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UWyo

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Division of University Public Relations University of Wyoming Department 3226 1000 East University Avenue Laramie, WY 82071-2000

UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING

UWyo THE MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING

Summer 2010

selections from Welcome

UWyo, the magazine that showcases UWyo magazine – V12N1 tothe Summer 2010 people who make the University of

Wyoming great. Our blend of features, news, and photography highlights members of the university community, its alumni, and friends who make the university a leader in research, teaching, service, and outreach. Thank you for supporting UWyo and the University of Wyoming.

LOOK AHEAD tO UWyo Visit the Kendall House Meet one of the nation’s up-and-coming poets and much more

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tHE NEED FOR SPEED SUPERCOMPUTING COMES TO WYOMING


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UWyo summer 2010 volume 12 number 1

UWyo summer 2010 volume 12 number 1

2011 Honorary Degrees

CONTRIBUTORS

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VIEWPOINT

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NEWS IN BRIEF

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NEWS UPDATE

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

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PORTRAIT

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SNAPSHOTS Kristina Hufford Jaime Cruz Kekoa Chavez Kassi Bauman

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OPENINGS

A Q&A with Dean Brent Hathaway on the new College of Business building

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS An honorary degree from the University of Wyoming recognizes individuals who reflect the university’s high ideals and values and exemplify the concepts excellence, 32 From over there toofover here service, and integrity. A university task force helps UW vets make the transition from soldier to student

by Dave Shelles

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UW veteran Troy Phillips as Pistol Pete in Iraq. photo courtesy of Troy Phillips

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ARTS Award-winning composer is UW’s Eminent Artist-in-Residence by Dave Shelles

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ALUMNI Dan Haley has ink running through his veins by Tom Lacock

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GALLERy Haub collection features Western art by Nicole Crawford

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ATHLETICS Women’s lacrosse club gets up to speed by Dave Shelles

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OUTTAkES

24 The need for speed

For more information about Honorary Degrees at the With the start of construction, UW faculty talk about the impact of the NCAR supercomputer by Dave Shelles

University of Wyoming and the nomination criteria, go to www.uwyo.edu/honorarydegree.

Nominations are due no later than October 29, 2010.

UW unveils floor plans for Visual Arts Center

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NEWS IN BRIEF

NEWS

line-quality methane) research, synthesis gas conversion, catalyst development, and materials research. Carbon capture and storage compresses carbon dioxide into a fluid-like state and injects it underground to further recover oil or for deep storage into saline aquifers or other geology. Coal gasification can convert coal to natural gas, transportation fuels and chemicals. This gift will be doubled by matching funds from the Wyoming State Legislature.

IN BRIEF

Beef: It’s what’s at the archive

Slater appointed to two national boards University of Wyoming professor Tim Slater has been recognized for his efforts to improve science education during his two years in Laramie, both on campus and nationally. UW’s Excellence in Higher Education Endowed Chair of Science Education has been appointed to the National Research Council’s Committee on Status, Contributions and Future Directions of Discipline Based Education Research (DBER). He also was appointed to the board of the National Science Teachers Association

(NSTA) for a three-year term. Slater is among five educators nationwide selected to the NSTA, the largest professional organization in the world promoting excellence and innovation in science teaching and learning. They join a 13-member board that oversees the science teachers association’s policies and procedures, finances and strategic planning. Board members are elected by the association’s membership, which currently includes more than 60,000 science educators and professionals. The committee will answer questions that are essential to advancing discipline-based education and research and broadening its impact on science teaching and learning at the undergraduate level in physics, biological sciences, geosciences and chemistry. The study will synthesize empirical research on undergraduate teaching and learning in the sciences; examine the extent to which this research influences undergraduate science instruction; and describe the intellectual and material resources that are required to further develop DBER. He is the director of the Cognition in Astronomy, Physics and Earth sciences Research (CAPER) group, where his research focuses on student

Charles Belden Collection, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming Charles Belden Collection, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

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Association (NCBA). That advertising plan led to commercials declaring “Beef: It’s what’s for dinner.” “We received this huge donation of records from the NCBA, because we have been the archives for decades,” Greene says. “[We already have] 370 boxes of records documenting the association from 1896 through 1990.” Granted, the acquisition is the most recent for the archive, which was recently honored by the Society of American Archivists with the 2010 Distinguished Service Award. But the story Greene excitedly tells a visitor to the AHC is the story of how beef has been marketed to

Americans for generations. “The Meat Board records hold a massive treasure trove of information about the changing ways in which producers used the growing power of advertising to shape the purchasing and eating habits of Americans, and to help keep the price of meat high in order to maintain a healthy ranching industry in the U.S.,” he says. The records document the impact of wars, droughts, and depressions on those marketing efforts, Greene says. Documented in these records, for example, is the changing perception of women as housewives and consumers, as well

as the recent shift to market to the men who control the outdoor grill. “Considering the crucial importance of ranching to Wyoming, this collection certainly boosts our internationally recognized documentation of our state and region,” he says. “But of course it includes coverage of cattle producing and marketing across the nation—and we are called the ‘American’ Heritage Center in part because our collections, in some topics, extend country-wide.” For more information on the AHC, log on to ahc.uwyo. edu . Summer 2010 • 7

I C O N I C Mass Culture

© 2010 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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n the campus of the University of Wyoming is Barbara Stanwyck’s Oscar, an honorary statuette awarded to the legendary actress “for superlative creativity and unique contribution to the art of screen acting.” But that’s not what American Heritage Center director Mark Greene thinks is the coolest thing in the archive—at least at the moment. Ask him that very question, and he talks up 800 boxes of records—including documents surrounding a familiar advertising plan—from the National Live Stock and Meat Board, courtesy of the National Cattleman’s Beef

Andy Warhol’s Portraits September 11–November 13, 2010

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conceptual understanding in formal and informal learning environments, inquiry-based curriculum development and authentic assessment strategies, with a particular emphasis on non-science majors and pre-service teachers. He also has established a doctoral degree in science education. Slater came to UW in 2008 from the University of Arizona. He has undergraduate degrees from Kansas State University in science education and physical science, a master’s in astrophysics from Clemson University, and a doctoral degree in geophysics from the University of South Carolina.

Research to continue at AMk ranch Hank Harlow’s passion for working in of one of the world’s unique environments hasn’t waned in the 19 years he’s directed the University of Wyoming National Park Service Research Center in Grand Teton National Park, in the northwest corner of Wyoming In fact, he’s now even more enthusiastic and appreciative of the opportunity to work at the center, located on continued on page 12


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Suites usher in new era for War Memorial

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he opening of the Wildcatter Suites at War Memorial Stadium this fall marks the end of construction that also included a host of improvements at UW’s venerable football stadium. Not only will the suites improve the experience at the War, but the revenue produced will do more for the athletics department as a whole. “Those suite holders are generating a significant amount of money that’s helping our program,” UW Athletics Director Tom Burman says. “Everybody says we want to get better. Well, how do you get better? One way is resources. Even in the first year, we’ll net more than $600,000 in additional revenue, which is substantial in Wyoming.” Better still, money to pay for the projects came though a fundraising campaign that concluded before construction started. “We have a small loan as pledges are coming in,” Burman says. “We had to borrow some money from the state to backfill it. Our debt service on that is minimal. Most of our competition around the country, when they build or renovate a stadium, they bond it and then they pay it back with pledges.” Indeed, the initial revenue from the suites will fund several projects to improve other sports facilities, many of which are out of date. Additional improvements to the east side stadium renovation

include concessions, building more restrooms, structural upgrades to the bleachers and concrete, and making the stadium compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. In addition to renovations at the War, in June the department broke ground on an indoor tennis facility scheduled to be completed by February. Burman says future projects might include renovations to the 30-year-old Arena-Auditorium and the floor in the 20-year-old War Memorial Fieldhouse, as well as improvements to Corbett Pool. Here’s a rundown on construction projects that have been recently completed, recently started or are now under way: Ribbon cuttings

–Wildcatter Suites, early September –UW College of Business, mid September –Bim Kendall House, mid September Under way

–Downey Hall, renovations –Robert and Carol Berry Center for Biodiversity and Conservation –Visual Arts Center About to start

–The Energy Resources Center, mid November

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kekoa Chavez

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ekoa Chavez has had a banner year. The recent University of Wyoming graduate won the Mountain West Conference championship in the 400meter hurdles and became the first member of his immediate family to graduate from college. All things considered, Chavez holds up his bachelor’s degree in social sciences as his greatest accomplishment. “Hard work and determination will get you a long way and take you a lot of places,” he says. “I’ve had people tell me that they didn’t think I’d make it through college. Honestly, in the beginning, I didn’t think I’d make it. I came here thinking I’d see how long I could make it before I got tired of it, but the longer you’re here the stronger you want to finish.” Chavez had to finish strong in the classroom after a less-thanstellar start to his college career. The native of Hilo, Hawaii, let his grades slip to a point where UW suspended him. Chavez went home for a semester in 2007 to refocus and improve. That semester was a turning point for Chavez. He went back to Hawaii, worked full-time and took a full course load at the University of Hawaii-Hilo. Surrounded by family members who kept him motivated, Chavez didn’t run very much but worked and studied a lot. To have track taken away from him because of his academic performance was enough to convince Chavez to buckle down. Originally, Chavez came to UW as a walk-on, or a nonscholarship athlete. After spring semester 2008, during which his grades improved markedly and his performance on the track went up, UW track coach Don Yentes found a partial scholarship for Chavez, another reason to keep up the good work in the classroom. 22 • UWyo

Furthermore, Chavez says he discovered the time away from the track left his lean body refreshed and ready to train again. “I think that break was actually good for me. I started running decent times, good enough to give me a solid spot on the team, so that felt pretty good,” he says. “I started practicing harder, so that semester off gave my body the rest it needed. It depends on the person, but if you’re running from eighth grade onward, sometimes you start to break down and get injured. You see that a lot with great athletes.” Chavez entered the 2010 Mountain West Track and Field Championships as the seventh-fastest 400-meter hurdler and qualified for the final with the seventh-fastest time. Figuring it was his last race as a collegian, he let it all hang out and won the race with a time of 50.74 seconds, the second-fastest all-time at UW. He also qualified for the NCAA regional championship, where his career ended in a semifinal heat. Chavez says he wasn’t disappointed with how his career turned out. He had a moment in his first year where he had to decide what was important, he says, and he made the right choices after that. “Before that I was just going to track practice, going to classes, and goofing around a little too much,” he says. “When something like that happens, you have to set priorities and meet goals. I wanted to come back to school. I didn’t want to be that guy where everybody says, ‘Remember that guy that ran here a while back? He could’ve been all right, but he dropped out of school.’ That motivated me a lot, because I didn’t want to be seen as a failure or a quitter.” Chavez says he hopes to be a counselor and coach, though post-graduate work will wait for a couple of years. v

assi Bauman opens up an Apple laptop computer and begins the sales pitch. She touts her ability to bridge the gap between rancher and livestock buyer, showing her Web site. For a price, a rancher can buy a professional-quality photo of one of his cattle and upload it to a ranch Web site, royalty free. That way, she says, a livestock buyer can make a purchase without leaving the house. Furthermore, Bauman says, parents of young livestock show participants can purchase photos from livestock shows, and they can upload them for potential sales as well. Bauman has taken the concept of a livestock auction and brought it into the 21st century with her business, Big Star Livestock Imaging LLC, starting in 2008 and continuing with her recent graduation from the University of Wyoming. Bauman used the business for her senior honors project and for an entry in the 10K Business Competition, in which she won second place. “When you’re dealing with animals like that and ranchers who are trying to market their animals, they need pictures, and even now it’s really very Internet-based,” she says. “There are a lot of Internet sales going on, so a lot of producers are looking to video to market their animals. “I provide an imaging service—both photos and video— to these ranchers, and they use my services to help market their animals. They’ll print my pictures in their catalogs or post them on their Web sites.” Bauman grew up on two different ranches near her hometown of Cheyenne, Wyoming. Her family, still in the ranching business after six generations, showed Charolais cattle in contests and sold them to other ranchers for breeding. During her time at Cheyenne Central High School, Bauman picked up an interest in photography, though she didn’t think of combining photography with ranching until recently. “My family has its own [livestock] sale in the fall, so a few years back I thought, ‘I can do the pictures; we don’t have to hire someone else,’” she says. “It has snowballed from there, but I really enjoy doing it.” She came to UW to study political science but eventually gravitated toward animal science, in which she earned her bachelor’s degree in May. An excellent science student, Bauman stuck with what she did well but still managed to keep her hand in photography and Web design. Overall, Bauman picked out a well-rounded education for herself, taking a course of study she enjoyed while growing

her business. She credits the 10K Competition, from which her $5,000 prize will go toward equipment upgrades, for giving her a taste of what setting up a business is like. “The 10K competition was really good because I learned firsthand about basic business plan stuff, cash flows, really practical business knowledge,” she says. “You don’t always get all the practical business knowledge and applications with some business classes. The 10K was a benefit for me. I’ll say that all day long. That was the best experience I had at UW, hands down.” v Summer 2010 • 23

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Editor’s Note: For more than a decade, the University of Wyoming has been working to build a Center for Excellence in Computational Science. While the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center will help UW reach its goal, it’s not the only resource available to UW’s growing roster of computational scientists.

Travel 40 miles east of Laramie on I-80 and you will come across the birth of the future.

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t’s as if Liqiang “Eric” Wang has been planning for a supercomputer his whole career. Really, that’s what every computer scientist wants—a massive, fast computer to run and improve code. Wang and the rest of the University of Wyoming community will have the chance to work with one of the fastest computers in the world, as UW and the National Center for Atmospheric Research broke ground on the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center (NWSC) near Cheyenne, Wyoming on June 15. Wang sits in his office in Engineering Hall with a smile on his face. He says he’s excited about the advent of supercomputing at UW and sees two main benefits. The first, he says, is to his own research. Wang designs tools for supercomputing that help create more dependable computer systems, and the NWSC can improve the performance of his systems by making them run faster. Faster computing means he can produce more data. Second, his faculty collaborations will benefit. Wang is one of eight scientists at UW who is part of the Interdisciplinary Computational Sciences program, a growing multidisciplinary area that focuses on solving scientific problems through computing. Wang says the NWSC will help improve the performance of applications in other areas; for example, geology. Shaochang Wo (UWyo, Spring 2008) sits in his office in the geology building, patiently watching a graphic replay of a sim-

“For now we usually limit the size of a model under one or two million grids, even while running on the cluster, because of the limitation of computer memory space. Data transfer and storage is also an issue. If you want to do really detailed reservoir modeling and simulation with tens of millions of grids, for now it’s almost impossible,” Wo says. “Think about this: The average Wyoming oil field has been in production for more than 40 years. If you want to know currently how the remaining oil distributes in a reservoir, you have to simulate the whole reservoir production history—it’s called history matching, in which the simulated results must match the observed measurements, historical production and pressure records for example. Usually we want to have a quick turnaround time during the history matching process, like a half-hour or so, to test various scenarios. Even for this small cluster we already speed up our turnaround and it’s five to six times faster. Before, you could run a 40-year simulation job for one week on a PC. Now it takes one day on the cluster. The supercomputer could easily cut that time by five or 10.” Wo also has some multidisciplinary plans, thanks to his background in mathematics. He earned his doctorate in mathematics from UW in 1997. Wo joined EORI in 2004 as a senior research scientist. With the supercomputer, he says solving the problems of advanced oil recovery gets somewhat easier. “For me, it was definitely a really exciting moment,” he says of learning UW would get the supercomputer. “The lack of computing power has been a bottleneck for us to conduct high-resolution reservoir simulation. No matter how powerful a computer is, there are always bigger and more complicated problems to challenge its capabilities.”

Robert Mayes, director of the Science and Math Teaching Center at UW, looks over the concept rendering of the NWSC facility at the June 15th groundbreaking ceremony.

