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TABLE OF CONTENTS

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MAgAziNE

Volume 6 • issue 5 • May 2016

WRitERS: terry Canter • Bob Cheesman Corrina Drost  •  Rem Fields Kelly geist  •  Jessica Key Rachael Lamb  •  Dawn Lemay Shobha N. Lizaso  •  Marissa Puckett Liz Stokes  •  Keith Wilkins PhotogRAPhERS: Jordan Kruger • Neal Nachman

Music News.............................3 May Scrapbook....................13 Album Reviews....................19 Club Calendar........................22 Event Calendar......................23 PuBLiShER/EDitoR: Neal Nachman

DiRECtoR oF SALES & PRoMotioNS: Liz Stokes gRAPhiC ARtiSt: Neal Nachman

DiRECtoR oF MuLti-MEDiA PRoDuCtioNS: Kenny Moore ACCouNt EXECutiVES: Liz Stokes LEgAL CouNSEL: Shobha N. Lizaso

EDitoRiAL iNquiRiES: editorial@fullaccessmagazine.com

PuBLiShED By: Full Access Magazine • 4211 E. Busch Blvd., Suite D • tampa, FL 33617 813.400.3110 (office) • 813.200.3916 (Fax) © 2016 ALL RightS RESERVED • No part of Full Access Magazine may be reproduced in any form by any means without prior written consent from Full Access Magazine.

ViSit uS oN thE WEB @ www.fullaccessmagazine.com


Whitney Houston Estate Signs Off on New Documentary Oscar-winning director Kevin Macdonald will helm a documentary about Whitney Houston that has been authorized by the singer's estate since her death in 2012. Per a statement, the as-yet-untitled film will offer the "unvarnished and authentic" story of Houston's life, from her early days singing in her church's gospel choir to her astounding success as a global pop star, which included a string of seven straight Billboard Hot 100 Number Ones. The film will include interviews with Houston's friends, family and collaborators, including famed record executive Clive Davis, who helped launch the singer's career. It will also feature never-before-seen footage of Houston, as well as demo recordings and rare performances from her archives. "The story that is never told about Whitney is just how brilliant she was as an artist; by many measures, she had the greatest voice of the last 50 years," Macdonald said. "She changed the way pop music was sung — bringing it back full circle to its blues and gospel roots. She was also completely unique in being a black pop star who sold in countries where black artists don't traditionally sell." But Macdonald added the film would not "shy away from the darker parts of Whitney's life," including her tumultuous marriage to Bobby Brown and struggles with drug abuse and addiction. Houston died in 2012 with an autopsy report naming accidental drowning as the cause of death, though cocaine use and a heart condition were listed as contributing factors. While Macdonald's film has the blessing of Houston's estate, it's not the only documentary in the works about the singer. Filmmaker Nick Broomfield — known for his controversial documentaries like Kurt and Courtney and Biggie and Tupac — is also helming a film about Houston for BBC Two that "goes in search of the forces that 3

made and then destroyed the singer." A spokesperson for Houston's family told Rolling Stone the estate had "no involvement in this program whatsoever." Macdonald's Houston documentary will be pitched to buyers at the Cannes Film Festival next month by Altitude Films. The production company also handled the heralded 2015 Amy Winehouse documentary, Amy. Zappa Family Trust Threatens Dweezil Zappa Over Band Name This summer, Dweezil Zappa and his backing band will once again perform the music of his father Frank Zappa on a nationwide tour, but unlike the past decade, the guitarist will be playing under a different moniker. Instead of Zappa Plays Zappa, the touring unit will now be dubbed Dweezil Zappa Plays Frank Zappa, stemming in part from a bitter feud between Frank Zappa's children over their father's copyright, the New York Times reports. In the wake of matriarch and longtime estate executrix Gail Zappa's death in October, son Ahmet Zappa was tasked with handling the day-to-day operations of his father's estate with help from youngest daughter Diva Zappa. While Dweezil and Moon Unit Zappa are not trustees, they both remain beneficiaries of their father's estate with their other two siblings. Earlier in April, Dweezil Zappa received legal notice from the Zappa Family Trust that continued use of the name Zappa Plays Zappa could result in copyright infringement damages of $150,000 per song performed. Gail Zappa had previously allowed Dweezil to use the Zappa Plays Zappa in exchange for an "exorbitant fee." "My last name is Zappa; my father was Frank Zappa," Dweezil said. "But I am not allowed to use the name on its own. I'm not allowed to use a picture of him. I'm not allowed to use my own connection with him without some sort of deal to be struck."

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Dweezil added, "I just hope people will understand that the only thing I'm changing is the name." The Zappa Family Trust issues have created a rift between brothers: Dweezil and Ahmet released a pair of albums together in the Nineties; now, they only communicate through lawyers. The siblings have also split over the upcoming authorized Frank Zappa documentary. Speaking to the New York Times, Ahmet Zappa said the trust's stance against Zappa Plays Zappa isn't personal and that they're only preserving the integrity of their father's legacy. "I am not standing in the way of Dweezil playing the music," he said. "He would just have to be in accordance with the family trust."

LoCash Plot Full-Length Album 'The Fighters' One point that regularly appears in news stories about LoCash is the long and exhausting road that they weathered before finally achieving their first hit single with "I Love This Life." Between family tragedies and label closures, Preston Brust and Chris Lucas had multiple opportunities to quit but persisted. Fittingly, the title of their forthcoming full-length album for Reviver Records is called The Fighters. Due out June 17th, The Fighters brings the six tracks from their 2015 I Love This Life EP together with a handful of new tracks like "Ring on Every Finger" and the album-closing title cut. LoCash's current single "I Know Somebody" just made its way inside the top 40 on Billboard's Country Airplay chart after a 12-week climb. "This album means a lot to us because it's an authentic reflection of who we are as artists, writers and musicians," Brust tells Rolling Stone Country. "The album title says it all: this one's for the fighters."

