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of the Charleston Family YMCA in Charleston, WV, increased its

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Ann Arbor News 2008 


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ANN ARBOR TOP STORIES • Slaying suspect arraigned • Boy, 3, dies as result of fire • Longtime dream takes flight at last Female aviators compete in cross-country race • 14-Day Archive

Sci-fi street light But new Buhr Park fixture, powered by wind and solar energy, is anything but fiction Monday, May 26, 2008

BY AMANDA HAMON The Ann Arbor News

ANN ARBOR BLOGS Ann Arbor News 24/7 • Delivery driver struck with pistol in Ypsilanti Township 1:01 p.m. ET

• Fatal crash closes Carpenter Road in Pittsfield Township until later this afternoon 11:56

The gizmo atop the utility pole near the Packard Road entrance to Buhr Park looks more like something from science fiction than a commonplace utility device. It's a hybrid solar-wind-powered streetlight, which the city installed last month. It's topped by a wind turbine and two solar panels, and contains a battery to store that energy, said city Energy Coordinator David Konkle. Advertisement

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LATEST MICHIGAN NEWS Kalamazoo's Wings Stadium officials mull options concerning lawsuit against Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids Attorneys for Wings Stadium are reviewing a lawsuit filed earlier this month by a Grand Rapids venue owner that alleges a secret agreement between Van Andel Arena and a major events promoter could be costing other area venues, including Wings Stadium. More Michigan News » ANN ARBOR FORUMS Tell us what's going on in Ann Arbor • Ann Arbor forum Ann Arbor Town Talk • Hey Lazy, how are your... by Salinian 06/23/2008 9:25 a.m. ET • Great! by Zyzal 06/23/2008 10:35 a.m. ET • I didn't replace mine... by Salinian 06/23/2008 11:01 a.m. ET • I replaced mine by LadyKlassy 06/23/2008 11:07 a.m. ET • More

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Reddit Digg del.icio.us Google Yahoo The streetlight was installed after Mojtaba Navvab, University of Michigan associate professor of architecture, contacted Konkle in March to discuss installing the light which a Jackson company had made using plans from Navvab's Sustainable Design Research Lab. Navvab said he immediately thought the city might want the light after his lab determined it functions properly. "In architecture these days, sustainability is a very hot topic,'' Navvab said. "We're trying to demonstrate to the public at large that there is a very strong possibility of utilizing not only wind but also solar (power).'' The Buhr Park location was chosen because of its public visibility and its need for more illumination, Konkle said.

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"We've got these really strong renewable energy goals here at the city, so ... (the streetlight) was certainly of interest to us,'' Konkle said. The 70-watt, 24-volt light can store 100 amp hours at 24 volts in its two batteries. It only turns on at night and is as bright as a normal streetlight, but more energy-efficient, Konkle said. The light uses induction technology, which means the power needed to generate it is transferred from the outside of the lamp via electromagnetic fields. Its life expectancy is about 22 years, Konkle said.

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CLTC is developing and demonstrating a high-low HID exterior lighting system that operates at a low level during unoccupied night periods and at a high level during occupied night periods. A beta-site demonstration of Bi-level fixtures is installed at the Mondavi Center in Davis, CA. Conceptual approaches, preliminary designs and lighting system prototypes are being developed for two applications: pole-mounted and wall-pack fixtures. The project team is working to refine the design of an HID exterior lighting system with integrated controls. Baseline evaluations of the field test site will be conducted with follow up field demonstrations of prototyped systems.

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Fitness Franchise Shapes Up With EverLast" Induction Fixtures

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Fitness Franchise Shapes Up With EverLast" Induction Fixtures When Peter Gorham and Rick Smith opened their new Model A Fitness franchise in Boonton, NJ, members joined in droves due to the wealth of equipment and reasonable pricing. The two partners say that Model A Fitness, a twenty-location workout chain serving four states in the northeast, has hit a nerve in the burgeoning fitness market with their retro-80’s atmosphere. However, one aspect of the “retro” concept didn’t sit well with the proud new gym owners: the facility’s old fashioned, metal halide lighting.