Where Wo migrated from mathematics to oil recovery, professor Dan Stanescu started out in engineering, earning

The need for speed Breaking ground with great expectations by Dave Shelles 24 • UWyo

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ulated moving oil bank in a reservoir. A three-dimensional reservoir model shows him where the remaining oil may exist, which is a simple explanation for his work with the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute (EORI). On another computer screen, a rolling report shows a simulation job is working slowly but steadily, drawing computing power from a cluster of 15 nodes, each node powered by two central processing units. The NCAR supercomputer will exceed that power exponentially. For Wo, that means his simulations of oil production will take far less time and enable him to report more data more accurately.

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GLOSSARy OF TERMS

Part of the energy that’s expected to power the NWSC will come from wind power. Project planners say this supercomputing center will be among the most efficient in computing speed per energy used.

“Before, you could run a 40-year simulation job for one week on a PC. Now it takes one day on the cluster. The supercomputer could easily cut that time by five or 10.” —Shaochang Wo Summer 2010 • 27

his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in that discipline before earning his doctorate in mathematics. Stanescu worked in aeroacoustics, the study of how to reduce the amount of noise from airplanes. At Florida State University, he worked on what at the time was the most powerful supercomputer in any university in the world, figuring out how sound waves transferred from high in the sky to the ground. “With this computer, we have a good chance to nail down very clearly the noise signature on the ground of an aircraft with a commercial turbofan,” he says. “Those are your jetliners today. We can probably model what will be the noise that someone on the ground hears from this airplane and see how we can optimize in the sense of reducing the footprint on the ground. That’s really what I see from my perspective.” Stanescu points out that the majority of research done with the computer will involve climate data and predicting weather. After all, climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing our planet today, and NCAR is at the forefront of developing the computational tools for weather and climate prediction. Stanescu describes a grid over the entire planet, and the intersecting lines create the data points. The supercomputer essentially creates those lines and takes the data from an increasing number of points. “If you put more grid points, make your grid denser, your computation is going to become more reliable,” he says. It’s not going to veer off so fast from the data you get from the meteorological stations, because a lot of this depends on what happens in the details in the grid. “We can be much more reliable. It’s not my research, but this is a very important research area.” The sciences of computer science, mathematics and geology dominate discussion of what to do with the supercomputing center. Associate professor Alex Buerkle, an evolutionary 28 • UWyo

geneticist in the department of botany, points out that the National Science Foundation’s largest grant was awarded to the University of Arizona to develop computational solutions to the biggest challenges in plant science. That illustrates the importance of computational science in biology, Buerkle says. “The biggest computer problems today aren’t restricted to math or engineering, but are also in biology,” he says. “The Human Genome Project is a computational project. You get words that you need to put together into sentences that you need to put into paragraphs that you put into the whole genome. The problem of ordering all that is a computational problem.” Buerkle has worked with Stanescu and engineering professor Dimitri Mavriplis on computational science projects and teaches a course in computational biology; last offered in fall 2009, he will teach it again in the spring. “Obviously I do computational science, and I do a lot of computing. But there is a lot yet to be determined about how UW faculty and student researchers will use this resource,” Buerkle says. “We are trying to build programs and facilities for research computing at UW and this is one component of the research computing landscape.” Dimitri Mavriplis might be the luckiest one of the bunch. The professor of mechanical engineering will spend the 2010–11 school year at ground zero of the project, working with applied mathematics and statistics groups at NCAR on developing new algorithms and parallel computing, a technique where many calculations are carried out simultaneously. “We will be collaborating on developing and testing new algorithms and parallel computing techniques designed to scale to large numbers of cores on machines such as the NCAR supercomputer,” Mavriplis says. “By being in residence at NCAR, I also expect to keep well informed on the

developments of the new facility and the hardware configuration of the machine and to be able to serve as a liaison back to the UW research community on these matters.” Like Stanescu, Mavriplis has experience with supercomputers, having worked with nationally funded installations at NASA and with the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. He knows firsthand what a supercomputer can do for research. “The availability of the NCAR machine to UW researchers provides a unique advantage for engaging researchers in the important aspects of developing leading edge simulation capabilities,” Mavriplis says. “In the absence of supercomputer facilities, researchers naturally gravitate toward developing applications which can be run on commodity hardware, which is typically available at the department level and thus do not engage in the important aspects, which are needed to enable large scale simulations on leading-edge hardware.” While it’s easy to get excited about the research aspect of supercomputing, Stanescu says the primary mission is to educate students. He cites the opportunities for educating the next generation of computational scientists that arise from having access to the supercomputer. The multidisciplinary approach benefits both from multiple departments working together, and from enthusiastic students willing to learn. “You have to know a lot of stuff. You have to know a lot of mathematics and a lot of computer science,” Stanescu says. “It’s a very narrow niche in computer science, and it’s not taught in most places. I’m talking about this item called ‘how to use this big computer.’ It’s called parallel programming. “We need to teach our students parallel programming, and a major incentive to learn that would be to have access to a big computer, at least a little bit of it. Try it out, check it out, see how it works. Of course, by the time they use that computer, they have to have their programs tested and running. So we provide some of those capabilities here. It might do well for them to have in the back of their minds the idea that there is a good possibility to work on that supercomputer at a later time. “I think it’s a very important step, a big opportunity that we have. I hope that this is going to get the kids more active in this direction,” Stanescu says. In the fall, Wang will teach a class called Introduction to High-Performance Computing. Two years away from the first experiments on the new supercomputer, Wang says he’s excited about the future of this class, a core course in the interdisciplinary computational science minor. “This class introduces students to how to do programming on a supercomputer,” Wang says. “Right now we run our programs on a local cluster, not a real supercomputer. When we have the NCAR supercomputer, we can teach students how to run code on that machine. That’s a very good opportunity for students. Maybe now we can have a trend of more graduate and undergraduate students interested in this kind of research.” v

Bit: Short for binary digit, the basic unit of information in computing and telecommunications; it is the amount of information that can be stored by a digital device or other physical system. Byte: A unit of digital information in computing and telecommunications. It is an ordered collection of bits, in which each bit denotes the binary value of 1 or 0. Computer science: The study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation, and of practical techniques for their implementation and application in computer systems. CPU: The central processing unit of a computer where computations are carried out. Interdisciplinary Computational Science: A relatively new but rapidly growing multidisciplinary area that focuses on the solution of real-world scientific problems through the development and use of computer algorithms, methods and hardware for analysis. NWSC: The NCAR Wyoming Supercomputing Center Parallel computing: A form of computation in which many calculations are carried out simultaneously, operating on the principle that large problems can often be divided into smaller ones, which are then solved concurrently (“in parallel”). PUE Index: The Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) Index reflects how much of the facility’s power consumption is used for actual computing, as opposed to support functions like cooling. PUE is defined as the ratio of the total power consumed by a supercomputing center to the power consumed by the information technology equipment of the facility. Supercomputer: A large, very fast mainframe used especially for scientific calculations. Supercomputers are used for highly calculation-intensive tasks such as problems involving quantum physics, weather forecasting, climate research, molecular modeling (computing the structures and properties of chemical compounds, biological macromolecules, polymers, and crystals), physical simulations (such as simulation of airplanes in wind tunnels, simulation of the detonation of nuclear weapons, and research into nuclear fusion). Terabyte: A multiple measured by the International System of Units of the unit byte for digital information storage and is equal to 1012 (1 trillion short scale) bytes. The unit symbol for the terabyte is TB. ON THE WEB The National Center for Atmospheric Research http://ncar.ucar.edu Interdisciplinary Computational Science at UW www.uwyo.edu/ICS/ The NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center http://cisl.ucar.edu/nwsc/ Summer 2010 • 29

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“The most important part, for the supercomputer, is we can do highresolution reservoir simulations. Right now, looking through seven layers of rock is difficult. You can see lots of geological features called fissures, only to a depth of a few feet. Once you get into enhanced oil recovery you need to look at where the remaining oil is. The supercomputer can give you much more information.”

What impact does the supercomputer hold?

Shaochang Wo Senior Research Scientist, Institute for Energy Research/Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute; Adjunct professor, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering “It will put us in a very good position in terms of computational science, which is a major focus area for the university. If we have this capability here, we are going to be much, much more likely to attract researchers in this field. From my perspective, I also hope that we’re going to attract a lot of students, in particular graduate students. Undergraduates would be good, as long as they go on after that. I think it’s going to have a major impact. I’m optimistic. Maybe this will give them somewhere to come.” Dan Stanescu Professor of mathematics Research: Computational aeroacoustics, or the study of how sound waves from airplanes behave on the ground; also computational fluid dynamics, numerical solution of stochastic differential equations

“I try to design tools to help design parallel programs, so the first benefit of the supercomputer is to provide a platform for me to conduct my research. I also work with other faculty, and we’re trying to develop a code. As other faculty have said, the supercomputer will improve the performance. Based on the architecture, based on the network, based on the CPU, we would like to customize our code. To customize means we can adjust our code for this machine and make our code faster on that machine. That’s our plan for when the new supercomputer is done.” Liqiang Wang Assistant professor of computer science Research: Design and analysis of parallel computing systems. He also is interested in integrating parallel computing with scientific workflows 30 • UWyo

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A task force helps UW vets with the transition to university life

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Over there

Research: Flow in porous media, or seeing how fluids behave inside a reservoir

“Since we are focused on the development of high-performance algorithms and simulation capabilities, the availability of leading-edge hardware is not only desirable but necessary for us to contribute significantly in our field of research. We have traditionally had access to government-funded supercomputers, but the proximity and availability of the NCAR facility will provide us with a considerable advantage in this respect.” Dimitri Mavriplis Professor of mechanical engineering Research: Computational fluid dynamics, algorithm development, parallel computing techniques, wind energy simulations, aerospace applications

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Over here

“Traditionally people have thought about those problems, but all the advances people hope to make with respect to medical genetics and understanding how the genome affects health, those are huge computer problems and that’s what I study. [The supercomputer] could allow us to do all kinds of calculations here that either now I do in my own lab or would have to go to national centers elsewhere.” Alex Buerkle Associate professor of evolutionary genetics Research: Speciation and the genetic architecture of isolating boundaries, hybridization, genetics of adaptation Summer 2010 • 31

by Dave Shelles

“Pistol Pete flew in on a Blackhawk and flew out on a Blackhawk. He flew on a little plane called a Sherpa, a shoebox with wings that flies below power lines and stuff.”—Troy Phillips as Pistol Pete in Iraq. photo courtesy of Troy Phillips

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roy Phillips knew he would get a break on his college education expenses after four years in the United States Navy and a year in the Navy Reserves. But what he didn’t know was how difficult it would be to adjust to life on campus. After a year of scanning crowds for signs of danger, Phillips had to learn that the 200 classmates crowding the doors of a lecture hall were to be trusted. And, that’s not all he learned about making the radical transition from soldier to student when he arrived at the University of Wyoming in August 2001. He discovered a new way of life and a new system to navigate. Years later, when Phillips was asked to be part of the Veterans Services Task Force, he remembered his early experience and vowed to help out veterans at UW in the future. “As a vet, I know what we’ve been through overseas,” Phillips says. “To have the chance to have school paid for by scholarships and people who give the scholarships and donate, we veterans can’t say ‘thanks’ enough for the scholarships that we do receive. So it’s important to let the veterans know about the scholarships are there.” A native of Rockford, Illinois, now living in Laramie, Phillips is one of 21 members of the UW community on the task force, which was formed for fall 2009 to make UW a better place for those who have served in the armed forces. Faculty and staff are represented on the task force, as are students and Laramie community members. “The administration did a nice job of trying to anticipate all the things veterans might need, and I’m sure they got all the people together to start planning.” The task force has been credited with clearing up the bureaucratic maze facing every student upon arrival at UW, especially veterans accessing government-entitled benefits. Denise Jairell of UW’s financial aid office says she was honored to be named to the task force. “It’s a wonderful thing for the university, because we’re looking at different kinds of veterans coming back to school,”

she says. “They’re much younger: a different generation. It’ll be a good thing for them to have help with the transition to get back into school.”

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ike all veterans, Phillips is categorized as a non-traditional student—according to UW’s Nontraditional Student Center he meets two of its criteria, being 25 or older, and a veteran of the United States Armed Services. After earning his high school diploma in Illinois at 20, he enlisted in the Navy, achieving the rank of petty officer third class while serving as a signalman. He spent four years in the Navy, and then spent a year in the Navy Reserves. In December 2000, after spending time with a friend’s family in Wyoming, he moved to Laramie and joined the Army National Guard in February 2001 as a heavy equipment operator in the 133rd Engineer Company. Seemingly in preparation for the transition to college, Phillips says he had to get used to whole new sets of terminology and language in transferring from the Navy to the Guard. “When I came into the Army National Guard, there was no transition course to take you from one branch to the other, so I never did basic training. I was a little lost,” he says. “The cadences and the acronyms are quite a bit different than what we had in the Navy, and I’m still adjusting to things.” Upon learning of the educational benefits, he enrolled at UW in fall 2001. Of course, on September 11 of that year, his plans changed. He says his unit spent the 10 days in Laramie immediately after the terrorist attacks providing security around the armory, and Phillips deployed later, in early 2003 with the 1041st Engineer Company out of Rock Springs, Wyoming. “They needed people to volunteer to go with them, so I changed my job to the 1041st. We called ourselves the ‘Bridge Trolls,’” he says. “From January 2003 to May 2003 we were in Fort Polk, Louisiana, preparing to go over [to Iraq], and we never did. So we came back here, and I went to school again.”

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t can be an eye-opening experience for a veteran … to now be responsible for one’s self in the wide-open world of college.

He was called up for duty again in October 2004, this time with the 133rd, and this time the unit went to Iraq. It arrived at Tallil Air base in Iraq on New Year’s Day 2005 and returned in December of that same year. “We traveled all over Iraq,” Phillips says. “We went from Kuwait to Tallil Air Force Base in southern Iraq. We were up in Baghdad, and we were in Rahwah, which is near the Syrian border. “We’re engineers, so we did a lot of improvements on camps for security. We also did convoy security. Some of our people did mass-grave digs, in which they never found anything. There was quite a lot we did, out in the community as well, not just on our bases.” Some of that community outreach involved introducing other parts of the world to Pistol Pete. Phillips served as UW’s mascot at football and basketball games and other functions while a student, and he took the act on the road while in Iraq. “I did that on and off for about four years, and it was fun,” he says. “I took him over to Iraq with us and took some pictures and videos. Pistol Pete flew in on a Blackhawk and flew out on a Blackhawk. He flew on a little plane called a Sherpa, a shoebox with wings that flies below power lines and stuff. “Even over there, people loved Pistol Pete. He stayed on base. Iraqis and Indians that were working for us liked him. It was the first time they’d seen anything like him. A lot of the soldiers liked him, too. We played volleyball and baseball 34 • UWyo

with him. It lifted a lot of morale over there.” Once the unit returned to Laramie, it was back to school for Phillips. Even with all of his stops and starts, he’s stayed on task and will graduate in spring 2011 after his student teaching ends. His educational odyssey has been longer than average, but he says he’s had plenty of help along the way—help he hopes to return to veterans after him. “The university has been very understanding, and so have a lot of the faculty and staff,” Phillips says. “I think it’s getting more noticeable on campus with the university realizing how many vets there are, how much it does impact your life. We had missions for fires to go to, so I had to start school a couple weeks late before. We had snow removal in Rock River before the spring semester. So I think they’re realizing how much we do through the course of a school year.”

