firegrants@dhs.gov) with any questions they have on the program. Between application periods, AFG Help Desk staff members field general questions about AFG programs. During application periods, they provide technical assistance with the online application and answer questions about the AFG guidance.

Q: Are there any future plans to run a new round of Fire Station Construction Grants, funded last through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act? A: The Fire Station Construction Grants program was a one-time appropriation, and all FY 2009 funds have been committed. We are not aware of plans to appropriate additional funds for fire station construction grants. §

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February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.11


grants should be permanently eliminated or altered. Growing concerns have arisen that modifications to the SAFER statute may be necessary to enable fire departments to more effectively participate in the program. For instance, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included a provision that waived the matching requirements for SAFER Emergency grants awarded in FY09 and FY10. The FY09 SupContinued from p.10 plemental Appropriations Act included a provision authorizing the Secretary of Homeland Security to SAFER Grant Program Concerns over local fire departments’ budgetary waive further limitations and restrictions in the problems have also framed debate over the reau- SAFER statute for FY09 and FY10. thorization of FEMA’s SAFER grant program. Enacted into law through the FY04 National Defense Funding Outlook: Given the current economic climate and growAuthorization Act, the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response Act was a direct response ing national support to cut federal spending, what to growing concerns over the national inadequacy can firefighters expect from the 112th Congress? As of firefighter staffing. The SAFER Act authorized is the case with almost every federal program, congrants to career, volunteer, and combination local cerns in the 112th Congress over the federal budget fire departments for the purpose of increasing the deficit will have some impact on future budget levnumber of firefighters to help communities meet els for AFG and SAFER. At the same time, firefightindustry-minimum standards and attain 24-hour er assistance budgets will likely receive heightened staffing to provide adequate protection from fire scrutiny from the fire community, given the nationand fire-related hazards. Grants are also authorized al economic downturn and local budgetary cutbacks to volunteer fire departments for activities related that many fire departments are now facing. Deto the recruitment and retention of volunteers. In spite these bleak conditions, most experts engaged FY10, Congress provided $420 million for SAFER in national firefighter issues agree that funding for which was double the amount appropriated in FY09. SAFER and AFG programs will benefit from the fact However, the Administration’s FY11 budget pro- that there has been real bipartisan support for fireposed $305 million for SAFER, a 27% decrease from fighter grants over the last ten years. Even if changes do occur, theywill have more to do with the ways the FY10 level. in which both programs have been run in the past, as Like AFG, the SAFER grant program needs to well as how they can be improved. While we would be reauthorized. And like AFG, Congress is evalulike to emphasize this as cautious educated guess: ating SAFER to see if the program’s rules and refederal treatment of these programs will likely be strictions governing hiring better than most in the days ahead.

Assistance for Local Law Enforcement

Like firefighters, funding for law enforcement efforts has historically been the responsibility of local and state governments with little involvement from the federal government. But over the last few decades, the federal government has dramatically increased its support for domestic crime control by creating a series of grant programs designed to assist state and local law enforcement.

p.12 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

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Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program, which helps local agencies hire more police officers, was a pet project of Vice President Joe Biden. In 1994, Biden championed the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act which sought -- through the COPS Office -- to put 100,000 additional police officers on America’s streets. However, funding was drastically reduced and the the program faltered under the Bush administration, which cited a General Accounting Office report that questioned the cost-effectiveness of the program in reducing crime. Recently, Barack Obama has taken several steps to restore the COPS program. The economic stimulus package approved by Obama in February included $1 billion for COPS hiring grants, to fund the hiring of more than 7,000 police and sheriffs deputies in 2009 and 2010. The Obama administration’s proposed 2010 budget also included $298 million for COPS hiring grants, with an eye toward moving closer to the goal of hiring 50,000 police officers nationwide. As Congress considers legislation to reauthorize the COPS program through FY14, some members want to discuss whether continuing to fund hiring programs is an effective way to reduce crime. Research on the impact of law enforcement officers on crime suggests that additional officers may decrease crime, but the conclusions are not definitive. Evaluations of the impact of COPS hiring grants appear to support the assertion that hiring grants can help reduce crime, but the impact of hiring grants in large cities is ambiguous. Opponents of the COPS program also argue that the federal government should not invest more money in the COPS program because hiring funds (like those appropriated as part of the ARRA) allow law enforcement agencies to retain officers that would have been laid off because of budget cuts. The ability to use grants to retain these officers could provide local governments with an incentive to supplant local funds with federal dollars. Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grants Congress created the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance (Byrne Grant) program and the Local Law Enforcement Block Grant (LLEBG) program to assist state and local law enforcement in their efforts to control domestic crime. In 2005, Congress passed the Violence Against p.14 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

COPS demand outstrips funding: In 2009, COPS had $1 billion under the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act for the hiring of law enforcement officers. Yet the program received over 7,000 applications requesting a total of $8.3 billion for 50,000 officers. In 2010, COPS received over 4,000 applications requesting $2.2 billion, yet had only $298 million allocated to its hiring program. It is a very competitive program.

Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act which combined the Byrne Grant programs and LLEBG into the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) program. Administered by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), JAG is the leading source of federal justice funding to state and local jurisdictions. JAG funding distributed to states and local governments supports a range of program areas including law enforcement, prosecution and court, prevention and education, corrections and community corrections, drug treatment and enforcement, planning, evaluation, technology improvement, and crime victim and witness initiatives. Under the current JAG formula, the total allocated to a state is based on the state’s population and average reported Uniform Crime Report (UCR) Part I violent crimes. Specifically, half of a state’s allocation is based on a state’s respective share of the U.S. population, and the other half is based on the state’s respective share of the UCR Part I violent crimes in the United States for the three most recent years for which data are available. Like LLEBG grants before it, JAG funds are directly awarded to local jurisdictions in the state. After the initial state allocation is calculated, 40 percent of the state’s allocation is directly awarded to units of local government. Awards to units of local government under JAG are based on the jurisdiction’s proportion of the average number of UCR Part I violent crimes committed in its respective state. In addition, each state is required to pass through a certain percentage of the funds directly awarded to the state. Funding Outlook: Shrinking federal support and other budget pressures are making it tougher to protect local law enforcement agencies from future cuts. Senator Max Baucus (D-MT) recently told law enforcement agents in Montana that while law enforcement is an essen-

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tial government service likely to be spared deeper cuts possible for other spending programs, Congress will be in “triage” mode in coming months as members seek to rein in a trillion-dollar deficit. Unlike AFG and SAFER, the COPS and JAG programs have not received widespread bipartisan support over the years. During his presidency, President Bush and Congressional Republicans drastically reduced funding for state and local law enforcement programs. Citing reports by the Heritage Foundation on the program’s ineffectiveness, the president led an effort to cut millions of dollars worth of funding from both COPS and JAG. By 2006, Republicans had cut funding for these DOJ programs by nearly 50 percent. During the Clinton administration, Republicans controlling Congress also sought to roll back grants to local law enforcement, with decidedly mixed success. With a new Republican House majority seeking to cut federal spending back to 2008-levels, COPS and Edward Byrne Funding could see serious cuts in the upcoming budget cycle.

Assistance for Emergency Medical Services

Unlike police officers and firefighters, EMS has no grant programs dedicated to its basic operating needs. This, however, was not always the case. Prior to the 1980s, Emer-

gency Medical Systems (EMS) across the nation benefited from a steady stream of federal funding, much of which was made possible by the EMS Systems Act of 1973. At the time, the Health Services and Mental Health Administration was designated as the lead agency for EMS within the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) and provided funding for EMS capacity-building. This funding stream would collapse during the early 1980s when the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 rolled EMS funding into the Preventative Health and Health Services block grants that gave states the discretion to determine funding priorities. States overwhelmingly chose to fund programs other than EMS, and after 1981, federal funding for EMS never returned to its previous levels. Localities would be left to bear the burden of funding EMS for years to come with almost no assistance or guidance from the federal government. In recent years, the creation and funding of certain EMS public safety functions through the Department of Homeland Security have led to a diverse landscape of federal support. DHS, HHS and DOT/ NHTSA all play some role in supporting EMS. Additional EMS-related programs are housed within the Department of Commerce, at the FCC and in other places. EMS has many unfilled equipment needs (personal protective equipment an specialized equipment for medical interventions and rescue), as well as demands for the recruitment and retention of personnel, particularly volunteers. Even within those programs that allow EMS providers to apply for funding, these applications typically receive only a small percentage of total funding available, if any. One program that extends a hand to EMS is AFG, although there are strict rules for qualification. By direction of FEMA, only a nonaffiliated EMS (defined as “a public or nonprofit emergency medical service organization that provides direct emergency medical services, including medical transport, to a specific geographic area on a first due basis, but is not affiliated with a hospital and does not serve a geographic area where EMS is adequately See Emergency 2 p.28

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February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.15


The Legislative Desk The Legislative Desk is designed to enhance your community’s advocacy efforts in Washington by providing you with actionable advice corresponding to vital points on the federal legislative calendar. With this overview of what important dates are upcoming, your community will stay abreast of the legislative process and be able to use it to influence those developments more effectively.

Without question, the President’s budget request is the starting point for consideration of all federal funding levels. Even during the toughest times, the President will direct money to the issues and programs that reflect his priorities. Upon release, you should carefully watch which programs the President seeks to cut funding for (which will also be analyzed in The FundBook). Look specifically at how programs that you may be interested in applying to may change in the coming year. Agencies are preparing to cut some programs. In June 2010, the Office of Management and Budget issued two memos directing non-security federal departments and agencies to submit separate plans in their FY12 budget submissions to reduce spending and eliminate low-priority programs. Agencies must identify either entire programs for elimination or “substantial cuts amounting to at least 50 percent of total spending within a program or subprogram.” It will be interesting to see where the President proposes allocating the funding that would normally be earmarked. Obama has threatened to veto any bill with earmarks that comes to his desk.

riations p o r p p A FY12 s Earmark

cess c a t io n p r o li p p A : e p Ty ble not applica t, s o m r o F When:

p.16 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

et Pr es id en t’s FY 12 Bu dg re qu es t Ty pe : M on ito rin g W he n: Ea rly Fe br ua ry

nt’s Read analysis of the Preside h arc M proposed budget in the issue of the FundBook.

While in typical years local governments would be busy contacting their congressional delegation for earmarks at this point, local government participation in the FY12 appropriations process is significantly diminished this year. Because both the House and the President are resisting any earmarking of the appropriations bills, there are very limited circumstances where communities should apply for funding. First, if you have a Democratic Senator they may still take appropriations requests. Second, if you have any congressmen who favors the earmarking process, they may still solicit requests. Submitting requests in such cases may be a form of maintaining your relationship with your elected and is therefore useful, however they will very likely not be able to fulfil them. Be aware that a project that is submitted this year could potentially be scrutinized at the national level if it were made public, and communities submitting applications may face local backlash from citizens critical of the earmarking process. Finally there are some very specific programs that require congressionally-directed funding to operate. In such situations -- like funding through the Army Corps of Engineers -- the earmarking process this year will still be crucial.

www.fundbook.org


To build support with your congressional delegation, you must maintain frequent communication with your elected representatives and staff from relevant agencies, as they will be even more effective advocates for your community if they are kept well-informed. It is important to develop strong ties with not only the congressional members themselves, but also their staff. While it is not made widely known, congressional staff can be extremely helpful resources when trying to navigate the maze of the federal government. Although they can rarely guarantee a specific grant outcome, they can help you obtain reliable federal information, order agency forms, avoid common applications errors that local governments make when requesting federal assistance, and inquire on your behalf with federal agency staff. One tried and tested way to keep an office apprised of the developments inside and pressing issues facing your community is to provide them with a short, quarterly newsletter.

EEC BG Fun din g in FY1 2 Typ e: Lett er outr each Whe n: Febr uary

Download a template letter in support of EECBG funding here: http://goo.gl/fCI6j

Quarterly outreach to federal officials Type: Letter/phone outreach When: March

Download a template quar terly outreach newsletter here: http://goo.gl/u859t

When the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EECBG) program was first funded by the Recovery Act in 2009 it provided a one time opportunity of $3.2 billion to local governments across the country. In FY11 neither the House nor the Senate included the program in their budgets. This year there is a possibility that the President’s budget request will include the EECBG program once again. Associations including the U.S. Conference of Mayors, the National League of Cities, and the National Association of Counties have adopted policies supporting full funding for the EECBG program. But regardless of whether the program is funded this year, its five-year authorization period beginning in 2007 will expire this year. If the program is not funded, it may require support simply to reauthorize it. If your community has a project relevant to the program, or if you support the expenditure of federal dollars for this program, it is encouraged that you communicate your support to your Congressional Delegation

Cutting out earmarks will put billions of dollars of spending power with the federal agencies. This means more lobbying of the executive branch, in addition to Congress, becomes increasingly important this year. If you have not done so already, it is time to begin reaching out to the federal agency staffers who are running the grant programs that matter to you. Lawmakers routinely help local governments in their efforts to lobby a federal agency. Ask your congressional delegation to submit letters of support to the federal agencies’ program directors. Lawmakers also routinely bypass the existing agency process with behind-the-scenes communication called phone-marking or letter-marking. Formally or informally, we see federal agencies giving the congressional appropriations staff lists of projects they intend to fund. The process of awarding grants is anything but transparent, and there’s certainly evidence that well-placed members of Congress do better in the grant-making process than less well-placed members. Almost all members of Congress work with local governments to help them better compete for grants. www.fundbook.org

Outreach

to the fed eral agencies

Type: Letter /phone outr each When: Ong o in g

Download a te questing Co mplate letter re ngr of a grant or essional support a community pplication your has submitte d to agency: http ://goo.gl/lR an 3j1

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.17


By the numbers: No earmarks, but grants increase A look into federal emergency services grants with earmarks absent

A

s you know, the FY11 appropriations process was thrown into disarray last year as an omnibus bill was prevented from passing. Instead, a continuing resolution was passed which would allow reconsideration of all budget items in the new year with a Republican-held House of Representatives. When the FY11 appropriations amounts are finally sorted out this winter, there will be no earmarks in either the House or Senate versions. If there were earmarks, they would be dropped when the bills are reconciled at conference. Continuing last month’s By the Numbers investigation, this article will delve into the federal budget and explore grant programs that will increase in funding by not having portions of their funds earmarked. To tie in with the theme of this February FundBook issue, we specifically examine accounts related to emergency services funding and projects from the annual Commerce-Justice-Science (CJS) bill and the annual Homeland Security appropriations bill. This is not a comprehensive survey of grants for emergency services projects, it is a survey of grants with funding levels that will change drastically without earmarks. The loss of earmarks effects described in the accounts below will almost certainly persist through the FY12 and FY13 appropriations processes, and so this information will be useful for some time. However, it is far from likely that the practice of earmarking is gone for good. Many member of Congress recognize earmarks as a way of exercising their own power and sidestepping agency evaluation to get funding for their community’s pressing projects. According to Taxpayers for Common Sense, a nonpartisan organization in Washington D.C., there were between $15 and $16 billion worth of earmarks in FY09 and FY10. Some top earmarkers like Sen. Cochran (R-MS) were able to pull nearly half a billion dollars to their state in a single fiscal year. With what seems to be turning into a complete ban on earmarks in FY11 and likely FY12 and FY13, that $16 billion will instead be distributed through agency grant programs.

p.18 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Community Oriented Policing Services Programs

Without a doubt one of the most important sources of federal funding for law enforcement organizations is the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program. COPS funding is specified as a section of the CJS bill. Within the COPS section there are a number of accounts that provides funding to local governments nationwide and several allow large portions of their funds to be earmarked and thus decrease the amount of funds the Department of Justice distributes. The first of such earmarked accounts is that of the COPS Law Enforcement Technology program. It provides funding for the continued development of technologies and automated systems to assist state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies in investigating, responding to, and preventing crime. Grants provided through this program in the previous three years number in the hundreds and are 100 percent earmarked. Only organizations specified in the appropriations law are eligible to apply. While COPS Tech is an account where competitive grant funding will increase without earmarks, this switch will not necessarily be beneficial for many local governments. During the last year in which this account had no earmarks -- FY07 -- the Department of Justice (DOJ) awarded only 37 grants. If a replay of FY07 becomes a reality, only larger communities are likely to receive a grant through the DOJ-administered selection process. The second account is the COPS Meth program which is designed to help state and local law enforcement agencies reduce the production, distribution, and use of methamphetamines. This program is often heavily earmarked between 60 and 85 percent in the last three years. Removing earmarks from the COPS Meth account will almost double the amount of funding available through the DOJs competitive grant program. However, like the quandary with the COPS Tech program above, a fully DOJ-administered COPS Meth grant program might involve a selection process that distributes the available funds to a significantly reduced number of local government entities than the earmarking process usually does. Smaller communities

www.fundbook.org


OJP - Byrne Discretionary

Like COPS, the Byrne discretionary grants are a major federal boon supporting criminal justice across the country. Typically Byrne funds are initially distributed through a 60% allocation to states and a 40% allocation to local governments. Component local governments subsequently apply to either their state or containing local government. It is unlikely that this process will be changed, but applicants can generally look forward to something in the ballpark of a 30 percent increase in competitive funding amounts when earmarks are removed from this account. Applications are administered at the state level, so there will be no federal-level bottleneck of the funds as there might be in the COPS programs.