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After consulting with the experts at Full Spectrum Solutions, Inc., the leading innovator in energy-efficient, high performance lighting, the Model A Fitness team chose EverLast™ induction fixtures to replace the existing metal HIDs. Peter Gorham states “Our club members have already commented on how much they like the ‘cleaner’, high-energy lighting coming from the EverLast™ fixtures.”

www.AE

“ Quite frankly, the old 400 watt metal halide technology hasn’t changed or improved significantly in over thirty years,” commented Mike Nevins, founder and CEO of Full Spectrum Solutions. “Our EverLast™ fixtures represent the very latest breakthroughs in commercial lighting. When tested head-to-head with metal halide, EverLast™ costs a fraction to operate, give off much less heat and produces a high quality full spectrum light for increased productivity and error reduction. Furthermore, EverLast™ has an unmatched bulb rating of up to 100,000 hours, and requires virtually no maintenance. EverLast™ uses a multi-phosphor blend which is almost indistinguishable from sunshine,” Mr. Nevins stated. “This produces a very natural feel without the stressed-out, yellow hue of most common cool-white HID lighting.” For more information visit www.fullspectrusolutions or www.everlastlife.com or call 800-574-7014.

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6/23/2008


College Planning & Management — ARTICLE ARCHIVE

PUBLISHED BY THE PETER LI EDUCATION GROUP CATECHIST College Planning & Management

School Planning & Management

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Today's Catholic Teacher

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The information resource for construction, facilities, business, and technology professionals serving the college and university market.

A Reintroduction to Induction Lighting by Christine Beitenhaus About 30 years ago a new lighting technology became available without much fanfare, but popularity after being reintroduced in the 1990s. With induction lighting's obvious benefits lifespan and little-to-no maintenance, are college campuses rushing out to switch over?

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About 30 years ago a new lighting technology became available without much fanfare, but popularity after being reintroduced in the 1990s. Induction lighting technology, similar to flu lighting, “offers a life span of up to 100,000 hours, outlasting 100 incandescent bulbs, five five typical fluorescent lamp changes,” according to information from Full Spectrum Solutio induction lighting’s obvious benefits of a long lifespan and little-to-no maintenance, are col rushing out to switch over? How It Works Induction lighting is based off the principle that a gas discharge through magnetism can pr Basically, mercury vapor, located in the discharge vessel, is excited with the creation of a inside the lamp vessel, producing invisible ultraviolet light. Visible light is then produced wh ultraviolet light passes through a phosphor coating on the surface of the tube. There is no connection within the bulb, thus the generation of light is achieved through electromagneti

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Benefits and Drawbacks According to Dae Hur, HID product manager, strategic marketing for Philips Lighting Comp of electrodes means, “the system’s life is much longer than conventional light sources. If th components are designed properly, in terms of thermal management, then the system ave will be about 100,000 hours.” This long life translates into lower maintenance, a benefit to often recoup their initial costs through time from use of these lighting systems. Often, the o to these systems is the initial cost, so it has been important for colleges and cities using in to show the rate of return. “Sacramento Municipal District does a lot of case studies, and th to show the payback in the long life,” commented Steve Beede, market development mana “They were showing the energy efficiency and the long life. It does have a high price to it r they are trying to show the benefits in the payback in the life of the bulb.” Joelle Kolhagen, director for Full Spectrum Solutions, added to that point. “It’s maintenance free; you’re not to mess with it once it is up. There aren’t the maintenance charges of someone going out a change your bulbs,” she explained. Induction lighting technology has other benefits. Induction lighting can be turned on and of waiting, like a typical halide fixture. Philip’s QL induction lighting system “is instant on/insta which is helpful during power outages,” stated Hur. Most induction lighting systems also ha optics. “It replicates natural daylight, so it isn’t glowy orange,” said Kolhagen. The phospho to a traditional fluorescent system’s, providing great white light of CRI 80 with a choice of c temperatures. Beede also mentioned that an induction light puts out more lumens than an fluorescent light, although “a typical fluorescent fixture will have six lights compared to the incandescent light in its fixture.” Where It Works According to Beede, induction lighting operates well at a range of temperatures, including temperatures. He suggested, “These systems work great for outdoor applications, places w want to be doing a lot of maintenance. This includes places where you want to have a goo like parking garages.” Kolhagen noted that Full Spectrum Solutions works with the University of California, Davis recently been redoing some parking garages. “We have different options for controlling [ou lighting systems],” she stated. “Some of the fixtures have daylight sensors so that the light