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ollege is a different world for a veteran; one where students find their own paths rather than being told what to do, when to do it, and how to do it. It can be an eye-opening experience for a veteran, who has spent so much time in the structured world of the military, to now be responsible for one’s self in the wide-open world of college. It’s also a different social environment. Most veterans just starting school are five years older than the typical college freshman—sometimes more—so there’s a disconnect in life experiences. Phillips says he tries to remember that he was 18

once, though by the time he was 20, he lived in Japan while on his first deployment with the Navy. “I don’t have any problems relating to the younger kids,” he says. “You just have to take some things with a grain of salt as far as dealing with … I don’t want to say immaturity, because at their age it is their maturity level. They haven’t experienced what [veterans] have, which has caused us to mature faster or look at things differently.” Veterans Services Task Force chairperson Dolores Cardona says veterans bring a non-traditional student’s approach to learning and socializing. After years spent out in the world working and being soldiers, she says, they’re focused on learning, dedicated to the task at hand, and respectful of their instructors and administrators. “Most non-traditional students come in with a different perspective on approaching the classroom than a typical 18–24-year-old,” says Cardona, the associate dean of students for multicultural affairs. “They don’t want to talk about what a good time they had the previous night. They’re more serious and more dedicated. They talk a little bit sometimes about the lack of respect that they see toward faculty.” After coming back from Iraq, Phillips says he had issues with large groups of people. Sometimes terrorist attacks happen in crowded streets, and if a veteran has been near such an event he or she is gun shy about being in large groups, which is a part of life on a campus with more than 13,000 students. “The hardest adjustment to me has been the large classes,” Phillips says. “When you’re in Iraq, you only let people in uniform close to you. So when you come back to normal life and you’re in a busy place like a restaurant with all the noise and commotion, it can really mess with people’s minds until they adapt to it, which takes time, especially if somebody’s been mortared, or they’ve had an explosion near them. “One of my music classes was 200 people. To me that was large. A lot of veterans usually sit in the back of the class instead of the front, so if they have to leave they can. That was the most difficult part of college.”

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ccording to the task force’s report, there are 260–280 veterans accessing their benefits at UW and 47 faculty members who have served in the armed forces. Phillips says nearly 900 soldiers with various detachments recently returned to Wyoming from Iraq and Afghanistan, and some of them plan to enroll at UW and at the state’s community colleges. Thanks to the Veterans Services Task Force, UW is addressing the problems facing veterans, from financial aid to counseling for combat trauma. Already there is a Web page for veterans looking for information about UW [see box] , and Jairell says she has received several queries about what the university offers. In time for fall semester, there will be a veterans-only orientation, and

a veterans’ services center will open on the second floor of Knight Hall. Cardona says the center will be staffed by workstudy students who also are veterans, and it will be a resource to answer any questions veterans might have about anything related to college. There also will be a lounge for veterans to congregate with places to sit and a TV. “By having the vets’ center, they’re going to have somewhere to go to feel that camaraderie that they had felt before and give them the resources they need,” Jairell says. “The university didn’t have that before. They could come in and talk to me about getting their education benefits, but they didn’t really have a network, so it’ll be a wonderful thing to set up a network for them.” “It’s also going to give veterans the chance to go to a place where they’ll be comfortable, especially those who have served in Iraq,” Phillips says. “Coming back to a younger crowd, it’s hard having a lot of people around who aren’t familiar with what you dealt with overseas. Allowing veterans to have a space like that—I wouldn’t say it’s an advantage but it is a great resource for the veterans to use.” The task force will continue meeting finding newer and better ways to serve this growing student population. Gray says it will show UW cares about its veteran students. “The hope is that it’s conspicuous that UW is trying to do everything it can to mobilize resources in a coordinated effort to provide them with any benefits and support we can offer,” Gray says. “So if they see that there is this mobilization from the administration, that there’s a Web page devoted to veterans’ services, that there are ongoing resources and personnel devoted to veterans’ services, it communicates that this is something that really value and help folks with.” Phillips continues to serve with the Guard, giving it one weekend each month and two weeks each year. In July he joined his unit at Camp Guernsey to run through equipment maneuvers, help rebuild roads, and put in culverts for drainage. The unit also underwent weapons qualifications and physical fitness tests, among other things. He’ll student teach in January in Cheyenne, and after that he says he hopes to find a teaching job in Wyoming. In the meantime, he’ll continue to serve on the task force and help veterans with the transition from military life to college life. “They’re looking into more veterans’ benefits and things the school offers,” he says. “So as long as the [number of] veterans keeps growing, the task force is going to continue.” v

For more information on the post-9/11 GI Bill, go to gibill.va.gov/GI_Bill_Info/benefits.htm . For more information on UW’s offerings for veterans, go to www.uwyo.edu/Studentaff/ veteranservices/ or email uw-vets@uwyo.edu . Summer 2010 • 35

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Pulitzer- and Grammy-winning composer comes to UW as its next Eminent Artist-in-Residence �ennifer Higdon laughs when she’s introduced as a Pulitzer

by Dave Shelles

photo by Candice diCarlo

Jennifer Higdon and Beau

Prize-winning composer. Being introduced as a Grammy-winning composer has the same effect. “That sounds funny when I hear that,” she says. “I don’t think I’m adjusted to it yet. It’s been kind of an unreal year, an amazing year at that. To have gotten both of those within months of each other, and for different pieces, is staggering. It’s a lot to take in.” She won the Pulitzer Prize for music with her Violin Concerto, a piece she wrote for the young virtuoso Hilary Hahn. Her 2010 Grammy award honored her Percussion Concerto in the category of Best Contemporary Classical Composition. Funny-sounding or not, the award-winning composer is the University of Wyoming’s Eminent Artist-in-Residence for the 2010–11 academic year, during which she’ll spend four one-week sessions at UW, each with a different focus. On September 22–25, she’ll work with an ensemble of music faculty for New Frontiers, the annual new music festival. On October 14, the UW Symphony Orchestra will perform one of her works after a few days of rehearsals. From March 29 to April 1, she’ll work with the wind symphony, and UW’s Collegiate Chorale will rehearse one of her choral pieces with her April 18–21. The multi-week format at UW is her preferred method for residencies, as it gives her the chance to reach more people and work on more aspects of a performance than in a compressed, one-week format. “It’s really hard when you have everything crammed in within one week,” she says. “I’ve done the repeat visits before with a lot of other universities, and I’ve done it with orchestras. It seems to work better when you come back over a period of time. It’s a lot to process in a short amount of time. You get to know the faculty, and they get to know you. It’s a win-win for everyone.”

While at UW, she’ll also lecture on the business of music sharing knowledge from more than 20 years as a composer of works for every configuration from solo saxophone to orchestras. Higdon is a staunch advocate for educating music students about the business aspect of the craft. She’s the first self-published composer to win a Pulitzer, and she owns her own publishing company, Lawdon Press. “Often, when I go into schools I talk about business— what goes into running a business whether you’re a performer as an individual or with a group,” she says. “Even in my own teaching here in Philadelphia, I make sure we cover the business aspect because it’s not in curriculums, and it’s a very important thing. That’s the first thing students notice when they leave school and they run up against something, and they’re like, ‘Oh, we didn’t cover this.’” While she says she’ll let the situation dictate what she teaches, she’ll speak on composing. She has composed some 140 works at a rate of about 10 a year, she says, and she always is working on something. “Some of those are small, but it’s quite a bit of writing,” she says. “I make my living from composing, and I’m fortunate because it’s hard to do that in the U.S., especially in classical music.” Higdon just started a piece for concert band, a co-commissioned work for 50 bands that will be performed by each band in the first year the piece comes out. After that, she’s been commissioned by the Grand Teton Music Festival in Jackson, Wyoming, to write a piece for orchestra. In both cases, Higdon says the key is just getting started writing. “Starting the piece is the hardest,” she says. “Maybe because I’m at the point where I’m starting a piece I’m saying that, but I find that’s the most agonizing part of it. I’m in the worst possible mood because just trying to find the world of sound a piece emerges from is just difficult. It’s like wandering in a dark room trying to find the light switch.” v Summer 2010 • 39

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selections from UWyo magazine – V11N2 Fall 2009

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Features

Departments

UWyo Fall 2009 volume 11 number 2

UWyo Fall 2009 volume 11 number 2

22 the story Lab and Into the Wild 38 Out This of is the headline This is a story teaser by Sarah Wolff by the author

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CONTRIBUTORS

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VIEWPOINT

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UW NEWSBRIEFS

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SNAPSHOTS Ed Barbier Jonelle Martinez Joy Williams Rey Fuentes

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ARTS Heyokah/Hokahey by Dave Shelles

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ATHLETICS Jock Dorm Reunion by Tom Lacock

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ALUMNI Clint Jessen by Tom Lacock

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GALLERY Native American Regalia by Susan Moldenhauer

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PORTRAITS Marcelle Cornfeld Professor of Anthropology

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OUTTAKES

18 CAREERs in the Making by Dave Shelles

26 The Past Continues into the Future by Jessica Lowell

30 Real World Experience is the Prescription by Dave Shelles

ON THE COVER The National Science Foundation has chosen five UW professors for its Faculty Early Career

Development (CAREER) Awards. Read the story on page 18.

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to get students excited about science, and coming to join the department and pursue chemistry. “The reviewers of the CAREER award all agreed that this outreach program would have a great impact because Wyoming is mostly a rural place. This is the only university in the state, so this is a way we can make state-of-the-art equipment available to high school students around the state.”

Franco Basile

Jan Kubelka

he National Science Foundation is taking notice of the University of Wyoming’s emergence as a renowned research university. During the 2008-09 school year, five UW professors were awarded Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Awards from NSF. The awards honor young faculty members who show excellence in scientific fields, and provide stipends to fund five years of research and education. “Having five CAREER award winners in one year is quite an accomplishment; this is the type of thing that happens at a major research institution the size of Stanford,” UW president Tom Buchanan says. “It underlines the fact that UW has become very competitive in hiring the very best new faculty available.” The five CAREER award winners from UW are: • Mark Clementz, geology • Bryan Shuman, geology • Gregory Lyng, mathematics • Franco Basile, chemistry • Jan Kubelka, chemistry Much of the emphasis on climate change centers on what’s happening now and what will happen in the future. UW geology professor Bryan Shuman says you need to look back to see what has happened before and possibly make some inferences about what might happen in the future. Shuman’s studies of lakes in Wyoming and Colorado have revealed the current drought is nothing new. In fact, it was much worse thousands of years ago. So Shuman is trying to figure out how dry the climate has been in the past to see what effects a drought would have on a denser, fastergrowing population like the one in the American West. “Some of my research shows that the driest year we’ve had, 2002, really is only as dry or not even as dry as some periods in

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the past that were extremely dry and persistent for thousands of years,” he says. “We have evidence the Platte River, a key river for Wyoming, didn’t even consistently flow for several thousand years early on. Or several thousand years ago it ceased to flow for centuries to millennia. That’s how dry it was. “The potential exists for things to shift over into this very dry climate for this region. That’s happened before so if it happens again, there would be huge implications for our economy and all the development that’s taking place in the region.” He’s also studying the beetle kill of forests in the Snowy Range in southern Wyoming and other places, hoping to find a fossil record of what happened to the forests in the wake of destruction. Shuman says having such a ready real-world application for his work likely helped him get the funding for his studies. During his summers off from teaching, he’ll do his research in northern Colorado, using a radar system to look at sediment on the bottom of several lakes to tell a story thousands of years in the making. He also says he’ll check out soil samples under various lakes throughout North America in hopes of mapping out drought patterns over a larger area. “The nice part is I get to float around on these lakes in the mountains, and look at what’s under the surface,” he says. “The rest of the time I’ll be writing up my results for publication.” In part, scientific study is about finding solutions to problems and possibly thinking differently about problems that have puzzled academics for years. Science also encourages its practitioners to take risks in their research, to present sometimesdry scientific material in an accessible and engaging way. It’s no surprise, then, that the NSF looks at proposals that suggest something unique to help educate people about the ways of science.

Mark Clementz—like Shuman a member of the geology faculty—specializes in paleoecology, looking at how marine ecosystems have changed over time. Specifically, he studies how early whales made the transition from land to water 50 million years ago, and what pressures might have made that transition necessary. To bring this field of study to school children, he’s collaborating with Cecelia Aragon of UW’s theater department to write a children’s play about evolution, and part of his award will go toward expanding that aspect of his mission. “It’s also going to help us fund our educational program, too. The goal is to try to incorporate more different ways of learning with students,” he says. “We had written a children’s play (UWyo, Fall, 2007) that talked about whale evolution, and it went really well. Now we’re trying to expand on that, and possibly work on a children’s book or some other projects that may incorporate theater or the arts with the sciences, giving a fresh perspective to some of these questions we’re trying to ask.” Clementz says the NSF is helping scientists take risks in their research by funding proposals that take a different look at various aspects of science. “That definitely helped the success of the proposal. It was something outside the norm, and that’s what they like to fund,” he says. “I appreciate NSF taking a risk because any time you fund someone who’s at the early stages of their career you don’t really know how it’s going to pan out. I appreciate them taking a chance on me and funding me with this project. “These awards give us the money to really explore and take risks with our research, really develop the questions we want to ask about where we want to take our programs. But at the same time it’s got to be so much easier for recruiting. Grad students are going to be much easier to acquire because this gives us a little bit of prestige. It’s really going to pay off in the long run in terms

of what kind of funding assistance we’re going to have and what future hires we’re able to make. It’s a good record to have.” Overall, Clementz says the awards are a major boon for UW, not just in geology but over all its scientific departments. “It’s something the University of Wyoming should be very proud of for the people they’ve [hired] because getting five of these awards in one round is incredible. The university’s doing a great job of selecting the right people and really building up its programs. We’re a research institution that’s taking off and hopefully—no, not hopefully, we are putting the university on the map as far as being a major center for geology and paleo research.” While geologic time is measured in thousands and millions of years, scientists now have the advantage of looking back quickly to see how our world has progressed. UW chemistry professor Franco Basile earned his honors by looking forward just as quickly. He pioneered a process that speeds up the breakdown of proteins in a controlled and specific way, and this technique is being applied in his laboratory to quickly identify and study biological samples, including bacteria. Normally the process uses enzymes that take as long as a day to break down proteins to make enough smaller peptides to be easily detected, but Basile managed to accelerate this process by eliminating the use of enzymes while still maintaining the integrity of the experiment. “What we’ve developed in my laboratory are several approaches that use no enzymes and no chemical reagents,” he says. “One uses microwave radiation to bring the protein solution to boiling temperature where proteins decompose by a unique pathway, and the other technique uses high heat—just plain heat like in your toaster oven—to heat the sample rapidly to 200 degrees Celsius in 10 seconds. What

we’ve discovered is when you subject proteins to that heating, they don’t just degrade randomly. They actually degrade following a set of very specific reactions, and my laboratory was first to discover those reactions. “We also recognized quickly the utility of that information to mimic the function of enzymes. Our processes happen in a time scale of seconds to minutes. The improvement goes from digesting a protein overnight with enzymes to digesting it with our methods in a matter of seconds or minutes. With this ability to prepare the sample rapidly, now you’re able to think of doing this type of measurements in real-time, as in an environmental detector.’” Basile uses a mass spectrometer, an instrument that makes his lab look high-tech and futuristic. There still are test tubes, eyewash stations, and Bunsen burners in his lab on the fourth floor of the Physical Sciences building, but most of his instruments, like the mass spectrometer, require expensive parts and supplies as well as qualified staffing. The latter is something Basile says the CAREER award will help provide. “Amazingly, the limiting factor right now in my lab is people. If I could put four more people in my lab right now I would be OK,” he says. “I find myself going up to my lab to do train and help students use the mass spectrometers, and I need to be here [in my office] writing papers and getting those out, publishing, which has slowed down quite a bit this year. I’ve had this [CAREER award] funded, I’ve had a Department of Defense funded project — along the same lines, application of our rapid sample processing techniques to potential bioweapons material to be detected eventually by other techniques Then I have another energy-related grant too, so I’m fairly busy these days.” Basile also hopes to get Wyoming’s high school chemistry teachers in his lab to work with this high-tech equipment. By proxy, he says he hopes it will inspire their students to come to UW and study chemistry—and possibly work with these instruments every day. “That [the CAREER grant] will allow their students to do their science projects here at the university,” he says. “It’s an outreach/collaboration program with high school students

For using mathematical equations to understand the stability of traveling waves, UW math professor Greg Lyng won his NSF CAREER Award. He’s trying to understand the behavior of nonlinear partial differential equations, in particular how they can interpret traveling waves, either gas through a pipe or pulses through optical fibers, such as those used to transmit information. And like the other NSF honorees at UW, Lyng’s studies apply to multiple disciplines. “I’m enough on the math side that it’s not super close, but this is one of the reasons these are interesting math problems—because they are interconnected, eventually, to these real-world things,” he says. “That is a guide in terms of being interesting because they do apply to real-world things.” But while the crux of his research ascends to the stratosphere of mathematical understanding, what he plans to do with his award will have an impact on at the university and beyond. Lyng will try to build a group to get people throughout Wyoming excited about math, from high schoolers to professors at Wyoming’s community colleges. “That will build and strengthen our mathematical network in the state, in addition to getting them involved in research and getting them on campus a little bit so when their students transfer and come here—I hope they’ll be excited by Bryan Shuman


magazines

Out of the Lab and Into the Wild

Gregory Lyng

Story and photos by Sarah Wolff

Mark Clementz

the research but I also hope they’ll be better able to tell their students what to expect and what kinds of things they can get into when they come to Laramie,” Lyng says. While Lyng will continue to work on his projects, he’ll still help his graduate students get the word out about UW’s math department, and the opportunities an education in math can present. He says the NSF wants faculty equally committed to educating and researching, two roles he takes seriously. “When the NSF puts out the call for this, it says, ‘We want people who are teacher-scholars.’ They want people who are doing good research, but my impression is that’s not quite enough,” he says. “You have to be good at both things. You have to do something that’s going to position you as a young faculty member at the forefront of these issues, going for a career. “We want to do good research, but we want to get people involved in it, too.” UW chemistry professor Jan Kubelka is pioneering research that could offer better understanding of the fundamental biochemical processes in all living organisms, but also bring many applications arising from design of new and functional proteins that would parallel or even surpass those of the genetic engineering. Protein folding research  is also crucial for understanding of how Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases take shape ... and, therefore, for prevention and treatment of these diseases, as they result from proteins not folding properly.

