Issuu on Google+

IST359  –  INTRODUCTION  T O  DATABASE  MANAGEMENT  SYSTEMS   1.  C OURSE   D ETAILS    

 

 

C OURSE   ( SECTION ):  

IST359  (M004)  

T ERM :  

I NSTRUCTOR :  

Yang  Wang  

P HONE :  

Hinds  342  

E MAIL :  

ywang@syr.edu    

O FFICE  HOURS :  

TBA  

H OME  PAGE :  

http://blackboard.syr.edu  

M EETING  TIME :  

W/F  8:00  -­‐  9:20am  

L OCATION :  

TA S   ( EMAIL ):  

Aslan  Berent  (beaslan@syr.edu)   James  Dollbaum  (jmdollba@syr.edu)   Zhining  Gao  (zgao11@syr.edu)  

TA   OFFICE   HOURS :  

Class  (W):  Hinds  111        Lab  (F):  Hinds  013   TBA   Hinds  Hall  016  

O FFICE :  

 

 

Spring  2013  

 

443-­‐3744  (Office)  

P REREQUISITE :   •

IST352:  Information  Systems  Analysis  of  Organizational  Systems  

C OURSE   M ATERIALS :    

 

• • •

nd

Databases  Demystified:  A  Self-­‐Teaching  Guide,  2  Edition,  Oppel.  2010.  ISBN:  978-­‐0071747998         Murach’s  SQL  Server  2008  for  Developers,  Syverson  &  Murach,  2008.  ISBN:  978-­‐1890774516   On-­‐line  class  materials,  posted  to  the  learning  management  system  (LMS).      

C OURSE   D ESCRIPTION :   This  course  examines  data  structures,  file  organizations,  concepts  and  principles  of  database  management  systems   (DBMS);  as  well  as,  data  analysis,  database  design,  data  modeling,  database  management  and  database   implementation.  More  specifically,  it  introduces  hierarchical,  network  and  relational  data  models;  entity-­‐ relationship  modeling;  the  Structured  Query  Language  (SQL);  data  normalization;  and  database  design.  Using   Microsoft’s  SQL  Server  DBMSs  as  implementation  vehicles,  this  course  provides  hands-­‐on  experience  in  database   design  and  implementation  through  assignments  and  lab  exercises.  Advanced  database  concepts  such  as   transaction  management  and  concurrency  control,  distributed  databases,  multi-­‐tier  client/server  architectures  and   Web-­‐based  database  applications  are  also  introduced.  

C OURSE   O BJECTIVES :   Like  any  introductory  class,  we  will  be  exploring  a  wide  array  of  topics,  rather  than  a  detailed  drill-­‐down.  It  is  the   primary  objective  of  this  class  to  expose  you  to  the  various  ideas  of  databases  and  database  design,  with  a  major   focus  on  the  relational  model  and  SQL  (Structured  Query  Language).  With  that  in  mind,  the  outcomes  of  this   course  are  to:   IST359  M004  Spring  2013,  Yang  Wang,  Syllabus  –  v2012.12.27    

Page  1/1  

 


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Describe  fundamental  data  and  database  concepts   Compare  and  contrast  the  relational  database  model  with  other  database  models   Explain  and  use  the  database  development  lifecycle   Design  databases  using  data  modeling  and  data  normalization  techniques     Create  databases  using  popular  database  management  system  products     Solve  problems  by  constructing  database  queries  using  the  Structured  Query  Language   Develop  insights  into  future  data  management  tool  and  technique  trends   Recommend  and  justify  strategies  for  managing  data  security,  privacy,  audit/control,  fraud  detection,  backup   and  recovery   Critique  the  effectiveness  of  Database  Management  Systems  in  computer  information  systems  

2.  M ETHODS  OF   E VALUATION   This  table  outlines  each  method  by  which  you  will  be  evaluated  in  this  class.  