In FY10, 100% of COPS Technology funding was

earmarked to 513 projects.

# Grants

in particular may find it hard to compete for these grant funds in FY11.

FY10

FY07

In FY07, only 37 projects were funded through COPS Technology

FEMA - State & Local Programs - EOC

when the grant program was

The state and local programs section of the Homeland security bill sports a grant account that provides Emergency Operations Centers (EOCs). In recent years this account has been heavily earmarked -- more than 60 percent annually. Without earmarks however, this year may be a bonanza for the grant program. Expect a much larger available amount of funding -- and thus many more grants -- than would be offered in a typical year. Because the FY11 budget has not yet been set, and because the amount of competitive funding in this program has fluctuated so much in recent years, the FY11 round of applications for this program will likely be slightly delayed from years past. The FY10 application deadline was Feb 15, while the grant program announcement has not yet even been made this year.

In FY11, assuming funding levels are

OJP - Juvenile Justice

not cut, the Bryne Discretionary

Grants provided through this program are designed to reduce the prevalence of youth crime through primarily preemptive programs.Typically the funds for this program are fully earmarked -- in the cases of FY08 and FY10. Due to Recovery Act budget increases in FY09, the program was only half earmarked. ยง

administered through DOJ.

FY11

FY10

Grant program should see a

33% formula funding boost without earmarks.

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.19


Transportation Roundup

Keeping tabs on the new highway bill’s progress Congress is attempting to craft a successor to the $286.4 billion bill that funded transportation infrastructure spending between 2005 and 2009. However, committing to several years of robust spending on anything right now is a tough sell as a new wave of austerity hits Capitol Hill. In the interim since the last bill expired, lawmakers have passed a series of short-term extensions to continue spending on transportation infrastructure, the latest of which was included in the Continuing Resolution in December that provides temporary FY11 federal funding through March 2, 2010. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood recently said he’s confident there will be transportation bill by August. Representative John Mica (R-FL), chair of the House Transportation Committee responsible for moving the bill, has said that, while he’s prioritizing the Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization above the surface transportation bill, he generally agrees with that timeline. Both officials are hoping to get the bill moving before the August recess because at that point the campaigning begins for the upcoming presidential races. Even when the pres- idential campaigning begins, however, the surface transportation bill will not be abandoned. “We’re going to get the darn thing done,” promised Mica. Inside sources tell us that Mica has promised House leadership that he would draft a bill at $200 billion or below. This is substantial reduction from the last bill, named SAFETEA-LU, and would result in the

95

elimination, reduction and/or consolidation of many existing programs. The Congressman is also committed to produce nothing short of a six year bill. Some legislative movement has already begun. Before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee even has all its members named (which should happen in the first week of February, according to Sen. Boxer), it held a hearing to get the ball rolling on the new transportation bill. “We need to take care of this sooner than later,” Sen. Barbara Boxer said last month at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing in reference to a surface transportation reauthorization. “We can’t keep doing extension after extension.” Top committee Republican James Inhofe is in favor of a big infrastructure bill, but he supports limiting the bill’s scope. “Our problem in getting the bill we need to get is really not as much the Democrats as it is the Republicans,” he said. Inhofe suggests that getting back to a more streamlined version of the highway bill is the key to securing Republican support. “The best way I can get the full cooperation of the Republicans is if we took this back to the way it was originally, when we had the highway trust fund and the people who paid to use our highways would confine it to maintenance, new construction, bridges, highways then that would be sellable to the conservative community,” he said. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has said that the length and size of the bills “will be determined by our priorities and how far we can really stretch a dollar.” Regardless, of the debate, the current transportation funding extension expires March 4, so there will have to be another extension. §

Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Listening Sessions Schedule

The tentative schedule hits small towns, big cities, and suburbs. The hearings may be focused on specific topics, which haven’t been announced yet. Witnesses must be invited to speak. • February 14th – West Virginia (Ranking Democrat Nick Rahall’s home state) • February 17th – Philadelphia area (Republican committee freshmen Patrick Meehan and Lou Barletta are from the area, as is Democratic T&I member Tim Holden) • February 18th – Rochester, NY (freshman Republican Tom Reed’s district and not too far for some of Richard Hanna’s constituents) • February 19-20 – Columbus, Ohio, Indianapolis, and suburbs of Chicago (within reach of four Republican members’ districts and one Democrat) • February 21-23 – Portland, OR; Vancouver, WA; Fresno and Southern California (reaching four Republican districts and two Democrat) p.20 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

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Ensure that you are providing the best service to your citizens. Subscribe to The FundBook today. Upcoming Issues:

The March issue will pick apart the President’s FY12 budget request to see which programs may be increasing, as well as those that may be seeing cuts. The President’s Budget is important because it sets the precedent for the appropriations action that will ensue in Congress. Your actions (and quick reactions) to the budget announcement can have a meaningful impact on grant programs your community utilizes.

Connect with us! You already recieve our comprehensive monthly issue by email, but you can recieve even more frequent updates through our FaceBook, Twitter, or LinkedIn accounts. Become a Fan, or Follower today!

The April issue will analyse the framework of what will likely be included in the upcoming Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization and the various related important airport funding sources. This month will also look at the plethora of arts and museum programs that are generally released in the springtime.

Upcoming Grants Timeline Grant descriptions follow

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One Month From Now

DOC Grant: MBDA Business Center (MBC) - p.24

NOAA Grant: Community-based Marine Debris Removal Project Grants - p.37 IMLS Grant: Museums for America - p.29

Oct 28 FWS Grant: North American Wetlands Conservation Act Small Grants - p.33

Oct 27

Issuu http://goo.gl/dih2B

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Housing -

Commerce/Business -

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Health/Medical -

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Disaster

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Three Months From Now

Nov 22 HUD Grant: HOPE VI Revitalization Grants Program - p.34

Nov 18 HUD Grant: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program - p.35

Nov 17 HRSA Grant: Health Center New Access Points Program - p.25 Flood Mitigation Assistance Program - p.32

Oct 26

Severe Repetitive Loss Program - p.30 Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program - p.31

HUD Grant: Choice Neighborhoods Initiative - p.34 Brownfields Assessment Grants - p.27 Brownfields Cleanup Grants - p.26

DOT Grants:

FY 2011 High Priority Grant Opportunity - p.28 FY 2011 MCSAP New Entrant Funding - p.28

Dec 3

Repetitive Flood Claims Program - p.32

EPA Grant: Market Based Approaches to Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions - p.38

Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Grants - p.27

FaceBook http://goo.gl/Hfff1

1

Nov 10

EPA Grants:

Twitter http://goo.gl/UlHhG

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Nov 1

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LinkedIn http://goo.gl/fIT9l

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FEMA Grants

Dec 10

NOAA Grant: Regional Ocean Partnership Funding Program - p.37

Nov 16 HUD Grants: Hazards in Housing (1) - p.39

Dec 15 IMLS Grant: Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program - p.29

Dec 22 USDA Grant: Rural Community Development Initiative - p.33

Nov 8 HUD Grants: Hazards in Housing (3) - p.38, 39

Dec 31

USDA Grant: Solid Waste Managment Grant - p.40 MMS Grant: Coastal Impact Assistance Program (CIAP) - p.36

p.22 ~ The Fundbook | October 2010

www.fundbook.org

October 2010 | The Fundbook ~ p.23

Stay Organized. Our unique timeline of upcoming grants helps you plan and prepare.

Get more information or to subscribe today by visiting www.fundbook.org or contacting our office at 202-681-FUND (3863) A single local government’s subscription can be sent monthly to as many full-time staff as requested. www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.21


On the docket

Federal legislation affecting federal funding Mayors fight for more EECBG funding

a template letter to send to you Congressional Delegation Although the program has received much criticism supporting EECBG funding. § in the past for administrative delays, mayors across the President may cut CDBG funding country are urging the federal government to fund the It is rumored that the president will ask for a 25 perDepartment of Energy’s Energy Efficiency and Concent reduction in Community Development Block servation Block Grant (EECBG) program in FY12. The block grant program, first funded through the American Grant funding in his FY12 budget proposal due out this Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, provides fund- month. The program, which was established in 1974, ing to states and local entities for projects that improve received $4.4 billion last fiscal year. Cities that get the grant money have great flexibility in how they spend energy efficiency and reduce fossil fuel emissions. Much of the discussion at last month’s meeting of the it. More than 1,200 cities and towns receive the money U.S. Conference of Mayors’ Energy Standing Committee either directly from the federal government or from involved strategic discussions on how the program can be the states. Seventy percent of the money flows directly made into an annual part of future federal budgets. Many to cities with populations of at least 50,000 and counmembers of congress are also pulling for new funding for ties with at least 200,000 people. The rest goes to states EECBG. To date, forty members have signed on to a letter which distribute the money to municipalities and rural that asks President Obama to include $2 billion in the fis- areas with smaller populations. Mayors attending the U. S. Conference of Mayors cal 2012 budget for the program. winter meeting last month expressed concern that the But with Republicans talking about cutting upward of $100 billion from the federal budget, inclusion of energy president, in his budget due this month, will target this block grant funding into the upcoming spending bill is program. As part of its “2011 metro agenda,” the U. S. going to be an uphill battle. It certainly doesn’t help that Conference of Mayors is lobbying federal lawmakers the Department of Energy reported last August that ac- to keep block grant funding stable. The group contends tual spending and job creation through the program had that any cuts in the program would “severely slow down fallen well short of anticipated goals. As of the end of Jan- or eliminate thousands of local and state projects and uary, grant recipients have spent $791 million, or about programs that are directly contributing to local and re25 percent, of the total $3.2 billion that had been autho- gional recovery.” rized in the stimulus. During a meeting at the White House with mayors At last month’s Conference of Mayors meeting, Secretary attending the conference, the president said he’s comof Energy Steven Chu offered his continued support for the mitted to the mayors’ agenda, but stressed that Demoprogram, but urged mayors to move quickly to spend fund- crats and Republicans need to reduce the federal deficit. ing that had been granted and to submit receipts to the gov- That, the president told the mayors, will require innoernment. Chu also encouraged the mayors to collect precise vative solutions that cost less than some traditional feddata on dollars saved and jobs created by the program be- eral programs. President Obama acknowledged calls to cause he said that is the best way to convince Congress and keep funding stable for community development block the White House that the program is worth continuing. grants, but stopped short of promising the mayors the Refer to this month’s Legislative Desk section (p.16) for funding would not be cut. § p.22 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

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ocus: F n i s t etirement n R e a r r o f G e b l il le Farm B ad to Tack r n o C r o t a n Se

d e of programs an g n ra e id w a s cover d, d food policy, it an rm fa al years. The Foo e er d v fi fe s n to e er v re o g th l ly every The farm bil last renewal rough d an w ie v succeeded the re h ic es h o g w er l, d il n b u d nt farm provisions, an usis the most rece 08 20 f o mmunities by ct A co l y g ra er ru n r E fo d rn an its conce Conservation, ide nely expresses ti u ro ss and amend a w re g ze n o ri C o . th 02 au 20 re in well as to version passed cies: rural issues as g in g er em t mission agen ss en re m d p o ad el to ev ls d il l ree rura ing the farm b ties d by USDA’s th re te is in the Rural Utili m d ad s an m e, ic ra g v er ro S p ooperative range of rural ral Business-C u R e th e, ic v sing Ser the Rural Hou islarm bill this leg fa 08 20 e th f o rization Service. ring nsider reautho co l il w y e conditions du el k th li to ss ar re il g n im o S C . in 2012 The 112th t by ent law expires rr cu e th f e driven in par o b to ch u y m el k se li au is ec e ill debat tive session b get coming farm b p u e th In fact, the bud l, t. il b in ra rm st fa n co 08 al 20 sc ds for fi debate on the dget growing deman d an s it ing federal bu ic w ef ro d g et f g o d u se b au e ills bec relatively larg gs in in past farm b an th lt cu fi ers held hearin b if d am re ch o m th e o b B . d in 2010 situation may ups get rules enacte d u b o -g u ther interest gro o o y d san -a s ay er p rm ew fa changes deficits and n subrking and what o w is sk forces have w ta la n 08 io 20 ct e u d th re w o it er defic 2010 to see h ose tration and oth is in m d A e at odds with th e ar h es T h l. il ac b ro t p ex ap n d these want in the rm supports, an fa ce u d re to ls proposa mitted budget ted a rural areas, crea cates. o in v ss ad r ce o ac ct d se an ed broadb of many farm ent rm bill expand fa 08 orative investm 20 e ab ll th s, co l em ra it ru er ew th Among o created a n e bill ance program, st si as mmissions. Th al ri co t eu n en re m p ep o tr el n ev mic d new micro-e fraregional econo ew n e re d wastewater in th an d ze er ri at o w th g au in d d ding of pen program, an farm a one-time fun r fo n o ding in the 2002 li il en m sp 20 ry o $1 d at d ze with man also authori ightms authorized ra g ro p bill (Rural Firef al er rm ev fa S 08 s. 20 ct e je th ro nding in structure p vestdiscretionary fu h it w d ural Business In R ze , ri o m ra th g au ro re P t so Investmen bill were al anding Rural Strategic , el n n ). Many longst so as er re P A l cy ra en u g R er vices in ers and Em waste Broadband Ser to s es cc d — water and A ze e ri th o d th an au , re m so ra were al ment Prog water appropriations al u n an cy community h g en u g ro er th em ed s, d n em fu ater syst programs ts.. § ce for rural w an st si as al -medicine gran ic le n te d ch te an , g ts in n n ra tance lear disposal g grants, and dis y it n u rt o p p o ness assistance, busi

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.23


Perspective from the Hill

Congressman Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ) discusses the Assistance to Firefighters Grant program and his work to help communities in New Jersey’s second congressional district apply for funding. Q: Knowing that you have been particularly active is helping local fire departments pursue grant funding, what are some of the ways in which your office can assist a community seeking an AFG, FP&S or SAFER grant?

year, you can’t submit a proposal that meets last year’s criteria and expect it to be competitive. But again, I think hearing from those who have already been successful in securing funding is really important. Whether they did it by developing a reA: Well let me start off by saying that I have noth- gional partnership or simply by themselves, these ing but the utmost respect for the men and women departments can tell you in person what worked for who are protecting our communities every day. And them. I know how that their jobs are hard enough, let alone having to deal with the funding shortfalls in city and town budgets that you read about every day. To that end, my office has been holding an annual briefing for firefighters in the second district on the federal government’s AFG, FP&S and SAFER grant programs. For the last eight years we have worked with the Congressional Fire Institute to highlight the benefits of these grant proI think hearing from those grams and assist with the application process. who have been awarded We have a pretty good track record too. Since funding is really important. the program’s inception in 2001, more than $22 million has been awarded locally to some 115 first responder organizations in the second district. At the briefing, someone seeking a grant can learn what other fire departments and communities have done right in their applications, and ask questions, I really do recommend that they attend.

Q: As demand for the Assistance to Firefighters Grants program funding is at an all-time high (the fiscal year 2010 program received 16,231 applications nationwide), what should communities and local fire departments be doing in order to make their applications more competitive? A: It’s probably most important that you don’t fall into the usual traps that hurt most applications. First thing’s first, you need to have an air-tight grant application, sound budget, lots of details. But you also need to pay close attention to the current criteria for the grant program and make sure that your proposal matches it closely. Because the federal agencies often change what they’re looking to fund in any given p.24 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

www.fundbook.org

NJ-2


Q: And if someone in your district can’t attend the seminar? A: They can call my office, we’ll be happy to send them a copy of the grant presentation. Although this method won’t be as valuable as being there in person.

Q: In light of a renewed effort to get the federal government’s fiscal house in order, do you foresee Congress cutting

...we focus our efforts on helping our fire departments and the communities they serve pursue funding through AFG.

funding for programs like AFG, FP&S or SAFER in the days ahead?

A: There is no doubt that these are treacherous times for all federal programs. But it is during these challenging economic times and sustained budgetary concerns, that federal support for our first responders is particularly critical. Firefighters are typically hit first when local governments face shortfalls. While I can’t say whether or not funding for these types of programs will get hit in the days ahead, I will continue to support critical programs like AFG to ensure that our firefighters have the resources needed to keep our communities safe.

Rep. Frank LoBiondo

Q: What other funding options does your office usually recommend local fire departments pursue outside of the Department of Homeland Security’s grant offerings? A: As I said before, we’ve had a lot of success in working through this program. While there might be other programs that provide funding, we focus our efforts on helping our fire departments and the communities they serve pursue funding through FEMA’s fire assistance programs.