But Kubelka seeks a broader, less-focused, mission from the world of science. “The mission of science is understanding things,” he says. “Everybody always asks about real-world applications, but I don’t think that necessarily is what we’re after or what we should be after. Understanding that world that we’re living in—that’s what we should be doing. “Everything has applications eventually, right? Somebody said there’s no basic or applied science; it’s all applied. The difference is only that some is short-term and some is long-term. But I don’t think that real-world applications should necessarily drive all of this. We should be interested in understanding what’s going on, and if there are applications but we don’t see them right now, who cares? We should be figuring things out.” Kubelka got interested in physical chemistry in graduate school at the University of Illinois-Chicago. He also worked at the National Institute of Health for three years, where he worked with Bill Eaton, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and chief of the laboratory of chemical physics there. Kubelka also gave credit to Jim Hofrichter, whom he called “an experimental lab wizard.” While he says working in such an important and recognized field inspired him, there were some tough times. He says he applied for numerous other grants that were rejected, and he wondered at times if his path was the right one. The NSF CAREER award, he says, validates his work. “A lot of people kind of change when they think, ‘OK, it doesn’t look like this kind of research is going to bring in any money. Maybe I’ll try to do something else.’ I was actually trying that, too,” he says. “I was actually trying to tap into this energy stuff, applied to the Petroleum Research Fund with some ideas I had about petroleum refinement. It never got funded and now I am actually glad it didn’t. I do not have to do any petroleum research. I can focus on my proteins. It’s a tremendous boost in every way.”

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hana Wolff, an undergraduate researcher at the University of Wyoming, stepped out of a blue bus and into a different world. A quick look around revealed a sea of green with clouds trapped in the tree canopy. Wolff was clearly not in Wyoming any more. Instead, she stood in Yanayacu (yah-nuh-YAH-koo), a remote biological field station in Ecuador. The research opportunity of a lifetime beckoned in the eastern foothills of the Andes Mountains, approximately four hours’ drive east of Quito, Ecuador’s capital city. Wolff, along with seven other undergraduate researchers in UW’s honors program, had come to discover new insects and research new ideas under the guidance of Scott R. Shaw, UW professor of entomology, and Greg K. Brown, professor of botany. Their journey to Ecuador illustrates UW’s commitment to undergraduate research and demonstrates the vast research opportunities offered to UW undergraduates. Undergraduate research at the University of Wyoming is one of the best-kept secrets of higher education in the country. “One of the great things about Wyoming is that undergraduates can get involved—and are encouraged to. The small class size makes it easier for students to get to know a teacher and drop in to discuss research,” says Barbara Kissack, the Senior Project Administrator for the state of Wyoming’s National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Program. “It is not only that we are small, but it is part of Wyoming culture,” says Duncan Harris, director of the UW Honors Program. “We take undergraduate education seriously, and it is a major commitment of the university. Other research universities have different priorities.” Harris helped set up 24 • UWyo

UW undergraduate students Kathleen Meyers and Emily McRae inventory live caterpillars collected in bags at the biological field station Yanayacu, Ecuador. Each visible bag contains a live caterpillar.

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arts the trip to Ecuador and has been instrumental in encouraging undergraduates to research and travel abroad. “Being a research mentor means extra work, and for the most part faculty doesn’t even raise an eyebrow here, but instead welcome undergraduate students,” Harris says. “At

(Top) This wasp lays her egg inside a parasitic fly larva that is already inside this caterpillar, and is just one of the new species Shaw discovered with students in Ecuador. (Bottom) Drew Townsend, UW alumnus and manager of Yanayacu biological field station, collects caterpillars with his research mentor Shaw.

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UW if you have [an] idea, UW will support it. There is never that feeling of frustration. This atmosphere encourages innovation.” UW provides undergraduate students the opportunity to follow a research project from proposing the idea to presenting the results at a conference. Many other universities just let faculty members, graduate students or professional researchers see the big picture of research. Not so at UW, where undergraduates participate in the entire scientific process. Undergraduate research gives students a set of skills that makes them more competitive as they seek jobs or graduate schools. “UW gives students an opportunity to experience hands-on research. This is different from learning in a classroom or learning in the lab,” Kissack says. “Undergraduate research allows students to experience what it is like to be a professional researcher.” In Ecuador, 10 UW undergraduate students participated in one of the many unique research opportunities offered through the university last summer. These students traveled from Wyoming to the dense and lush Ecuadorian rainforest to study entomology, botany, biodiversity and ecology. Seven of the undergraduates, including Wolff, participated in an Honors Program class on cloud forest ecology. Shaw, curator of the UW Insect Museum, and Brown, head of the botany department, designed this interactive course to engage critical thinking and research skills. Five other undergraduate students received NSF money from a Research Experience for Undergraduates grant (REU). Shaw and Guinevere Jones, Shaw’s graduate student, applied for this NSF money to involve students in entomological research. Jones and Shaw say they feel passionately about engaging undergraduates and started the entomology club at UW to excite students about insects. The Yanayacu biological field station provides these researchers relatively untouched ecological niches and the organisms that fill those niches. Shaw’s primary research interest on this recent trip focused on Braconidae, or parasitic wasps. Approximately 12,000 species of Braconidae have been described so far, but Shaw says there might be between 30,000 to 40,000 species of undiscovered Braconidae in the world. Once at Yanayacu, Wolff’s morning started with a 7 a.m. wake-up call from a rooster at a nearby ranch. She donned a black rain suit with matching rain boots and set out to discover new insects. She brought along an arsenal of insect-catching devices: a butterfly net, several small plastic vials, plastic bags and small yellow pans. She filled plastic yellow pans with water and a dash of detergent and placed them around the forest floor to attract insects from the top of the tree canopy. Insects are drawn to the color yellow, and when they flew into the pans, they were trapped in the water for later collection and identification in the Yanayacu lab. In some cases, Wolff

collected live caterpillars and brought them back to the field station to be stored and studied in the máquina, a shed located 100 feet from the eating and sleeping areas where studies of the caterpillars’ development could be accomplished. Kathleen Meyers, one of the undergraduate fellows, started each morning in the máquina—meaning “the machine,” because insects were turned out as if they were being produced in a factory. She looked at the live caterpillars in the approximately 100 to 200 plastic sacks hanging in the shed to see if anything had happened. One of three things could have emerged: a butterfly, if nothing parasitized the caterpillar; a parasitic fly; or a parasitic wasp, which Shaw hoped was in every caterpillar. Each caterpillar turned into an ecological surprise, but it sometimes took months to see the end product. When Shaw finds a new species of parasitic wasp, he preserves it, brings it back to the United States, and then describes it in a scientific journal. He has discovered approximately 40 new species of parasitic wasps at Yanayacu, which means “black water” in Quechua. The undergraduate researchers collected a large number of Braconidae for Shaw to study and describe. One undergraduate researcher, Mary Centrella, continues to work in Shaw’s lab to help him analyze some of the new species. She and Shaw plan to coauthor articles about their findings. “It’s pretty cool to think that I might have a publication before I graduate,” Centrella says. Publishing is a “great thing on a résumé and makes our graduates competitive on the market,” Kissack says. Other undergraduate researchers from UW discovered and researched topics of their own interest while in Ecuador. Dale Novotny, an environmental natural resource and international studies major, researched the natural resources and environmental sustainability of the biological field station. The field station is a model in environmental sustainability because it has pure drinking water, environmentally sound sewage disposal and power from a hydroelectric source. Novotny wrote a report on his findings, which is now posted online. Wolff and botany major Samantha Stutz focused their independent research on bromeliads, a family of New World monocot flowering plants, which includes Spanish moss and pineapples. Wolff and Brown are currently collaborating on an investigation of the possible anti-microbial effects of the clear mucus found between the seeds of a Bromeliad species.

Seize the play:

Shaw instructs students on insect collecting methods including placing yellow pans with detergent around the forest to attract and catch new insect species.

As an undergraduate, Wolff has helped create the study, collect the sample and plan the analysis with the hope of presenting her work at Undergraduate Research Day. “UW has the ability to inspire a happy learning environment,” Wolff says. “I feel academically appreciated. I can go on a trip like this and have professors ask about my ideas and encourage them. My favorite quote is from Scott (Shaw), when I was talking to him about my research in geology and plants. He said ‘I’m excited that you’re excited.’ Although he wasn’t personally interested in the topic, he encouraged me to continue my research.” “The most important thing from this research experience is that students leave with a positive feeling and have learned something,” Shaw says. “I am most interested in teaching the next generation of scientists.” Indeed, Wolff says she plans on finishing her undergraduate studies in chemistry, followed by a master’s in geology and a Ph.D. in paleontology, continuing the love of research that started at UW. v For more on the research station at Yanayacu, go to www.yanayacu.org Fall 2009 • 27

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Bill Bowers and Leigh Selting, Chair of the Department of Theater and Dance, share ideas for a scene with the cast.

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Heyokah/Hokahey urges cast to just go for it Fall 2009 • 37

ill Bowers came to Laramie in January with “two words and a box full of information.” He left with a production unlike anything seen at the University of Wyoming. And the student cast came away with a unique theatre experience. “This is different from anything I’ve ever done,” says Billy Higgins, a recent theatre graduate from San Francisco. “I’ve done some weird shows in the big city and here, but I guess I’m thinking more from a process point of view.” “Heyokah/Hokahey” is devised theatre, where the cast and crew make it up as they go. By the end of the fiveweek project there was a script, but everything in the show came from the minds of 16 students, UW theatre professor John O’Hagan, and Bowers, UW’s Eminent Artist in Residence—“16 students and two grown-ups,” as Bowers described it. Bowers, a native of Missoula, Montana, and a well-known mime who now resides in New York City, came to UW with the words “Heyokah” and “Hokahey,” and some reading

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material on each. In December 2008, each student auditioned for the show by bringing a 2- or 3-minute piece of his or her own creation, and successful auditioners received an e-mail with some of the information on those words. He called the cast “actor/creators,” since the students brainstormed and conceptualized the show, from the lighting crews and performance pieces to the costumes and set design. Obviously, the cast embraced its expanded role in the production of the show, bringing any and every possible idea to the table. Though some of those ideas didn’t make it into the roughly 90-minute show, every idea—no matter how off the wall—was given due consideration. “It really goes with the sense of ownership,” says Jaime Cruz, a recent theatre graduate from Evanston, Wyoming. “It feels like it wasn’t just one person’s show. We all contributed just the same, or so it feels.” “It was a very positive atmosphere. You can try and you can fail, and it was awesome,” says Lindsey Neinast, a recent theatre graduate from Arlington, Texas. The source material pushed the performers’ abilities to their outer limits. The scenes contained in the sketch-driven show drew from disparate sources, such as Native American myths, Sherwood Anderson’s short stories from the early 20th century, and mime. Still, there was nothing in the show so heavy that it completely took away a child-like sense of fun. The performers, while working five long weeks in preparation, never forgot the fun of being other characters. “It’s kind of a nice escape, because you get to come spend three hours, hang out with your friends, and be a kid and play,” Neinast says. It also gave the performers a chance to branch out. Cruz says his focus is on writing plays, while Neinast and Higgins concentrate on their acting. Every actor/creator used multiple talents with “Heyokah/Hokahey.” “It’s just nice because in some parts you might feel restricted, because you have to do Centennial Singers if you want to do musical theatre, and if you’re just in shows here it’s just usually straight (theatre). The opera usually goes to music students,” says Chelsey Byrd, a recently graduated theatre major from Fraser, Colorado. “With this we all get to dance, we all get to sing, we all get to act.” v

What is Heyokah? A Heyokah was a kind of clown in Lakota indian culture, a contrarian whose purpose in life was to show society its opposite. in some cases the Heyokah walked backward, dressed backward, and mimicked people to (as Bowers explained) show the world a different way of looking at things. What is Hokahey? in his research, Bowers found the word “Hokahey” and liked it in part because it seemed to mirror the word “Heyokah;” indeed, the two reflected each other on posters for the performance. “Hokahey” is another Lakota word, this one a battle cry translating to “Today is the day to die.” in the context of the show, Bowers took the meaning to be “Go for it. Be your true self. Carpe Diem,” which is Latin for “Seize the Day.” What was “Heyokah/Hokahey” it ended up being a series of vignettes about being an outsider, from a representation of common people going about life in uncommon ways. As the Heyokah was an outsider to Lakota Sioux society, the outsiders are urged throughout the show to “go for it,” and to show their true colors while those watching the show are encouraged to look at things in new ways.

Bowers makes notes and rewrites after a night of rehearsal.

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THE MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING

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selections from UWyo magazine – V11N1 Summer 2009

ELEMENTAL E LEM E NTAL COAL ncar • what’s next for uw grads

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FEBRUARY 2008

Crowds spill out of the meeting room on the third floor of the Wyoming State Capitol in February 2008. Legislators and state officials leaning in at the doorways strain to hear what their colleagues seated and standing inside are hearing. Partway through the legislature’s busy budget session, they make time nonetheless to hear the presentation on a proposed joint project between GE Energy and the University of Wyoming with funding from the state of Wyoming that will become the High Plains Gasification - Advanced Technology Center. Coal is a mainstay of the state’s economy. Powder River Basin coal generates nearly 40 percent of electricity consumed in the United States. It’s plentiful and it has low sulfur, which makes it attractive. But it has its drawbacks: It’s high in moisture, and it’s located at a relatively high elevation, which means burning it is less efficient. What’s more, national policymakers are beginning to consider imposing limits on the amount of carbon dioxide that’s emitted by industrial processes—including electrical power generation fueled by coal. The goal of the High Plains Gasification Advanced Technology Center project is to build a coal gasification plant that will use a chemical process to turn Wyoming’s abundant coal resource from a solid fuel to a gas that can be burned more cleanly to make electricity, or converted into fuels like gasoline and diesel. The promises aren’t new. Many coal conversion projects had been proposed and discussed, but few progressed any further. This time, though, the equation is different.