Fate of Prince's Estate Begins in Court The onset of what could be a years-long legal battle over Prince's estate began Monday as lawyers for Prince's six siblings and half-siblings, along with representation

of others who believe they deserve a stake in the late singer's estate, congregated at a brief court hearing outside Minneapolis. Prince left no will to his estate at the time of his April 21st death, which might create an environment of legal grappling that in turn could prevent the release of any posthumous material from the singer's stacked musical vaults. However, on Monday, the siblings were "all on the same page," a lawyer for Prince's half-brother Alfred Jackson told the court, the Star Tribune reports. In the immediate aftermath of Prince's death, Tyka Nelson, Prince's sister and the sibling most closely tied to his business affairs, and Carver County District Court judge Kevin Eide named Bremer Trust as temporary special administrator of Prince's estate to safeguard his holdings, including his musical vaults. According to ABC News, the vaults had to be drilled open, as only Prince knew the safe's combination at the time of his death. Monday's hearing confirmed Bremer Trust's role as special administrator, with all but one sibling (John Nelson) approving their involvement. While Judge Eide also confirmed that no will had been found, he stressed that doesn't necessarily mean that no will exists, and that Bremer Trust would continue searching for one. In lieu of finding a will, under Minnesota law, his six siblings (including half-siblings) will divvy up his estate as Prince had no direct descendants. However, Eide added that creditors, including the IRS and tax agencies, as well as other outside parties, could still stake their claim to Prince's estate at a later date, barring the discovery of his will. In the decades before his death, Prince reacquired ownership of his master recordings and owned royalties on his immense catalog, which Reuters estimates could be worth $500 million alone. The actual valuation of Prince's estate is closer to $100 million.

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There’s no doubt that former Motley Crue bassist, and founding Sixx:AM member, Nikki Sixx, is an unstoppable force in the music business. With Motley Crue, Sixx was public enemy #1. An undeniable force. In Sixx:AM, along with guitarist DJ Ashba and lead vocalist James Michael, they’re out to change the world, and they’re asking for your help. The band posted an open letter to YouTube and Google and their founders, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, imploring the conglomerate to compensate musicians fairly, Less than 24 hours later, Nikki Sixx spoke to Full Access Magazine regarding this important matter, as well as their #reasontorise campaign, the new album “Prayers For The Damned,” and its coinciding tour. The call to YouTube and parent company Google for realistic compensation for musicians has been brewing under the surface for quite a while now. With the prevalence of music streaming and the decline of album sales, what’s a new band to do, and why have Sixx:Am decided to take this on now when they have so many other things on their plate? Putting it simply: they’ve got your attention now. So really what better time is there?

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by Kelly Geist

Sixx elaborates, “We’re putting tickets on sale for the Five Finger Death Punch, Shinedown, Sixx:AM, As Lions tour in a couple of days and our tour starts in a couple of days, and the way the three of us looks at things is not only do we put massive amounts of work into our songwriting, and our lyrics, our production, our art, and everything, but we also look at opportunities when to do something. Say something. This is the best time when we have people’s attention.” Certainly makes sense. If you, as a fan, think this cause doesn’t affect you, think again. How can the world be blessed with another Sixx, Prince, Bowie, or Jackson, if new talent can’t afford to create? No one is asking for anything above and beyond, merely to be compensated for the art they put out. Seems fair, especially for a company that sells itself as doing the right thing. Not only would fair compensation help the future of music, but it will also cascade to the rest of the rock world, the businesses that are dependent upon musicians for their livelihood. Sixx is hopeful: “The idea is to start a conversation that hopefully doesn’t end up in a court. People can go, ‘Lets do the right thing.’” “Isn’t it ironic, or is it just me, that Google’s branding statement, or their motto, was ‘Don’t Be Evil’ and then they changed it to

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“Do the Right Thing.’ I mean we’re just saying to do that. If it trickles down to all these other people that should be paid for their art, we would be really happy about that,” explained Sixx. Sixx:AM taking a public stand is hardly anything new, though. This recent call out to YouTube/Google isn’t the first social cause the band has recently taken on. Sixx:AM has launched the social media #reasontorise campaign, urging fans to stand up for whatever cause may be close to their hearts and meaningful in their lives. Nikki explains how the idea developed. “Reason to Rise was something that the three of us came up with when we were actually finishing the song Rise. Each of us have things that we believe in, and that’s the thing about being in a band. You have not a singular vision all the time. You have a singular sound and an idea of what you want your band to be, but we are individual people, so we are able to look at our song and how it’s connecting to people, and then how each of us individually found different things we are passionate about. To inspire people to look at the world in a different way.” Big ideas and serious goals from a relatively “new” band with a solid past between them. Outside of taking on billion dollar corporations and seeking to change the world, you might forget that what these guys are at the heart of it all is an amazing band, with a brand new album and tour about to start, and this is great news. “Prayers For The Damned” is the first of a double album, the fourth in the band’s career. The first single off the album, Rise, is the No. 1 most-added song on rock radio, and the remainder of the album is also exceptional. These songs are deeper and heavier than anywhere the band has been before, yet by heavy, it doesn’t mean that they are not palatable. The tracks communicate profound personal messages and a serious guitar crunch. The album will most certainly fuel long time fans while easily drawing interest from those outside the genre.

According to Sixx, the decision to go with a heavier sound was not an accident. “D.J., our guitar player, is extremely versatile. And so is James. And so are we lyrically. So musically we can do just about anything we want to do. When we were making this album, the idea came from touring “Modern Vintage.” We just wished we had more of the meat and potatoes in our set list, so we started writing an album for touring. Not paying attention to the lyrics and the melody and all that stuff. But in general, it’s like ‘What’s it gonna feel like to play live?’ These are guitar driven songs with strong messages.” So in conjunction with a heavier guitar sound, it would only suffice that Nikki’s bass playing would need to change as well. So just how do the twists and turns of Sixx:AM’s music differ from what Nikki has done in the past? “It’s a different style of bass playing. I’m not saying my style of playing bass for Motley Crue doesn’t come in. There are times when that’s what the song needs too. Just that kind of very aggressive, punk rock style of bass playing, but in general the song structures are different, and it pushes me to come up with different parts, as well as DJ and James push me to come up with different parts.” With so much creativity actively flowing within the band, it’s no wonder they didn’t stop with just the 11 songs on the first album but instead turned it into a full length, double album release. In an era of one-off singles and short attention spans, why did Sixx:AM out do themselves and go ahead with a double album release? “We believe in music, and we believe in supporting our fans. The idea of basing your success on album sales alone is a little bit dated. It’s 2016, and we have to look at the reality that you don’t sell as many physical copies of stuff. We are trying to become more of a digital band, streaming. But, for us, the idea that we would put out one song or two songs, it’s not really who we are.”

