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CONTENTS


nce again we present to you our edition of FUNDATED News, where you will find original articles on various topics but particularly we want to highlight the importance of our traditions Guatemalan. What are the traditions? ... Are certain social facts corresponding to a custom and are transmitting from one generation to another to become a tradition. Each town or region of a country can develop their very own traditional expressions, that distinguish them from others, well as there also exist traditions in a nation, Our traditions are enclosed in the word called "folklore" and differ from each other because of the different types of features they possess; they encompass all the knowledge concerning in a culture and therefore can be transmitted orally, they can be located geographically, they are functional and anonymous. Guatemala is a country of traditions. A country of colors, customs and personalities and through their expressions, builds the identity of its habitants. The smell of sawdust during “Semana Santa� or Holy Week, The processions enveloped in incense, nativity scenes for Christmas, Marimba*, the Christ of Esquipulas, the colorful Mayan costumes and the giant kites of Santiago

SacatepĂŠquez; they build our Guatemalan identity and we get to miss them when we are out of our country. One of the traditions of this time of year, are the processions and their passage through the streets of various parts of the country, remembering the passion, death and resurrection of Christ. The largest processions in the Guatemala City and Antigua Guatemala are transmitted on national television and on the Internet, so that the world may know and share this the Guatemalans this beautiful tradition. All our traditions make us the country we are, they become in one of the ways that will always binds us to it, makes us identify each one from others and gives us a sense of belonging. Therefore is necessary to know our most popular traditions and rescue those who have been left forgotten to continue rooted with our origins.

Letter from the Editor

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We encourage the Guatemalan people to know and keep our traditions, because they are a means to stick together and strengthen our identity. *Marimba: The marimba is a musical instrument in the percussion family. It consists of a set of wooden bars with resonators.

Editorial Board Fundated News


By: Mario Julio Salazar. ’m not that sure of that, I think it was the 2nd of December the last year. I'd be lying if I hold that exactly that date. It was 7:00 in the morning. Of that, I am sure, because my alarm sounded, which would have scheduled for that time.

I

Sounding the alarm and almost immediately, I felt the smell of fresh home made coffee. That makes me awake completely. I remember that I did not want to get up because I felt a cold much stronger than the normal; the bed was warm and I felt really tired. But that whiff so particular, wakes me up every second more and more. I also have present that in that moment I had the feeling, that at any time, the smallest of my children would enter the room, he would uncover me and would come under the duvet to warm himself next to me on the same pillow we share each morning. The minutes passed and I began to suspect that something was not in the right place. I did not hear the steps of Nicolas ran from his room to mine. That was just the thing that did not fit into at all in the whole scene. Something happened to him? Did he fallen asleep more than usual? Hopefully yes, because if so, he was giving me a few more minutes to continue sleeping. I did that, but something told me that it was too good to be true! That smell of fresh home made coffee was inviting me, more and more each time, to get up. “Too much cold”, I was saying to myself …” I'll try to sleep a little longer because, if I'm not wrong, today is Sunday”. It seems that the morning was definitely plotting to make me leave my bed and finally get up.


The smell was unbearable and I had to try it. In addition, with the “plus” of the traditional noise when you put an egg frying in the pan and you imagine it in the same dish accompanied by toasted bread. It was enough! I couldn’t resist any more and I ended giving me up. At the time that I give the first step, I realized that what I suspected become a reality much pleasant than I could imagined. I was not in my bed, neither in my room and what a big surprise because it wasn’t my country too. I was 13 flight- hours from where I used to sleep at night and be awakened the next day by Nicolas, my youngest son. It was at that moment that I realized that the night before I had shared a nice dinner with Enrique and Anne Grethe. With the dinner, we shared a few glasses of wine, which probably inclined to me to reschedule my alarm before bed. Enrique, Spanish-blooded and tremendous friend had awaked a little before me to prepare breakfast and continue with the talktable that we had begun a few hours earlier. Anne Grethe, his wife, Norwegian birth and especially a remarkable woman, was out in the snow to buy some bread for breakfast. Both are close friends of whom I am honored to know. I had been invited by them to spend a night at his home in the town of Fredrikstad, a few hours from Oslo, by train. The cold, the ice, the snow and the temperature of -02 degrees had not prevented us feel and remember that time had ever passed since the last time we met at my house in Guatemala. For moments I wondered what made me not miss my mores even if in that moment I was thousands of miles separated from them? I immediately responded and I knew that I had never left behind. I took them with me and in the moment I entered in the house of Enrique and Anne Grethe, the tradition of our laughter over dinner that was repeated for a lot of years, represented the culture of our friendship.