http://www.peterli.com/cpm/resources/articles/archive.php?article_id=1878

8/6/2008


COLLEG Planning Csf Management

July 2008

A Reproduction lo Induction Lighting by Christine Beitenhaus About 30years ago a new lighting technology became available without much fanfare, but il only gained popularity after being reintroc/ucecl in ihe 1990s. With induction lighting's obvious benefits of a long lifespan and litdc-to-no inuinh-nance, are college campuses rushing out to switch over?

About 30 years ago a new lighting technology became available without much fanfare, but it only gained popularity after being re introduced in the 1990s. Induction lighting technology, similar to fluorescent lighting, "offers a life span of up to 100.000 hours, outlasting 100 incandescent bulbs, five HID lights, or live typical fluorescent lamp changes," according to information from Full Spectrum Solutions. With induction lighting's obvious benefits ofa long lifespan and Httle-to-no maintenance, are college campuses rushing out to switch over? How It Works

induction lighting is based off the principle Unit a gas discharge through magnetism can produce light. Basically, mercury vapor, located in the discharge vessel, is excited with the creation ofa magnetic field inside the lamp vessel, producing invisible ultra

violet light. Visible light is then produced when the ultraviolet light passes through a phosphor coating on the surface of the tube. There is no electrical connection within the bulb, thus the generation of light is achieved through electromagnetic induc tion. Benefits and Drawbacks

According to Dae llur, HID product manager, strategic marketing for Philips Lighting Company, the lack of electrodes means,

"the system's life is much longer than conventional light sources. If the system components are designed properly, in terms of thermal management, then the system average raied life will be about 100.000 hours." This long life translates into lower main

tenance, a benefit to colleges who often recoup their initial costs through time from use of these lighting systems. Often, the only drawback to these systems is the initial cost, so it has been important for colleges and cities using induction lighting to show the

rate of return. "Sacramento Municipal District docs a lot of case studies, and they were trying to show the payback in the long life." commented Steve Beede, market development manager at l.utron. "They were showing the energy efficiency and the long life. It does have a high price lo it right now, and they are trying to show the benefits in the payback in the life of the bulb."

JoeMe Kolflagen, marketing director for Full Spectrum Solutions, added to that point. "Its maintenance free: you're not going to have to mess with it once it is up. There aren't the maintenance charges of someone going out and having to change your bulbs." she explained.

Induction lighting technology has other benefits. Induction lighting can be turned on and off without waiting, like a typical haiide fixture. Philip's QL induction lighting system "is instant on/instant restrike, which is helpful during power outages," stated 1 lur. Most induction lighting systems also have very good optics. "If replicales natural daylight, so it isn't glowy orange," said Kolhagen. The phosphors are similar to a traditional fluoresceul system's, providing great white light of CR! 80 with a choice of color temperalures. Beede also mentioned that an induction light puts out more lumens than an individual fluorescent light, al though "a typical fluorescent fixture will have six lights compared to the one incandescent light in its fixture/" Where It Works

According to Beede. induction lighting operates well at a range of temperatures, including lower temperatures. He suggested. "These systems work great for outdoor applications, places where you don't want to be doing a lot of maintenance. This in cludes places where you want to have a good deal oflight, like parking garages."

Kolhagen noted that Full Spectrum Solutions works with the University of California, Davis, which has recently been redoing some parking garages. "We have different options for controlling [our induction lighting systems]." she stated. "Some of the fixtures have daylight sensors so that the light is off during the day." The fixtures installed in (he UC Davis parking garages can be dimmed to 50 percent when no one is using the facility. The lighting returns to 100 percent when someone comes in. "The

parking fi.xlures do go down to 50 percent, so you still have the light for safety issues. At 50 percent, the light is still pretty bright,'' she added.