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Lucky us. Anything less than a full-length album from Sixx:AM would be a tease; to be beatified with two albums is a reason to rejoice. As “Prayers For The Damned” hits the shelves with it’s counterpart soon to follow (hopefully early fall), what can we expect as far as a Sixx:AM tour is concerned? “The tour starts playing festivals on the 30th of April. We’re doing a handful of headline shows in America, we jump over to Europe, we’re doing a few shows there and festivals. Starting in October we’re going out. It’s gonna be Five Finger Death Punch, Shinedown, Sixx:AM, and As Lions.” Set times at the festivals will vary, “Some will say 40 minutes, some will say 65 minutes. We like the longer ones, but we’ll take what we can take.” And the tour schedule is beyond hectic. Take for instance the band’s upcoming date at River Rock Fest in San Antonio, TX, “San Antonio is fun because we’re playing, I think afternoon, and then we fly straight to Dallas and we’re doing another show in Dallas, then we’re leaving straight from there and going to Paris. It’s gonna be a crazy day.” And you know what’s even crazier? You just never know if the band might roll up at your favorite watering hole for an

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impromptu set while bussing it across the country. “One of the things that’s on our docket, of things we want to do, is what we call ‘hit and runs.’ When we’re on the bus and have our guitars out, traveling across the country like the Partridge Family From Hell. We’d like to just pull up somewhere and get out and play some of our songs, some of other people’s songs, just for us to stay creative. You never know. We may just end up on your front doorstep.” Well if nothing else up to this point clued you to what this band is about, hopefully that sentiment did. Sixx:AM is a band driven by the pure love of creating music and giving that back to the world. In its most basic form it embraces the fans that know them already and welcomes every new set of ears their music will touch. They are a trio rooted in social awareness, integrity, and rock n’ roll. If you’ve yet to become acquainted with this band, if all you know of Nikki Sixx is his past, then brace yourself for the future, because it’s here, and Sixx:AM is leading the way. And don’t forget to ask yourself…what’s your reason to rise?

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by Scottie Brown

Chris Batten of Enter Shikari was nice enough to give us his time. We discuss their current US tour, the re-release of their latest album, their rise to fame, influences in so much more in this interview. FA: Let’s start this interview off by asking, how you doing, I know that you guys are promoting a spring tour that’s happening soon. Are you getting excited for it? CB: Yeah, we’re ready. We fly out Thursday morning. It’s our last day at home. The batteries are recharged and we are ready to do this. FA: Correct me if I’m wrong, but you guys usually tour the US about this time almost every year, is that right? CB: (Laughs) I don’t think that that’s anything that we’ve planned to go to America that time ever year. I think it’s just something that happens. FA: I know that you guys are doing a lot more festivals and having more of a festival run here in the states, have you guys done a lot more festivals in the US other than warped? CB: I mean we’ve done a lot of festivals overseas in the UK and all around Europe. I think it’s more common for these types of summer festivals. We get a lot of festivals that will last three or four days. People camp out and that kind of thing. So, we are

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quite used to it and it’s something that we love doing. FA: Do you enjoy the more energetic atmosphere of a festival or do you enjoy more of the intimate and sweaty venues? CB: It’s tough, I think each have their positives. Obviously, when you’re playing in a sweaty club venue and everyone is there to see you, knows who you are. There is something special about that, but as well there is something about playing outside looking at the sky and being at a festival that you just can’t beat. If you’re one that loves to listen to music, at a festival music is playing all around you, so it’s a wonderful place. FA: You re-released The Mindsweep: Hospitalized. What was the reasoning about re-releasing that album? CB: Hospital Records is a drum and bass label that we have been massive fans of for ages. We first got in contact with them when some of their artists remixed some of the songs off of our second album. We’ve just kind of always kept in touch. It came about that we’d give the album to Hospital records and we’d have a different one of their artist remix a different song on the album. We’d thought we’d re-release is as a separate piece of work and a completely different album. That really excited us, not just because we love all the artists, but we

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thought it was a pretty original idea. It’s pretty exciting for us as a band to work so hard on The Mindsweep to have other musicians and artist come take a stab at moving it in a different direction. FA: You guys have always done a great job at evolving but keeping your sound. You guys put so much music into your work and you can tell that you guys have taken your time on it. Do you guys just take all your musical influences and just put them together and see what comes out? There is so much music in your songs and you can tell that you work really hard on it. CB: Thank you! Yes, we try not to hesitate when it comes to making music. I think that is the main thing that we have learned. You know, you write your fist album and that’s a combination of songs that you have written over three or four years. When you write your second album in a rehearsal room, you have to be like, “okay, we have to make some new songs from scratch.” It’s an interesting experience. I think something we learned on the second and third is to push ourselves outside of our comfort zone and to write music that is fresh and not be afraid to take influence from anywhere. Don’t be afraid to try different instrumentation or to not cater to what people expect you to do. I think by realizing that and not being afraid to go outside our comfort zones has allowed us to write music that is more interesting and excited. I think that’s the main base of our focus when writing music is to just keep it fresh to ourselves and hope people like what we’re doing. FA: Let’s talk about your personally for a second. You play a big part in the music and you put a lot of your influence into the song. When you were growing up and jamming to music, what did you like? CB: Me, Rou, and Rob have known each other since we were five years old going to the same primary school (what we call it over here). So, at a very young age we were kind of like singing and messing around together. We started learning guitar together and things like that at about 10 or 11. We were brought up on The Beatles, we are massive Beatles fans. In that time period