“This is a real collaborative effort,” says Monte Atwell, general manager of gasification at GE Energy. Atwell is heading up the GE Energy side of the collaboration. “There are benefits to GE Energy and to the university and the state of Wyoming and ultimately people around the world who rely on coal for their electricity.” Electricity, particularly coal-fired electricity, is at the core of the U.S. energy portfolio. In the world of regulated utilities, under which most of the United States lives, ratepayers bear a share of the cost of building and maintaining power plants, Atwell says. Those costs include scrubbers to remove particulates from the air and technology that captures mercury and sulfur, among other things, and that can increase

consumer costs considerably. “If you take the cost out and can generate power reliably, when we pay our bills that’s something we can afford,” he says. “It’s always a journey, especially when we’re generating electricity with new technologies.” “In the past and now to a great extent, coal is being used for base electrical load,” says Bill Gern, UW vice president for research and economic development. Base load is the amount of electricity required for most uses. “Natural gas has been used for peak loads,” when demand for electricity suddenly spikes, Gern says. Natural gas, widely used for home heating, has been used to generate electricity. In some areas of the country it’s preferred because it’s a cleaner-burning fuel and less carbon dioxide is produced than in burning coal. Burning gas also doesn’t require the additional work of adding technologies that can remove particulates and heavy metals. A coal gasification plant, Gern says, will produce synthesis gas, or syngas, which, like natural gas, is a cleanburning fuel used to generate electricity. “What we hope gasification does,” Gern says, “is make a coal-fired plant look like a gas-fired plant in terms of carbon dioxide production.” The interests of GE Energy and UW intersect naturally over plentiful Powder River Basin coal, but what drew GE Energy’s attention was the UW School of Energy Resources, with its emphasis on clean-coal technology. “Things work best when there is a shared need, a common vision for really trying to do the right things. We felt Wyoming was taking some steps with the School of Energy Resources, the university, and the support from the governor’s office,” Atwell says.

OCTOBER In October, negotiations between UW, state officials and GE Energy result in the first of a series of agreements that spell out the basics of the venture. UW is to own the facility and to conduct research, both on the coal before it’s gasified and the synthetic fuel that results. GE Energy officials are interested in testing at a higher elevation the technologies resulting in gasification of Powder River Basin coal. The company will lease the facility from UW. GE Energy is a world leader in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology. Company officials have an interest in solving the technical problems of IGCC and gasification of the plentiful coals of the Powder River Basin. The

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plastics—can be derived. “The beauty of syngas is that it’s highly reactive,” Gern says. “You can do a lot of chemistry with it to make a whole bunch of very useful products, some of which are fleet fuels.” GE Energy’s interests lie in between. “What we’re looking at is partnering with UW,” Atwell says from his office in Houston. “We want to take the technology we’ve invested in heavily over the last several years, get a site, and test this stuff out. “It’s one thing to test individual components, but when you add them all together, it adds a whole different dimension.” The goal, Atwell says, is generating as much power for as little money possible and making it extremely reliable.

research at the High Plains Gasification - Advanced Technology Center will contribute to making coal and IGCC plants marketable and valuable worldwide. The University of Wyoming has significant existing expertise and research interest in treating high-moisture coal to remove hazardous elements and increasing energy efficiency, as well as reducing carbon emissions produced by the IGCC process and producing synthesis gas for other useful products.

“What we know is that gasification is proven clean-coal technology,” Gern says. He heads up the UW division that’s keenly interested in the science behind preparing coal for efficient gasification and using the products that result. “The reason it’s clean-coal technology is that it doesn’t combust coal, it gasifies it. It creates this other product called synthesis gas, or syngas. Syngas can be cleaned up because it’s mostly hydrogen and carbon monoxide,” Gern says. 24 • UWyo

This conceptual image of a commercial IGCC plant shows the steps in the process of coal gasification; the High Plains Gasification – Advanced Technology Center demonstration plant will not include turbines and will not produce electricity. Illustration courtesy of ge energy

“It can be combusted in a much cleaner way, because when you combust hydrogen, you make water. And because this is actually a chemical plant, you can handle the carbon dioxide that’s produced easily. It can be sequestered, put in a pipeline and used for enhanced oil recovery, or if it’s pure enough, you could even make industrial-grade carbon dioxide.” UW researchers want to understand how to treat the coal before it’s gasified to achieve the greatest efficiency, and they want to understand what can be done with the products of gasification. They are specifically interested in syngas and the uses it can be put to. “By taking carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a metallic catalyst fleet fuel, and other products, such as acetate—which is used in making

jANUARY By early January, the request for proposals to secure the site is ready; on January 5, it’s sent out statewide. The criteria are spelled out in the request: The land must be at least 35 acres in a square or rectangular dimension; it must be at least 4,000 feet elevation; it must be an undeveloped site, flat and with minimal vegetation; and it must be free of encumbrances, both above ground and below. The research that is expected to take place at the High Plains Gasification - Advanced Technology Center is intended to accelerate developing and validating innovative technologies that GE Energy has developed and

“The reason it’s cleancoal technology is that it doesn’t combust coal, it gasifies it. It creates this other product called synthesis gas, or syngas. Syngas can be cleaned up because it’s mostly hydrogen and carbon monoxide.”

BiLL gERN

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“This is a real partnership.... We’re doing this because we believe it’s the right thing to do....” MONTE ATWELL

continues to develop. The result should be a source of energy derived from coal that is more marketable, even as regulations on emissions increase and regulations for carbon dioxide become reality. One of the uncertainties is how to make this technology work at higher elevations. Most such plants operate at or around sea level. “As policy starts to be generated, carbon is something we’ll regulate, tax, and create a value for. And there will be legislation about what you will do with it. A facility like this gives us the option to make a plant run, create electricity, and create a syngas stream. And it gives us an opportunity to work on technology that deals with effluent streams,” Atwell says. There are, he adds, some unique challenges that require focus. “We’re going to the land of Powder River Basin coal to do it,” he says. “It’s physics. You lose efficiency the higher you go. Whatever you produce, you produce less at higher elevations. How do you mitigate that?”

FEBRUARY

In February, 11 proposers submit 15 sites in nine counties for consideration. They are judged against the listed criteria and three sites, one each in Campbell, Goshen and Laramie counties, are identified for further investigation. Site visits started in March and further evaluation continues into the spring.

UW and the state of Wyoming are interested in other elements of this relationship as well. “We’re interested in maintaining Wyoming coal sales,” Gern says. “We understand that Powder River Basin coal is used to produce about 38 percent of the nation’s electric power. With carbon legislation, we know there’s going to have to be technologies that deal with the carbon dioxide. We think it’s possible. Researchers can surmount technical problems, continue the coal sales, and basically use coal in a very clean way.” The issue, he says, is moving coal up the value chain. “We’re going from an economy where we mine it and ship it somewhere to where we mine it and use it within Wyoming and create valuable products with coal,” Gern says. “It’s very important for creating an economic robustness in Wyoming.” “Another really important byproduct of our relationship is our students will get to work in a state-of-the-art facility that will look like a production facility,” Gern says. “And so our students will have an opportunity that’s unavailable probably in the United States. Our students are going to be here, they’re going to be learning about these processes and we hope that draws industries to the state.”

SPRiNg After lengthy review, a site in Cheyenne is selected. Other agreements that spell out pieces of this project are being negotiated. Building the facility is expected to take two to two-and-a-half years.

The gasification process can use a number of feedstocks including coal to make a number of products including synthesis gas. Illustration courtesy of ge energy

Construction employment is estimated at 300 jobs. Engineering and construction estimates are still being calculated, but the plant is expected to cost between $100 million and $120 million. When it’s up and running, the facility is expected to require about 15 skilled and semi-skilled workers on a continuous basis.

Both Gern and Atwell are optimistic about the future for coal. “Too many people look at coal negatively today. I want to help change that.” Atwell says. “People need to understand the issues with coal and the opportunities. It’s too

much an integral part of our world economy to just walk away from completely. We have the technology today to utilize coal while reducing the polluting emissions. We need to advance that technology, make it even more efficient on a wider variety of coals. The research we do with this center is expected to help us do that.” As the United States moves toward an energy-secure future, Gern says, coal has to be part of it. “It has to remain an important part of the nation’s electric production, and this will help us secure that in an environmentally acceptable manner,” he says. “UW is a major energy university, and now we will become much more so. We have enhanced-oil recovery, carbon dioxide capture, and a reclamation center. Now this will help us understand coal, and that’s important for a state that produces more coal than the next four states put together.” v

st r e ngt h i n di v er sit y ncar, uw and four hBcus join to form an array of scientific expertise by dave shelles

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đ?’Şđ?’Şđ?’Şđ?’Ş

n the surface, the University of Wyoming doesn’t have much in common with four historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). Investigate a little more, and a recent agreement with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) shows UW is the right choice to join forces with these four other universities to increase diversity in the field of atmospheric sciences. With that goal in mind, the five universities entered into a memorandum of understanding with NCAR in August. The memorandum lays out several activities designed to accomplish the increased diversity; notably faculty exchanges between the schools, graduate student research and internship opportunities, and NCAR scientists serving as visiting faculty at the member institutions. “What we hope it’s going to mean is that we’ll have more exposure to those types of institutions that have historically educated African-Americans,� says Nell Russell, UW’s associate vice president for diversity. “Hopefully that exposure is going to lead to our having an ability to recruit from that group in order to create a more diverse community. “This is not just students. We’re talking about faculty and hopefully administrative positions also.� The efforts to expand diversity have not gone unnoticed among UW’s partners in the agreement. Quinton Williams, a professor of physics at Jackson State University in Mississippi, says he is impressed with UW’s commitment to this agreement. “I’m really excited that University of Wyoming took it up on its own will to look at this consortium that was put together with NCAR and several HBCUs and say, ‘Hey, we’re committed to diversity and we should be a part of this.’ That sends a very strong message out there,� Williams says. “They’re looking for active opportunities to engage this problem of lack of diversity and really hitting it head on by finding which institutions they can partner with to basically work this problem out of existence.� Along with Jackson State, UW enters into the agreement with Hampton University in Hampton, Virginia; Washington D.C.’s Howard University; and North Carolina

dr. gregory Jenkins (kneeling on left), along with nasa and howard university students, the french falcon 20 aircraft science support team, and senegalese students, faculty and researchers during a field campaign in 2006.

dr. Quinton williams of Jackson state university

A&T, located in Greensboro, North Carolina. Hampton University and Howard University are a private schools and the other two are state schools, budding research universities that have strong programs in all the sciences—particularly earth sciences. They all offer affordable educations. All four HBCUs are represented to NCAR by professors who have taken the lead in producing research focused on the atmospheric sciences. Dr. James H. Russell III, (no relation to Nell Russell), joined the academic world after serving as head of the chemistry and dynamics branch and the theoretical studies branch in the NASA Langley Atmospheric Sciences Division. He is a professor of atmospheric and planetary sciences and Summer 2009 • 33

courtesy

co-director of the Center for Atmospheric Sciences at Hampton University. He says he’s been associated with NCAR for most of his professional career, so it’s a natural thing for Hampton to be in on this agreement. “We have a very extensive program in atmospheric sciences. As a matter of fact, we formed a new department in November 2006, which is the department of atmospheric and planetary sciences,â€? he says. “Prior to that time, we were part of the physics program, and we had a center for atmospheric sciences. So we—I’m talking about my partner Pat McCormick and I—have been here for about 13 years. We came from NASA-Langley and set up a program in atmospheric sciences here at the university with the goal of increasing the number of minorities in our field. We now have our own satellite mission to help us train students.â€? Gregory Jenkins is the chair of Howard University’s department of physics and astronomy, and past director for the program in atmospheric sciences. He has done extensive research on hurricanes that begin off the coast of Africa, and he has advised several summer research projects aimed at getting minorities involved in the atmospheric sciences. Solomon Bililign, a professor of physics at North Carolina A&T University, says Jenkins made the call to get him involved with NCAR. Already North Carolina A&T was involved with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s center in Boulder, Colorado, so Bililign had an “inâ€? with NCAR. “That was one of the programs that we’re looking into in terms of developing collaboration to enhance our capacity and obtain summer research positions for our students, and a faculty exchange, so that’s where NCAR comes into play,â€? Bililign says. 34 • UWyo

“The other point is our center is aligned with the research lab in Boulder, which is next door to NCAR. So that’s one of the motivations because we have lots of common activities going on between the NOAA lab and NCAR and our centers. It made sense to be part of that direction.� Jenkins says the HBCUs have had a loosely organized alliance to involve minorities in the atmospheric sciences, both at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Those alliances have involved NCAR, as all four faculty representatives and their respective schools have been involved with NCAR courtesy for years. This formalized agreement, Jenkins says, will only strengthen their programs. “We all felt there had to be a coalition. Our programs are small, we’re not necessarily big enough to compete with the giants out there,� Jenkins says. “But as it relates to underrepresented students, we are doing as much as any large institution for graduating students. We are in a sense creating the next generation of students that won’t be in isolation and who will make a much deeper impact on a national scale—at universities, at labs, and in private industry.� Williams says he’s continuing an association between NCAR and Jackson State—he became the school’s academic affiliate representative to NCAR in 2003. That association has benefited Jackson State because Williams has helped establish a degree program in earth systems science. But Williams says the sky is the limit with this current memorandum of agreement. “That particular program is in its early phases, and there are all sorts of opportunities for outside institutions to come and hopefully partner with Jackson State to help make that program as strong as it can be to produce those qualified students that will one day go out there [to NCAR in Boulder] and obtain Ph.D.s in geosciences, and maybe some will ultimately end up working at NCAR,� he says. “But we look for strong partners to help us achieve our goal and objective of becoming the definitive source of diversity in the atmospheric sciences and geosciences over the next few years.� From the science standpoint, UW is a natural fit for this agreement as its programs in the earth sciences are on par with the other four universities and among the best

in the country. But from the diversity standpoint, even Nell Russell admits UW doesn’t come immediately to mind. “Wyoming tends to kind of be on the periphery to the HBCUs,� she says. “People just don’t really think about Wyoming when they’re thinking about going off to school, professional school, or pursuing a faculty position. I think that [NCAR] connection is going to serve us well because Wyoming is a fabulous school, and I think we’re sort of like a sleeper. They don’t realize we have great faculty, great programs, great environment. That’s what we’re hoping to have.� Maura Hagan, the deputy director of NCAR, says she sees strength in numbers. Rather than one school joining with NCAR to solve the lack of diversity in atmospheric sciences, five schools well-known for their

dr. James russell of hampton university

programs in these areas will pool their resources to forge a better future. “The result will be greater than the sum of the parts, in terms of the fact that we really do share a common vision regarding the promotion of education in the atmospheric and related sciences,� she says. “Each of us brings unique expertise as well as experiences to the whole issue, and by working together we can really leverage the individual efforts and go much further.� Nell Russell says she sees an even greater opportunity for UW—even greater than the scientific research going on at NCAR. “Diversity is a movement similar to civil rights,� she says. “Wouldn’t that be incredible for Wyoming to be at the forefront of that movement? It can only be a positive in the long run.� v

About the National Center for Atmospheric Research ncar provides the university science and teaching community with the tools, facilities and support required to perform innovative research. through ncar, scientists gain access to high-performance computational and observational facilities, such as supercomputers, aircraft and radar—resources researchers need to improve human understanding of atmospheric and earth system processes. ncar and university scientists work together on research topics in atmospheric chemistry, climate, cloud physics and storms, weather hazards to aviation, and interactions between the sun and earth. In all of these areas, scientists are looking closely at the role of humans in both creating climate change and responding to severe weather occurrences. source: ncar.ucar.edu

About the universities courtesy

Howard University—enrollment 10,623; founded in 1867; notable alumni include former chief justice thurgood Marshall and novelist toni Morrison Hampton University—enrollment 6,154; founded in 1868; notable alumni include inventor Booker t. washington and comedian wanda sykes North Carolina A&T—enrollment 10,383; founded in 1891; notable alumni include civil rights activist Jesse Jackson sr., Illinois sen. Jesse Jackson Jr., and nfL hall of famer elvin Bethea Jackson State—enrollment 8,351; founded in 1877; notable alumni include nfL hall of famer walter Payton, weather channel meteorologist Vivian Brown, and jazz singer cassandra wilson University of Wyoming— enrollment 12,875; founded in 1886; notable alumni include former vice president of the united states dick cheney, sports announcer curt gowdy, and former u.s. army chief of staff Peter schoomaker.