A SSESSMENT  

Q TY   N OTES  

P TS   E ACH   P TS   T OTAL  

Quizzes  (Q01-­‐Q11)  

11  

5  

50  

Labs  (L01-­‐L11)  

11  

5  

50  

Assignments  (A01-­‐A04)  

4  

50  

200  

Exams  (E01,  E02)  

2  

100  

200  

 

 

TOTAL  

500  

11  quizzes  total;  Lowest  grade  dropped;   Conducted  at  the  start  of  class  on  Wednesdays.   11  labs  total;  Lowest  grade  dropped;  Conducted   Fridays,  due  the  following  Wednesdays  by  8am   All  assignments  are  required     Dates:    2/15,  3/6,  4/5,  4/26   In-­‐class  hands-­‐on  exams   Dates:    3/8,  4/26    

G RADE   E XPECTATIONS :   Your  grade  in  this  class  is  based  on  the  quality  and  accuracy  of  your  submitted  work.  At  any  given  point  in  time  in   this  class,  your  grade  can  be  calculated  as  the  ratio  of  points  you’ve  earned  to  points  issued,  based  on  the   following  scale:  

 

G RADE  

E XPECTATION  OF  THAT  GRADE  

A   B   C   F  

A:  [.93,  1.00]  A-­‐:  [.90,  .93)   B+:  [.87,  .90)  B:  [.83,.87)  B-­‐:  [.80,  .83)   C+:  [.77,  .80)  C:  [.73,.77)  C-­‐:  [.70,  .73)   D:  [.60,  .70)  F:  [0,  .60)  

Your  work  is  outstanding  and  exceeds  expectations.   Your  work  meets  expectations;  on  par  with  the  average  student.   Your  work  is  adequate  but  could  be  better.   Your  work  is  inadequate  and  needs  substantial  improvement.  

When  it  comes  to  your  final  grade  in  the  course,  the  grade  you've  earned  is  the  grade  you  get:  for  example,  an   86.9%  is  a  B,  not  a  B+.  I  will  not  curve  final  grades  or  round  up  (or  down)  your  final  grades,  so  don’t  ask.             IST359  M004  Spring  2013,  Yang  Wang,  Syllabus  –  v2012.12.27    

Page  2/2  


3.  C OURSE   S PECIFIC   P OLICIES   •

• •

• • • •

• •

• • •

Participation:  You  are  expected  to  participate  in  every  class.  If  you  fail  to  contribute  to  class  discussion,   use  computers  for  non-­‐class  work  during  class  time,  or  show  tardy  (up  after  attendance  is  taken)  you  will   be  marked  absent.   Attendance:    Attendance  will  be  taken  randomly  throughout  the  semester.  If  you  arrive  to  class  after   attendance  is  taken,  then  you  are  absent.  There  are  no  excused  absences  unless  documented  by  the   university.  If  you  have  4  or  more  absences,  your  final  grade  will  be  dropped  one  level  down  the  grade   scale.  (B+  becomes  a  B,  for  example)   Blackboard:    Weekly  course  content  will  be  posted  to  Blackboard  .This  includes  textbook  readings,   additional  readings,  multimedia  (video  clips,  podcasts),  class  notes,  slides,  and  labs.   Readings  and  Class  Materials:  All  assigned  readings  (textbook  chapters  and  online  supplemental   materials)  should  be  completed  prior  to  the  class  day  where  they  are  posted.  I  expect  you  will  come  to   class  prepared  –  ready  to  ask  questions  and  comment  on  class  materials.   Submission  of  work:  All  work  must  be  submitted  as  per  the  instructions  to  be  eligible  for  credit.     Due  Dates:  All  due  dates  for  quizzes,  labs,  and  exams  are  clearly  posted  on  the  final  syllabus.  All  dates  are   firm  so  please  plan  accordingly.  No  make-­‐ups  are  allowed.     Quizzes:  Quizzes  will  be  handed  out  on  Wednesday’s  at  the  beginning  of  class.  They  are  simple  timed,   closed-­‐book  assessments  designed  to  make  sure  you’re  keeping  pace  with  your  studies.   Labs:  Lab  dates  are  posted  on  the  course  schedule  of  the  syllabus.  Labs  are  always  due  on  or  before  the   following  Wednesday  at  8:00AM.  Labs  are  graded  on  a  pass  (full  credit)  /  fail  (half  credit)  /  zero  (no   credit)  scale.  No  late  labs  will  be  accepted.   Exams:  There  are  2  hands  on  lab  exams  issued  in  the  course.  Dates  are  firm  and  posted  on  the  final   syllabus.  Because  these  are  timed,  in-­‐class  exams,  no  make-­‐ups  are  allowed.   Assignments:      Assignments  are  instruments  which  gauge  your  ability  to  apply  the  concepts  we’ve  learned   throughout  the  course.  Students  get  different  problem  sets  selected  from  a  random  pool.  Assignments   are  always  due  on  the  due  date  at  8:00AM.  No  late  assignments  will  be  accepted.   Late  Work:  Late  work  will  not  be  accepted.    No  exceptions.  If  it  is  not  on  time,  it  does  not  count.   Group  Work:  All  work  is  individual  effort  unless  specified  otherwise.   Academic  Integrity:  All  work  should  be  your  own  effort.  To  be  safe,  do  not  assist  other  students  without   clearing  it  with  me  first.  Violators  of  academic  integrity  will  receive  an  F  in  the  course,  and  an  incident   report  will  be  filed  with  the  office  of  academic  integrity.  