there was also the Brit-Pop scene which included stuff like Oasis, Blur, and had amazing guitar and it was decent pop music being made. It was very inspiring. It started out as a hobby where we were just playing covers. So, once we played covers and did a couple of gigs as a cover band, we would start throwing a few originals in there and it kind of just grew from there really. Influences from an early age were The Beatles, Queen, and then later on Oasis, Blur and stuff like that came along. I think once we got older, that’s when the heavier stuff started with things like Rage Against the Machine. We were lucky that we were 15 or 16 that we had a great local scene. That really did shape the way we wrote music and the way we went about getting gigs and stuff like that. We had all kinds of music in our local scene with stuff like pop, funk, heavy metal, we just had so much right at our doorstep. FA: Weren’t you guys one of the only unsigned bands to sell out a venue in London? CB: Yeah that’s true! That was just after that festival we played that I was telling you about. We were doing a tour before the album came out. We put it on our website and we didn’t really expect people to show. This was the first show where we put tickets out in advance and we tried to step it up a bit. We were just blown away by the response. It was a small venue of about 800 people and we sold out with still a few weeks to go. We sat down and talked to each other and we thought “well, we could upgrade it to the bigger one, it would be half empty, but at least all the people that want to come can make it out.” We upgraded the venue and sold about 2,000 tickets. That was the London Astoria. FA: If there is anything I left out? CB: No, I think you covered the entire basis. We are just looking forward to getting out there at Stateside again. We are very excited to get out there. Thanks so much Chris for sitting down with us. We know that Enter Shikari will put on a great US tour. Be sure to catch them out on tour this spring.

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by Jason Guerrasio

The good ol' boy attitude. The laugh. The mustache. For a solid decade, Burt Reynolds was one of the biggest stars in the world. From "Smokey and the Bandit" to "Cannonball Run," Reynolds epitomized the tough guy before the late '80s brought in the hulking action stars like Schwarzenegger and Stallone. In the new documentary "The Bandit," director Jesse Moss ("The Overnighters") looks back at the height of Reynolds' career through the making of "Smokey and the Bandit," the surprise hit of the late 1970s directed by legendary stuntman and Reynolds' best friend Hal Needham, which follows a bootlegger (Reynolds) as he illegally travels a truckload of Coors beer across county lines while a sheriff (Jackie Gleason) is in hot pursuit. Reynolds talked to Full Access Magazine about the documentary (airing on CMT later this year), the bra-throwing welcome he got when screening it at the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival, how he reacted when he met "Saturday Night Live" Reynolds imitator Norm Macdonald, and the one stunt he wishes he didn't do. Full Access: Did it take some convincing for you to be in "The Bandit"? Burt Reynolds: No. I was really flattered that they wanted to do it and that picture "Smokey" was some kind of strange little

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miracle in a way, for the fact that it made so much damn money and it was so much fun to do. As soon as we got Jackie Gleason and Sally Field, I knew we were off. FA: What was your relationship with Hal up to his death? Were you guys close until the end? Reynolds: Oh yes. Very close. He was my roommate when we did our first picture together and I was always taken by how prepared he was when he was doing second unit. I knew he would do a good job directing. FA: So have you ever had to buy a Coors ever in your life after that movie? Reynolds: [Laughs] No, I haven't. I have all I want. FA: You talk a little in the movie about the 1972 nude Cosmopolitan spread. How much do you feel it hurt your career? Reynolds: I wish I hadn't done it because I wasn't taken as a serious actor. I think "Deliverance" suffered because of it and a lot of other things and I wasn't pleased that I did it, but at the time I wanted everyone to understand the humor of it. But who knows what lurks in the minds of filmmakers. FA: I'm sure you've been trying to figure that out for decades now.

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Reynolds: I have. I have. I haven't figured it out, either. FA: What was going to SXSW like? I mean, a woman at one screening threw her bra up to you onstage. Where you taken aback by the reception you got? Reynolds: I was taken aback by it. And with the bra incident, I didn't know who to give it to, and it didn't fit me. I looked at it and if it was a double D, I might have tried to find out who she was. FA: But having lingerie thrown at you is something that's not new for you, let's be real. Reynolds: Well, it happened a couple of times in the old days. But now, I mean, I just had an 80th birthday. FA: Are you aware how popular you are in the current era? Norm Macdonald playing you on "Saturday Night Live," for instance, is still legendary. Your persona is widely known, regardless of the generation. Do you realize that? Reynolds: Yeah, I do. And I'm very flattered by that. Now with Norm, when he met me, he got scared that I was going to punch him out, and I told him I thought he was wonderful. I don't want to be thought of as a total idiot, but I do like the idea that somebody is playing you and having fun with

it and I always had fun. I always felt I was playing a part — I mean I still do. I'm having fun with the business. I've been very lucky. FA: You were known to do many of your own stunts. Do you think actors tend to migrate to the stunt guys? You hear about it with Tom Cruise. Reynolds: There's a lot of truth in that. And with Tom, he's very brave with the stuff that he does. And he wants to be thought of as that because for such a long time he was a pretty boy and smaller than he wanted to be, I think. The stunts that he's done, it's obvious it's him, and I'm very impressed with that. I've told him that. FA: Is there a stunt you did that, looking back, you wish you had a stuntman do? Reynolds: [Laughs] Yeah, there's a couple. When it's cold and I'm limping around I think, "Why didn't I let Hal make some money and I just sit down?" But you can't go back. It was a dumb macho thing. FA: Entertain me with one example. Reynolds: I went over the falls in "Deliverance" and I hit a rock and cracked my tailbone. I tell everyone I was a 31-year-old guy in great shape before I went over the falls. And once I got in they couldn't find me. I remembered one of the stunt guys said to me before the stunt, "If you get caught in the hydrofoil and you can't get out, go to the bottom and it will shoot you right out," but he didn't tell me it was like being shot out of a torpedo. I came out of the river about a mile away it seemed like, and I came out with no clothes. I had no shoes, socks — the falls tore them off. It was a pretty hairy stunt. FA: And did you just play it off and go on with the day, or did you tell the guys you were hurt? Reynolds: Oh no, I went on with the day and told them I was fine. If I told them I was hurt, they would have gotten all over me for insisting on doing it. So I just went on with the day. Be sure to check out the airing of “The Bandit” documentary, airing on CMT later this year.