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n idea hits in the shower, on an exercise bike or knee-deep in a river with fly-fishing rod in hand. Perhaps the writer finds inspiration in a place that’s near and dear, such as a hiking trail in a nearby mountain range or at a horse track at dawn. Maybe hearing the platitudes of a politician’s speech inspires the gears of creativity. Then it’s a matter of pulling out a notepad and scrawling that idea with good, old-fashioned pen and paper or sitting down at a computer and hammering out a phrase or several. For the University of Wyoming’s well-known writers, writing is the one thing they have in common—that and a general creative process. How they get from concept to publishing press is another matter altogether.  Poetry professor Harvey Hix’s latest work involved downloading 8,000 pages’ worth of former President George W. Bush’s speeches from the White House’s Web site. He incorporated elements of those speeches into a series of poems for the compilation God Bless (Etruscan, 2007).  Alyson Hagy, who teaches fiction in the MFA program in creative writing, had a flash of inspiration as she strolled around Keeneland Racetrack near Lexington, Kentucky. After writing a short story about what she saw, heard, smelled, and felt, she expanded it to a novel, Keeneland (Simon & Schuster, 2000).  Creative nonfiction professor Jeff Lockwood follows a more winding path to the printed page. He starts with the skeleton of an idea, follows this by adding flesh to the outline of that idea, and then writes several drafts to carve out the fat before finally landing an essay in a magazine (For example, “The Nature of Violence,” Orion, January/February 2006).

by dave shelles

etting physical The three writers also derive inspiration from their avocations. All three are physically active in pursuits ranging from fly-fishing to tennis, but while Hix says ideas hit in his living room rocking chair, they also emerge while working out on his Schwinn Airdyne exercise bike. He says the physicality and rhythm are conducive to the creative process—therefore pen and paper sit nearby for those moments of inspiration. “I have a little stack of pieces of paper that I’ve torn into quarters. I keep scrap paper and pen there and scribble away on the exercise bike,” he says. “Those scraps of paper go over to the computer and get keyed in to whatever file is appropriate.” Ask Lockwood about the genesis of his ideas and he’ll say, “In the shower.” Press him a little more and he’ll also talk about a combination of physical activity and reading prodigiously. “Ideas come in the shower, but the best place to get ideas is hiking or skiing. There’s something about that repetitive, rhythmic motion that gets you thinking deeply,” says Lockwood, whose most recent book, Six-Legged Soldiers, was published by Oxford University Press in October. “So lots of ideas begin and die on a single trip or a single outing.” “certainly ideas can come anywhere.” harvey hix takes a moment to jot down ideas.

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selections from UWyo magazine – V10N1+2 Summer/Fall 2008


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UWyo THE MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING Summer 2008 Summer/Fall

neWsBrIeFs WPR stays on the air . . . with some horse sense

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he first significant snowstorm of the season has hit Wyoming, and that leaves the staff at Wyoming Public Radio wondering what it will take this winter to keep its broadcasts on the air. In February, WPR Chief Engineer Reid Fletcher needed to get to the top of Copper Mountain outside Thermopolis because WPR’s Thermopolis transmitter, KUWT 91.3 FM, was off the air. Both KUWT and KUWZ, Rock Springs/Green River 90.5 FM, had gone silent on February 14. KUWZ was the easier problem to solve; the tower was accessible by truck. Fletcher and Engineering Coordinator Shane Toven drove there, made the repairs, and returned to Laramie the following day. Reaching the top of Copper Mountain was a different matter. The utility road to the 8,025-foot summit was drifted in three feet of snow in some stretches. Three inches of ice covered most others. Clouds shrouded the mountain top and a sustained 40-mph wind blew down the slope, driving snow straight across the land-

scape. Even a four-wheel drive truck couldn’t reach the transmitter site. Fletcher had few options. Locating a tracked vehicle like a snowcat would have taken several days; a snowmobile would be easy to find but hard to maneuver and impossible to pack with all the gear he needed. Wyoming Public Radio is heard statewide on a network of 24 satellitefed transmitters and translators on mountaintops across the state. During the summer, reaching the sites is a slow four-wheel drive trek. In the winter, when the sites are rocked by vicious weather systems, the roads become both treacherous and impassible. Fletcher turned to Program Director Roger Adams, who was concerned about a string of signal problems in the wake of severe winter mountain weather that nearly blocked access to several sites. When transmitters are down, WPR is off the air and not serving its listeners. In radio, dead air is a cardinal sin. “We do our best to stay on the air; we have an ambitious operation. Mountain tops are wonderful posi-

tions for antennas,” Adams says. “The downside is repairing them.” He had offered, almost as a joke, to use his horses to reach remote locations. He renewed his offer for this trip. This time his offer was accepted, forging a link between 19th century transportation and 21st century communication technology. Toven and Fletcher began troubleshooting the transmitter, anticipating what parts and tools Fletcher would need. They concluded the problem was either the satellite receiver or the dish. They limited their load to 200 pounds—what a pack horse could reasonably carry. Fletcher packed a replacement receiver, a radio spectrum analyzer, a laptop computer, cables, connectors and tools. Adams made his own preparations. He chose Buck, a gray Percheron gelding, for Fletcher, and Billie, a coffeecolored mare, for himself. Pepa, a light bay mare, would pack the radio gear. The men and horses left Laramie early Saturday. When they arrived in Thermopolis, they scouted the trail up Copper

Mountain. From Wyoming Highway 20, they drove in fair weather about half the distance to Birdseye Pass. From there, they could just make out the towers at the top of the mountain. That’s where they would start their trek. When dawn broke Sunday, the weather took an ominous turn. Clouds blanketed the peak, the temperature hovered in the low teens and the wind was blowing harder. “The wind was really cold,” Fletcher says. “I’m a Wyoming native, and I know how to dress warm.” But it wasn’t quite enough. The horses picked their way through drifts and across ice. The trek was long and cold. Buck, they say, seemed to question the sanity of the quest, but they reached the top of the mountain and the windbreak of the transmitter shed. The problem was indeed the satellite dish. Buffeted by wind, its central aiming component had shaken loose; the dish was no longer aligned with the orbiting satellite. Fletcher, outside in the howling wind, adjusted the dish bit by bit. Inside the shed, Adams

Photo by Reed Fletcher

monitored the satellite receiver and the radio spectrum analyzer. By the time of the Sunday rebroadcast of Garrison Keillor’s A Prairie Home Companion, KUWT was back on the air.

“This showed us what’s possible,” Adams says. “I’m not a rancher, but this trip gave me an appreciation for people who work with animals in all kinds of weather.”

—roger adams

sCULPTURE inviTATionAL rebka • baker • namibia • mCnair

Photo by Roger Adams

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Artist profile

Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational is an exhibition of outdoor public art on the campus of the University of Wyoming and throughout Laramie. By Susan Moldenhauer

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The idea was conceived in response to the University of Wyoming Art Museum’s planned renovations affecting the galleries, and to the increasing interest in public art for our campus and community. Summer/Fall 2008 • 21

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Putting it all together

Patrick Dougherty Twenty-five years ago, an artist named Patrick Dougherty from North Carolina began receiving recognition for his sculpture. His work was experimental, combining his love of nature, his carpentry skills, and used tree saplings as construction material. His first sculpture, MapleBodyWrap, was selected for the North Carolina Biennial Artists’ Exhibition at the North Carolina Museum of Art. The next year, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art mounted his first one-person exhibition.

During that time, I learned of his work and scheduled an exhibition at Second Street Gallery in Charlottesville, Virginia, where I was the director. He filled the 25-by30-foot gallery with two whirling hut-like structures and called it Two-Hut Tango. It was amazing, created only from saplings, offering intimate spaces and the earthy aroma of the outdoors, and so structurally sound that chainsaws were necessary to remove it at the end of the exhibition. Since then, Patrick has created nearly 150 sculptures for sites all over the world. When we decided to organize an exhibition of outdoor art for the University of Wyoming, I knew Patrick Dougherty had to be on our list of artists. Patrick came to Laramie in December 2007 for preliminary work to create a sculpture for the University of Wyoming. During the two-day site visit, we toured possible locations for his work, met with the Sculpture Committee, reviewed necessary equipment and staffing needs with the museum and physical plant staff, and traveled the Laramie Valley to identify possible sources of saplings for his work. He left with impressions of Wyoming, the campus, and his site on the northeast corner of Prexy’s Pasture. Preparing for his return six months later included the challenge of securing approval to collect a variety of saplings

(far left) Artist Patrick Dougherty takes a moment to examine and reflect upon his recently completed sculpture in Prexy’s Pasture. (above) Dougherty works on one of the outer walls of Short Cut early in the installation process.

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Linda Fleming, Refugium Jesús Moroles, Granite Windows (above) Patrick Dougherty talks with members of his work crew of museum interns and staff shortly after finishing his sculpture, Short Cut. (right) Dougherty and museum chief preparatory Sterling “Stoney” Smith work on the upper portion of the sculpture.

from accessible locations. With the help of Paul Harrison, director, and Mike Zook, manager, of Laramie Parks & Recreation, Don Bath gave us permission to collect from the Bath Ranch southwest of Laramie. Securing a site with larger saplings that could be used for structural elements was more challenging. However, a fortuitous call to Lefty Cole of the Deerwood Ranch was met with a resounding “Yes.” Two days of cutting, bundling, tying, and hauling truckloads of alder and willow saplings was the first challenge for Dougherty and his extended work crew of museum interns and staff, UW physical plant and city parks employees, and volunteers. Once on site, physical plant personnel dug 46 post holes under Dougherty’s guidance for planting structural support saplings for the sculpture. Knowing what material he had available, Dougherty could determine what form and shape his sculpture would take. Always relating his work to its site and environment, he was inspired by the boulders of the Simpson Family Plaza on Prexy’s Pasture. Their crevices and the relationship of one boulder to the next intrigued him. Working around the unpaved short cut that bisects the site, Dougherty created four large boulder-like forms with an array of doorways and passages, each with a view of the sky. Structural saplings were pulled and tied to create the general shape of the sculpture and smaller saplings were woven into the structure. With the assistance of interns, staff, and volunteers, the work took almost three weeks to create. Placing the structures strategically to retain the integrity of its inspirational path, he titled it Short Cut. Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational is an exhibition of public art, primarily outdoor, that was inspired by the eightmonth closure of the Art Museum galleries for renovations. After consulting with museum staff, board members, donors, and faculty to explore keeping the museum visible and active 24 • UWyo

during this time, we decided to respond to the increasing interest in having public art on our campus and in our community by organizing an outdoor exhibition. Planning for an exhibition of contemporary art by internationally known artists began in early 2007. A desire to connect with nature, Wyoming’s landscape, and human presence were a guiding principle in choosing artists for the exhibition, in addition to their public art experience, professional accomplishments, and the ability for their work to withstand Wyoming’s climate. Artists from larger urban art centers, the Mountain Plains region, and Wyoming were invited. In the end, the exhibition is comprised of 18 sculptures, 13 by contributing artists, 4 from the art museum’s collection, and one created by the artists of Ark Regional Services. Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational has been a remarkable experience for all who have been involved and, by early accounts, for many who will encounter an explosion of art in Laramie for the coming year. To my knowledge, it is the largest exhibition of contemporary sculpture to be mounted in Wyoming and is unique in that it has been organized by a university art museum, and enthusiastically embraced by the university and the city. It is a testimony to the importance of art in our community. It also speaks to the importance of the exhibition for the artists. Many, who could have simply lent existing work to us, were so excited to be asked to show their work in Wyoming that they created new sculpture specifically for this exhibition: Charles Parson, Jesús Moroles, James Surls, John Henry, and Carl Reed. Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational is a temporary exhibition that will remain on view through July 2009. For information on the sculptures and the artists, visit the UW Art Museum Webpage at www.uwyo.edu/artmuseum or the museum’s new blog at www.uwartmuseum.blogspot.com. v

Steven Siegel, It goes under Charles Parson, Molto Allargando Horizon

James Surls, In Circle

Ursula von Rydingsvard, Doolin Doolin Carl Reed, Braced Ring with Outlyer

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Go where the art is

City of Laramie

University of Wyoming Campus

Celebrating an extraordinary career

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N 1 Steven Siegel (American, b. 1953), It goes under, 2008, mulch, screening, wood, 170 ft, site specific installation 2 Stan Dolega (American, b. 1943), Vedauwoo Modernized, 2008, steel, rock, 10 x 10 x 8 ft, lent by the artist 3 John Kearney (American, b. 1921), Alligator, 1973, chrome plated steel, welded, 26 ½ x 115 x 24 in, University of Wyoming Art Museum Collection, gift of Mr. Harris J. Klein, 1974.3 4 Artists of ARK, Synergy: A Tribute to Alexander Calder, 2008, steel and mixed media, size variable, made possible by a grant from the Wyoming Arts Council 5 Robert Russin (American, 1914–2007), First Steps, ca. 1972, bronze, 5 x 6 ½ x 3 ½ ft, University of Wyoming Art Museum Collection, gift of Isadore Familian, 1991.23 6 Charmaine Locke (American, b. 1950), Open Book, 2004, bronze, 1/5, 79 x 63 x 40 in, lent by the Surls Locke Personal Collection 7 John Henry (American, b. 1943), River High, 2008, painted steel, height 55 ft, lent by the artist 26 • UWyo

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8 Linda Fleming (American, b. 1945), Refugium, 2007, laser cut steel, 105 x 228 x 108 in, lent by the artist 9 Wanxin Zhang (Chinese, b. 1961), Waiting, 2007, glazed ceramic, 76 x 24 x 18 in, University of Wyoming Art Museum Collection, Patricia S. Guthrie Special Exhibits Endowment and the National Advisory Board of the UW Art Museum Purchase  Carl Reed (American, b. 1944), Braced Ring with Outlyer, 2008, stone, steel, dimensions variable, lent by the artist  James Surls (American, b. 1943), In Circle, 2008, stainless steel, 120 x 113 x 107 in, lent by the artist  Patrick Dougherty (American, b. 1945), Shortcut, 2008, saplings, site-specific installation  Jesús Moroles (American, b. 1950), Granite Windows, 2008, found steel tank and granite, 7 x 8 ft dia, lent by the artist  Charles Parson (American, b. 1948), Molto Allargando Horizon, 65 ft, steel, glass, plastic, earth, lent by the artist

 Deborah Butterfield (American, b. 1949), Billings, 1996, found steel, welded, 87 x 102 x 32 in, lent by the artist  Ursula von Rydingsvard (Polish/Ukrainian, b. 1942), Doolin Doolin, 1995-1997, cedar and graphite, 83 x 212 x 77 in, private collection  Jun Kaneko (Japanese, b. 1942), Untitled Dango, glazed ceramic, 75 ½ x 59 x 29 in, 2001, University of Wyoming Art Museum Collection, Purchased by Patricia R. Guthrie, the W. Sherman Burns Estate, and the University of Wyoming Art Museum, Acquisition Funds, 2004.3  Jesús Moroles (American, b. 1950), Eclipse, Vermont granite, 78 ½ x 33 ¼ x 7 ½ in, 1990, University of Wyoming Art Museum Collection, gift of Harvey and Mireille Katz, in honor of Olga Mordo, 1998.8

An exhibition of drawings and models of the sculptures in the invitational are on view at the UW Art Museum. For more information on this, download a walking and driving tour which includes art on

permanent view in Laramie and at the University of Wyoming, or read the Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational Blog, visit uwyo.edu/artmuseum.