Our friendship is one in a million of the cases, that like me, had friends in other continents and over the years, the different ways of seeing life in our societies, instead of separating us just bring us closer. It's amazing how, being so different, humans are so equal between each other. We see life in the same way but call it with a different name. Culture as it, identifies the origin we have; do what we like and respect, what we believe that only us can make. However, it is formed by a series of events that are repeated with some consistency and we call tradition. The world has become so small, that keeping the tradition of not losing contact between people we consider our friends, is a culture: cultures of friendship that place world in the same frame of equity, trustfulness, of friendship without distinction of raze creed or religion. The important thing of being lucky of having this experience is that even if the time passes we are not making it dissolve. We are letting the culture of friendship touch the harts of the people who live in this planet. I keep dreaming every night, of having again the opportunity of awaking the next day with that smell of home made fresh coffee, go down the stairs of a house, no matter which one, but find Enrique cooking the breakfast, my dear friend and Spanish-blooded.


Enjoy the memories with the Ex Spor Participants, who have had the opportunity to share different traditions in their exchanges to Norway, Tanzania and Guatemala.

PRINTS FROM NORWAY…… THE COTTAGE My Sami Family had many traditions, totally different of what I do with my family in Guatemala, such as going to the cabin in winter, ice fishing, start a fire in the snow and cook sausages, but due to weather, we went to the winter cabin using snowmobiles to reach there. My father in Guatemala really enjoys handle a motorcycle, in different conditions, but has been an activity that even if do not happen often, is invaluable to both. What a Big coincidence in Norway like in Guatemala, I was using a motorcycle with my dad. I love the time that I drive motorcycle in the snow and go to different places, like The Tundra (picture), the cottage or simply to an other place. In the cottage everyone together with my family, we used to talk and share a good time. I like that the family group goes from the grandparents to the grandsons. The picture is from the time that I get to see the extension of the Tundra in the outlands of Kautokeino; in the picture is my dad Jan Olav (in the left) and Ole Nicklas (in the right). I will keep these memories forever… By: Aaron Bendfeldt. Ex Spor; phase # 18


BRANDING REINDEERS The Sami culture is really surprising, very much like ours, many experiences that i lived left their mark on me. One of them was branding reindeers, I had not the slightest idea of how to do it and how big were their offspring’s. With a bit of fear I went closer to where they were, we took them one by one and put them apart from their mothers, each group of reindeers had a different brand. I asked why the reason was, and they asked me: to the child of a herder are given a different brand since he is a baby so that when they became a herder can identify their reindeer; each brand was different and unique. What caught my attention the most was seeing children between 4 and 5 years with their parents going to the mountains to take care of their reindeers, learning the job with great interest and pride, moving with a Tipi* from place to place, learning and living their customs and traditions since childhood. Tipi*: A tipi (also tepee and teepee) is a conical tent traditionally made of animal skins and wooden poles used by the nomadic tribes and sedentary tribal dwellers (when hunting) of the Great Plains. By: Jacqueline Morales; Ex Spor #18 n/s