2008 Top Products - Features - EDC Magazine

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The following are the most-requested products of 2008. Previously featured in a 2008 issue of ED+C, these products received the most reader inquiries. The following are the most-requested products of 2008. Previously featured in a 2008 issue of ED+C, these products received the most reader inquiries. 1 Skin-Integrated Solar System San Francisco — Suntech’s MSK Design Line of building integrated photovoltaic products can be used to create visually stunning building designs and deliver cost-effective, sustainable solar energy to the tenants, the company reports. Suntech’s MSK Design modules are not add-ons, but are a part of the building’s skin, offering shading, weatherproofing, thermal and acoustic protection. A remote display unit enables building users to see, in real time, how much energy is being produced and how much carbon is being saved. www.suntech-power.com. Suntech Power

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Reader Service No. 206

2 Certified Insulation Rogers, Ark. — BioBased 1701s Insulation is the first spray polyurethane foam insulation to meet GREENGUARD Certification guidelines for indoor air quality, according to the company. BioBased Insulation’s soy-based, water-blown, closed cell insulation product earned both the GREENGUARD Certification and the GREENGUARD Certification for Children & Schools. www.biobased.net. BioBased

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Reader Service No. 207

3 Bamboo Ceiling Tiles Minneapolis — BIOLINE Wood Ceiling Tiles, from pinta acoustic, inc., are available in natural and caramel finishes, perforated or unperforated. The Solid-Finish tiles are made from a real wood veneer with a recycled (70 percent, by weight), renewable content, according to the company. The tiles’ standard finish is UV-cured with a waterborne finish and UV blockers for color stability. The tiles feature no added urea-formaldehyde in the core and are Class 1 fire-rated. BIOLINE tiles feature a self-centering revealed edge, and fit conventional grid systems. www.pinta-acoustic.com/bamboo. Pinta Acoustic, Inc.

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Reader Service No. 208

4 Efficient “Indoor Sunshine” Jackson, Mich. — Patented EverLast lighting technology from Full Spectrum Solutions is essentially a fluorescent lamp without electrodes. With the absence of electrodes, the lamp relies on the fundamental principles of gas discharge and electromagnetic induction to produce light. With a lifespan of as many as 100,000 hours, this system can last longer than 100 incandescent, five HID, or five typical fluorescent lamp changes. EverLast induction fixtures provide light with a more natural, high color rendition and a dimmable option, the company reports. www.fullspectrumsolutions.com. Full Spectrum Solutions, Inc.

|

Reader Service No. 209

5 Cement-Bonded Wood Fiber ICF Hamilton, Ont. — The Durisol Wall Form System is the only reinforced insulated concrete form that does not use foam or polystyrene, the company reports, and is made from Durisol — a proprietary cement-bonded wood fiber material. Durisol wood concrete insulated forms are ideal for below- and above-grade building construction for many commercial, residential, industrial and agricultural building designs. www.durisolbuild.com. Durisol Building Systems

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Reader Service No. 210

6 Interior Movable Walls Solon, Ohio — Environmental Wall Systems, LLC’s IrisWall is a full-height movable wall system that features eco-benefits including SCS-certified recycled content, 100 percent reusability, and a full range of environmentally preferable finishes, the company reports. IrisWall, designed for private offices and conference rooms, does not penetrate the building interior and is designed for ease of relocation. The IrisWall system includes a full range of solid panels featuring a carcinogen-free insulation material, custom recycled glass panel options, FSC-certified doors, and modular electrical. www.ewswalls.com. Environmental Walls Systems, LLC

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Reader Service No. 211

7 High-Performance Wall System Moon Township, Pa. — The accel-E Steel Thermal Efficient Panel (S.T.E.P.) wall system combines the strength and performance of cold-formed steel framing with the superior insulation properties of expanded polystyrene (EPS) using the exclusive Plastbau manufacturing process. All steel used in the accel-E S.T.E.P. system is galvanized to industry standards to prevent rust. According to the company, this technology virtually eliminates the transfer of temperature from one side of the framing component to the other side. The result is a thermally efficient, high-performance building technology that is strong, lightweight, energy efficient and economical. Accelerated Building Technologies