Congressmen’s Bio Congressman Frank LoBiondo has been a staunch supporter of firefighters in New Jersey’s 2nd district since his days as a Cumberland County Freeholder and in the New Jersey General Assembly. He is a member of the Congressional Fire Caucus, a bipartisan group that supports fire service legislation that benefits all first responders. §

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.25


Finance Corner

Updates on local government financing opportunities Current availability of TIFIA funding for infrastructure work The Department of Transportation is making available financial support for infrastructure projects through a popular loan and credit assistance program, according to an agency notice in the Jan. 19 Federal Register. The Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program offers direct loans, loan guarantees, and standby lines of credit for highway, transit, rail, and other surface transportation projects.The notice is a regular solicitation of applications done periodically by DOT. Potential applicants must submit a letter of intent by February 18, 2011. The notice also lays out the eight weighter criteria upon which projects are judged. The three most important criteria, each making up 20 percent of a project’s score, are national and regional significance in terms of economic benefits and transportation efficiency, the degree of financial support from the private sector, and environmental sustainability.

The minimum project size for TIFIA projects is typically $50 million, but that figure is lowered to $15 million for intelligent transportation systems. Current surface transportation law authorizes $122 million annually from Highway Trust Fund receipts for the TIFIA program. The current short-term transportation policy and funding extension is slated to expire March 4. Recently, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority in California won TIFIA support, subsidized through a grant program, for a new rail line (199 DER A10, 10/18/10). More information on the TIFIA program can be found on the DOT website at http:// goo.gl/jrhRG §

Path is sought for states to lessen debt burden It is common knowledge that many states are deep in debt. And, just like in individual cases there are no easy ways for them to change that. Even more difficult than individuals, as each state is regarded as a sovereign entity, they are not legally allowed to declare bankruptcy as some local governments can. Declaring bankruptcy allows the debt-burdened person or organization to seek court protection from their lenders and sometimes even renegotiate debts or interest rates. This would be particularly useful in states where there are continuing long term obligations like worker pensions to fulfill. Despite these realities, Congress says they are not considering bailing out states. Meanwhile, President Obama’s State of the Union address left little doubt that more federal assistance to the cash-strapped states is unlikely. There are dual reasons for this: fed-

p.26 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

eral policy makers do not want to set the precedent of assuming state debt, and secondly, the introduction of a state bailout bill would easily result in municipal interest rates skyrocketing, lenders dropping out of the market, and general financial panic. But while policy makers are in no mood to throw another stimulus bill out the Capitol’s doors, members of both parties are working behind the scenes to come up with a way to let states declare bankruptcy. While lawmakers might decide to stop short of a full-blown bankruptcy proposal, several congressional members have taken an interest in the issue, including the establishment of some sort of oversight panel for distressed states. To date, no draft bill is in circulation. Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) has, however, asked Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke about the possibility of a hearing to discuss potential options. §

www.fundbook.org


CBO Report: Sources of local governments’ fiscal stress

Municipal bonds

For the past several years, one blossoming category of investment became a very important aspect of municipal financing. The municipal bond market, encouraged through the Build America Bond program and its subsidized financing rates, was an attractive way to fund large infrastructure investments like bridges, roads, and public housing. With the BAB program having expired on Dec 31, 2010, local governments are once again thrown to compete for loans with private borrowers. Not only does this make it more difficult for local governments to afford loans for their projects and local services, but lenders and investors are fleeing the municipal bond market making the situation even more complicated. When competing to borrow money for your projects be sure to gather data on why your community is a safe investment. A cache of money in the bank is of course the best (and most rare) attribute, but other qualities like never having defaulted, the ability to raise taxes if needed, non-essential budget items that could be dispensed with, and of course a high credit rating can all make your debt more attractive to investors during these tough economic times. If you simply cannot find a loan at the rate desired, remember that hard times come and go and this may not be the best time to start your project anyway. But do consider the opportunity cost of not financing projects. Your community may be taking a hit by not building infrastructure during the depression and being unprepared for the subsequent economic recovery. §

This CBO report covers local governments’ sources of fiscal stress, and those governments’ actions in response to the stress. Certain local government actions can potentially counteract federal fiscal strategies on the economy at the macro level. Transitory economic shocks and structural budget imbalances were the primary identified factors causing fiscal stress to local governments. Transitory shocks are those that are not permanent and can be internal like a local disaster or external like the housing market crash. Structural imbalances are persistent and can be the result of demographic shifts or unsustainable employee benefits. Responses to such fiscal stresses were decreasing spending amounts, increasing taxes and fees, shifting the timing of payments, and/or borrowing. States and the federal government may choose to help local governments using varying methods. At the state level, local governments may receive additional grant aid or permission to increase local taxes. In severe situations a state may step in and provide oversight or even assume control of the local government. At the federal level there may be debt guarantees or provisions of the tax code, or direct aid through grants or loans.

In dire circumstances, a local government may default on its loans or declare bankruptcy. This has only happened 600 times in the last 70 years. In some cases a declaration of bankruptcy can actually help the local government recover by putting a court between the government and its collectors’ pressures. Additionally a declaration of bankruptcy can aid in negotiations with the community’s employees and vendors when rates for such services are contractually too high to maintain.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) provides nonpartisan information and analyses on a variety of fields which help inform and prepare Congress for their annual budget process.

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.27


Emergency 2

Continued from p.15

provided by a fire department”) may apply for funding. Disqualified from participating include EMS or Rescue Squads that do not transport, EMS Helicopters and Fire-Based EMS (although this group can apply as a fire department). Other EMS grants are intended for specific purposes or equipment purchases, not necessarily for the department’s needs overall. Also, many programs only award grants to departments in certain types of areas. For instance, the Rural Housing Service, within the Department of Agriculture, administers the Community Facilities Program and is authorized to make loans and grants to develop community facilities for public use in rural areas and towns of not more than 50,000 people. The program is intended to be the lender of last resort for rural public/nonprofit organizations – including fire departments and rescue squads – needing to finance essential public structures and services. Funding obtained through the Community Facilities Program may be used to construct, enlarge, or improve fire stations

View

Continued from p.9

For others, however, the situation is starting to sink in. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL) recently said that the Senate will not pass spending legislation that contains earmarks, even though he personally opposes banning the practice. That statement is born out of the reality that earmark proponents face a political climate where it is virtually impossible to p.28 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

and buildings to house fire and/or rescue equipment. In addition, funds may also be used to purchase fire trucks, ambulances, or emergency communication equipment, to buy or build fire and rescue multi-service centers, and to pay necessary costs connected with these facilities. But grant funding is distributed based on population and income, economic feasibility, and availability of funds. Priority is given to applicants located in rural communities of 25,000 or less and projects that serve low-income communities. Sometimes, even if programs don’t require departments to be in certain types of communities, the reviewers may prefer it. Funding outlook: On the bright side, one cannot cut what does not exist. Because of the limited federal assistance currently devoted to EMS will at at minimum not decrease. However, efforts to dedicate funding exclusively to EMS services will probably not take form during a period of such heavy funding cuts. § Taking the macro view Be aware that police and fire programs are some of the most well funded and prolific grant types out there. There are many free and comprehensive resources to help you seek federal, state, and local funding. One of our favorite sources is http://www. policeone.com/grants which is a very comprehensive and often up-to-date listing of police grants.

secure any congressionally-directed funding while Obama and Republicans in Congress maintain their opposition. Without the support of the president, Democrats in the Senate have essentially become boxed-in on the issue. Unless Republicans and the president cave in soon, earmarks are dead in FY12. Despite the fact that congressional earmarks will not make their way into any of the spending bills for FY12, your congressional delegation still wants to know what projects and initiatives you have planned for the months and years ahead. If your delegation can’t make an appropriations request in your behalf, they certainly can and will be helpful in other ways. See this month’s Legislative Desk to learn what you need to be doing in order reach out to the federal agencies that matter to you. §

www.fundbook.org


The Conservation Fund - National Green Infrastructure Conference

Shepherdstown, WV ~ February 23-25, 2011

2011 NLC Congressional City Conference

Washington DC ~ March 12 - 16, 2011

The Conference will bring together policy-makers, practitioners, and on-the-ground implementers of green infrastructure practices and design from around the country to discuss key elements for success and lessonslearned. Featured sessions will include green infrastructure and public health, social equity, transportation, economic development, and climate change.

The NLC Congressional City Conference is a unique venue at which municipal officials from across the country come together to gain valuable insight into the latest Capitol Hill activities affecting cities and towns and to share best practices. National League of Cities’ meetings provide attendees with invaluable opportunities for networking and one-on-one interaction with experts.

More information at: http://goo.gl/Cpnu9

More info at: http://goo.gl/laUtt

The 2011 Good Jobs, Green Jobs National Conference

10th Annual New Partners for Smart Growth Conference

Washington DC ~ February 8-10, 2011

The Good Jobs, Green Jobs National Conference, now in its fourth year, is the premier event for bringing together key stakeholders - including union, environmental, business and elected leaders - to share ideas and strategies for building the new, green economy. Speakers include EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, and White House Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley. More info at http://goo.gl/Czoug

Charlotte NC ~ February 3-5, 2011

The conference encourages smart growth solutions that will reduce American dependence on foreign oil, create a green economy, assure a healthy population, foster more equitable development, and expand transportation and housing options. The three-day schedule includes a dynamic mix of plenaries, breakouts, implementation workshops, specialized trainings, peer-to-peer learning opportunities, and coordinated networking activities. More info at: http://goo.gl/4NdGo

Upcoming grant events & conferences Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) 2011 Conference

Washington DC ~ August 1-2, 2011

The conference will feature interactive workshops, plenary sessions, and supplementary activities that highlight innovative community policing approaches for advancing public safety in this changing and challenging new economy. More info at: http://goo.gl/KslLs Webinar on Transportation and Land Use

Online ~ February 8, 2010

The National League of Cities and the National Association of Regional Councils will host a webinar on best practice examples of how regions are linking transportation and land use and how local elected officials can play a role in developing the regions they represent. City officials are encouraged to register for free at http://goo.gl/irDN4

W

e Want to Hear from You! As we have come to learn quite well here at The FundBook, no city or county is created equal. Whether your community is small and rural or large and coastal, you have unique needs that can’t always be lumped together in one of the traditional categories of capital improvement projects. That is why we are always looking to our readers for information on their ever-changing lists of needs. If you would like to submit information on a particular project or initiative for which your community currently seeks outside funding, we would very much appreciate the opportunity to address such in a future issue. To do so, please contact us at the email below. As it is our mission to stay on top of the most pressing funding issues facing communities like yours, we thank you in advance for your suggestions! Sincerely, The FundBook Team, suggestions@fundbook.org

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.29


Upcoming Grants Timeline Grant descriptions follow y ar

u br

Fe

1

ch ar

M

Now Feb 11

USDA: Conservation Innovation grants - p.55 Reclamation: WaterSMART Feasibility Studies under Title XVI Water Program - p.45

EAC: Pre-Election Logic and Accuracy Testing & Post-Election Audit Initiative - p.55 Reclamation: Water Conservation Field Services Program - p.44

Feb 23

HUD: ROSS Service Coordinators - p.51

EPA: Woody Biomass Utilization - p.36

Mar 3 OVW: Assist Children Exposed to Sexual Assault- p.58

EPA: Source Reduction Assistance Program - p.51

Mar 18

HUD/CD

HHS: Dru

OVW: Court Training and Improvements - p.59

EPA: Env ment and

Mar 16

OVW: Services Advocate For a spond to Youth

Mar 4

Feb 28

OVW: Encourage Arrest and Enforcement - p.59

NOAA: Estuary Habitat R

NIJ: Solving Cold Cases With DNA - p.54

NOAA: Chesapeake Fisheries - p.48

Feb 24

EDA: Public Works, Econ ment, and GCCMIF Roun

Mar 8

Reclamation: WaterSMART Water and Energy Efficiency Grants - p.45

p.30 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Mar 10

NEA: Our Town Applications p.57

Feb 17

NOAA: Great Lakes Habitat Restoration - p.54

One Month From Now

Mar 1

Feb 15

Reclamation: Title XVI Water Construction Activities - p.46

1

FWS: Urban Bird Treaty New Cities - p.48 DOT: Pipeline Technical Assistance Grants - p.42 HRSA: Rural Access to Emergency Devices - p.42

Mar 15 DOT: Transit Workforce Development - p.56

M

H

Mar 2

Mar 11

EPA: C

OJJDP: Anti-Gang Stra

VA Grant: VA Support Program - p.34

www.fund


Icon Legend

{

Housing -

Commerce/Business -

Museums/Art /Educ-

Health/Medical -

Green/Environment -

Ocean/Coastal -

Emergency/Disaster -

Rural -

Water/Wastewater -

Transportation -

il 1

r Ap

Two Months From Now

nomic Adjustnd 2 - p.38

Restoration - p.52

y Ma

1 Three Months From Now

Apr 1 DHS: Citizenship and Integration Instruction - p.52 FWS: Great Lakes Habitat Restoration - p.54

DC: Healthy Homes & Lead - p.43

ug Free Communities - p.60

vironmental Workforce Developd Job Training - p.40

Apr 21

DOL: Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training - p.46

Mar 31

EPA: Environmental Justice Small Grants - p.57

s to and Reth - p.60

Apr 15

Rolling

NOAA: Coastal and Estuarine Conservation - p.37

EDA Grant: Planning and Local Technical Assistance - p.40

Mar 24

HUD: Service Coordinators in Multifamily Housing - p.41

22

Community Action for a Renewed Environment - p.35

ategies - p.50

May 3

NEH: Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions - p.56

tive Services for Veteran Families

dbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.31


Upcoming Grants Index Grant Name

Page

Link

Supportive Services for Veteran Families NEW 34 http://goo.gl/oMiRn NEW Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) Program 35 http://goo.gl/mCam6 Publishing Historical Records NEW 35 http://goo.gl/hSwbO Technical Assistance and Capacity Building 36 http://goo.gl/xUwtT Woody Biomass Utilization Grant 36 http://goo.gl/zAHFR Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation NEW 37 http://goo.gl/pYd6L NEW Projects of Special Merit Competition 37 http://goo.gl/ahx0F Joint Public Works, Economic Adjustment, and GCCMIF Programs 38 http://goo.gl/vs1t Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Grants 40 http://goo.gl/zHVzr Planning and Local Technical Assistance Programs Opportunity 40 http://goo.gl/VmKqH Emergency Capital Repair Grants for Multifamily Housing Projects 41 http://goo.gl/S3R9W NEW Service Coordinators in Multifamily Housing Program 41 http://goo.gl/EQckr Pipeline Safety Technical Assistance NEW 42 http://goo.gl/kunQO Rural Access to Emergency Devices NEW 42 http://goo.gl/1sB3N Weatherization Formula Grants NEW 43 http://goo.gl/P03fl Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program NEW 43 http://goo.gl/8DOI7 Water Conservation Field Services Program 44 http://goo.gl/1Fzjv WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grants 45 http://goo.gl/hfyFS WaterSMART: Development of Feasibility Studies under the Title XVI 45 http://goo.gl/vorui Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program Construction Activities 46 http://goo.gl/BzNkt Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College & Career Grants NEW 46 http://goo.gl/hHeib Rural Innovation Fund Program 47 http://goo.gl/m4zpd Great Lakes Restoration Initiative NEW 47 http://goo.gl/Q8158 Urban Bird Treaty New Cities 48 http://goo.gl/luX3Z Chesapeake Bay Fisheries NEW 48 http://goo.gl/BUXfS Crime Evaluation, and Development Project Grants 49 On line below 1) http://goo.gl/uggkL 2) http://goo.gl/d4txi 3) http://goo.gl/Mfwol 4) http://goo.gl/1tqKH 5) http://goo.gl/GemTl Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program 50 http://goo.gl/MwIA Comprehensive Anti-Gang Strategies and Programs NEW 50 http://goo.gl/EZ9iJ Resident Opportunity and Self-Sufficiency (ROSS) Service Coordinators 51 http://goo.gl/uO7l Source Reduction Assistance Grant 51 http://goo.gl/U64U5 NEW Citizenship and Integration Grants 52 http://goo.gl/wnAFe Estuary Habitat Restoration Program NEW 52 http://goo.gl/HCnpp Coastal Program 53 http://goo.gl/b1Rr NEW Modernizing and Improving State CZM Information 53 http://goo.gl/FUFyB Great Lakes Habitat Restoration NEW 54 http://goo.gl/hIAxQ NEW Solving Cold Cases With DNA 54 http://goo.gl/3Dvnm Pre-Election Logic and Accuracy Testing & Post-Election Audit Initiative 55 http://goo.gl/ipUVa Conservation Innovation - Greenhouse Gas 55 http://goo.gl/w14XX NEW Innovative Transit Workforce Projects 56 http://goo.gl/YhNY8 Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions NEW 56 http://goo.gl/YWF6p NEW NEA Our Town Applications 57 http://goo.gl/jLSbS Environmental Justice Small Grants NEW 57 http://goo.gl/srdeW Grants to Assist Children and Youth Exposed to Sexual Assault NEW 58 http://goo.gl/V6dCu NEW Court Training and Improvements 59 http://goo.gl/2JARn Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders NEW 59 http://goo.gl/o3QA8 Services to Advocate For and Respond to Youth NEW 60 http://goo.gl/VSiac Drug Free Communities NEW 60 http://goo.gl/AfWoo Health Impact Assessment to Foster Healthy Community Design NEW 61 http://goo.gl/kWK0o Assisted Living Conversion Program NEW 61 http://goo.gl/EPmUx p.32 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

www.fundbook.org


The FundBook

Actionable funding information, visible results.