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early four decades after the fact, Lee Schick remembers hearing the pride in Derek Prowse’s voice and seeing the joy on his face. It’s easy to understand why Prowse, Schick’s department head, was so excited on that summer day in 1970. He was announcing the hiring of Glen A. Rebka, a renowned Harvard University-educated physicist who was leaving his position as a Yale University professor to join the faculty of the University of Wyoming’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. “I remember Derek getting up and saying that he had always wanted to hire a Harvard man and a Yale man,” recalls Schick, then a professor in the department. “In Glen, he got both.” And UW got lucky. In the nearly 40 years since, Rebka has left an indelible impression while bestowing wisdom upon his students, helping to rejuvenate and strengthen curriculum and shaping the department’s vision for the future. “That’s why I wanted to find a way to commemorate him and his contributions to this department and this university,” says Ron Canterna, a UW professor who has worked with Rebka since 1979.

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Canterna decided on a conference to be named in Rebka’s honor that would include a celebratory banquet and breakout sessions and discussions relevant to his research on high-energy physics and general relativity. He invited many of Rebka’s former students, many of whom have gone on to find great success at universities or research institutions in the United States and abroad, and some of his former colleagues from Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, where he often conducted research during his teaching years at UW. Everybody liked the idea of paying homage to Rebka’s scientific and academic career. Almost everybody. “It took some convincing of him,” Canterna says. “He really didn’t think he deserved it, and I said to him, ‘There are a lot of people who think you do, and this is the only way that I feel is appropriate.’” Still, Rebka says he isn’t so sure. “It’s certainly a great honor, and it’ll be good for the department to bring back all of the former students,” he says. But, “I don’t feel I’m worthy of all this,” Rebka says with a characteristic shrug of his shoulders.


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at a GLanCe

Photo by Lumidek

Jefferson laboratory at Harvard University.

“Glen has probably been the most prestigious physicist here, ever,” Canterna adds.

Glen A. Rebka

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WHEN HE ARRIVED AT UW IN 1970, Rebka brought more than a grand resume and a profound knowledge of physics. He brought instant credibility. Ten years earlier, Rebka had worked with his Harvard adviser, Robert Pound, to verify Albert Einstein’s prediction that gravity can change light’s frequency. The Pound-Rebka experiment, as part of Rebka’s doctoral thesis, is widely considered to have ushered in an era of precision tests of general relativity. To confirm Einstein’s 1905 prediction of gravitational redshift, or a shift in the frequency of a photon to lower energy as it climbs out of a gravitational field, Rebka and Pound placed an emitter at the top of the 74-foot tower of Harvard’s Jefferson Physical Laboratory and installed a detector on the ground. By adjusting the emitter and measuring the detection rate, Rebka and Pound found the velocity difference between the top of the tower and the detector that compensated for the change of frequency. Their experiment was labeled a major scientific achievement by Clifford Will, regarded as one the world’s foremost experts on the theory of general relativity, and lauded by scientific publications. It was among the earliest precision experiments testing general relativity. After completing his studies at Harvard, Rebka joined the physics faculty at Yale, where he worked before relocating to UW. Rebka cites the opportunity to work with colleagues at Los Alamos, as well as UW’s budding research program, fronted by Prowse, as key factors in his decision to journey nearly 2,000 miles from Connecticut to Wyoming. The arrival of Rebka and other prominent new professors nearly 40 years ago—including Schick, Tom Grandy, Dave Hoffman, and Jim Rosen—helped push UW’s physics and astronomy department to new heights. By the early 1970s, the department had more than 20 active faculty members and some 120 graduate students. Prowse’s ambitious research program emphasized experimental atomic and molecular physics, theoretical physics, high-energy particle physics, atmospheric physics, and infrared astrophysics.

The career of University of Wyoming professor emeritus Glen A. Rebka and the scientific contributions of the Department of Physics and Astronomy were honored at the three-day Rebka Scientific Conference in Laramie in September.

“This department was really doing substantial physics,” Canterna says. “That was a time when practically every Wyoming high school science teacher in physics came from here. Those were especially good times.” Canterna contends Rebka was the centerpiece of that activity. “Glen has probably been the most prestigious physicist here, ever,” Canterna adds. Rebka, who served as department chair from 1983 to 1991, retired in 1998—sort of. He still has an office on campus in Laramie, and he has taught a springtime undergraduate course in modern physics for the past 10 years. “I just remember that one of my colleagues got sick and the course was in shambles and that I took over the second half of the course one year,” Rebka remembers. “It was sort of fun and I enjoyed the students, so I kept doing it.” He smiles and adds, “I’ve always enjoyed working with the students.” THE OPPORTUNITY TO VISIT many of his former students played a critical role in Rebka agreeing to go along with Canterna’s plan for a conference named in his honor. The professor, now 77, is eager to reflect on days gone by and hear stories of their successes. Former students from as far away as India were hoping to travel to Laramie to attend the conference. Others, from across the United States, were expected to have easier trips. Rebka’s former colleagues on faculty and at Los Alamos were planning to attend, too. In fact, Canterna was worried there wouldn’t be enough seats for everybody at the banquet, which he prefers to call “the reunion dinner.” Despite Rebka’s reticence over the honor, his colleagues have a different opinion. Schick chuckles at Rebka’s assertion. “I can believe that would be Glen’s reaction,” Schick says. “But he’s wrong. He was the stalwart of the department— the most well-known physicist, both nationally and internationally—and I think that says it all. “He’s contributed greatly to his field and to this university, and no matter how much he pooh-poohs it, that’s the truth.” v Summer/Fall 2008 • 31

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rvive: e to Su Stuggl Rights oners’ on Pris rt po a A Re Namibi in V/AIDS and HI

How a Human Rights Class Became a Class in Humanity by Alan Barstow

Alan Barstow and seven University of Wyoming classmates spent their spring break doing something nearly unimaginable. Under the direction of UW College of Law professor Johanna Bond, the eight were part of a yearlong human rights class, and in March, they traveled halfway around the world to Namibia to help the Namibian Legal Assistance Center in a fact-finding mission on HIV/AIDS issues in Namibian prisons. The result is a 52-page report titled, Struggle to Survive: A Report on Prisoners’ Rights and HIV/AIDS in Namibia, which the Legal Assistance Center will use to advocate for prison reforms. Some group members had never traveled overseas before this trip. For Barstow, who served in the Peace Corps, the class and its work was a chance to return to a country where he lived from 2002 to 2004. The Emerging Process WINDHOEK, Namibia—Professor Johanna Bond comfortably negotiates taxis in this African country—a skill that would intimidate many. She learned this skill doing human rights research around the world, including a 2001 trip to Africa as a senior Fulbright Scholar that resulted in Voices of African Women: Women’s Rights in Ghana, Uganda, and Tanzania, a book she edited. “It’s one thing to read about human rights treaties in a book. But to see how they are applied in practice gives a richer understanding,” she says. Namibia is beautiful in the way that Wyoming is beautiful. High plains. Towering mountains. Dry climate. Namibia’s springbok, colored brown and white, could be mistaken for Wyoming’s pronghorn. Unlike Wyoming, Namibia has a rugged, desert Atlantic coastline, and the interior is covered in dense, scrub trees. Namibia is among the most sparsely peopled countries in the world. Its 2 million people, from 13 different ethnic groups, live in an area three times as big as Wyoming. Formerly known as South-West Africa, the country gained independence from South Africa and its history of apartheid in 1990. While the capital, Windhoek, is a modern city of tall buildings and walking malls that could be found in Europe, (left) From left to right, UW student Alan Barstow, Tonderai Bhatasara of the LAC, UW student Haydee Dijkstal, and Gabes Augustus of the LAC stand outside of the LAC’s northern office in Ongwediva, Namibia.

Photos courtesy of Alan Barstow

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(above) From left to right, Univ. of Namibia law student Ashley Tjipitua, Gabes Augustus of the LAC, Univ. of Namibia law student Gloria Situmbeko, and UW students Jason Mundy, Joe Azbell, and Haydee Dijkstal at a guest ranch outside of Windhoek, Namibia.

officials, revealed that Namibia’s prison system, like most prison systems around the world, is plagued by violence, overcrowding, coercive sex, and rape. Nutritious food is scarce, and prisoners don’t have consistent access to health care, including HIV/AIDS testing facilities, prevention methods, and treatment. Staff shortages and the stigmatization of both prisoners and people living with HIV/AIDS further confound the problem. The investigation shows these conditions violate prisoners’ human rights as stated in international treaties that Namibia is a party to, and they also violate Namibia’s own constitution and policies.

most Namibians rely on subsistence farming and live in rural areas. Its most pervasive problem is its HIV/AIDS infection rate. Namibia is consistently ranked as one of the top five countries most affected by AIDS. Nearly one in five of its citizens is infected. Namibians have a saying: “If you’re not infected, you’re affected.” Namibia also has one of the highest incarceration rates in the world. Prisoners are considered a vulnerable group worldwide because of the stigma that being a prisoner carries and because prisons are often one of the last priorities in government spending. A high HIV/AIDS rate can further complicate conditions for prisoners. The Legal Assistance Center (LAC), a non-governmental organization based in Namibia, believes HIV prevention and support steps taken in Namibia’s general population must be mirrored in the prisons, and it wanted to discover to what extent prisoners’ fundamental human rights were being met. That’s where Bond’s class played an important role. Knowing that a firsthand human rights experience would enrich the studies of her students, Bond contacted the Legal Assistance Center in early 2007 to develop a collaborative project. In the fall of 2007, eight UW students, selected from a pool of almost 50 applicants, began researching Namibia’s domestic laws and international human rights obligations. The students also practiced interviewing skills in preparation for the March trip to Namibia. “To do this work in a different country,” Bond says, “folks must have a degree of flexibility. There’s significant culture shock, and people have to adapt during different types of interviews.” After 21 hours in flight and two layovers, Bond’s class had five days to conduct more than 60 interviews. The students split up into teams and partnered with law students from the University of Namibia, Legal Assistance Center representatives, and two volunteer lawyers from the United States. Interviews with former inmates and prison guards, as well as health-care professionals and non-governmental organization Summer/Fall 2008 • 33

Collier says she was amazed at how open and friendly the former prisoners were, and began to see prisoners not as misfits or outcasts of society, but as real people with needs similar to hers. A visit to Katutura, a Windhoek suburb full of tin shacks with no plumbing or carpet and kids running around without shoes, had the greatest impact on her. “It made me feel like I was too healthy, too well off,” Collier says. “It was an extremely emotional experience for me—to think that even though I grew up on public assistance, I never went unfed or unclothed or without a roof over my head. To compare how I had grown up in a bad state with what really is a bad state was heart-wrenching.” Collier says she now has a different outlook on what is a need and what is simply a want. “This class has made me a cheerleader for human rights,” Collier says. “It gave me an even greater passion to help those in need or who have no voice.”

“If you’re not infected, When Bond and her students returned to UW—this time, a flight cancellation stretched the journey to 42 hours—they compiled their observations and findings in a 52-page report titled, Struggle to Survive: A Report on Prisoners’ Rights and HIV/AIDS in Namibia, that the Legal Assistance Center will use to advocate for prison reforms there. The report includes suggestions the Namibian government can undertake to improve prison conditions. For example, it recommends the repeal of an anti-sodomy law that is in part to blame for the absence of condoms in prisons. The report also recommends that health-care workers be consistently available inside prisons, and that the government should increase monitoring of prisoners, limit overcrowding, and provide prisoners with greater access to HIV testing, prevention, and treatment strategies. Struggle to Survive was also sent to the United Nations Human Rights Committee in Geneva, Switzerland. Namibia was expected to appear before the Human Rights Committee in August 2008 as part of its routine reporting obligations. Bond says she hopes this experience stays with her students. “This class exposed students to what human rights work really looks like,” she says, “and the hope is that it will impact the students’ professional lives. Either they can go into human rights work or simply support clients with pro-bono work.” But many reported that the impact went beyond professional development, and was felt in a more personal way.

Change at the grassroots level The opportunity to take part in this class was one of the reasons Anne Spear enrolled at UW. Spear says she couldn’t miss the chance to work on a report that contributes to understanding and addressing a human rights issue.

you’re affected.”

A cheerleader for human rights Before she arrived in Windhoek, Clarissa Collier had never traveled outside of the United States. The May graduate of UW’s College of Law now works at Holland and Hart, a law firm with offices in Denver, Colorado. Her experience growing up on public assistance in Gillette, Wyoming, motivated her to apply for the class as a way to “assist people who don’t have the funding or political power to make a difference in their own governments.” 34 • UWyo

Spear is part of the graduate-level UW International Studies program. After completing one year of coursework, Spear will serve for two years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Burkina Faso in western Africa working on girls’ education and empowerment projects. Then she’ll return to UW to complete her thesis and master’s degree. Having worked for various non-governmental organizations in the United States, Spear is no stranger to the role and importance of local organizations. “Working with LAC was key to this project. They are a homegrown, grassroots NGO making an impact. Too often, you hear about big international organizations, and we forget the benefit of local perspectives.” Founded during the apartheid era of racial segregation practiced in South Africa and Namibia, the Legal Assistance Center has long advocated for human rights at all levels of Namibian society. Its work after Namibia’s Independence includes drafting with the legislature the Combating of Rape Act, hailed as one of the most progressive rape acts in the world, and the National Policy on HIV/AIDS, while also providing legal support and human rights training to private citizens and companies. Spear says she will take the lessons she learned working with LAC to her Peace Corps placement.


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percentage of the adult (ages 15–49) population with HIV/aIDs in africa. Source: UNAIDS

By 1989 the United States and the former Soviet Union had spent well over four decades in a cold war. During those 40 years both sides engaged in propaganda, espionage, and costly weapons development. General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev of the Soviet Union came to power in 1985 when that country’s economy was suffering from near zero growth, hurt especially by falling world oil prices. Although Gorbachev resolved to conclude the arms race to redirect resources to domestic priorities, many people of the United States doubted his sincerity. In their

“People know best their own needs and culture,” Spear says. “Outsiders, no matter what skills or degrees they have, do not have such knowledge. “I am coming to realize that change takes root when it starts at the grassroots level. In Burkina Faso, I will not do anything without seeking advice and assistance from local organizations. I hope the first thing I do is partner—meaning, they teach me—with a local group.” Personal advocacy Less than two weeks before heading to Namibia, Joe Azbell became a father. The 2008 UW graduate now works at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and says this class was one of the best he had as a law school student. He was able to learn theories and immediately apply them in a real-world situation. But, he says, the class also transformed him personally. Before March, the AIDS epidemic had simply been statistics about a large-scale human tragedy for him. On the third or fourth day in Namibia, he was homesick, missing his wife and newborn son. During an interview with a clinician at the Katutura State Hospital, Azbell saw parents and babies waiting to receive HIV/AIDS treatment. “That’s when the AIDS epidemic hit me at a personal level,” Azbell says. “When I saw babies that were my baby’s age crying, I was immediately able to view the tragedy in terms of people and not numbers. I got a small sense of what those parents were going through. “This is how important advocacy is,” Azbell says. “I feel that our work will help shed some light on the issues that are occurring in the prison system, and I hope it will help bring about much-needed change. “This experience transformed me in a personal way. It changed my view of Africa, of the world.” v

Namibia at a Glance Capital: Windhoek Official language: English Government: Republic Independence from South Africa: March 21, 1990 Area: 318,696 sq mi Population: 2002 census 1,820,916 Population Density: 6.5/sq mi Source: CIA World Fact Book

Students in the class: Name Major Joseph Azbell Law Alan Barstow MFA in Creative Writing Clarissa Collier Law Haydee Dijkstal Law Jason Mundy Law Charles Pelkey Law Rachel Ryckman Law Anne Spear MA in International Studies Funding: Due to the generous amount of financial contributions and in-kind support, students did not have to pay for their flights to Namibia, accommodation in Namibia, vaccines, and some meals.