PRINTS FROM TANZANIA…… MUSIC FROM THE HART Musicians from the heart, how a Tanzanian can start a day without music? Impossible. Music around the house: around the whole town showing the happiness that they have inside them. No matter what the situation is, you will hear music in everywhere. I get to learn a song in just a few days; because if it is a new hit in the radio you will hear it as a soundtrack all the day. Nothing could impress me more than realized that a Tanzanian without music is incomplete, he need it, he love it, he can not pas a day without hearing it, and is incredible how many rhythms can be together. Hip-hop, Bongo-flava, reggae, gospel and more. Breaking beliefs; the music connects them to each other, doesn’t matter the religion the musical tone of gospel music make them one by singing the songs. On the street you appreciate the people playing an instrument, singing, dancing, hearing very loud music, with headphones, alone, in group, in the car, in the bicycle, in the radio, in the phone, music videos all over. Definitely the music goes everywhere. What a musical culture, I get to love it more, but what i love the most is that they feel really happy and proud if you are singing and enjoying their music. By: Patricia Maria Martinez; Ex Spor # 5 s/s.


PRINTS ON ME! I’m not going to talk about one, but two of the traditions. One, to COTIDIANA: a word. The second; a show that take place in Bagamoyo since a lot of years; already a tradition. Was one of the first words that I learned in kiswahili and probably one of the words that I will never stop saying even far from Africa: “karibu”. This term has leave a mark in me because of their multiple meanings, all of them with the intention of share and bring with the people an join them. It can be understood as “welcome”, “you are welcome”, and “you are welcome to come in”, “feel free to take it. It leaves a mark in me because is the first word you hear when you just arrived and is the last word that people say when you are leaving, inviting you to be part of them. The other tradition that leaves a mark in me is the Art Festival in Bagamoyo, organized by the collage TASUBA, it take place each September. I feel my self so lucky for had the opportunity to attend to many of the presentations, were dancers, acrobats and musicians from all over Africa and beyond made their perform with all the splendor during a week. That was the demonstrations that in Bagamoyo in such small town can be huge events and a lot of festivals, were the African culture decked their selves and wet to feel proud of it salve. The event is open to the tourists and the local community, so because of that it is a great opportunity to know and strengthen the identity of the town by their representations of their artistic expressions, from traditional dances to new movements and rhythms. By: Julio Antonio Urizar; Ex Spor # 5 s/s.


MY BEAUTIFUL GUATEMALA!!! By: Diana Montenegro.

When we get to see the sun since early in the morning and it is pretty shinning, we know that the summer starts in Guatemala. We can see processions, carpets made of sawdust; the Holly Week starts and for the catholic people means the commemoration of the life, passion and death of Jesus.

But to me what i like the most of those days is the delicious food; we get to enjoy many dishes like “jocotes en miel” ( a fruit in Guatemala cooked with honey), mole (Guatemalan food made of banana, chocolate and sesame seeds), buñuelos (bread sweetened with sugar and honey) sweetened mangos, torrejas (Bread with caramel inside and covered with brown honey) garnachas ( Typical food of Guatemala made from a small tortilla with meat, vegetables, sauce, and dry cheese on the top) and Of course I could not miss the Dry Fish with Vegetables.

The food is something that I enjoy very much with my family. Our food, our traditions, our customs made us unique. My beautiful Guatemala, I couldn’t change my beautiful country for anything.


SAN SYLVVESTER’S RUNNING RACE By: Edgar Montenegro.

With this name are known different popular athletic races, which are played annually around the world on December 31, day of St. Sylvester as the Catholic calendar. In Guatemala thousands of competitors involved since 1957, with the peculiar difference that here, there are prizes for costumes.

Several activities we made in Guatemala to celebrate the New Year, as the San Sylvester race. I remember last year that during the event I could see a series of color-filled costumes that make the rice so full of colors. One of the highlights was the "Tashimovil". That you can appreciate in the picture.