The purpose of The FundBook is to empower America’s local governments by increasing their awareness of, and ability to pursue, federal financial assistance for local projects. This is via a monthly publication which describes federal programs that are currently available, how to best pursue available funds, and trends in federal funding for projects relevant to local governments. Our product is designed to be the most user-friendly federal funding awareness resource for all sizes of local government.

• In-depth articles with analyses and recommendations of how to pursue federal funding for different capital improvement projects. • A single local government’s subscription can be sent monthly to as many full-time staff as requested.

• Dual focus on both grants and appropriations for expanded options and security. yo u r nce t e n h a le fl e e in g to s ve h ic d n g fu n m e n t’ in d F in g ove r l lo c a Dem

ystifgovernment building Funds for a local ying nom the ic D projects energy efficiency Eco e

ing EDA funds. When naming your project, keep in mind that “energy efficiency� projects are how they are described && ressionally-directed 5 '0'4); '((+%+'0%; 9*+%* 9'4' (70&'& (14 %10)4'55+10#..; &+4'%6'& g&' for local governments,

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! '!&#0&'+08'56/'06%61( ment buildings %1//10)1#..1%#.)18 %#.$7+.&+0)59+6*'0'4); the terminology “green   &&'  #  )& #("'%, "+. "# 5  ! The City %' of Oakdale, %# '(%  +)0+6'& '40/'065 &' #4' (+0&+0) # # '((+%+'0%;6'%*01.1); *'# (+4'5614/ building.â€? "% # " &'%(  #% " # !  % '# .1%#. '"MN, the'(%City of )&'! *' 6*'/5'.8'5 +06'4'56 0  ' (41/ &  , 1( &'% 5% " Red% & +  "5'#4%*+0) '# 1%0 "' &   "

$ lands, CA, the Township * $%# &"$( Competitive Grant # $ '& (14 (70&+0) 4'5174%'5 )18'40/'065 +06'4'56'& Brownfields Assessment Grants EPA Brownfields Grants  C o$% n g r/! e s03 s i" o n a l$# l y%' '(+ ( !  Deadline #)%" '61 "   !$%#/!./  0$!', of  Branchburg, NJ, and ' ! %" !$ ' ') .&%" '+ 0$! !!*' '37+2 6*'+4 )18'40/'06 +/2.'/'06+0) '0'4); '$%# ( funding % !"'& +*+0 & 03(% directed %/ )! %'& )" !. ' Soon: Oct 15, 2010 ! Programs ! ( % $ "' %! &  /!2 (&  "' ( *'07+310/'05#.315'%5+10 :163 .#0& +4 215'05+#..: # $3180 )3#05 231)3#/ 1(('3'& %#..'& 5*' the Noble County Health ! *' 3180(+'.&4 44'44/'05 %+* # &'% 0  $%# %# .! ('%!/ *'#4+%4 $7+.&+0)59+6*'0'4);'( '((+%+'06 "+. ' "%( &$% '#" 0 & '# ,. ! ('& $!. /) ' +"6'%*01.1)+'5 0%2! &'# ! &#Department #!" && '&*%0 " *06#"  )'0%:*#45*3'')3#05 (+'.&4 4+5' +4 51 #%%'44 5*' 10.+0' Targeted Brownfields Assess3#054 4 #3' 5*' /145 %1/  ("Caldwell, &)%  of #% '%( (+%+'06126+105*+56;2' *15' 9+6* 2127.#6+105 .01 /+) (!funding "&  $ "" %( "  %((/0"&' 3180@+'.&4 44'44/'05 3#054 ! #! Congressional ,+ "' ,& of EECBG, !.*')! %*! %( !*0  +,  '# ' # 10( 12213560+5+'4 %633'05.: #7#+.#$.' &#5#$#4'1(<423'7+164$3180 ment (TBA) 8*+%*+442'%+(+%#..:  /10 5:2' 1( $3180(+'.&4 )3#05 " 0$ % #+2 2 OH were the recipients of # !// '" #  ($ Amount Available & !*0+! for   /14' 9'4' )! 14  Outside  # !3%((+ ' 1(%2! 2317+&' (60&4 51 '/218'3 45#5'4  ) 0/  # the energy 0 %/ 1(241,'%6+501610.;#0 "!.% #$! ') &!increasing &#  $%# #'# '"(&'# " %("! !""& " should it be funded 51#44+458+5*#.1%#.)17'30/'05<4 (+'.&4)3#05#8#3&48*+%*+4#7#+. /#&' #7#+.#$.' (13 %1//60+5+'4 $$ between *': 2317+&' (6.. ('&'3#. (60&+0) .!/!/ )! %#* +)  *0/ thousand ,.+ # #.0)% "'$%# ) 1..!* 04 %*':%'..'06)'5674'(146*' Large: $52,400,000 %1//60+5+'453+$'4#0&010231( #..1%#6'& "'!0 !!("  ", %# #$400 !0$; !again, "!.* efficiency of government  " (70&+0) /0 #+2 0 0$! "(! *  "# ''there' are limited  ' %105#/+0#5'& .#0& *'3' +4 # #$.'#5)11). 59*'&#5#$#4'+4 8+5*165  3180(+'.&4 44'44 %*# 8+5* 01 .1%#. %145 /#5%* 51 5'45 & )+ ( /0.  ! &$ and $1 million in funds !/ % ' '&   !"'& 0$!#0& &#%  difficult to   5/#..'4 +54 51 23'7'05 +07'0513: #44'44  %(  ) %#) ' '08+410/'06 6*' (14/7.# 9*+.' &' && (+(  $% buildings  "+. !/% "%**%*#  ,1#$./1 #+2!.* ! (1635*)3#05231)3#/Job Train- 4'#3%*#$.' $: )3#05 5:2' 45#5' 13 /'053#054= 0+ &&( % grant programs for this "+. !0 is1( '! each. Three #" of these were %#(" " . %* #!  +*!  '% %&  %.'#062#0&3'64'$3180@+'.&4+5'4 8*'5*'3 # 4+5' +4 %105#/+0#5'& 13 /  "("$ #( !("' !. 1(6'0 .1%#. )18'40/'065 %1/ %  0$! ' +$76 come by, 0% but not impos "(! & * "! 0%2!  /00!%1//70+6; * #!  ing Grants,8*+%*2317+&'4'07+ 3')+10 #0& :'#3 41 +5 +4 4+/2.' 51  015 ( 5*' 4+5' +4 (160& 51 $' %10 (+( /  % % %/ Number of Awards 2!$%( && %# +" ! project   ,. " # .! through EERE and the $' *06 &'" 0 "' ! it %! $ $%#type at the fed&' two +" The / / ')" )!% )11& #5 !.* 2'6'&(14(70&56*#69'4' / #)'%101/+% sible. 05,sources # &%0%2 ,!05'05'  * ! 0$ 310/'05#. 53#+0+0) (13 3'4+&'054 4'' 0'#3$: 231,'%54 18'7'3 51 # % 5#/+0#5'& )3#05''4 1(5'0 #22.:   ) %"   '# 0%+*  Two of the ( latter &was through EDA. Many: 185 )!*06 +" . 0$% &&eral level. "'& % 6*417)* !#%!/  (+! 2!*1+6 %#0 ( #+2'&+564+$76'& 61 "'& 5+)0+(+%#06   Pu is most likely to be!. fund-&'%('& "+.

# !bli  5.'#& &' &&   /!# 1($3180(+'.&4%1//60+5+'4 (13 5*' Cleanup 13 Revolving 4'#3%* /13' 42'%+(+%#..: $: 06/  #) most natural candidates %1) "1* %*# ( 5#&& c W There ' were '# 6*'+4 "(!!0 * ork %" 0$! %/ (+%(41/ ! !( ++'! "#  ( '0'4); 0!.!/0ed0though 0%+ (no compa:#/2.'5 56#6' * " %/ !./ aretan the0. Depart3180(+'.&44+5'4#3'&'(+0'&#4 $'3 1( #%3'4 #22.+%#05 5:2' 13 Loan Fund Programs #7#+.#$.' +&'  )! +2!.( 5#8+0)5  '# ' 1('$&! ce to provide these grants '/ s " # FY09 (! % ( ) #$ .&!$%#    )% *%/ instances / / %%  rable Agency $%# (%#$0 $52,400,000  0.1 5% +"0!*  Econ in ' 6*4'' 8'4; *'5' (70&5 9'4' ,,.+ ! " ment of Energy !. " &+(('4'06.; &(" !&%*# # "'(+%'5  Energyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s >3'#.2312'35:5*''92#04+103'&' 15*'3 7#.6'4 5*' 64'3 /#: '0& 62 5*316)* 5*' 07+310/'05#. 31 '%&&0! *)!*0 " * /!/ 25 #" "!  !& * the Environmental Pro, + %0  105 !*0%( 2!. or FY08 which may in1Protection Environmental Agency   omic /0. Renew#("', %((1 "  ( #!  "1"& !"&'%.*/ "'  +"# #+ ! " *0  5+<'& %+6+'5 +..7564#6' 6*'&0! 50#22'&7237+6'37+%-.; Efficiency and %05 7'.12/'05133'64'1(8*+%*/#: %.+%-+0) 5*316)* /#0: 23'7+164 5'%5+10)'0%: $! %/ &#" Adjus '%#(  !(dicate )!  ' tection Agency and the  ( '% 5 !// %.!   , is a trend #% //%%( %# / .&#!241, "'& thatthis *  (&',(! $,&ac' ' *%+" tmen Department #%$ '#"%  /1, $'%1/2.+%#5'&$:5*'23'4'0%'13 #8#3&451(+0&%1/2#3#$.'#8#3&4 able Energy (EERE)  #22.+%#054 %#0 #22.: (13 1(+( 6*'5' #0&6*'241)4#/ +(10!(  "1*0%+*  0$! ,+ 0+ ('#5+$+.+6; #" & '# (5 +3 &' % "   of Energy -/ %) ( (5 t *( that may develop further    #!  "'& !  As "/%+ ' %/ *( " 215'05+#. 23'4'0%' 1( # *#;#3&164 10' *#;#3&164 46$45#0%' #44'44 13 # /13' +0&'25* .11- #5 # #(% in the Energy and  "  .!' this%&coming +5 10' 6*'# /156 %1/0$!count .!/ % ( /%+1( +.0! ! !. +1#$  +((./ !0'%65#6#0;5%#.'6*'+6; - currently provide  ,.+,!. %)% *# '%('( year,-or+ $#* dosisnot *#&$ .!/ '  + (& "' "+. (+&  %0!)/ $"  ' .+& 1( '..'87' 46$45#0%' 21..65#05 13 %105#/+ 4/#..'3 06/$'3 1( 231,'%54 5*'3' /'05)3#05#0&10'2'531.'6/#4 % & 0+ 0$! 0$! %*+., 0 +*(5 % '# that +'% Water appropriations $29,500,000  2127 /10.; +037+4'& #$176 %*#%! ! 0$. #(%*#   " # ," / * %# for green build,.+ $11,000,000 this"& FY10 0$!%.,  +) ''% "($%funding *+ ,&&%)  &+ congressional!  '&"(!  "1*  /,! 0#05? *+4 +0%.6&'4 .#0& 5*#5 *#4 #3' /#0: 46%%'44 4513+'4 (13 #.. 1( 4'44/'05)3#05#5#5+/'18'7'3 (&'% !)!*0 52'0&50! #5 !!0 ,#& or through the Hous&  61 9*'6*'4 +6 9+..!/ $'&bill, %*# +" 3!2!. 2!$%(! ( ''( &#"was ' "*  projects. However, / * .#6+10 ing  '#% $" & ly-directed %.!0! #!! %/1./ %.!0 .! *0 + ,$ +* $''023'7+164.:64'&(13+0&6453+#. $3180(+'.&4 231)3#/4 #7#+.#$.' )!*0#)#+0 # ing 5*' %1/$+0'& #/1605 #22.+'& (13 )funding and% Urban Develop0 (. ) 0%( #. ") "(&'the .'55 2'4 ;'#4 10 !.* (70&'& 6 .+-'.; +.%#% (   "1*% .! 1 %*% % Department of Agri #$ #$ 5  %, 0$! 0!* )1 a fluke. 1(  #+2   "'  %2! 263214'4%'35#+0%1//'3%+#.263 10.+0'#5)11). "2*  %* "+. %$#&&  +" ! 0$! Program (+(  #'# +&'" "' $%# +*(( (14 +65 Economic Devel+) +/0+" 0$! ** # mentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  # +6; #.. /) 9+..$'(70&'&#)#+0$76 //%76+.+6+'5 Pre-Disaster Mitigation Federal Emergency Agency Hazard Mitigation Programs%#0015$'.#3)'35*#0 

2'3

 (USDA) and the .!  culture !4,!*/ (/+ %* you in-  *  Deadline    !0 016+0" ''2 1 214'4 13 15*'3 #22.+%#5+104 .+-' :'#3 44'44/'05 2'3+1&4 60&'3 (010'1(5*'4')3#051221356 *0!+* %*Regardless, '& "&if +10 Administration +*#.! *#(6'4 )/4'641 opment FOA # .$/!/ /,!"# '& Economic %*#+65 '0'4); ! 0/tend !%0$!. *+1/%* &!)  #. / Development ./ ww $2 to pursue this type ) "# ,1 (& 3 .#0&(+..4 " soon: Dec 3, 2010 0+5+'4 (+5 :163 231,'%5 5:2' 5*'3' *0  account w.fund ,.+ 5! ', (% ! ".+ 70&+0) EPA-OSWER-OBLR-10-09 (EDA) in the  #$ *0 ,.+ )!+0 30 + >2+> 3> 3=0/ ,9>2 -97:/>3>3@/ +8.09< +-2 C/+< " :<9@3./= 03<=> 09?< :<91<+7= 0?8. :<94/->= ,C =?-2 </=><3->398=   $86C5*'4')3#054#3'5*3'':'#34= %*# !  /,!Not .00%+ (+6 +6; 1( (14  !*0 5!*! 1./7456 (2/+=3-= #.6*' ( +/ book.o $%# "' ,through )!*0