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by Paul Stokes

While most people visiting the Fort Worth branch of office suppliers Staples last December probably just needed envelopes or boxes for last-minute Christmas presents, Leon Bridges’ visit was somewhat more life-changing. That Yuletide, he made use of the stationery giant’s ‘Office On The Go’ facilities to sign and fax back a contract to Columbia Records. When he left the store he was Bob Dylan’s labelmate. “I was thinking about that on the way home,” laughs the quietly-spoken 26-year-old. “It felt like a dream. I didn’t really know what to make of it! We did have some champagne afterwards though, for sure.” Staples isn’t his only incongruous haunt. An artificial putting green, for example, proved the best place to capture the soaring yet characterful vocals that have already seen him favourably compared with some of soul’s biggest voices. “There’s a Fort Worth bar called Shipping And Receiving in the same building where they used to test golf clubs,” he laughs in his light Texan drawl. “So we recorded on a putting green and made some soul music on it.” The swinging choice of location was down to the album being recorded before any label was involved. “We didn’t have any money,” he continues, “so we did it with my

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friends, showing them the songs before the sessions, just going at it and seeing what happened.” One of those pals was White Denim’s Austin Jenkins, who got in touch after Bridges switched his focus from training as a choreographer and instead gained a reputation on the Texan open-mike circuit. “I needed someone to come in and fine tune and polish what I was doing, that’s definitely what Austin and the other Fort Worth guys did,” Bridges explains. “They helped my vision come to life.” The results are debut album Coming Home (released June 22). A collection of intimate songs rich in the imagery of the American south, they boast an enveloping, yet appealingly scuffed, soul sound. This has seen the singer nicknamed ‘The Truth’ in his home state, but as Bridges is keen to point out, while acknowledging his inspirations, the approach is his own. “Before I’d made the decision to pursue this classic sound, I’d written this song about my mother called Lisa Sawyer, a little progression on guitar,” he recalls. “Somebody asked me if Sam Cooke was one of my inspirations and I felt bad because I’d never listened to his music. After that I did some digging.” Musical archaeology over, success for Bridges looks if not nailed, then certainly stapled on.

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Keith Wilkins is a Syndicated Music Columnist, Songwriter, Promoter and Guest Radio Show Interviewer. You can reach him at keith@fullaccessmagazine.com

BAND/ARTIST NEWS: Hudson metal band, Shattered, have announced that they have recently received an endorsement deal from “Fireball” whiskey. Shattered consists of Mike Dougherty (vocals), Tony Pettry (guitar), Robert Hay (lead guitar), Craig Vessichio (bass / vocals), and Stan Hay (drums). Shattered is currently in the studio working on their new album. NEW RELEASES: The long anticipated documentary, “Hair I Go Again,” had it’s homecoming premiere screening last month in Tampa and Palm Harbor. “Hair I Go Again” documents the members of the 1980’s Tampa Bay band, Tryxx, in modern day as they try to reunite the band in order to reclaim their glory days. The documentary features interviews with countless musicians from both the Tampa Bay area, as well as from famous national acts. The soundtrack features music from legendary Tampa Bay bands such as Uncle Sally, Julliet, Roxx Gang, Powersurge, Stranger, Nova Rex, Tryxx, and many more. Both the Tampa and Palm Harbor premieres took place to a packed house made up of a virtual Who’s Who of the local music scene, past and present. Saint Petersburg pop-rock band, Grand Central (formerly known as Mighty Mongo), has released their new music video for their new single, “Genghis Khan.” Grand Central consists of Alex Card (lead vocals / Bass), Lindsay Vitola (lead vocals / Keytar), Andrew Rotunno (lead guitar), Jon Tucker (saxophone), and Lance Cox (drums). Grand Central is currently in the studio working on their new album. St. Petersburg singer/songwriter, Amber Lynn Nicol, released her new music video for her song “Set Me Free” last month. The video was done by VPN Studios, the same 17

company who shot the Video for “Cowboy,” Nicol’s song from her album Seven. Nicol is currently working on her up-coming new album entitled “Limitless.” Nicol has announced late June 2016 as a tentative release date for the new album. Once released, “Limitless” will be Nicol’s sixth studio album to date. Tampa metal band, Burning Fair Verona, released their new EP last month. The band celebrated the release by holding an EP release party on April 16 at the Brass Mug in Tampa. The event featured performances by Psykotribe, Murderfly, Ebullition, Thought of Redemption, A(k)new, and Burning Fair Verona. Formed in 2010, Burning Fair Verona consists of Anthony Marra (lead vocals), Evan Ursitti (guitar), Brett Stroub (guitar), Robb Gates (bass), and Nicholas Colvin (drums). Tampa metal band and Quantum Records recording artists, Nova Rex, premiered their new music video for their song, “She’s a Bitch,” on April 5th. Originally formed in 1985, Nova Rex consists of Adrian Primadonis, Eddie Cruise, Kenny Wilkerson, and Greg Polcari. UP-COMING RELEASES: Tampa Bay rock band, 5 Star Hooker, will release their new album this month. The band will celebrate by holding a CD release party at the Local 662 in St. Petersburg on May 13. The event will feature performances by 3 Killer Buds, New Tattoo, Bad Blood, Murder the Crow and 5 Star Hooker. Tampa Bay southern rock/country artist, Sammy Davis Jr., will release his debut album this month. Davis will celebrate the release of his album, “Moonshine Chronicles,” by holding a CD release party at the Aging Still in Largo on May 13. The event will feature performances by Around The

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Bonfire, Cowboy Calvin, WE-C-G, KC Rhymes, Sammy Davis Jr and more. IN THE STUDIO: Popular 1990’s Tampa Bay rock band, Uncle Sally, has reunited in the studio to work on original material for an up-coming double CD anthology album. According to founding member, Jeff Dyer, all the original Uncle Sally band members are onboard with the project. Formed in 1987, Uncle Sally was a hugely popular and successful band during their tenure. The band released several albums including “Tending to the Flock” (EP), “Live From Morrisound” (1992), and “World of Hurt” (1993 - Wolfgang Records). Uncle Sally’s main line-up consisted of Jeff Dyer (lead vocals/guitar), Dave Dennis (guitar/vocals), Dan Whitman (bass/vocals), and Jeffro Stahl (drums). Other past members include Tony Wise (lead vocals), Marty Kilbel (drums), Ben “Doc” Lovett, and Kenny Martinez. Other Tampa Bay area bands and artists currently in the studio working on new material/albums include Into the Grave (Brandon), Earl Foote (St. Petersburg), 4Ever Endeavour (Tampa), Demented Truth (Tampa), Shattered (Hudson), Maybe If You Hit It (Orlando), Kenny McGee’s Machine (Tampa), Geri X (St. Petersburg), Shattered (Hudson), Monstrosity (Fort Lauderdale), Psykotribe (Tampa), Jane Kaschak (Largo), and Grand Central (St. Petersburg). THIS MONTH IN TAMPA BAY MUSIC SCENE HISTORY: 31 years ago this month on May 20, 1985, Savatage released their third album, Power of the Night (Atlantic Records). 23 years ago this month on May 18, 1993, The Genitorturers released their debut album, 120 Days of Genitorture. 20 years ago this month in May, 1996, former Stranger lead singer, Greg Billings, forms Damn the Torpedoes. 20 years ago this month in May, 1996, Sarasota blues musician, Chris Anderson, is released from his Relativity Records contract after Relativity Records parent company, Sony, dissolves their blues rock division.