The distance of the test is 10 kilometers, starting on one side of the “Centro Comercial de la zona 4” and ends in front of the entrance of the stadium “Mateo Flores” in zona 5. These are the categories: female Male Yung Female Yung Male Costumes

from 20 years and up from 20 years and up From 14 up to 19 years From 14 up to 19 years Free edge


"LA HUELGA DE DOLORES" ツソWHAT IS IT? By: Barbara De Leon.

La Huelga de Todos los Dolores del Pueblo de Guatemala is a tradition starring primarily by the students of the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala ("sancarlistas" from the heart), it is celebrated during the Easter and the most special day is "Viernes de Dolores". La Huelga de Dolores was born in 1898 when the ex president Manuel Estrada Cabrera gave the poblation the freedom to express their needs and disagreements, the creative students saw this as an opportunity to manifest satirically and that's how on April 1st of 1898 the first Huelga de Dolores was celebrated. Since then, thousands of students from all the academic units of the University participate in the satirical parade, it means, using mockery to express outrage or dissatisfaction of the situation of the country, criticizing politicians and citizens of Guatemala society. This "bufo" (snorted) parade goes trough the streets of the historic center of Guatemala City. Another important fact of the "Huelga de Dolores" tradition, is "La Chalana", the sancarlistas anthem, other call it "El Son de Guerra de los Estudiantes sancarlistas y de la Huelga de Dolores". An important person who participated in the creation of this famous song was Miguel テ]gel Asturias, who, at that time, was a law student in the University. It is important that we keep the traditions as long as we take care and respect the cultural heritage of our country.


BIRTHE RIISNES, BIRTHE RIISNES, with twenty-tow years old, is from Norway and is our special guest this edition and in our country. She came to Guatemala as a volunteer and is living in PATZUN, Chimaltenango. Les’s know more about her in this interview FUNDATED made to her.

FUNDATED: What do you do in Norway, your country? BIRTHE: What I do is study Civil Engineering, the last June I finished three years of study and since July of that same year, I start working in construction as part of a project where I was just as assistant and responsible of “HSD” (Health, Security and Environment). I worked in that project until December to have enough money for travel.

FUNDATED: Why did you decided to came to Guatemala? BIRTHE: I want to experiment something different, I always knew that I have to take a tame and stop my studies, but I really want something more that just travel, I want to know people and know their culture, a culture that I didn’t know anything about it. That make me talk with a friend that is part of the SPOR program, about volunteering, she has being in Tanzania, her name is TUVA, and she has being one of my best friends. She knew something about volunteering in Guatemala and she gave me the contacts. I start communication with Norma Lopez, who talked to me about how many time I want to stay in Guatemala and what I could make here, she prepared everything about my trip, and finally I decided to come because it was a great opportunity that I can not let it pass.


F: When you go back to Norway, what is going to be the first thing you are going to tell your friends and your people? B: The moment I met my family, the people in PATZĂšN and here in Fundated; The goodness in everything since I came and how well received I get to felt. Although people have very little, they go ahead; they are happy with what they have and with their life and always show respect and equality between them. F: How did you feel in Guatemala? I need you to tell me something positive and something negative. B: I love the nature and climate of Guatemala, even if it is not the most important thing but it is something that I really like, the goodness of people, I love food like tortillas with guacamole and salsa. The negative is how insecure people lives here, I used to go out at any time and any where I want, but when I want to do it here, people tell me that it is not safe after six in the evening and that is better to not go; that makes me block the desire to go out to know and experiment. F: How do you see FUNDATED and people working in the organization? B: I have a very good impression of the organization, the people are very professional, I do not know details about how is the work here, but the first impression is that they are very dedicated to their work. I like the spirit of support they have in FUNDATED. F: Is there any advice you could give FUNDATED and people who work here? B: Keep up the good work and continue doing what they do to help people. F: How was the welcome your family in PATZĂšN? B: It was very pretty, very special, although my Spanish is not very good but it improved with the passage of time. I came, then they put me in my room, after that I was introduced to the two girls in the house, they hugged me, grabbed my hand, we went to the market and then they took me back home,