 ) of funding ap-!# &&(Administration (EDA) 0' 1( 5*' $'45 8#:4 51 4'' +( +4 #0 #&&+5+10#. $3180(+'.&4 010 "1! */,+  !2!(+, 0%+*/Transportation,  ."  %0%2!! )1 ( %/ 10! Housing rg 7?6+.<3@/8  &/-/8> -2+81/= +D+<. "3>31+>398 ==3=>+8-/ >2+></.?-/9</63738+>/>2/6981 -977?83>C 2+= ,//8 3./8>303/. ! !* 2+@/  %* .!  'chanc %0 &&+6+10#..; +6 #+2!.* *  ,!0 " ) '&(&'" do both offer annually repropriations, your %</3=+=>/< "3>31+>398 1<+8>= +</ .!/! "+. 2127.#6+10 .%  )%*0  .%'46#+0.;  $%( ,.!//%2! .+,.%%10"!and Urban %/0 -</+>/. + 8/A 9H 2C,<3. ">9'>+>/=+8.69-+619@/<8 >/<7<3=5>9=><?->?</=38=?</.?8 += 2+@381 ':/-3+6 699. +D+<. !0 538. * %*#:<9 $%(!':2'%65  *9+..  be best if your Amount 5#8'    "'  curring grant programs. !61Available   Development ! ./=318/. >9 37:6/7/8> + =?=>+38/.  ,, 016 * 0.!+</ +A+<./. !*38"(!  ) %) "1((Octes obewill !*01 # 6+07' #6 !$+..+10 3%(( $100,000,000 1<+7 A23-2 1<+8>= 7/8>=>2<9?12+:9<>09639900?8. ./< >2/ #+>398+6 699. 8=?<+8-/ </++"9<&"2+=,//8 !! 2  # The USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High appropriations r 201 *)(14'%#565 (! *0/Large: 0 /!! bill. #007#..; #0& 6*'    Brownfields Cleanup Grants %*#(+ Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Grants :</.3=+=>/<8+>?<+62+D+<.73>31+ 0 | Thdelegation $2! $.%*':<9-/== Deadline Deadline %<91<+7#%9<38+</+=:</@3 3==?/. / were congressional #+2!. #.!//%+ (+.0$! % (!4% * In*+FY10, / )!   7?=> 3> ,/ :+<>3-3:+>381 >2<9?12 381:<91<+7=>2/Hazard Mitigathere e Fu (;'#4 +/0/ + -97:/>3>3@/ // #!0+8. 2#;$#%- 2'4+1& (70&+0).'8'.+64'%'+8'& .!/!*0 >398:<91<+7>9</.?-/9@/<+66<3=5  %( Energy Cost nd bo 0%+ is associated with either 109<7?6+ (! 0+(+ ( Soon: Oct 15, Soon: 15, 2010 . / (5 +*/,! 9?=6C./-6+</.:</=3./8>3+6.3=+=>/< 38 #% >92010 /6313,6/ >9 +::6C 09< +6=9 3 tion 51 Grant >2/ Oct Flood * %*# instances of conok ~ ,+.0 four .!, 4#/2.+0) 1( 5*' 2312'35: 5'45 Program 15*'3581231)3#/4*#7'+0#..: )!*0 # 0$! 1, >2<9?12!.*1?+<+8>//. >9 >2/ :9:?6+>398 +8. =><?->?</= +1*0 *'#4+%4 10 6*'+4 +6; '0 +0 9*+%**/ +0%.7&'& *'#4+%4  #..=5 the House or Sen"  p.11 +79?8>= 09< /+-2 =>+>/    Mitigation Assistance :<91<+7 +</+=%</3=+=>/<"3>31+>398:<9 0?8.381 F 0+)0%Number 0!of Awards (13%105#/+0#054#3'/13'(#713 #.*0  /+..+101(%1/2'6+ #0& 2144+$.: /145 +/2135#05.: !*0 . 0<97 0?>?</ 2+D+<. /@/8>= A236/ '4);%.! '((+%+'0%; !241,'%6 ( #+2 %* !(5%* %. # 3180@+'.&4 .'#062 3#054 ate com3180@+'.&4'71.7+0)1#060& ""%% %0%2 >2/Repetitive Flood Claims:<9 1<+7%"0?8.3813=89>,9?8.  Many: 1001( '.'0 *((5 #$.:4%13'&105*'+3#22.+%#5+104 0$! ,!0 )3#054%#0$'64'&(13$15*#4 +6=9 </.?-381 </63+8-/ 98 /./< A3>2/6313,6/:<94/->=9<:6+8= 9< )+.! 6+8')4#065 Amount Available Amount Available 1(0 +" #0& 6*' +6; !  2317+&' (60&4 (13 %.'#062 #% !  3#054 2317+&'4 (60&4 (13 +) .!/ 0<97 + >9>+6 :<91<+7 1<+7>2/Severe Repetitive Loss  1%. 0.+-' 5*' 44'44/'05 3#054 !.!"+. / *  4'44/'05 #0& %.'#062 /B+7:6/ #5 5*' 4#/' !)!*0 +6 0?8.381 +6690>2/=/:<91<+7=E0/./<+6./+.638/=+</63=>/.  .!-   Medium: $11,000,000 Medium: $29,500,000 (  5+7+5+'4 #5 # 42'%+@+% $3180@+'.& Program provides finan2127.#6+10 ,.+ 1%#. )18'40/'06 )3#05 3'%+2+'054 51 %#2+5#.+;' # 3' 0<97 0?>?</ .3=+=>/<= +79?8> 7366398 ?: >9   :<91<+7 +8. >2/ Pre-Disaster .!,9H !/ $ .! #.)/ &'4%3+$'& #$17' .'#062 3#054 %( 5+/'3#5*'35*#04+/2.:10'135*' Agency 38>2/09669A381:+1/=>2/@+<39?==>+>/=90>/8  /+1+8. 4+5' 180'& $: 5*' #22.+%#05 2!$ rg 6*'0 5''- cial assistance for the 71.7+0) (60& #0& 51 /#-' .1#04 +* * +056#..'&#-951.#45;5 .'#&'45k.o /756 mittees on %*#:996  ,.+ >2/ 09<7?6+ 0% %*#3= 38 *#7' #

 %145 4*#3'Mitigation:<91<+7 6>29?12+66 8*+%* %#0 %" :<9@3./= 0?8.= 98 +8 +8 7366398 of Homeland Security undboo +.) 2+@/ .300/</8> ./+.638/= :<39< >9 >2/=/ 0/./<+6 ./+.638/= 09< #0& 38.32317+&' 46$)3#054 51 %#33: 15*'318'7'35*'#44'44/'05#% #+2!.* Department improvement of energy *# "1* %*" +0%'

 5*' 07+310/'0 6'/ 10 6*'+4 +6; #.. 16*'4 126+105 +( 6*'; appropria7366398 03@/ :<91<+7= 2+@/ ?83;?/ =>+>? Emergency Management Agency Number of Awards $'(6.(+..'&5*316)*010/10'5#3: 8?+6 ,+=3= 09< 2+D+<. 73>31+>398 >2/ </7+38381 Number of Awards www.f (+0%  %*# Federal (+( 3= +@+36 165 #44'44/'05 #0& 13 %.'#062 5+7+5+'4#3'816.&*#7'51$'*#4' +* @3.?+6 69-+6 19@/<87/8>= >9 ,/ 38-6?./. 38 A3>2 >2/ =>+>/E= -97 , 5#. 315'%5+10 )'0%:  *#4 generation, transmis#0& 5#8'5    #007 9+5* 61 #7)/'06 6*'+4 tions, or 0% +,6/ 09< >2/ -97:/>3>3@/ 1<+8>= +8. >9<C+?>29<3>3/=:<91<+7</;?3</ %1053+$65+104= :6+88381+8.>2/37:6/7/8>+>3989H Medium: 11 Many: 147 0+ '!!"(!!0/ "1* #%5+7+5+'4 #5 $3180@+'.& 4+5'4 13*+)*'3#4)3#0548+..015 #8#3&'&17'3&+45+0%53180 + sion, and distribution fa#..;+0#&&+6+1061241(+6 (70&+0) .'8'.5 (14 6*' 981</==398+66C.3</->/. =:/8.381 7/8>=+8.><311/<=09<0?8.381+66 798 +::63-+>398 09< " +==3=>+8-/  //: 38 738. >2+> A2/8 the relevant subcommit2010 73>31+>398:<94/->=:<39<>9+.3=+= $'#8#3&'&51%1//60+5+'48*+%* ober *0 (+'.&4.'#0623#05451%1//60+ *'  )3#05 +4 4.+)*5.: &+( cilities serving eligible 3>/7= )! 90>2/:<91<+7==2+</>2/-97798 69-+619@/<87/8>=?,73>=3>=+::63-+>398>9,/-98=963.+>/.A3>238 tees â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Energy and Water ok | Oct (41/ 5'..+0) 6*' ':%'55 '0'4); '((+%+'0%; 1( >/<>9</.?-/9@/<+66<3=5>9>2/:9: *#7'015&10'#5.'#45#*#4'#4 Agency nd bo 5+'41(#..4+;'4#%31445*'%16053: ('3'05 (31/ 5*' 15*'3?6+>398+8.=><?->?</= >>2/=+7/ 581 .+45'& rural communities with 6313,6/+->3@3>3/=38-6?./ 19+6 90 :<9@3.381 0?8.= >9 Agency </.?-/ +=>+>/E=+::63-+>398>2/</7+C,/+;?/=>39890<+853819<:<39<3>3 when pursuing EERE '.'%64+%+6;241&7%'& 6*'+4 $7+.&+0)5 6 6*' e Fu 4'44/'05 Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Protection Agency ~ Th 13 %.'#062 )3#054 5*' #22.+ *'3' $'%#64' +5 )+7'4 /6%* /13' G+-;?3=3>3989<</69-+>3989H2+D+<. >2/ 69== 90 630/ +8. :<9:/<>C 0<97 home energy costs that D+>398 &+8538109<-/=>2/=>+>/>9-299=/A23-269-+619@/<87/8> funds, or Transportation, *' 0'4); ((+%+'0 ('&'4#. .'8'. 6*'4' #4' :<91<+7+.7383=><+>9<=+6=9=//5>9 p.14 !*+.'  (60&4 #3' &'4+)0'& %#054/6451805*'2312'35:#0& #0& %10531.</.?-/ 51 5*'</63+8-/ 3' :<98/:<9:/<>C09<-98@/<=398>9 8+>?<+62+D+<./@/8>= are over 275 percent of :<94/->= 3> A9?6. 79=> 635/ >9 =// 0?8./.  $?> 90 >2/ "(.'9+$+.+5: :<9 Housing and Urban de0?8.381 %; #0& 105'48#6+10 51/'$76016/#0;12 5198 $'0/./<+6 .'05 165 51 5*+3& 2#35: %10 /645 *#7' # *#4'  #44'44/'05 %+2+'05 045'#& 1( 5*'0<97+->?+6.3=+=>/<./-6+<+>398= 5*3'' :'#3 9:/8=:+-/38:/<:/>?3>C 6>29?12 +66 90 >2/=/ :<91<+7= 1<+7=>2/%"+8."%:<91<+7=09<-/>2/=>+>/+::63-+8>>9 the national average. In velopment when pursu53#%5134 )3#05''4 %#0 .1#0 (60&4 FOA #  6+105 #8#+.#$.' $'69''0 .1%- 4#065



Proje



velo pme ct G nt rant Proc ess







FY10 this program consisted of $15.5 million split among 20 awards and will almost certainly be available again in the coming year. The application period closed September 8 this year, so there is some time to plan a competitive grant before the new application cycle begins. The EDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Global Climate Change Mitigation Fund (GCCMF) was established to strengthen the linkages between economic development and environmental quality. One of the project types supported through this program is new construction or renovation that leads to a â&#x20AC;&#x153;green buildingâ&#x20AC;? with an LEEDâ&#x201E;˘ or comparable certification. Projects that are chosen must lead to a net positive outcome in terms of energy, materials, and/or water use efficiency. In FY10 this program consisted of $25 million and will almost certainly be

available again in the coming year. The application period is rolling, so there is as much time as necessary to plan a competitive grant before applying. (See p.11 Demystifying the EDA Grant Process Additionally, one of the most promising resources for local governments looking for this kind of federal funding is through their stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s State Energy Program (SEP). However, SEPs vary as the Department of Energy emphasizes the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role as decision maker and administrator for SEP activities within each state. Priorities, and the amount available for this project type, are set by the state. To find out if funding is available in

)236/

%1/2.'5'& 8*+%* +0%.6&'4 # 5*13 16)*7+46#.4+5'#44'44/'05#0&#0 '9#/+0#5+10 1( *+4513+%#. &1%6 /'054#0&+0(13/#5+10%10%'30+0) 5*'2312'35:22.+%#0545*#5*#7' %1/2.'5'&#*#4'13*+)*'3#4 4'44/'058*+%*+0%.6&'44%+'05+(+% p.26 ~ The Fundbook | October 2010

5+/'.+0' #((13&'& 51 5*'9< AssessG =><?->?<+6 >2/ 79=> :+<> 1<+8>= DHS-11-MT-047-000-99 <+85=?,+::63-+8>= !9,,CC9?<=>+>/9003-/09<+199.<+85381 51 5*'/4'.7'4 51 09< 2'3(13/ %.'#062+8. 898=><?->?<+6 </> ment #0& Cleanup :<9>/->381 Programs:?,63- ,?36.381= 9< :<3 <9H3>>3819H/B3=>381,?36.381=+8. #%5+7+5+'4= 5*'  *#4 # (+7' :'#3 2'3+1& 1( p.18 ~ The Fundbook | October 2010 0+-363>3/=09<A36.H3</=/3=73-A38. @+>/</=3./8-/=+</>2/+A+<.=79=> 2'3(13/#0%' &&+5+10#..:  H699.A+66 =C=>/7= >2+> +</ ./ 9<H699.2+D+<.= -69=/6C+==9-3+>/.A3>2%" )236/ Severe Repetitive Loss Program )3#054 %#0 $' #8#3&'& 62 51   =318/.=:/-3H3-+66C>9:<9>/->-<3>3 G 7389< =><?->?<+6 2+D+<. -98><96 >2/7+49<3>C9H:<91<+70?8.3813= FOA # FOA # Deadline /+..+10&1..#343#5*'35*#0%#22'& -+6 0+-363>3/= +8. >2+> .9 89> -98 9< :<9>/->398 :<94/->= >2+> 7+C Not soon: Dec 3, 2010 =:/8>9873>31+>398:<94/->=+:9< EPA-OSWER-OBLR-10-11 EPA-OSWER-OBLR-10-10 .3.>2/C</-/3@/>23='&!1<+8>38 #5 

 5*164#0& &1..#34 .+-' 5*' =>3>?>/ + =/->398 9H + 6+<1/< H699. 38-6?./ @/1/>+>398 7+8+1/7/8> >3989H>2/0?8.3813==:/8>98>2/./ $->9,/<  ,?> >2/C +6=9 </ -98><96=C=>/7 =>9<7A+>/< 7+8+1/7/8> 9< '/@/</&/:/>3>3@/!9=='&!1<+8>= @/69:7/8>+8.37:<9@/7/8>9H=>+>/ -/3@/. + &/:/>3>3@/ 699. 6+37= Amount Available G 2+D+<. "3>31+>398 %6+88381  =29</638/ 6+8.=63./=>+,363D+>398 +</ ./=318/. >9 </.?-/ H699. .+7 +8.69-+62+D+<.73>31+>398:6+8= 8 1<+8> 09<  >29?=+8. 38 /+<6C October 2010 | The Fundbook ~ p.27 www.fundbook.org www.fundbook.org "+8+1/7/8>9=>=F Large: $100,000,000 +1/= >9 </=3./8>3+6 :<9:/<>3/= >2+> *  09< 38=>+8-/ :6+88381 1<+8>= G 69-+63D/. H699. -98><96 :<94/->= '/:>/7,/< F =?-2 += -/<>+38 <381 6/@//= +8. 2+@/ /B:/<3/8-/. =/@/</ </:/>3 7+./ ?: +679=>   :/<-/8> 9H >9>+6 >3@/ 69==/= ?8./< H699. 38=?<+8-/ 1<+8>= =/6/->/. 09< Number of Awards  -9@/<+1/ +8. >2+> A366 </=?6> 38 0?<>2/< </@3/A   > PDM Project Grant Selectivity (%) PDM Planning Selectivity (%) Many: 50 >2/ 1</+>/=> =+@381= >9 >2/ #% 3= 37:9<>+8> >9 38 >2/ =29<>/=> :/<39. 9H >37/  89>/ 29A/@/< 8 >2/6+<1/=>'&!0?8.381 Agency >2+>+->?+60?8.381   Department of Homeland Security </-3:3/8>= A/</ !9?3=3+8+ (/B+= +79?8>= 09< :6+8  Federal Emergency Management Agency +8. #/A /<=/C  9A/@/< >2/</ 8381+</;?3>/69A    +</ 0?8.= 38 9>2/< =>+>/ :<9:9< ?<381 *   >398+6>9>2/=>+>/E=8//.=    :6+883811<+8>+: 8 /B+7:6/ 90 + '&! 1<+8> :63-+>398= =/6/->/.  0?8./. >23= C/+< 3=   7366398 >9 09<0?<>2/<</@3/A  !3>>6/ +66= # 09< + :<94/-> >2+> >9>+6/. 986C   

 A366/6/@+>/297/=9?>90>2/69 73663989?>9H+>9 FOA # -+60699.:6+38 !3>>6/+66=3=+838 >+69H 7366398 DHS-11-MT-110-000-99 >/</=>381/B+7:6/,/-+?=/89>986C %" 3= +8 ?8 *  *  *  ?=?+6 :<91<+7 38 +</37:9<>+8>98/:<91<+7=>+8.= 9?> +7981=> >2/ </=> A2/</+= >2/

your state, contact your area State Energy Office.

Other funding mechanisms There are also other funding types available for local government energy efficiency in buildings projects, though most are available at the state, not federal, level. An excellent resource that lists state programs relevant to this project type is the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, which can be accessed at goo.gl/h4b6 One federally available option is Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) which can assist financing qualified energy conservation projects â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a term that includes energy efficiency capital expenditures for public buildings. QECB funding is available on a state-by-state basis, based on whether the federally issued funds have already been committed. Interested officials should contact their State Energy Office for additional information about availability. >

www.fundbook.org

(2/+=3-=

PDM Funding (millions)

p.30 ~ The Fundbook | October 2010

www.fundbook.org

www.fundbook.org

Upcoming Grants Timeline Grant descriptions follow r1

be

to Oc

Icon Legend b

em

v No

Now

1 er

1 er

b

m ce De

One Month From Now

{

Housing -

Commerce/Business -

Museums/Art -

Health/Medical -

Green/Environment -

ary

Two Months From Now

Ocean/Coastal -

Disaster

u Jan

Rural Transportation -

1

Three Months From Now

Nov 10 DOC Grant: MBDA Business Center (MBC) - p.24

October 2010 | The Fundbook ~ p.31

Nov 22 HUD Grant: HOPE VI Revitalization Grants Program - p.34

Nov 1 NOAA Grant: Community-based Marine Debris Removal Project Grants - p.37 IMLS Grant: Museums for America - p.29

HUD Grant: Continuum of Care Homeless Assistance Program - p.35

Nov 17

Oct 28 FWS Grant: North American Wetlands Conservation Act Small Grants - p.33

â&#x20AC;˘ Actionable quantitative analyses of current grant opportunities available to local governments.