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Reader Service No. 212

8 Recycled Glass Tile

http://www.edcmag.com/Articles/Feature_Article/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000... 3/20/2009


Full Spectrum Lighting is a privately held, 30-employee company that reports gross sales of $10 million. The company has historically marketed Paralite, UltraLux and BlueMax table and floor lamps, notable for producing natural light, in the retail sector. However, beginning in 2002, the company entered the commercial market with a high-bay lamp and fixture. The recently patented Everlast features a fluorescent lamp that is absent electrodes. “[The lamp] will play a part in the reshaping of lighting warehouses and other commercial spaces, including parking lots and roadways,” said Justin Baldwin, commercial sales manager. The lamp’s electronic ballast operates at 200,000 kHz, a level that eliminates the bothersome, irregular flickering of fluorescent tubes. Additionally, lamps will operate in temperatures ranging from –22°F to 130°F. “These lamps produce near perfect color rendition that lasts the life of the lamp, and lumen maintenance unaffected by continual on/off cycling,” Baldwin said. “Plus, lamps are dimmable in stages, or on a progressive pattern to 50 percent of maximum output. “We see EverLast making the largest impact anywhere that the lifetime cost of lighting fixtures are considered. The technology will allow for businesses to become more competitive, and municipalities to reduce their spending through decreased energy and maintenance costs,” he said.


WWJ Newsradio 950 - Ann Arbor Tries Out Solar, Wind Street Light

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Posted: Wednesday, 30 April 2008 7:36PM

Ann Arbor Tries Out Solar, Wind Street Light The city of Ann Arbor is beginning to harness the wind and the sun to run its street lights. This particular light is on a pole at the entrance to Buhr Park on Packard Road.

GLITR Newsletter

This light pole has a small wind generator at the top and two solar electric panels on the sides that provide electricity to charge batteries. These batteries operate a streetlight on the pole to illuminate the entrance drive to Buhr Park and Cobblestone Farm.

GLITR Friday, March 13, 2009

GLITR Thursday, March 12, 2009

This renewable-energy powered light is not hooked up to Detroit Edison and runs 100 percent on sun and wind energy. This hybrid wind-solar light represents a partnership between the City of Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan’s Sustainable Design Research Laboratory within the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. The light was donated to the SDRL for testing by Everlast Induction Lighting of Jackson. The city of Ann Arbor was contacted by the SDLR and given an opportunity to provide a location to install this test light. The Buhr Park entrance was chosen because of the need for more lighting at the entrance and because this unique light would be very visible to the public. “The City of Ann Arbor has set aggressive goals to reduce global warming emissions and use renewable energy where possible," said Ann Arbor city energy coordinator David Konkle. "This lighting pilot test represents a UM - city partnership to test technologies to help reach those goals.” Besides being powered by solar and wind energy, the light itself is unique. It is an “induction” light that has no electrodes or electrical connections to the lamp. The power needed to generate light is transferred from the outside of the lamp envelope by means of electromagnetic fields. Therefore, the light has a very long lifetime, and is expected to last over 22 years of nighttime operation. The hybrid wind-solar light features a 400-watt wind generator and two 50-watt solar panels used to charge two 12-volt batteries with 100 amp-hours of storage. The induction light uses 70 watts of electricity at 24 volts. For more, visit www.a2gov.org, www.fullspectrumsolutions.com or www.tcaup.umich.edu. © MMVIII WWJ Radio, All Rights Reserved.

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GLITR Podcasts Great Lakes IT Report 3/20 The latest in tech news throughout the Great Lakes area courtesy of WWJ's Matt Roush.

The Great Lakes IT Report 03/19 WWJ Technology Editor Matt Roush looks at technology trends across the state.

Great Lakes IT Report-3/18 More tech jobs coming up and no more gray hair with Matt Roush, WWJ's Technology Editor.

Great Lakes IT Report-3/17 WWJ's Technology Editor Matt Roush says the solar energy business may face lay-offs and a Wayne State Prof. gets a

http://www.wwj.com/pages/2102890.php?