they give me a copy of the key, so I could go out and in when I needed it, they were very gentile and kind since the beginning. Every time they try to help me with my Spanish and that makes it a beautiful experience. Something that makes me feel uncomfortable sometimes is that they live differently than I used in Norway; the food is different and I struggled a bit, the family is always working on something in the house, to clean, for example, and when I just want to sit and talk to them, you can not do it, I go to my room and sit there because they have no place to share like this. F: Is there anything that impressed you the most when you just came to Guatemala? B: Apart of the situation of insecurity, I think Guatemala is a country more developed than I thought, or at least, is on track to achieve a little more development, the people are friendly and try to do more of what they have, They love their country and fight every day to bring it up, that impressed me the most from Guatemala. F: Would you tell your friends about your experience in Guatemala to engage in volunteering? B: Yes, definitely F: From 1 to 10, what score you would give us: B: FUNDATED: 9 FUNDATED Workers: 9 Operation mode and Organization of FUNDATED: 9 Family: 9 F: Would you like to experience this again? B: If I could, yes. F: What would you change about this experience? B: Read a bit more about Guatemala and of course, study a little more Spanish. F: Final words, a phrase that you would like to share: B: Today I told my mother, "I feel I'm in the right place and the right situation."


GUATEMALA, LEAVING PRINTS ON THE HEART…. Hola! We are four students from Norway studying child welfare at the University of Stavanger. During our studies, we have to practice our skills for one semester. The first two months were in Norway at various places. The next three months are going to be in Guatemala. In Norway, equality and freedom of speech stands very strong. Norway has come far when it comes to equality and it is getting more and more normal that the dad takes a bigger part of the work at home, which gives the mother an opportunity to create a career. Equality between men and women has been an important political issue after the law of equality (Likestillingsloven) was established in 1978. Freedom of speech gives us legal rights to be able to have the lifestyle we choose and to say what we mean, without the government interfering. The reason we wanted to spend a part of our studies in Guatemala, was to give us a new perspective on how Norwegian government is operating. By experiencing the Guatemalan way of life, we hope that it will help us see the benefits and the drawbacks of the Norwegian child welfare system. It has been ten days since we arrived Guatemala City, and we have experienced a lot! We could probably write a small book about all the impressions and experiences we’ve had these few days, like the contrast of the structures within and outside the city, the flower, animals and bugs we’ve never seen before, the food, people and customs, and so on! To make it shorter we have decided to tell you about the most significant experiences we have had so far.


What first struck us was how warm and welcoming the people are. Greeting friends and family with a kiss on the cheek, saying “Buenos Dias!” to strangers in the street and insist on helping if you are in some sort of difficulty are just some of the things we noticed. Even on the plane from Panama to Guatemala, we could see strangers talking to each other. This was new to us Norwegians, who hardly gives a nod to each other in the streets, and mostly greets friends and family with a common “helo”. As mentioned earlier, equality stands strong in the Norwegian culture. Because of this, one of the biggest contrasts for us has been the difference between genders in Guatemala. To see how it is granted that females work at home and the men takes care of finances by working elsewhere, is in our eyes contributing to a patrialcalistic government. Without female interference in politics and economy, it will be hard for equality to find its place in society. Even so, we can see how this lifestyle is helping to create strong family connections and keeping important traditions alive. In Norway, it has become more common that institutions like kindergartens take a bigger part of raising the children while both of the parents are working. This leaves less time for the family to be together for bonding and keeping traditions alive. Over the next three months, we hope to get a better understanding of the Guatemalan way of living, and in that way get a clearer perspective of the benefits and drawbacks of our own society. We want to thank Fundated, our host families and everyone else who is contributing to make our stay both possible and enjoyable. We have had a fantastic time in Guatemala so far and are looking forward to the rest of our stay! Cheek-kisses from Ole, Kristian, Kristina and Marlene!


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