Nov 18

HRSA Grant: Health Center New Access Points Program - p.25 Flood Mitigation Assistance Program - p.32

Oct 27

Oct 26

Severe Repetitive Loss Program - p.30 Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program - p.31

HUD Grant: Choice Neighborhoods Initiative - p.34

Oct 15 EPA Grants:

Brownfields Assessment Grants - p.27 Brownfields Cleanup Grants - p.26 Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Grants - p.27

DOT Grants:

FY 2011 High Priority Grant Opportunity - p.28 FY 2011 MCSAP New Entrant Funding - p.28

Dec 3

Repetitive Flood Claims Program - p.32

EPA Grant: Market Based Approaches to Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions - p.38

FEMA Grants

Dec 10

NOAA Grant: Regional Ocean Partnership Funding Program - p.37

Nov 16 HUD Grants: Hazards in Housing (1) - p.39

Dec 15 IMLS Grant: Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program - p.29

Dec 22 USDA Grant: Rural Community Development Initiative - p.33

Nov 8 HUD Grants: Hazards in Housing (3) - p.38, 39

Dec 31

USDA Grant: Solid Waste Managment Grant - p.40 MMS Grant: Coastal Impact Assistance Program (CIAP) - p.36

p.22 ~ The Fundbook | October 2010

â&#x20AC;˘ According to the Office of Management and Budget, the costs of subscriptions to business professional and technical periodicals are allowable expenses, meaning you can use your federal grants funds for this subscription.

www.fundbook.org

October 2010 | The Fundbook ~ p.23

â&#x20AC;˘ Timeline of current grant opportunities to ensure that you and your staff stay organized and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss important application deadlines.

Get more information or subscribe today by visiting www.fundbook.org or contacting our office at 202-681-FUND (3863)


How to use the grants section of The FundBook

B

roadly, The FundBook is split into two sections; this latter grants half focuses exclusively on currently open grant programs which are of interest to local governments. Grants are chronologically listed on the timeline on the previous page, and their descriptions are grouped together thematically in the following pages. Each program description has three multicolored boxes that are color-coded to indicate the due date, amount of funds to be awarded, and projected number of grants. Favorable attributes are green, less favorable are yellow, and least favorable are red. A caveat is that these colors can be misleading as a “small” (colored red) grant program may

still be exactly what your community is searching for regardless of program size. Additionally, larger programs often draw more applicants, so smaller grant programs may be less competitive. There are links included in many of the grants descriptions and in the index at the end of the grants section. Each link is shortened so that it is easier to type into your web browser. The FundBook uses “goo.gl/XXXX” as the format for these links. Please be aware that the shortened links are case-sensitive. The process of applying for federal grant funding is almost always done through the website www.grants.gov. If your commu-

Supportive Services for Veteran Families The Basics: Funds awarded are to provide supportive services to very low-income veterans and their families residing in or transitioning to permanent housing.

February in many major cities. More information about, and free registration, can be found on the VA website. §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/oMiRn

Deadline

Two months: Mar 11, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $50,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 75

The program is in its first year, and as such is an excellent tool to learn about now. Unlike HUD’s related VA programs, it is important to note that this program does not directly provide housing. Additionally while local governments themselves are ineligible to compete for one of these grants, a local non-profits may be encouraged to do so. Grant writing seminars are being held throughout January and

p.34 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

nity does not yet have an account on this site, it is advisable to sign up as soon as it is convenient. The process includes verification steps that can take as little as three business days or up to one month to complete. Please keep in mind that any listed grant program’s attributes are subject to change without warning from The FundBook. Although every effort is made to ensure that details are correct at the time of publishing, be sure to closely monitor deadlines of any upcoming grant(s) your community might pursue. Additionally, grants included in this section are at the discretion of The FundBook. §

Agency

Department of Veteran’s Affairs

FOA #

VA-SSVF-121710

www.fundbook.org


Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) Program The Basics: This program provides funds to help communities understand and reduce risks due to toxic pollutants and environmental concerns from all sources.

and developing an understanding of local sources of risk from toxic pollutants and environmental concerns, and setting priorities for the reduction of the identified risks and concerns of the community. Level II agreements are for applicants that have previously received Level I agreements. Examples of Level II projects include identifying and implementing actual “on the ground,” communitybased projects to reduce risks in their community. In addition the program provides access and introductions for EPA and others’ programs for reducing pollutants in the community. §

The CARE program moves applicants through the four step process of joining together, identifying problems and solutions, implementing solutions/reducing risk, and becoming self sustaining. Level I applications normally deals with steps one, two, or three and Level II applications deal with either steps three or four. Examples of Level I projects include working with the recipient More information is available at to form community-based collab- http://goo.gl/mCam6 orative partnerships, identifying

W

NE

Deadline

Not soon: Oct 6, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Many: 30 Agency

National Archives & Records Administration

FOA #

PUBLISHING-201110

Deadline

W

NE

Two months: Mar 22, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $2,000,000 Number of Awards

Few: 9 Agency

Environmental Protection Agency

FOA #

EPA-OAR-IO-11-08

Publishing Historical Records The Basics: This program provides funds to promote the preservation and use of America’s documentary heritage essential to understanding our democracy, history, and culture.

and other aspects of the national experience. The historical value of the records and their expected usefulness to broad audiences must justify the costs of the project. Cost sharing is required and can include both direct and indirect expenses, in-kind contributions, non-Federal third-party contributions, and any income earned directly by the project. The Commission ordinarily provides no more than 50 percent of total project costs for publishing historical records projects. This announcement is specifically for Colonial and Early National Period Projects. §

Grants are awarded for collecting, describing, preserving, compiling, editing, and publishing documentary source materials. Grants do not support preparation of critical editions of published works unless such works are just a small portion of the larger project. Projects may focus on the papers of major figures from American life or cover broad historical movements in politics, military, More information is available at business, social reform, the arts, http://goo.gl/hSwbO www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.35


Deadline

Soon: Feb 24, 2011 Amount Available

Medium: $24,000,000 Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

FR-5415-N-30

Technical Assistance and Capacity Building under the Transformation Initiative choices, peer-to-peer training, and regionally and market foThis program is designed to help cused training. These grants are communities better implement meant only to assist previous federal community development, award winners make better use affordable housing, economic de- of the funds they have and fundvelopment, or special needs federal ing comes from the Transportafunding with assessment tools to tion Initiative Fund. Since this better make use of those grant funds. is a new program, data is not yet available to compare across preThese grants are intended to vious years. § disseminate knowledge of housing finance, land use planning, eco- More information is available at nomics, energy efficient design, http://goo.gl/xUwtT community development, transportation planning, accessible design, and job creation strategies. HUD intends to provide well crafted information, case studies that serve as models and illustrate

The Basics:

Woody Biomass Utilization Grant The Basics: A grant in this program provides funds to further the engineering/planning of woody biomass utilization facilities that produce thermal, electrical, or liquid/gaseous bioenergy.

proposed project. Grant winners will be applicants who have at least performed some preliminary and feasibility assessments. There is a 20 percent cost match required for grant funds. §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/zAHFR

This program exists to promote projects that use low-value woody biomass material to create renewable energy by reducing market barriers, reducing inherent costs, or create incentives to use biomass. A grant winner can use the plans resulting from this project to further apply for grants, funds or loans related to the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal. When applying consider that quite a bit of work should have already been done on planning the p.36 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Deadline

Soon: March 1, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $3,700,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 15 Agency

Department of Agriculture

FOA #

USDA-FS-TMU-2011

www.fundbook.org


Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation The Basics: This program provides funds to support land acquisition projects that can be completed within 18 months from the start date of the award and that have the purpose of protecting important coastal and estuarine areas.

The FY11 appropriations for this project have not yet been set and, while the President’s request is for $25 million, program funding has ranged between $8 and $50 million between 2002 and 2010. The federal cost share for this program is 50 percent. §

More information is available at

Abbreviated CELP, applications http://goo.gl/pYd6L for this program must be submitted at the state level to the federal government. Eligible states and territories can submit up to three applications with a maximum federal share of $3 million per application. Local governments may apply either through their state CELP or Coastal Zone Management Act lead contact.

W

NE

Deadline

Not soon: Sep 2, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 20 Agency

Department of Commerce

FOA #

NOAA-NOS-OCRM-2012-2002831

Deadline

W

NE

Not soon: Apr 15, 2011 Amount Available

Medium: $25,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 20-60 Agency

Department of Commerce

FOA #

NOAA-NOS-OCRM-2012-2002850

Projects of Special Merit Competition The Basics: This program provides funds to Coastal Management Programs (CMPs) for the opportunity to develop innovative projects that further their approved enhancement area strategies and focus on the following national enhancement area priorities.

reducing erosion, or flooding, or increasing tourism or fishing. Proposals should be between $50 and $400 thousand and should anticipate extensive involvement with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/ahx0F

This program is a great opportunity for coastal local governments or regions to voice their needs to their Coastal Zone Management Act (CZMA) lead contact. Grants awarded can change or add to the Coastal Management Plan (CMP) for their state. An altered CMP can create significant economic and ecological benefit to local areas by

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.37


Joint Public Works, Economic Adjustment, and GCCMIF Programs Opportunity The Economic Development Administration recently announced that for FY11 it will no longer process applications for its Public Works, Economic Adjustment Assistance, and GCCMIF programs on a continuing basis. Instead, the agency will implement a new process under which it considers applications at a set time in roughly quarterly funding cycles. This new process is intended to enhance the competitiveness, transparency, and efficiency of EDA’s grants-making process. EDA will continue to accept applications on a continuing basis, but if an applicant wishes to be considered for a particular funding cycle, EDA must receive a complete application before one of the FY11 funding cycles closes. For FY11, the funding cycle deadlines are as follows: December 15 for funding cycle 1; March 10 for funding cycle 2; June 10 for funding cycle 3; and September 15 for funding cycle 1 of FY12. Applications for financial assistance submitted under EDA’s Planning, Partnership Planning, Local Technical Assistance, University Center, and Research and National Technical Assistance Programs are not subject to same deadlines. Because EDA is currently operating under a continuing resolution that allocates funding based on FY10 funding levels until the enactment of the FY11 appropriations, we are still left to speculate how much funding will be available for the first cycle of the above grant programs. Assuming EDA p.38 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Deadline

Round 2: Mar 10, 2011

receives FY11 appropriations of Amount Available approximately the same level as in Large: $25,000,000 FY10, EDA expects to use approximately 30 percent of its appropriations for the Public Works, EcoNumber of Awards nomic Adjustment Assistance, and Unknown GCCMIF programs to fund those applications submitted before the publication of its recent announceAgency Economic Development Agency ment. The remaining 70 percent will be used to fund three funding cycles in FY11. During each of the first two funding cycles, EDA expects to fund projects totaling approximately 30 percent of EDA’s FY11 appropriation for the three programs. In the third cycle, if FOA # funds remain, EDA expects to fund EDA10142010EDAP projects with the remaining 10 percent of the agency’s FY11 appropriation and with any funds EDA allocated $133,280,000 for that may become available during the Public Works and Economic the first two funding cycles. Development Facilities Program in FY10. The average size of a Public Works & Economic Development Facilities Program Public Works investment was apEDA will provide strategic Pub- proximately $1.7 million, though lic Works investments to support investments ranged in size from the construction or rehabilitation $500,000 to $2,000,000. of essential public infrastructure and facilities to help communities Economic Adjustment and regions leverage their resourc- Assistance Program Through the Economic Adjustes and strengths to create new and better jobs, drive innovation, be- ment Assistance Program, EDA come centers of competition in provides a wide range of constructhe global economy, and ensure tion and non-construction asresilient economies. For example, sistance, including public works, EDA may provide funding to a technical assistance, strategies, and county to expand a rural economic revolving loan fund (RLF) projects, development center, allowing the in regions experiencing severe ecocenter to increase its capacity to nomic dislocations that may occur provide services to the State’s most suddenly or over time. This prounderserved and vulnerable com- gram is designed to respond flexibly to pressing economic recovmunities and small businesses. www.fundbook.org


ery issues and is well suited to help address challenges faced by U.S. communities and regions. For example, EDA might provide funding to a university or community college to launch a Regional Innovation Cluster (RIC) strategy that supports or provides technical assistance to smaller manufacturers to promote the growth of varied industrial clusters, stem job losses in manufacturing businesses as a result of foreign competition, accelerate the commercialization of research, support high-growth entrepreneurship, and promote the successful diversification of the region’s economy. As another example, EDA might provide funding to a city for the construction of a multi-tenant business and industrial facility to house early-stage businesses that successfully graduate from a business incubator that EDA also funded.

EDA allocated $38,620,000 to the Economic Adjustment Assistance Program in FY10. The average size of an Economic Adjustment Assistance investment was approximately $550,000, though investments ranged from $100,000 to $1,250,000.

Global Climate Change Mitigation Incentive Fund

finance a variety of sustainability focused projects, including renewable energy end-products, the greening of existing manufacturing functions or processes, and the creation of certified green facilities. For example, EDA might provide funding to a non-profit working in cooperation with a county to construct a technology-focused business incubator that achieves platinum status under the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system and to expand job training opportunities in industrial and green technologies. EDA allocated $25,000,000 in FY10 for the GCCMIF, with investments ranging between $200,000 and $1,500,000. §

EDA allocates funds for the Global Climate Change Mitigation Incentive (GCCMIF) to support projects that foster economic competitiveness while advancing the green economy. Grants awarded support projects that create jobs through and increase private capital investment in initiatives to limit the nation’s dependence on fossil fuels, enhance energy efficiency, curb greenhouse gas emis- More information is available at sions, and protect natural systems. http://goo.gl/vs1t GCCMIF assistance is available to

Percent of funding allocated to the four FY11 application rounds 30%

www.fundbook.org

1st Cycle (FY 2012) September 15, 2011

3rd Cycle June 10, 2011

0%

2nd Cycle March 10, 2011

10%

1st Cycle December 15, 2010

20%

Pre-Notification Cycle Applications Submitted Before October, 2010

Percent of total FY11 Funding

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.39


Deadline

Two months: Mar 18, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $4,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 13 Agency

Environmental Protection Agency

FOA #

EPA-OSWER-OBLR-11-01

Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training Grants The Basics: The Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) Grants Program supports environmental assessment and cleanup job skills training cooperative agreements that include expanded training in other environmental media outside the traditional scope of just brownfields.

Previously known as the Brownfields Job Training Grants Program, the transition to EWDJT grants expands the grant program’s scope beyond just environmental assessment and cleanup job skills. Proposed projects are expected to take the local community into con- More information is available at

http://goo.gl/zHVzr

Planning and Local Technical Assistance Programs Opportunity a Comprehensive Economic Development (CED) plan will allow The Local Technical Assistance the local community to more efProgram helps community leaders fectively pursue additional funds create regional economic developfrom the EDA and other agencies. ment plans in order to stimulate and Total funds will be divided beguide the economic development efforts of a community or region. tween the six regional offices. Subject to the availability of appropriTechnical assistance grants are ations, there will be approximately perfect for smaller communities to 4.5 projects per region. § pursue because they can generally More information is available at demonstrate the greatest need for http://goo.gl/VmKqH such technical assistance. A typical project might include figuring out how to better utilize an abandoned facility in the area in keeping with a larger regional strategy. An additional positive aspect of this program is that once created,

The Basics:

p.40 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

sideration when developing the proposed curriculum. In addition to brownfields-standard hazardous and solid waste remediation and health and safety training, additional curricula include innovative and alternative treatment technologies, leaking underground storage tank prevention, and training related to solid waste management or cleanup. In FY10 this program had $78.9 million to award. However, this was an abnormally large amount; in FY09 and FY08 the program had just $6.8 and $2.5 million respectively. This year the program has returned to its usual levels at $4 million which should yield slightly more than ten awards. §

www.fundbook.org

Deadline

Rolling

Amount Available

Small: $1,350,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 27 Agency

Economic Development Agency

FOA #

EDA11242010PAT


Emergency Capital Repair Grants for Multifamily Elderly Housing Projects The Basics: This program provides funds to make emergency capital repairs to multifamily projects that are designated for occupancy by elderly tenants.

More information is available at http://goo.gl/S3R9W

W

Deadline

Two months: Mar 24, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $31,000,000 Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

FR-5415-N-29

Not soon: Nov 29, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $5,000,000 Number of Awards

Unknown

“Emergency capital repairs” are repairs at a project to correct a situation that presents an immediate threat to the life, health and safety of project tenants. Applications are processed on a firstcome-first-serve basis, so while the closing date for applications is almost a year away, it is best to apply as soon as possible. The maximum grant size is $500,000 with no local cost match requirement. §

NE

Deadline

Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

FR-5415-N-28

Service Coordinators in Multifamily Housing Program 2010 Omnibus Appropriations Bill passed by Congress on December This program provides funds for 15, 2009. The remaining $59 milmultifamily housing owners to aslion was used to fund one-year exsist elderly individuals and nontensions to expiring service coorelderly people with disabilities living in HUD-assisted housing and dinator grants. Those interested in applying in the surrounding area to obtain needed supportive services from for a grant should be familiar with the community, to enable them the fiscal year (FY) 2010 Notice of to continue living as indepen- Funds Available (NOFA) Policy dently as possible in their homes. Requirements and General Section for HUD’s discretionary programs HUD has announced the avail- that was released in June 2010.§ ability of $31 million for new ser- More information is available at vice coordinators in multifamily http://goo.gl/EQckr assisted housing. The $31 million is part of the $90 million in funding for multifamily grant service coordinators included in the FY

The Basics:

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.41


W

NE

Deadline

Soon: Feb, 28, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 20 Agency

Pipeline &Hazardous Material Safety Administration

FOA #

DTPH56-11-SN-000002

Pipeline Safety Technical Assistance The Basics: The program provides funds to obtain funding for technical assistance in the form of engineering or other scientific analysis of pipeline safety issues and help promote public participation in official proceedings.