20 years ago this month in May, 1996, Tampa black/death metal band, Acheron, signed a record deal with Seattle based Moribund Records. 20 years ago this month in May, 1996, Holiday band, Touch The Sky, signed a deal with national promoter Bill Jerome. 20 years ago this month in May, 1996, Refuge Records began operations in Sarasota. The independent label was started by Denise Williams of Daddy Kool Records and Tony Rifugiato of No Clubs! Productions. 20 years ago this month on Sunday, May 19, 1996, The 3rd Annual “Bay Area Music Awards” were held at Boomerz Nightclub in Seminole. 20 years ago this month on May 21, 1996, Tampa Bay bands Wedgee & Sister Sara perform at the MTV sponsored “Choose or Lose” event held at the Tampa Bay Center. That same month, Wedgee starts getting airplay on 98ROCK, as well as other radio stations around the country. 19 years ago this month on May 3, 1997, Hourglass Garden held their CD Release Party at Gasoline Alley in Clearwater. the event started off with a video montage and CD listening, followed by a debut performance by bay area band, Custom Deluxe. the event continued with performances from Hourglass Garden and Harry Dash. 19 years ago this month on May 10, 1997, WMNF 88.5 fm held their “16th Annual Tropical Heatwave” concert in Ybor City. Among the performers at the event are Joe Popp, Edison Shine, and Patty Sanphy & the Womens Blues Revue. 12 years ago this month on May 11, 2004, Florida Governor Jeb Bush signed into law a bill that made it a felony to assist in a suicide for commercial or entertainment purposes. The new law is in response to Hell On Earth’s attempt to allow a terminally ill fan commit suicide live on stage during one of their shows at the State Theatre in St. Pete. * All dates & information courtesy of the Tampa Bay Music Scene Historical Society (www.tampabaymusichistory.com).

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18


Katy B Honey Virgin EMI gggff by Wren Graves

Picture the hunter: With one hand on an antenna and the other wobbling the dial, the hunter paces around the room, pausing now by the window, now in the bathroom, wherever the signal seems strongest. The hunter is looking for a new kind of music — music that radio doesn’t play. The trail leads in between official stations, into the lawless bandwidths, straight to pirate radio. Any history of the UK music scene since the turn of the millennium (and Kathleen Brien is an important character in that history) has to include pirate radio. Most urban centers hide some of these rogue broadcasters, of course, but the relative weakness of their signals (too strong and the authorities will come knocking) means that they tend to flourish among denser populations. In London in the aughts, before streaming services but after globalization, these pirates became a musical force: grime, dub, and the vague catch-all genre called “UK garage” blossomed and infiltrated first the clubs and then the mainstream. Some stations, like Kiss and Rinse FM, became so popular that they sought official licensing. And practically the moment that Rinse FM went straight, one of their favorite artists, a 21-year-old calling herself Katy B, shot to the top of the UK charts. The success of her excellent first album On A Mission opened commercial avenues for other underground artists like Rudimental and Disclosure, who went even further, crossing the Atlantic to scale the American Billboards. When Katy B released her strong sophomore LP Little Red, she seemed certain to do the same. And then she didn’t. Perhaps it’s because Katy B looks like a 19

normal young woman, while Americans prefer to hear dance music from the mouths of pubescent fantasy. Or perhaps there are elements of London club culture that don’t translate for a country as dispersed and diverse as the States. Or perhaps her catchy dancehall dramas weren’t quite catchy enough for audiences accustomed to the earworms of Max Martin and Ester Dean. Whatever the reason, Katy B seems determined to invade foreign markets, and for her third album, Honey, she’s called in reinforcements. The most likely candidate for world domination is “Who Am I”, the album’s second track, featuring Craig David and produced by heavyweight hitmakers Major Lazer. The euphoria of the beat is pure sugar, and an unmistakable indication that Katy B is inching into a new, more commercial direction. But her appeal was never just her unusual sounds; here, the darkness of the lyrics, the feeling that you’re watching the singer’s self-esteem go into a nosedive, adds weight to what sounds, at first blush, like disposable fluff. The opening title track, produced by KAYTRANADA, is a sip of silky R&B and another lottery ticket for mainstream success. The prospective hits are frontloaded, and not necessarily the best tracks. Honey is the rare album that gains momentum as it goes, peaking late in the second half with “Dark Delirium” and “Water Rising”. The former is the best pure dance track of the LP, a smasher made all the more powerful by its descriptions of an unhealthy relationship with a lover who is definitely manipulative and possibly even abusive. The way that Katy B blends fun songs with serious subjects is reminiscent of all-time dance great Robyn, and on tracks like “Heavy,” she captures some of that legend’s swagger. But the emotional climax of the album is “Water Rising.” In a lesser artist’s hands, this might have been a dreary mid-tempo

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ballad, but here it’s turned into something that is no less gorgeous for being bizarre, and no less majestic for making a breakup sound like the apocalypse. Coming as it does at the end of a long night of love, lust, and self-doubt drowned in drinks, it’s easy to imagine a character with smeared mascara, leaning against the wall of the bar, holding her jacket and a cigarette and waiting for the world to end. After all, this is Katy B’s great talent: miniaturization, shrinking all the drama of the human experience down to the size of an underground club. Katy B is a master of capturing that oceanic feeling when individuality melts away, and every soul rises and falls together on the wave of the beat. Holy Ghost Crime Cutz EP DFA 33tff by David Sacjkkah