              IST359  M004  Spring  2013,  Yang  Wang,  Syllabus  –  v2012.12.27    

Page  3/3  


4.  U NIVERSITY  AND   S CHOOL   P OLICIES   A CADEMIC   I NTEGRITY   The  academic  community  of  Syracuse  University  and  of  the  School  of  Information  Studies  requires  the  highest   standards  of  professional  ethics  and  personal  integrity  from  all  members  of  the  community.  Violations  of  these   standards  are  violations  of  a  mutual  obligation  characterized  by  trust,  honesty,  and  personal  honor.  As  a   community,  we  commit  ourselves  to  standards  of  academic  conduct,  impose  sanctions  against  those  who  violate   these  standards,  and  keep  appropriate  records  of  violations.    The  academic  integrity  statement  can  be  found  at:   http://supolicies.syr.edu/ethics/acad_integrity.htm.  

S TUDENT  WITH   D ISABILITIES   If  you  believe  that  you  need  accommodations  for  a  disability,  please  contact  the  Office  of  Disability  Services  (ODS),   http://disabilityservices.syr.edu,  located  in  Room  309  of  804  University  Avenue,  or  call  (315)  443-­‐4498  for  an   appointment  to  discuss  your  needs  and  the  process  for  requesting  accommodations.  ODS  is  responsible  for   coordinating  disability-­‐related  accommodations  and  will  issue  students  with  documented  disabilities   “Accommodation  Authorization  Letters,”  as  appropriate.  Since  accommodations  may  require  early  planning  and   generally  are  not  provided  retroactively,  please  contact  ODS  as  soon  as  possible.  

O WNERSHIP  OF   S TUDENT   W ORK   This  course  may  use  course  participation  and  documents  created  by  students  for  educational  purposes.  In   compliance  with  the  Federal  Family  Educational  Rights  and  Privacy  Act,  works  in  all  media  produced  by  students  as   part  of  their  course  participation  at  Syracuse  University  may  be  used  for  educational  purposes,  provided  that  the   course  syllabus  makes  clear  that  such  use  may  occur.  It  is  understood  that  registration  for  and  continued   enrollment  in  a  course  where  such  use  of  student  works  is  announced  constitutes  permission  by  the  student.  After   such  a  course  has  been  completed,  any  further  use  of  student  works  will  meet  one  of  the  following  conditions:  (1)   the  work  will  be  rendered  anonymous  through  the  removal  of  all  personal  identification  of  the  work’s   creator/originator(s);  or  (2)  the  creator/originator(s)’  written  permission  will  be  secured.  As  generally  accepted   practice,  honors  theses,  graduate  theses,  graduate  research  projects,  dissertations,  or  other  exit  projects   submitted  in  partial  fulfillment  of  degree  requirements  are  placed  in  the  library,  University  Archives,  or  academic   departments  for  public  reference.  

A TTENDANCE   P OLICY   Regular  class  attendance  is  obligatory.  An  instructor  may  recommend  that  a  student  be  dropped  from  a  course  for   poor  achievement  due  to  excessive  absence.  A  student  who  is  dropped  after  the  deadline  for  dropping  courses   may  be  assigned  a  grade  of  F.  Students  who  have  two  unexcused  absences  during  the  first  two  class  meetings  of   the  semester  may  be  dropped  from  the  course  at  the  discretion  of  the  instructor.  The  instructor  or  the  department   offering  the  course  will  notify  the  Registrar  of  this  action.  However,  students  should  not  assume  that  they  have   been  dropped  from  a  class  just  because  the  first  two  classes  were  missed.  It  is  ultimately  the  responsibility  of  the   student  to  drop  a  course  that  they  are  not  planning  to  attend  by  the  deadline  published  in  the  College  calendar.   For  more  information  about  the  Syracuse  University  Attendance  Policy,  please  see  the  following  web  site:   http://www.syr.edu/policies/rules_regs.html     IST359  M004  Spring  2013,  Yang  Wang,  Syllabus  –  v2012.12.27    