This program provides funds to rural community partnerships to purchase automated external defibrillators (AEDs) and provide defibrillator and basic life support training in AED usage.

schools, churches, shopping malls, restaurants, home owner associations, businesses, local government bodies, or security firms.” §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/1sB3N

Deadline

Soon: Feb 28, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $100,000 Number of Awards

Agency

Dept. of Health & Human Services Health Resources & Services Administration

FOA #

HRSA-11-088

www.fundbook.org

W

NE

Medium: 10

Abbreviated RAED, this program, funded at only $100 thousand, is a very small grant program to be administered at the federal level. Because the actual project. award resulting from this program is so small, the equipment purchased can be placed in almost any location. Even the non-tangible training aspect of this grant has been used in a variety of locations “via advertisements, news media,

p.42 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

More information is available at http://goo.gl/kunQO

A relatively less well known entity, the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) of the Department of Transportation recently issued its third year of technical assistance grants for pipeline safety. Predominantly these grants are awarded either to local governments or regional utilities. Awards can be up to $50 thousand and cannot be for

Rural Access to Emergency Devices The Basics:

regulatory compliance or maintenance. §


Weatherization Formula Grants The Basics: The program provides funds for states to create a grant program which increases the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety.

Deadline

W

NE

Soon: Mar 1 ,2011 Amount Available

Large: $210,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 59

States apply to this program and then further distribute the funds at the local government level. And while you cannot yet apply, it is useful to anticipate the program being available at the state level later this year. ยง

Agency

Department of Energy

National Energy Technology Laboratory

More information is available at http://goo.gl/P03fl

FOA #

DE-FOA-0000446

W

NE

Deadline

Two months: Mar 18, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $69,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 40 Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

CDC-RFA-EH11-1102

Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program The Basics: This duce lated mote safe,

program is designed to reor eliminate housing-rehealth hazards and to prohousing that is healthy, affordable, and accessible.

hood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program (CLPPP) to expand efforts in addressing a variety of environmental health and safety concerns and complements a number of other lead paint grant programs offered by HUD. ยง

In 2009, the name of the Child- More information is available at hood Lead Poisoning and Preven- http://goo.gl/8DOI7 tion Branch program was changed to the Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch (HHLPPB). This name change reflects the new direction of the HHLPPB in implementing a healthy homes initiative that addresses multiple childhood diseases and injuries in the home. The Healthy Homes Initiative builds upon the successful Childwww.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.43


Bureau of Reclamation Grants The Bureau of Reclamation is a federal agency in the Department of the Interior tasked with the purpose of conservation, recycling, and reuse in the western states. Reclamation is the largest wholesaler of water in the country, bringing water to 31 million people and over 10 million acres of farmland. While the bureau sponsors larger projects, like the Yuma Project and the Hoover Dam, Reclamation provides significant amounts of funds to communities to leverage local dollars as a match to federal dollars. Two of its most important local programs are its Title XVI and WaterSMART grants which are currently available. Most of the bureau’s programs are increas-

ing in size, which makes them North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oreappealing for applicants. Recla- gon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, mation’s opportunities are only Washington, or Wyoming. § available to applicants located in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico,

Water Conservation Field Services Program The Basics: This grant promotes preparation of written water management/ conservation plans and implementation of activities identified in written water management plans.

for additional agricultural, urban, or environmental need. §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/1Fzjv

Soon: Feb 15, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 10

Plans developed through this grant program can improve reliability of existing water supplies, reduce overall operating costs for water users, postpone the need for new or expanded water supplies, storage capacity, treatment works, or drainage remediation, result in higher crop yields, reduce soil erosion and drainage problems, reduce the impacts of drought, or yield conserved water

p.44 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Deadline

Agency

Bureau of Reclamation

FOA #

R11AF20002

www.fundbook.org


WaterSMART: Water and Energy Efficiency Grants The Basics: The program promotes projects that save water, improve energy efficiency, address endangered species and other environmental issues, and facilitate transfers to new uses.

Soon: Feb 11, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,200,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 10 Agency

Bureau of Reclamation

FOA #

Soon: Feb 17, 2011

to help serve their population better through conservation efforts. A local cost match of 50 percent is required. §

Medium: $25,000,000

More information is available at http://goo.gl/eWo3c

Number of Awards

WaterSMART (Sustain and Manage America’s Resources for Tomorrow) grants are part of a rapidly expanding water conservation program. Between 2004 and 2010, $73.8 million was awarded through WaterSMART, and in FY11 an additional $27 million will be awarded -- up almost 50 percent from just last year. These grants help entities with entities with water or power delivery authority

Deadline

Deadline

Amount Available

Large: 60-75 Agency

Bureau of Reclamation

FOA #

R11SF80303

WaterSMART: Development of Feasibility Studies under Title XVI Water The Basics:

http://goo.gl/vorui

This program provides funds for the development of a new Title XVI feasibility study.

Title XVI project promote water reuse for urban and irrigation water supplies. Reclaimed water can be used in a variety of ways and is very useful when in a period of short water supply. This grant program allows applicants to develop a Title XVI study and submit it for authorization. After such authorization, construction funding can be sought through other Reclamation grant programs. §

R11SF80310

More information is available at

p.45 ~ The Fundbook | January 2011

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.45


Deadline

Soon: Feb 11, 2011 Amount Available

Medium: $20,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 15 Agency

Bureau of Reclamation

FOA #

R11SF80311

Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program Construction Activities The Basics: This program provides construction funding for sponsors of authorized Title XVI projects.

Title XVI project promote water reuse for urban and irrigation water supplies. Reclaimed water can be used in a variety of ways and is very useful during periods of short water supply. This grant is for previously authorized Title XVI projects to go through to gain funding. To become authorized for this Title XVI funding, an applicant must first perform a study. There is another Reclamation grant available to assist with study fees.

Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grants The Basics: This program provides funds to community colleges and other eligible institutions of higher education with funds to expand and improve their ability to deliver education and career training programs that can be completed in two years or less, are suited for workers who are eligible for training under the Trade Adjustment Assistance for Workers program, and prepare program participants for employment in high-wage, high-skill occupations.

current one from the Economic Development Agency -- this investment signals adjustment to increasing competition for jobs from abroad. Under the program, each State is allotted $2.5 million. The remaining 50 percent of funds is competitively awarded. SEAs and LEAs are not eligible to apply. ยง

More information is available at http://goo.gl/hHeib

This is the first year of this large, four year grant program. Paralleling other Trade Adjustment Assistance grant programs -- like the

p.46 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

The local grant winner has a 75 percent cost share requirement. ยง

More information is available at http://goo.gl/BzNkt

Deadline

Not soon: Apr 21, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $500,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 20-400 Agency

Department of Labor

FOA #

SGA-DFA-PY-10-03

www.fundbook.org

W

NE


Rural Innovation Fund Program The Basics: The program provides support to address the problems of concentrated rural housing distress and community poverty.

consideration. All non-tribe applicants should apply to Category 1 of this solicitation. ยง

More information is available at http://goo.gl/m4zpd

W

Deadline

Not soon: Apr 1, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 100 Agency

Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

FOA #

FWS-JVGLRI-2011

Soon: Feb 23, 2011 Amount Available

Medium: $25,000,000 Number of Awards

This is the first (and possibly only) year for this particular grant program as no funds were requested for FY11. Projects supported under this application are meant to better the quality of life in the entire community, not just a small project area. USDA primarily envisions this happening through creating jobs and expanding the supply of affordable housing in rural areas. Applicants who plan to coordinate this funding with other federal funding are given priority

NE

Deadline

Unknown Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

FR-5415-N-35

Great Lakes Habitat Restoration The Basics: This program provides funds to target the most significant environmental problems in the Great Lakes ecosystem by funding and implementing federal projects that address these problems.

one year of the date of award. Proposed projects must fall within the U.S. watershed of the Great Lakes as defined by the U.S. EPA as within states bordering the Great Lakes (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin). A Federal interest will be attached to real property interests acquired with grant funds or contributed as match and must be titled to, or held by, either the grantee or an approved subgrantee.ยง

An eligible proposal is a plan of action supported by grant and partner funds to conserve habitats for migratory birds and other wildlife through acquisition (including fee title, permanent conservation easements and donations of real More information is available at property interests) or enhance- http://goo.gl/Q8158 ment projects. Matching contributions of at least 25 percent of the total grant request are required, and projects must be completed within

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.47


Deadline

Soon: Feb 28, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $630,000 Number of Awards

Few: 9 Agency

Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

FOA #

FWSR9MB1011NEW

Urban Bird Treaty New Cities The Basics: The Urban Bird Treaty New Cities program provides funds for local governments to protect bird habitats, reduce bird hazards, educate urban residents, and promote outdoor bird-related experiences.

After New Orleans became the first city to join the Urban Bird Treaty in 1999, many more cities from Portland to Anchorage to Philadelphia have joined as well. Many of these cities are positioned along migration routes, but there are other factors that go into selecting participant cities as well. More information is available at One of the great hallmarks of http://goo.gl/luX3Z the program is the flexibility with which grant funds may be used.

Chesapeake Bay Fisheries Science The Basics: This program provides funds to address ecosystem-based fisheries management, fisheries monitoring, and applied oyster restoration research.

ects at approximately $50,000 to $100,000 per project. No cost sharing is required under this program, however, but applicants are strongly encouraged to share as much of the project costs as possible. ยง

More information is available at More specifically, the Chesa- http://goo.gl/BUXfS

peake Bay Fisheries Science Program is a competitive program that supports vital restoration, research, monitoring, analysis, modeling and assessment activities that will assist NOAA, and other Chesapeake Bay Program partners in reaching the goal of effective ecosystem-based management and integrated restoration. It is expected that program will provide support for 10 - 15 proj-

p.48 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Many activities satisfy the program requirements from education programs in schools to bird-related outreach activities at a festival. Even some light infrastructure improvements can be made such as bird deterrents or electrocution-prevention upgrades on exposed power lines. A comprehensive program handbook with many more additional ideas can be found online at http://goo.gl/P8lb0 A separate grant program is funded for existing urban bird cities. ยง

Deadline

Two months: Mar 4, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $2,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 15 Agency

Department of Commerce

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

FOA #

NOAA-NMFS-NCBO-2011-2002881

www.fundbook.org

W

NE


Crime Evaluation, and Development Project Grants These programs encourage research, development, and evaluation to further understand the causes of crime and violence, methods of crime prevention, and criminal justice system responses to crime and violence. Many of the grants available through this program can be used for limited implementation/evaluation projects at local police departments that aim to enhance their capabilities with regard to the relevant dimensions. However, it should be noted that these are not typical equipment or personnel funding grants; these are designed to explore very specific topics, often in conjunction with another party

-- such as an academic institution. These are an opportunity for a police department to gain in-depth knowledge on a subject and participate in furthering the field of law enforcement while improving their departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practices. This year there are several topic-specific grants available through this program which are listed below and may be useful for certain local governments.

Deadline

Soon: Feb 3-14, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Many: 500+ Agency

Department of Justice

National Institute of Justice

More information is available at the links below.

FOA #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

multiple

Electronic Crime and Digital Evidence Recovery Focuses on developing forensic tools for mobile cellular devices, data forensics in the Internet-based (Cloud Computing) environment, forensic tools for Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications, and forensic tools for vehicle computer systems. Location and Tracking Technologies for Corrections Applications Focuses on evaluation of tracking devices currently used to monitor the location of offenders under community supervision or used to monitor staff and detainees in correctional institutions. Electronic Surveillance Technologies for Criminal Justice Applications Focuses on electronic surveillance is a vital crime-fighting tool, and includes evaluation projects.

Sensor, Surveillance, and Biometric Technologies for Criminal Justice Applications Focuses on remote detection of concealed handguns, integrated sensor systems, crime scene evidence identification, and biometric technologies authorizing legislation. Performance Management Information Systems for Law Enforcement and Corrections Applications Focuses on evaluation of the efficacy of performance management information systems (PMIS) currently in use with law enforcement agencies, research on how the PMIS currently in use might be improved, and research identifying how PMIS used by law enforcement agencies might be adapted to corrections applications.

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.49


Deadline

Not soon: Sep 30, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $60,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 1,000 Agency

Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

FOA #

PARTNERS-11

Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program The Basics: The Partners program provides direct technical and financial assistance to private landowners interested in restoring, enhancing, and managing fish and wildlife habitats on their own lands.

The program provides funds for localities to support coordinated federal, state, and local partnerships to implement primary prevention, secondary prevention, gang intervention, and targeted gang enforcement.

tion, suppression, organizational change, and anti-gang programs. This program’s awards can be for a longer time period, up to 36 months, but no additional awards will be made to the same locality during those subsequent program years. §

Primarily this program is de- More information is available at signed to decrease youth gang ac- http://goo.gl/EZ9iJ tivity in award areas. Youth gangs refer to those with members under the age of 18. Decreases in gang activity should be completed through the “The Comprehensive Gang Model” which includes both direct and indirect methods like community mobilization, opportunities provision, social intervenp.50 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

More information is available at http://goo.gl/MwIA

While the prospect may sound cumbersome, wildlife management projects can fit well with many types of land use -- especially farming and ranching. Types of restoration projects vary by state and the types of natural resources present in each region. Projects in the Partners program are typically small, but are a welcome funding aid to for conservation efforts. This annual program

Comprehensive Anti-Gang Strategies and Programs The Basics:

is quite reliably funded and as it generates significant local interest and cost-matching. The first step for this program is to contact your local state program coordinator. §

www.fundbook.org

Deadline

Two months: Mar 11, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Office of Justice Programs

FOA #

OJJDP-2011-2893

W

NE


Resident Opportunity and SelfSufficiency (ROSS) Service Coordinators The Basics: This program provide funds to hire and maintain Service Coordinators who will assess the needs of residents of conventional Public Housing or Indian housing and coordinate available resources in the community to meet those needs.

istrative expenses and training as eligible uses of the funds. Local governments are not eligible to be the primary applicant to this program, but they can team up, encourage, or support Public Housing Authorities, non-profits, or Resident Associations to apply for the local community. ยง

ROSS service coordinators are More information is available at essentially the staff that work to http://goo.gl/uO7l make the PH FSS and HCV FSS programs function. These staff work to develop a local program to improve the lives of public housing residents. The ROSS Service Coordinators program provides three-year funding and requires a 25% match. Grants include admin-

Deadline

Soon: Feb 24, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,170,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 20 Agency

Environmental Protection Agency

FOA #

EPA-HQ-OPPT-2011-03

Deadline

Soon: Feb 23, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $35,000,000 Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

FR-5415-N-20

Source Reduction Assistance Grant $1,170,000, each EPA region will have $130,000 to award. This program provides funds Applicants are required to proto projects that reduce or elimivide a minimum 5 percent costnate pollution at the source. share match to the federal grant Different regions have dif- funds. ยง ferent priorities, but in general More information is available at projects should use new, innova- http://goo.gl/U64U5 tive techniques, surveys, studies or use research, investigations, experiments, and/or training promoting source reduction efforts. An ideal project reduces or suppresses the source of some contaminant rather than cleaning up that contaminant. Projects with primarily cleanup and implementation activities will not be considered. While the entire program has

The Basics:

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.51


W

NE

Deadline

Not soon: Apr 1, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,500,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 10 Agency

Department of Homeland Security Office of Procurement Operations

FOA #

DHS-11-CIS-010-001

Citizenship and Integration Grants The Basics: The program provides funds to support high quality citizenship preparation programs.

If you have ever spoken to a first generation legal citizen, citizenship exams set a high bar for knowledge. These grants specifically must be to prepare such testtakers for the Civics components of the test. The civics components include U.S. history and government knowledge for reading, writing, and speaking test sections.

The principal objective of the Estuary Habitat Restoration Program Project Solicitation is to provide federal financial and technical assistance to estuarine habitat restoration projects.