Holy Ghost!, the Brooklyn-based electronic duo of Nick Millhiser, and Alex Frankel, has always been a band out of time. The group rose up in the second half of the 2000s with a string of impressive singles and remixes that faithfully recreated disco and funk, working on DFA with artists like LCD Soundsystem and Cut Copy at a time when that subsection of dance was at its prime. With a style closer to the latter — as they eschewed the irony and post-punk inclinations of LCD — the duo emerged as one of the stronger disco revival artists of the period. Unlike Yacht or Chromeo, Holy Ghost! never delved into kitsch, but instead played it straightforward, sticking to a formula and doing it very well. When they were on, they could put together great material. Songs like “Jam For Jerry” or a 2011 cover of Ministry’s “I Wanted To Tell Her” featuring Nancy Whang found them tapping into a sense of jubilance and urgency that elevated the music beyond

many of the contemporaries of that time. After four years of being known for singles, they put out a good eponymous debut in 2011 followed by 2013’s Dynamics, in which their penchant for sticking to a framework started to catch up to them with diminishing returns. After remaining fairly silent for three years (apart from a compilation of remixes, last year’s Work For Hire), they have emerged with a foursong EP that aims to recapture the spark of their early material without the pressure a full-length album brings. Technically, Holy Ghost! has never sounded cleaner or as proficient than on the four tracks here. The amount of effort that went into the four songs is apparent, as they feel meticulously crafted. The duo have never made poor quality recordings, but Crime Cutz feels like their most expansive release to date. Like an engine powering up, the title track steadily builds momentum over its seven minutes to make for a pounding, soulful approach that ratchets tension without ever releasing it. That sense of propulsive energy benefits them on “Compass Point” as well, where focused verses get paired with sweeping choruses. By the time the horns come in, the song moves to a higher level, making for the most danceable moment of the EP. At best, Crime Cutz is a decent release by a talented group that clearly has potential to make some great retro records. At its lowest points, it’s filled with clumsy lyrics and meandering tracks that never really go anywhere. Calling Holy Ghost! derivative isn’t necessarily a bad thing, as they aren’t trying to do anything more than write fun, faithful disco pop songs. It’s just that when playing it this straight, the songs need to stick, and only “Compass Point” really does that here. Coming three years after their last album, Crime Cutz doesn’t feel like a substantial follow-up. When that finally comes, it may be time for the band to vary their approach.

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20


Brass Mug • 813-972-8152

1450 Skippers Road, Tampa, FL 33613 ______________________________________

May 6

Game Over

Buckets tavern & tap • 813-960-2222

4535 Gunn Highway, Tampa, FL 33624 ______________________________________

May 13 Soul Circus Cowboys

Ferg’s Live • 727-822-4562

490 Channelside Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 ______________________________________

May 5 May 6 May 7 May 8 May 12 May 13 May 17 May 19 May 20 May 21 May 26 May 27

John Rhey Band 97X Local Band Search Nick Blizz Boxcar Hollow Railway Kings 97X Local Band Search Forest Hoffar Band Matt Billor Band 97X Local Band Search Slingshot Robot Clemons Road Brandy Clark

o’Briens • 813-661-9688

701 W. Lumsden Road, Brandon, FL 33511 ______________________________________

May 5 May 6 May 11 May 21

Pullman Standard Soul Circus Cowboys Pullman Standard Jerrell Baker

10008 North 30th Street, Tampa, FL 33612 ______________________________________

May 7 Wicked Touch & Adjustments May 20 Shahow Laughter, Shot, Funeral System, The Prople & Canforrat

16 2nd Street North, St. Petersburg, FL 33704 ______________________________________

May 5 May 6 May 7 May 8 May 10 May 11 May 12 May 13 May 14

Jah Movement Fencewalk Green Sunshine Bransons’ Jam Porcupine Green Light District Tony Tyler Band Stormbringer Uncle John’s Band

677 75th Avenue, St. Pete Beach, FL 33706 ______________________________________

May 12 Soul Circus Cowboys May 26 Soul Circus Cowboys

Skipper’s Smokehouse • 813-971-0666

910 Skipper Road, Tampa, FL 33613 ______________________________________

May 4 May 5 May 7

May 11 May 12 May 13 May 14 May 15

May 18 May 19 May 20 May 21 May 22 May 25 May 26 May 27 May 28

Impulse Uncle John’s Band Beebs and Her Money Makers & Resinated Impulse Uncle John’s Band Selwyn Birchwood & Daniel Heitz Igor and The Red Elvises & UNRB The Black Honkeys, Stone City, Greg Billings Band, Shevonne & Soul Circus Cowboys Impulse Uncle John’s Band Doug Deming & Jewel Tones Betty Fox & Ari and the Alibis The Empty Pockets Impulse Uncle John’s Band Tony Tyler Band & Grape Soda Boxcar Hollow and Flat Land

the Amsterdam • 727-623-4950

Pegasus Lounge • 813-971-1679

Ringside Cafe • 727-894-8465

Shark tales • 727-767-0070

1049 Central Avenue, St. Petersburg, FL 33705 ______________________________________

May 6 The Glorious Rebellion May 11 Jordan Esker

the hideaway Cafe • 727-644-7895

1756 Central Ave., St. Petersburg, FL 33704 ______________________________________

May 1 May 3 May 4 May 5 May 6 May 7 May 10

May 13 May 17 May 21 May 24 May 27 May 28

Pierce Pettis WAHH World Fusion Band TC Carr & Bolts of Blue Rachel Potter & Steel Union Iris Calling Glen Phillips Kaleigh Baker & Kristopher James Rebecca Loebe Phil’s Juke Joint Ed Woltil & the Loaded Question Steve Everett & Forrest Hoffar Nate Currin Danielle DeCosmo

Attention Bands & Venues: Want to be listed here, Contact Liz Stokes at (727) 485-4624 Full Access Magazine

22


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MAY

Rob zombie, zz top, Five Finger Death Punch, ghost, Megadeth, Lamb of god, A Day to Remember, Anthrax, Cypress hill, Sevendust, Sick Puppies, Clutch, P.o.D., yelawolf, Parkway Drive, Memphis May Fire, Avatar, texas hippie Coalition, Beartooth & glorious Sons

Metropolitan Park, Jacksonville

Disturbed, Shinedown, 3 Doors Down, Sixx A.M., Pop Evil, Pennywise, Bullet For My Valentine, trivium, Asking Alexandria, Bring Me the horizon & Red Sun Rising