Page  4/4  


A DD / DROP   P ROCESS  AND   C OURSE   W ITHDRAWAL   P OLICY   It  is  the  responsibility  of  the  students  to  be  fully  informed  of  the  college  catalog  policies  regarding  course  add,  drop   and  withdrawal  policies.  For  more  information  about  the  Syracuse  University  Add/drop  Process  and  Course   Withdrawal  Policy,  please  see  the  following  web  site:  http://sumweb.syr.edu/registrar/regintro.htm    

F AITH -­‐ BASED   O BSERVANCES   Syracuse  University  recognizes  the  diversity  of  faiths  represented  among  the  campus  community  and  protects  the   rights  of  students,  faculty,  and  staff  to  observe  according  to  these.  A  more  detailed  student  policy  can  be  found  at:   http://supolicies.syr.edu/studs/religious_observance.htm.                                           IST359  M004  Spring  2013,  Yang  Wang,  Syllabus  –  v2012.12.27    

Page  5/5  


5.  C OURSE   C ALENDAR     The  following  course  calendar  lists  all  reading  assignments,  lecture  topics,  labs,  and  exams.  All  additional  reading   and  class  materials  can  be  accessed  from  our  course  Blackboard  site.  You  should  plan  on  reading  the  materials   associated  with  the  learning  unit  prior  to  the  date  posted  on  the  syllabus.  All  dates  are  firm,  so  please  use  this   schedule  to  plan  accordingly.   O  –  Oppel  book,  M  –  Murach  book,  Q  –  Quiz,  L  –  Lab,  A  -­‐  Assignment  

W EEK #   D ATE   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15  

W  1/16   F      1/18   W  1/23   F      1/25   W  1/30   F      2/1   W  2/6   F      2/8   W  2/13   F      2/15   W  2/20   F      2/22   W  2/27   F      3/1   W  3/6   F      3/8   W  3/13   F      3/15   W  3/20   F      3/22   W  3/27   F      3/29   W  4/3   F      4/5   W  4/10   F      4/12   W  4/17   F      4/19   W  4/24   F      4/26  

C LASS   S UBJECT  

R EADING    

D UE  

Intro  to  the  course   Unit  0:  The  database  environment     Unit  1:  The  relational  database  model   Lab  1:  Intro  to  a  DBMS  and  the  relational  model   Unit  2:  Intro  to  Structured  Query  Language  (SQL)   Lab  2:  Intro  to  SQL  (DDL  and  DML)   Unit  3:  The  SQL  SELECT  statement  /  Table  Joins     Lab  3:  SQL  SELECT  statement  joins  more  DML   Unit  4:  Advanced  SQL  SELECT   Lab  4:  SQL  SELECT  aggregates,  sub-­‐selects,  views   Unit  5:  SQL  programming:  procedures,  functions   Lab  5:  SQL  programming:  procedures,  functions   Unit  6:  Data  and  database  administration   Lab  6:  Transaction  management,  DBMS  security   Unit  A:  distributed  DBMSs,  review  for  Exam  1   Lab:  Exam  1  (E01)   No  Classes  Spring  Break   No  Classes  Spring  Break   Unit  7:  Database  analysis  –  data  modeling   Lab  7:  Conceptual  modeling  in  Visio   Unit  8:  Logical  database  design   Lab  8:  Mapping  to  the  logical  model   Unit  9:  Logical  database  design  -­‐  normalization     Lab  9:  Data  normalization   Unit  10:  Data  migration   Lab  10:  Data  migration   Unit  11:  Physical  database  design,  performance     Lab  11:  Performance  tuning   Unit  B:  Review  for  Exam  2     Lab:  Exam  2  (E02)  

O1/M1     O2/M11,2     O4/M10,7     O4/M3,8     O4/M4,5,12     O8/M13,14     O10,11/M16,17     O9         O5     O7     O6/M9     O8     O8        

    Q1     Q2,  L1,  release  A1     Q3,  L2     Q4,  L3   A1,  release  A2   Q5,  L4     Q6,  L5     A2,  L6         Q7,  release  A3     Q8,  L7     Q9,  L8   A3,  release  A4   Q10,  L9     Q11,L10     L11   A4  

6.  A CKNOWLEDGEMENT     The  instructor  thanks  Prof.  Michael  Fudge  Jr.  and  Prof.  Deborah  Nosky  for  generously  sharing  their  course   materials.  This  course  is  heavily  based  on  past  IST359  courses  taught  by  Prof.  Fudge  and  Prof.  Nosky.  

IST359  M004  Spring  2013,  Yang  Wang,  Syllabus  –  v2012.12.27    

Page  6/6  


test syllabus