1,000,000 acres of estuary habitat. For purposes of this program, estuary is defined as “a part of a river or stream or other body of water that has an unimpaired connection with the open sea and where the sea water is measurably diluted with fresh water from land drainage.” Estuary also includes the”... near coastal waters and wetlands of the Great Lakes that are similar in form and function to estuaries.” The Federal share of the cost of an estuary habitat restoration project may not exceed 65 percent in most cases.§

The program seeks to fund projects that restore estuarine habitats in a manner to adapt to the stressors associated with climate change, and achieve cost-effective restoration of ecosystems while promoting increased partnerships among agencies and between public and private sectors. Projects funded More information is available at under this program will contrib- http://goo.gl/HCnpp ute to the Estuary Habitat Restoration Strategy goal of restoring

p.52 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

More information is available at http://goo.gl/wnAFe

While this grant has decreased in size, scope, and number of awards since previous years, it is still a promising opportunity for a

Estuary Habitat Restoration Program The Basics:

local government or region to increase the number of Lawful Permanent Residents in their area. §

www.fundbook.org

Deadline

Two months: Mar 10, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $7,000,000 Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Department of Commerce

FOA #

W

NE

NOAA-NMFS-HCPO-2011-2002885


Coastal Program The Basics: Through the Coastal Grants Program, established by the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (Act) of 1990, the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) provides matching grants for acquisition, restoration, management or enhancement of coastal wetlands. Projects can include either acquisition of a real property interest in coastal lands or waters from willing sellers or partners for long‐term conservation or restoration, enhancement, or management of coastal wetlands ecosystems. The FWS expects that approximately $16 million will be available for grants in FY11. Awards typically range from $200,000 to a maximum of $1,000,000, and award announcements are expect-

W

NE

Deadline

Soon: Feb 7, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,000,000 Number of Awards

Few: 4-10 Agency

Department of Commerce

FOA #

NOAA-NOS-OCRM-2011-2002843

Deadline

ed in December 2010 or January 2011. Funding for the program originates from excise taxes on fishing equipment and motorboat engine fuels. Coastal States bordering the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, the Pacific and the Great Lakes are eligible to apply for this funding. While only State agencies can apply for and receive grants from this program, FWS encourages partnering with local governments on projects. A state will provide 50 percent of the total costs of the project unless it has established and maintains a special fund for acquiring coastal wetlands, other natural areas or open spaces. In that case, the federal share can be increased to 75 percent. §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/b1Rr

Not soon: Sep 30, 2011 Amount Available

Medium: $16,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 200 Agency

Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service

FOA #

COASTAL-11

Modernizing and Improving State Coastal Zone Management Information The Basics: This program provides funds to support state coastal zone management programs in their efforts to build, modernize, expand on, or otherwise improve state information systems to assess, track, and manage permitting activities and/ or land use in state coastal zones.

More information is available at http://goo.gl/FUFyB

In states with Coastal Zone Management Information Systems (CZMAs) it is to the benefit of all the parties in the state to ensure that the relevant information system is up-to-date. Local governments may participate as partners for this grant program, but not as the primary applicants. § www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.53


W

NE

Deadline

Soon: Feb 17, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $5,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 20 Agency

Department of Commerce

FOA #

NOAA-NMFS-HCPO-2011-2002872

Great Lakes Habitat Restoration The Basics: This program provides funds for habitat restoration in U.S. Great Lakes Areas of Concern for projects that realize significant ecological gains and are “shovel-ready.”

This program provides funds to identify, review, and investigate “violent crime cold cases” that have the potential to be solved using DNA analysis, and to locate and analyze the biological evidence associated with these cases.

As mentioned above, awards can be used for one of three activities. Firstly, identification or review of cases where DNA evidence might prove useful. Second, further evidence gathering from cases where DNA can be expected to be found. And finally for the actual performance of the DNA analysis. A useful resource is the Office of Justice Programs’ DNA Cold Case

p.54 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

More information is available at

NOAA wants to fund projects http://goo.gl/hIAxQ that will result in on-the-ground restoration of Great Lakes coastal habitats. Projects must be within a U.S. Great Lakes Area of Concern and contribute to the removal of either project-based delisting targets or numeric delisting targets for fish and wildlife habitat related beneficial use impairments (degradation of fish and wildlife population, loss of fish and wildlife habitat, and degradation of benthos).

Solving Cold Cases With DNA The Basics:

While the majority of projects selected for funding will be for on the ground restoration projects, a small number of engineering and design projects will also be funded. §

manual which also gives step by step instructions for law enforcement officials to help in selecting cases that are likely to be aided by DNA technology. The manual is available online at http://goo. gl/78MDw §

More information is available at http://goo.gl/3Dvnm

Deadline

Two months: Mar 8, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Many: 100 Agency

Department of Justice

National Institute of Justice

FOA #

NIJ-2011-2810

www.fundbook.org

W

NE


Pre-Election Logic and Accuracy Testing & Post-Election Audit Initiative The Basics: This program provides funds to to research, demonstrate, document, and recommend improvements to the elections processes and best practices.

minimizing the cost of these initiatives for communities. While grants can go to many different sizes of local government, the funds predominantly go to larger organizations, like those at the county level. ยง

Local governments can apply for a grant to improve either the More information is available at http://goo.gl/ipUVa pre-election logic and accuracy testing of their voting machines, or their post election audits of the results. It is expected that funding awards will be split between both of these categories. The end goal of the grant is to develop and document processes for increasing the efficiency and

Deadline

Soon: Feb 11, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $5,000,000 Number of Awards

Large: 60 Agency

Department of Agriculture

FOA #

USDA-NRCS-NHQ-11-02

Deadline

Soon: Feb 15, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $2,000,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 15 Agency

Election Assistance Commission

FOA #

EAC-10-002

Conservation Innovation - Greenhouse Gas sities and organizations with agendas, This program provides funds pro-environmental to stimulate the development however even county-level conand adoption of innovative con- servation districts are among the servation approaches and tech- winners. There is a 50 percent cost nologies of greenhouse gas reductions on agricultural land. match for this grant. Only half of the local cost match can be in inThe grantee would secure the kind contribution. ยง participation of agricultural pro- More information is available at ducers, determine baseline values http://goo.gl/w14XX of greenhouse gas emissions and/ or carbon sequestration, verify the implementation and maintenance of GHG benefiting practices, and determine GHG benefits so that these benefits can be successfully registered in a commonly recognized carbon registry. The majority of grant recipients are univer-

The Basics:

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.55


W

NE

Deadline

Two months: Mar 15, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 20-200 Agency

Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration

FOA #

FTA-2011-009-TRI

Innovative Transit Workforce Projects efforts. While either type of effort will be considered, programs or This grant provides support of inapproaches with an existing track novative transit workforce develrecord of success are likely to reopment efforts for pre-employment ceive significant consideration. training/preparation, recruitment and hiring, incumbent worker Cost sharing or local matching training and retention, and succes- funds are not required as a condision planning/phased retirement. tion for application, but leveraged resources are strongly encouraged FTA anticipates entering into and may affect an applicant’s final cooperative agreements with ur- score. § ban and rural transit agencies and More information is available at providing funding to support in- http://goo.gl/YhNY8 novative solutions to pressing workforce development issues in public transportation. Selected proposals will support products and approaches that support new innovative programs or augment existing workforce development

The Basics:

Preservation Assistance Grants for Smaller Institutions The Basics: This program provides funds to small and mid-sized institutions to preserve and care for their humanities collections.

Preservation Assistance Grants help small and mid-sized institutions—such as libraries, museums, historical societies, cultural organizations, town and county records offices, and colleges and universities—improve their ability to preserve and care for their significant humanities collections. These may include collections of books and journals, archives and manuscripts, prints and photographs, moving images, sound recordings, architectural

p.56 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

and cartographic records, decorative and fine art objects, textiles, archaeological and ethnographic artifacts, furniture, historical objects, or digital materials. Preservation Assistance Grants may be used for general preservation assessments, consultations with professionals, purchasing storage furniture and preservation supplies, purchasing environmental monitoring equipment for humanities collections, and education and training. Small and mid-sized institutions that have never received an NEH grant are especially encouraged to apply. Grants are up to $6,000 and there is no cost-sharing requirement. §

More information is available at www.fundbook.org

Deadline

Two months: May 3, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Endowment for the Humanities

FOA #

20110503-PG

W

NE


Our Town Applications The Basics: This program provides funds for creative placemaking projects that contribute toward the livability of communities and help transform them into lively, beautiful, and sustainable places with the arts at their core.

Deadline

improves local business viability and public safety, and brings diverse people together to celebrate, inspire, and be inspired.” These grants are available for planning, design, or implementation, but applicants should only have one project focus per application round. Interestingly, Our Town Applications are required to be submitted by at least two organizations to be eligible for funding. Statements of interest are due by Mar 1 after which point chosen candidates will advance to the formal application stage with a due date of Apr 25. §

The National Endowment for the Arts defines creative placemaking as when “partners from public, private, nonprofit, and community sectors strategically shape the physical and social character of a neighborhood, town, city, or region around arts and cultural activities. Creative placemaking animates public and private spaces, rejuve- More information is available at nates structures and streetscapes, http://goo.gl/jLSbS

W

NE

Deadline

Two months: Mar 31, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $1,200,000 Number of Awards

Many: 44 Agency

Environmental Protection Agency

FOA #

EPA-OECA-OEJ-11-01

W

NE

Soon: Mar 1, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

National Endowment for the Arts

FOA #

2011NEAOT

Environmental Justice Small Grants The Basics: This program empowers communities that are working on local solutions to local environmental and public health issues.

emphasizing climate equity, energy efficiency, renewable energy, local green economy, and green jobs capacity building. Environmental Justice Small Grants funding is available for two categories of projects: 40 grants of up to $25,000 each—to support projects that address a community’s local environmental issues through collaborative partnerships, and; 4 grants of up to $50,000 each—to support research on the environmental and human health impacts of exposure to multiple sources of pollution in communities.§

This year’s grants will continue to aid community projects and will support EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson’s top five priorities: Improving air quality; Managing chemical risks; Cleaning up hazardous-waste disposal sites; Reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and Protecting America’s water. In addition to the traditional criteria, EPA encouraged applica- More information is available at tions focused on addressing the http://goo.gl/srdeW disproportionate impacts of climate change in communities by

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.57


Office of Women’s Violence Programs Last month, President Obama proclaimed January 2011 as National Stalking Awareness Month, pledging to work across the federal government to protect victims of violence and enable survivors to break the cycle of abuse or harassment. Marking the occasion, the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) has announced the opening of several grant programs designed to administer financial and technical assistance to communities across the country that are developing programs, policies, and practices aimed at ending domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

As a component of the Department of Justice, OVW provides national leadership in developing the nation’s capacity to reduce violence against women through the implementation of

the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Created in 1995, OVW currently administers two formula grant program and 17 discretionary grant programs. §

Grants to Assist Children and Youth Exposed to Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking

NE

The Basics: This program provides funds to increase the resources, services, and advocacy available to children, youth and their nonabusing parent or caretaker, when a child has been exposed to incidences of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

after-school programs) on how to safely and confidentially identify children and families experiencing domestic violence and properly refer them to programs that can provide direct services to the family and children.§

More information is available at http://goo.gl/V6dCu

Funds may be used for programs that provide services which include (1) direct counseling, advocacy, or mentoring; (2) training, coordination, and advocacy for programs that serve children and youth (such as Head Start, child care, and

p.58 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

Deadline

Soon: Mar 03, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Medium: 20 Agency

Office of Violence Against Women

FOA #

OVW-2011-2929

www.fundbook.org

W


Court Training and Improvements The Basics: This program challenges courts and court-based programs to work with their communities to develop specialized practices and utilize educational resources that will result in significantly improved responses to sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking cases, ensure offender accountability, and promote informed judicial decision-making.

Priority will be given to applications that propose to develop innovative courts and court related programs. Similar priority will be given to applicants that propose to provide comprehensive services to communities that have been traditionally underserved. Grantees that received Courts Program funding for 24 or 36 months in FY 2010 are not eligible to apply.§

Deadline

W

NE

Two months: Mar 08, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $2,900,000 Number of Awards

Medium: 15 Agency

Office of Violence Against Women

More information is available at

In FY 2011, OVW will accept http://goo.gl/2JARn applications for the Courts Program from court and court-based applicants proposing specialized court infrastructure development or supplemental judicial and court staff training projects.

W

NE

Deadline

Soon: Feb 24, 2010 Amount Available

Large: $50,000,000 Number of Awards

Many: 90 Agency

Office of Violence Against Women

FOA #

OVW-2011-2905

FOA #

OVW-2011-2911

Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders The Basics: This program provides funds to encourages local government treatment of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking as serious violations of criminal law requiring the coordinated involvement of the entire criminal justice system.

Grant funds may be used for activities including implementing pro-arrest programs, improving tracking of cases involving relevant activities, developing policies or coordinating activities regarding the same, centralize activities regarding the same, or establish comprehensive victim service and support centers. Budgets caps of $400 thousand, $750 thousand, and $1 million are in place for populations of up to 500 thousand, 750 thousand, and 1 million respectively. §

This is one of the largest programs offered through the Office of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Violence (OVW). Grants are routinely distributed across the fifty states and to a variety of sizes of cities. However, in More information is available at the case of smaller communities, it http://goo.gl/o3QA8 would be very beneficial to apply with local partners. www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.59


W

NE

Deadline

Two months: Mar 16, 2011 Amount Available

Unknown

Number of Awards

Medium: 15 Agency

Office of Violence Against Women

FOA #

OVW-2011-2908

Services to Advocate For and Respond to Youth Program The Basics:

This program is the first federal funding stream solely dedicated to the provision of direct intervention and related assistance for youth victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking. Overall, the purpose of the Youth Services Program is to provide direct counseling, advocacy, legal advocacy, and mental health services for youth victims of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, as well as linguistically, culturally, or community relevant services for underserved populations. Funds under the Youth Services More information is available at Program must be used by nonprofit http://goo.gl/VSiac

Drug Free Communities The Basics: This program provides funds to establish and strengthen collaboration to support the efforts of community coalitions working to prevent and reduce substance use among youth.

Deadline

apply as either year 1 or year 2, but can potentially get funding for up to the congressional limit of 10 years. Of course to be able to take advantage of funding for that long a time the grantee would be require to show steady progress in a positive direction and excellent compliance with grant requirements. Over the last twelve years 1,750 DFC grants have been awarded. This year only 75 more are expected to be. This is, unfortunately, only half the usual number per year. Additionally DFC is only authorized until 2012, so its funding reauthorization will be contested in a difficult year. ยง

Abbreviated DFC, this grant program does not provide direct support or services to reduce drug use. It instead encourages cooperation of different government jurisdictions and local nonprofit organizations so that they can be more effective working together. Awardees are expected to counter youth drug use in communities by promoting factors that limit drug use and inhibiting factors that More information is available at increase drug use. Applicants must http://goo.gl/AfWoo

p.60 ~ The Fundbook | February 2011

and community-based nongovernmental entities for the following purpose to provide direct counseling and advocacy, mental health, legal advocacy efforts, childcare, transportation, educational support, and respite care. Please note that OVW will conduct three pre-solicitation conference calls to review program requirements and the application process as well as answer questions. Participation in these calls is optional for applicants. The conference calls are all scheduled for 2 p.m. - 4 p.m. E.T. on the following dates: Thursday, February 24, 2011; Tuesday, March 1, 2011; Wednesday, March 2, 2011 ยง

www.fundbook.org

Two months: Mar 18, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $9,350,000 Number of Awards

Many: 75 Agency

Dept. of Health & Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration

FOA #

SP-11-002

W

NE


Health Impact Assessment to Foster Healthy Community Design and data of their areas so that they can better further their design. This program provides funds to inSecond, encouraging health impact crease the capacity to include health assessments of policies, programs, considerations in community develand projects for evaluation. Third, opment, transportation, housing, and land use planning decisions, and evaluating the three areas above in to expand the scope of health impacts the field is also allowable. Research activities are not solicconsidered when making decisions ited, and projects proposing them that impact community design. will not be considered. The letter of intent deadline is This program focuses on the Feb 25, while the application deadthree areas of transportation, landuse, and parks and public spaces. line date is Mar 28. § Each of these areas impacts the More information is available at health of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resi- http://goo.gl/kWK0o dents. Grants can improve the planning of such areas by performing three different actions. First, communities can improve monitoring

The Basics:

W

NE

Deadline

Two months: Mar 29, 2011 Amount Available

Large: $30,000,000 Number of Awards

Unknown Agency

Dept. of Housing & Urban Development

FOA #

FR-5415-N-33

Deadline

W

NE

Two months: Mar 28, 2011 Amount Available

Small: $2,800,000 Number of Awards

Few: 6 Agency

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

FOA #

CDC-RFA-EH11-1104

Assisted Living Conversion Program The Basics: This program provides funds for the conversion of dwelling units in an eligible project into assisted living facilities for frail elderly persons.

isting project units, common and services space. The ALCP provides funding for the physical costs of converting some or all of the units of an eligible development into an ALF, including the unit configuration, common and services space and any necessary remodeling. Facilities must be licensed and regulated by the State (or if there is no State law providing such licensing and regulation, by the municipality or other subdivision in which the facility is located).§

Assisted-Living Facilities (ALFs) are designed to accommodate frail elderly and people with disabilities who can live independently but need assistance with activities of daily living (e.g., assistance with eating, bathing, grooming, dressing and home management activities.) ALFs must provide sup- More information is available at port services such as personal care, http://goo.gl/EPmUx transportation, meals, housekeeping, and laundry. Typical grant funding will cover basic physical conversion of ex-

www.fundbook.org

February 2011 | The Fundbook ~ p.61


The FundBook Š The FundBook 2010 | Washington D.C. www.fundbook.org


The FundBook Š The FundBook 2010 | Washington D.C. www.fundbook.org

2011-02 FundBook February Issue  

The purpose of The FundBook is to empower America’s local governments by increasing their awareness of, and ability to pursue, federal finan...

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