Jetblue Park, Fort Myers

Chris isaak

Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

Kentucky headhunters & Artimus Pyle

Auburndale Spdwy, Winter Haven

Sebastian Bach

House of Blues, Orlando

Prong

The Orpheum, Ybor City

gipsy Kings

Mahaffey Theater, St. Petersburg

Prong

The Haven, Winter Park

Cypress hill

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Boyce Avenue

House of Blues, Orlando

Blue october

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Blue october

House of Blues, Orlando

hunter hayes & LoCash

Central FL Fairgrounds, Orlando

6 7 7 8 8 8 9

11 11 11 11

12

12 12 13 13 13 13 14 14

the tenderloins

Youkey Theatre, Lakeland

Bill Burr

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

C&C Music Factory

Parliament House, Orlando

in Dying Arms

Backbooth, Orlando

Floetry

House of Blues, Orlando

young thug

The Ritz Ybor, Ybor City

in Dying Arms

Epic Problem, Tampa

george Benson

Capitol Theatre, Clearwater

the Sword & Purson

The Social, Orlando

trampled By turtles

House of Blues, Orlando

(hed)pe

West End Trading Co., Sanford

(hed)pe

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

trampled By turtles

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Flatbush zombies

The Beacham, Orlando

Styx & .38 Special

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

Donna the Buffalo

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

PVRiS & Lydia

House of Blues, Orlando

Murder By Death

The Social, Orlando

Apocalyptica & 10 years

The Ritz Ybor, Ybor City

Michael Carbonaro

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater Full Access Magazine

14 14 14 14 15 15 16 17 17 18 18 18 19 19 19 20 20 20 20

otEP

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Mushroomhead & Madame Mayhem

The Haven, Winter Park

Florence & the Machine

Amway Center, Orlando

Deftones & Code orange

House of Blues, Orlando

Born of osiris, After the Burial & upon A Burning Body

The Beacham, Orlando

Fonseca

House of Blues, Orlando

Amy Schumer

CFE Arena, Orlando

the Dear hunter

The Social, Orlando

Strfkr & Com truise

The Beacham, Orlando

the Dear hunter

The Orpheum, Ybor City

the Struts (uK)

The Social, Orlando

Shakey graves & Son Little

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

insane Clown Posse

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Pinking talking Fish

The Plaza Live, Orlando

Strfkr & Com truise

The Orpheum, Ybor City

Def Leppard, tesla & REo Speedwagon

Amway Center, Orlando

the Monkees

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

Chuck Ragan

The Social, Orlando

half Moon Run

State Theatre, St. Petersburg


20 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 21 22 22 23 24 25 25 25 26 27 27 27

Primal Fear

The Haven, Winter Park

Primal Fear

The Orpheum, Ybor City

Daryl hall & John oates

MidFlorida Credit Union Amp, Tampa

the Summer Set The Social, Orlando

C&C Music Factory

Victory Casino, Cape Canaveral

Chuck Ragan & tim Barry The Crowbar, Ybor City

Marlon Wayans

Tampa Theatre, Tampa

Pink talking Fish

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Wednesday 13

Fubar Downtown, St. Petersburg

Alunageorge & Kiiara The Orpheum, Ybor City

Millencolin

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Coasts & Knox hamilton The Social, Orlando

Say Anything & Mewithoutyou The Beacham, Orlando

Say Anything & Mewithoutyou The Ritz Ybor, Ybor City

Dying Fetus, Acacia Strain & Jungle Riot The Orpheum, Ybor City

the griswolds

The Social, Orlando

Buckethead

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

R. Kelly

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Buckethead

The Plaza Live, Orlando

CJ Ramone

Backbooth, Orlando

28 28 28 28 28 29 29 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3

Joe Walsh & Bad Company

MidFlorida Credit Union Amp, Tampa

young the giant, Jr. Jr., Bear hands, Strumbellas, Joywave & the Wombats

Vinoy Waterfront Park, St. Pete.

Sunset Music Festival

Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

Colt Ford

Joyland, Bradenton

Blues traveler

Curtis Hixon Park, Tampa

American head Charge The Orpheum, Ybor City

Sunset Music Festival

Raymond James Stadium, Tampa

Eve 6

JUNE

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Pro-Pain

The Haven, Winter Park

Ellie goulding

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Pro-Pain

The Orpheum, Ybor City

Alejandro Escovedo The Social, Orlando

Eve 6

The Crowbar, Ybor City

Spyro gyra

The Devyn, Sarasota

Darius Rucker, Dan + Shay & Michael Ray

MidFlorida Credit Union Amp, Tampa

Weird Al yankovic

Mahaffey Theater, St. Petersburg

Alejandro Escovedo

Skipper’s Smokehouse, Tampa

Emblem3 & Before you Exit House of Blues, Orlando

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3 4 4 4 4 6 8 9 9 9 9

10 10 11 11 11 11 11

13

Andy Black & Colours

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

Ellie goulding

CFE Arena, Orlando

Bas, Cozz & Earthgang

Backbooth, Orlando

Andy Black

The Social, Orlando

Confederate Railroad

The Barn, Sanford

Jason Bonham’s Led zeppelin Experience

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Cyndi Lauper

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

Cyndi Lauper

Dr. Phillips Perf. Arts Ctr, Orlando

Frank turner

Jannus Live, St. Petersburg

Weird Al yankovic

Youkey Theatre, Lakeland

Refused & the Coathangers

The Beacham, Orlando

Selena gomez & DNCE

Amway Center, Orlando

Journey, Doobie Brothers & Dave Mason

MidFlorida Credit Union Amp, Tampa

the turtles, Chuck Negron, gary Puckett & Mark Lindsay

Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater

Frank turner

The Beacham, Orlando

Damon Fowler

Skipper’s Smokehouse, Tampa

thrice

House of Blues, Orlando

the So So glos

The Orpheum, Ybor City

St. Lucia

State Theatre, St. Petersburg

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Full Access Magazine - May 2016  
Full Access Magazine - May 2016  

Florida's Largest Music/Entertainment Magazine featuring interviews with Sixx: A.M., Enter Shikari, Burt Reynolds and Leon Bridges.

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