3/20/2009


PRODUCT NEWS EverLast Facility Lighting Out Performs Competitors with EnergyEfficient Fixtures Full Spectrum Solutions, Inc., an innovator in energyefficient, full spectrum facility lighting, has completed several independent studies comparing the performance of EverLast commercial lighting solutions with other popular brands in facility, warehouse, manufacturing and other work environments. Based on typical customer experiences and data supplied by facilities managers, EverLast has consistently delivered significant energy savings, improved worker productivity and safety records under normal operating conditions. “With the cost of energy these days and the increased concern for worker safety along with an emphasis on reducing operational overhead, EverLast has become the preferred choice for new and replacement commercial lighting,” said Mike Nevins, founder and CEO of Full Spectrum Solutions. “Businesses that have been waiting for competitively priced facility lighting that can dramatically reduce maintenance costs and increase energyefficiency will discover that EverLast is the solution that can do it all.” Among the cost factors studied was the replacement of traditional fluorescent tubes or HID fixtures with energy-efficient EverLast commercial induction fixtures. By providing energy savings of up to 60 percent, expenditures for EverLast products were recouped in less than 2 years and resulted in ongoing, long term savings. When compared to traditional commercial lighting, EverLast also outperformed competitors with respect to lighting quality and worker productivity. EverLast lamps provide an increase in contrast recognition which has been credited with increased job safety rates and improved worker efficiency.  


Ann Arbor tries out wind, solar powered street light  The city of Ann Arbor is beginning to harness the wind and the sun to run its street lights. This particular  light is on a pole at the entrance to Buhr Park on Packard Road. This light pole has a small wind  generator at the top and two solar electric panels on the sides that provide electricity to charge  batteries. These batteries operate a streetlight on the pole to illuminate the entrance drive to Buhr Park  and Cobblestone Farm. This hybrid wind‐solar light represents a partnership between the City of Ann  Arbor and the University of Michigan's Sustainable Design Research Laboratory within the Taubman  College of Architecture and Urban Planning. The light was donated to the SDRL for testing by Everlast  Induction Lighting of Jackson. (From Mi Energy Report) 


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ANN ARBOR TOP STORIES • Slaying suspect arraigned • Boy, 3, dies as result of fire • Longtime dream takes flight at last Female aviators compete in cross-country race • 14-Day Archive

Sci-fi street light But new Buhr Park fixture, powered by wind and solar energy, is anything but fiction Monday, May 26, 2008

BY AMANDA HAMON The Ann Arbor News

ANN ARBOR BLOGS Ann Arbor News 24/7 • Delivery driver struck with pistol in Ypsilanti Township 1:01 p.m. ET

• Fatal crash closes Carpenter Road in Pittsfield Township until later this afternoon 11:56

The gizmo atop the utility pole near the Packard Road entrance to Buhr Park looks more like something from science fiction than a commonplace utility device. It's a hybrid solar-wind-powered streetlight, which the city installed last month. It's topped by a wind turbine and two solar panels, and contains a battery to store that energy, said city Energy Coordinator David Konkle. Advertisement

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Reddit Digg del.icio.us Google Yahoo The streetlight was installed after Mojtaba Navvab, University of Michigan associate professor of architecture, contacted Konkle in March to discuss installing the light which a Jackson company had made using plans from Navvab's Sustainable Design Research Lab. Navvab said he immediately thought the city might want the light after his lab determined it functions properly. "In architecture these days, sustainability is a very hot topic,'' Navvab said. "We're trying to demonstrate to the public at large that there is a very strong possibility of utilizing not only wind but also solar (power).'' The Buhr Park location was chosen because of its public visibility and its need for more illumination, Konkle said.

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"We've got these really strong renewable energy goals here at the city, so ... (the streetlight) was certainly of interest to us,'' Konkle said. The 70-watt, 24-volt light can store 100 amp hours at 24 volts in its two batteries. It only turns on at night and is as bright as a normal streetlight, but more energy-efficient, Konkle said. The light uses induction technology, which means the power needed to generate it is transferred from the outside of the lamp via electromagnetic fields. Its life expectancy is about 22 years, Konkle said.

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