The entrance to the Casualty Unit (Emergency Room) of the Oshakati State Hospital

eyes a peaceful end to the war was by no means assured. In September 1989, in the midst of this uncertainty, a historic meeting occurred at the joint University of Wyoming/National Park Service Research Station on Jackson Lake. Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze convened to discuss recent internal events in the Soviet Union, regional conflicts around the world, human rights and arms control. Ellen Nye discussed this ministerial meeting with Secretary Baker during his visit to the University of Wyoming earlier this year.

Photos courtesy of the U.S. State Department

Fresh ideas in the fresh mountain air: Wyoming’s place in the close of the Cold War

Donors: Open Society Institute, UW President’s Office, Dick and Lynne Cheney Study Abroad Grants, UW International Studies Department, UW Office of International Programs, UW College of Law, and an anonymous donor. Summer/Fall 2008 • 35

By Ellen M. Nye

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GaLLerY In your opening statements in Jackson Hole you mentioned the natural beauty of the area and used it as a metaphor for preserving that international environment. Shevardnadze also said, “We need fresh ideas, and hopefully the fresh mountain air of Wyoming will help them to emerge and to develop.” To what extent did the setting of the meeting help produce this outcome? [At this time the Soviets] were talking about glasnost and perestroika, openness and freedom, and the wide-open spaces of the West seemed an appropriate environment. It was the first time the Soviets had ever been allowed to go outside of the 25-mile radius around their embassy in Washington, D.C., and their office at the U.N. in New York. The Soviets were really happy and excited about being able to see the American West for the first time and to be able to leave New York and Washington. Here we were promoting the idea of freshness and openness and dialogue and freedom. It was just a very logical place for us to be, and it was a very successful ministerial for that reason. Starting in June 1989, Poland voted the Communists out of government, which is seen as the beginning of the fall of Communism across Europe. To what extent was this apparent in the West? Did this affect your aims for the conference? No it didn’t. We knew of course from our intelligence and we knew from talking to our friends in Solidarnošč, Lech Walesa and others that things were moving rapidly in Poland and in other of the captive nations of Central and Eastern Europe. We knew that change was in the air. I should add that we did have people inside the administration who at the time were misreading what was happening in the Soviet Union. Some of them thought the Soviets were lulling us into a false sense of confidence and that there was not true decline taking place there. But others of us thought there was decline taking place. One of the things that enabled the United States to win the Cold War was the economic decline in the Soviet Union. President Ronald Reagan had a lot to do with that. President George Bush presided over the end of the Cold War and saw to it that it ended peacefully. President Reagan, in his peace through strength buildup of the defense department, in effect made it impossible for the Soviets to compete economically. Did the election of Mikhail Gorbachev in May of 1989 change the relations between our governments? Yes, it did. But Gorbachev had been there before. He was there when we came in in ’89, and the Reagan administration

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had been dealing with him. President Bush wanted to take a close, hard look at what was going on between the United States and the Soviet Union. So it was not until May of ’89 that we really engaged with the Soviets. We were criticized in some quarters for that. But we needed to put the new president’s brand or imprimatur on the nation’s foreign policy, and it was quite proper and appropriate, I think, for us to take a cautious approach to make sure that Gorbachev and Shevardnadze were for real and that perestroika and glasnost were for real. In your opening statements at the news conference at the White House on September 21, 1989, just before you flew to Wyoming to meet the foreign minister, you mentioned that there had been a letter from Gorbachev that restated long-held Soviet positions on arms-control, but “in some instances, it puts new twists on those positions.” To what changes in position were you referring? Were these the breakthroughs that allowed you both to conclude an agreement on arms control? The Soviets had been linking the negotiation of a strategic arms reduction treaty to the space talks, the anti-ballistic missile treaty and space-based weapons discussions. They had a linkage there, and we wanted that linkage severed. There was a hint in that letter that they were willing to sever that linkage, which they ended up doing. And it was in Wyoming that we really made significant progress on a chemical weapons convention that had been a particular interest of [President] Bush when he was vice president. We made so much progress that we concluded that chemical weapons convention shortly thereafter. We also in Wyoming got agreement from the Soviets that the strategic arms reduction treaty would not include sea-launched cruise missiles, which was a position the United States very much wanted adopted. And what was your initial impression of Shevardnadze? I had met him before I became secretary of state at a lunch in the second Reagan term in the East Room of the White House, when he was there on a visit to President Reagan, and I was treasury secretary. But I hadn’t had any real relationship with him. I knew from intelligence reports that he was an old-line politician from the state of Georgia. So he was a Soviet apparatchik in Georgia. But he seemed to be a person with whom you could reason and who would listen and who would take your arguments back and think about them and come back, and oftentimes he would agree with what you were trying to get him to agree to. He was a gentle man. He was quite intellectual. He was not given to losing

his temper. He was quiet, gentle, reflective. I had been told by George Shultz, my predecessor at the State Department, that Shevardnadze was somebody I could do business with. I tested that out and found out that was right. Did your impression of Shevardnadze change at all through your work with him? Our relationship became more and more positive, the more meetings we had. The first ones were rather formal, before we came out here to Wyoming. The first one was, I think, in March in Vienna. They were a bit more stilted and formal. But the more I met with him the more we developed a personal friendship, a relationship of trust. He displayed a great deal of candor. He told me things that I was shocked to hear about how bad things were in the Soviet Union. That was as early as July of 1989. At the end of our meetings in Jackson Hole, I gave him a pair of cowboy boots befitting the venue where we were. And he in turn gave me an enamel picture of Jesus teaching the people. But Communists were not usually very religious. No they were not. They were atheists or agnostics for the most part. But he said, “You see, Mr. Secretary, even we Communists are changing our world view.” And what was your impression of Gorbachev? Well, Gorbachev was a man very much in charge. He was always full of confidence and optimism. I used to think that he was juggling 18 balls at one time, never knowing really where—I’m not sure he was operating with a very welldesigned and well-thought-out plan. He thought he could reform socialism, but he couldn’t. It got away from him. When he gave people freedom, both economic and political, they wanted more. He let the freedom genie out of the bottle, and he couldn’t get him back in. But he was a man of great capacity, in my view. Very smart. He was very good at negotiating, very good at reasoning and always brimming full of confidence. History will be very kind to Gorbachev and Shevardnadze, because they are the two who determined the Soviet Union would not use force to keep the empire together. It had been built on force. It had been kept together by force all those years. And if they had not done that, the Cold War would not have ended peacefully, for sure. So I think historians will be very kind to them. But that’s not the view of the people in Russia now? Not the view of people in Russia now, because Russia has lost its superpower status. It did so under them, so they’re not very highly regarded by the populace in Russia.

In negotiating with Shevardnadze in your series of meetings, what were the greatest obstacles that you had to overcome? Well, you know, we ended up doing a pretty darned good job of making progress in all areas. The biggest obstacles were probably the resistance that we had to arms control within our own respective governments. His military and defense department and our defense department really didn’t want to see things go too fast on the arms-control negotiations. That was probably the most difficult. I remember there were times with Shevy when he would come into the meetings and just read the formal position of the Soviet Union. It was always in those meetings where there were a lot of his military included. Then when we would go off and have our one-onone, he’d be more open and more willing truly to negotiate. The biggest problem was frankly the pushback within our respective governments. But I never had to worry about that. I had a president who was there for me and would be. That’s one of the big advantages of having been his political counselor as well as his foreign policy, his secretary of state. Less than two months after your meeting in Wyoming, the Berlin Wall was torn down. And on December 3, 1989, you met with President Bush, President Gorbachev and Minister Shevardnadze in Malta for the summit that is credited by the British Broadcasting Company as the official end of the Cold War. Did you have any idea in September that these events would unfold so quickly? No, none of us did, including the Soviets. They didn’t anticipate it. None of our allies in Western Europe anticipated it. We didn’t anticipate that the Soviet Union would implode the way it did. I think it’s fair to say that we did anticipate that the Cold War would end, because the wall was breeched and the captive nations of Eastern and Central Europe were given freedom. But we had no idea that the Soviet Union would implode the way it did just two years after Malta. Malta was in December of ’89, and by December of ’91 the Soviet Union had ceased to exist. In his public remarks at UW in April, Baker recalled the words of John F. Kennedy, “Let us never negotiate out of fear. But let us never fear to negotiate.” Baker acted on that advice when he developed an atmosphere of trust during the ministerial in Jackson Hole. As he later summarized the meeting for a CNN documentary on the end of the Cold War: “Everyone on the American side . . . felt it was very important that we assist Gorbachev and Shevardnadze and the reformers in the Soviet Union in any way we could to arrive at a soft landing. The Cold War didn’t have to end with a whimper—it could have gone out with a bang.” Wyoming should be proud of the role it played in this historic peacemaking.” v Summer/Fall 2008 • 39

Do Not Enter: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at the Art Museum during Renovations and Upgrades By Susan Moldenhauer

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Alysia Kraft and Mike Hurley move a painting from storage to a temporary location in advance of the construction.

n March, the University of Wyoming Art Museum closed its galleries to accommodate several complicated projects. The fire-suppression system is being upgraded; changes to the air handling system are being made so that walls no longer vibrate; and the lighting is being enhanced. While the galleries are a priority for completion, the dry-pipe fire suppression system work also has an impact on significant areas of the Centennial Complex—all of the storage areas for the museum and the American Heritage Center, the Reading Room, and the Rentschler Room. Moving nearly 7,000 objects in the art collections ahead of construction and within the secured areas of the museum is a daunting task. Working in concert with Rock Morgan, project director with Facilities Planning; Emory Speigelberg, general contractor; and sub-contractors, a staged approach to organizing the pipe replacement work was scheduled. The galleries and south storage areas were first, then the American Heritage Center Reading Room, the north storage areas of the art museum, and remaining storage areas in the AHC. The museum’s staff compressed the collection into half the storage areas while work was completed in the cleared areas. Over the summer, all the objects will be moved to south storage areas and finally, once all construction is complete, objects will be returned to their permanent location, and a full inventory of the collection will be completed. Storage areas in the Art Museum fill nearly 8,000 square feet of space and are divided into six rooms organized by material (i.e. painting, works on paper, photography, organic, inorganic and the vault). EK Kim, collections manager, is supervising the object relocation, tracking new locations and noting any changes in the condition of objects. Advance planning enabled the museum staff to consider and plan how to keep the Art Museum open and visible during this time. The large public art exhibition, Sculpture: A Wyoming Invitational, is the result. With a four-month installation period between April and August, the first sculpture instal-

lations were at the museum. The museum’s education program continues without interruption, as the sculptures have been the focus of School Tours during the spring, Art Camps in June and Paint Pony Express in July. The Museum Store is also unaffected by the work in the facility. The galleries will be closed through at least September. While the fire suppression work is complete, repairs to correct vibrating walls along the hallway are in the design phase, relocating track for the lighting system in the hallway and the small galleries is planned, and adding a series of point loads in order to present ceiling-mounted contemporary art or equipment for new media exhibitions is scheduled throughout. Once complete, the galleries will be painted and the floors re-finished. The various aspects of this project are essential in ensuring that the University of Wyoming Art Museum can comply with the safekeeping of art objects both in storage and on loan, eliminating potential damage to artwork hung on walls that vibrate from an affixed air handling system, and enhancing the gallery lighting to ensure that every artwork is both presented in light levels appropriate to its medium and lit for the viewer to experience the art. The University of Wyoming Art Museum is the only university art museum in Wyoming. Its exhibition program offers an average of 20 exhibitions a year in-house. Education programs use the exhibitions in addressing K-12 curricular goals and benchmarks, mentoring future teachers in the College of Education, and broadening an understanding of art from all times, genres, and styles for Wyoming’s citizens and visitors. “Imagine Learning from the Masters” is a guiding principle. The Art Museum reaches statewide through its Ann Simpson Artmobile program and the Touring Exhibition Service. Both outreach programs have been running continuously for 25 years. The Art Museum is an accredited member of the American Association of Museums and, with the current upgrades to the Centennial Complex facility, will serve its visitors and preserve collections more effectively in the future. v Summer/Fall 2008 • 45

When Every Shot and Takedown Counts After spending a year at the United States Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs training with other world-class atheletes, University of Wyoming wrestler Michael Martinez is ready to bring his experience back to UW. by Milton Ontiveroz

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decade into the life of a magazine seems like a worthy time to reevaluate the features we offer. Earlier this year, we put together a photo essay to show a day in the life of the University of Wyoming campus. The hard part wasn’t deciding what to put in; it was the process of editing out some very fine images that our photographers captured. The conversation we had about the project led to other conversations about how we could continue to invite people in to the lesser-seen aspects of the university— the kinds of things that casual visitors or even the people who work here year-round might not see. The result is Portraits. In each issue, we’ll introduce you to someone at the university you probably haven’t met. We hope you will enjoy meeting them as much as we have. v

Sergeant Anthony Johnson University Police “I really enjoy the interaction. I’ve met people from all over the world in this job and lifelong friends that I’ve been able to have because of that.” 54 • UWyo

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“I really love the opportunities I’ve been given here and the opportunities to live in this wonderful state. This is home, has been home, and will be home, according to my plans, even after my days as a police office are over.” 56 • UWyo

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UWyo THE MAGAZINE FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING Spring 2008

seeing through rock A $27 million gift from Schlumberger Limited puts state-of-the-art tools for today’s energy needs into the hands of students and researchers at the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute

selections from UWyo magazine – V9N4 Spring 2008

By Jessica Lowell

SEEING THROUGH ROCK TA L K I N G T O E T • S C I E N C E P O S S E

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The sheaf of papers in Shaochang Wo’s hand tells a story of things unseen and things not completely known. Graphs, inked in bright primary colors, show Wo and his colleagues at the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute (EORI) at the University of Wyoming what the spaces holding oil thousands of feet below the earth’s surface look like. It’s a compelling tale for those who have the key and an important story that impacts nearly everyone. Understanding the nature of those rock layers is critical for those who want to reach the oil, and that’s the core of the institute’s work. “We promote enhanced oil recovery in the state,” director Jim Steidtmann says. That’s done through courses, meetings and seminars, and working with oil producers to determine their reserves with simulations and modeling. The Wyoming State Legislature created the Enhanced Oil Recovery Commission in 2004 to oversee the work of the institute. EORI’s mission has been made easier by a gift of software from the world’s leading oilfield services company, Schlumberger Limited. The software, ECLIPSE Parallel, is the same software that oil and gas industry companies are also using. Through models and simulations, it provides a graphic glimpse of what subterranean oil reservoirs look like. Valued at nearly $27 million, the gift is the largest in UW’s history, but as a tool, its value to students and researchers is measured in a different way. “This puts in place state-of-the-art software,” Ben Blalock, vice president for institutional advancement, says. “UW

would not be able to raise the money to buy the software outright. With this gift, however, UW is building a relationship with Schlumberger that benefits both sides. “Our faculty can enhance this partnership by working closely with Schlumberger to further strengthen the ECLIPSE Parallel software,” Blalock says, “and as a result the industry standard can become even better.” Dianne Shelton, university relations manager for Schlumberger, details the benefits to her company this way: “We offer students the chance to have technology and solutions in their hands. Many experts in the exploration and production industry are anticipating retirement. By providing students a chance to learn industry tools while gaining academic knowledge, they understand what some of the processes look like in the exploration and production workflow when they get to the job market.”

Getting at that oil is not merely a matter of drilling a deeper well. Understanding the layer of rock that holds the oil is crucial—its porosity; how much oil, natural gas, or water it holds; whether any geologic feature like a fault will impede the flow of fluids through the space. Equally important is knowing what to use to build pressure in the reservoir to make the oil flow. “It’s not easy to use a pencil to calculate that,” Wo says. In many cases, producers use enhanced oil recovery techniques to produce oil stranded in the reservoirs. That involves injecting a substance such as steam, some kind of surfactant to break up the oil, or carbon dioxide, for example, into the sedimentary layers that hold the oil. Because those decisions are economic, understanding how much of what substance to use and where is critical. With enhanced oil recovery, Steidtmann says, a production well is converted to an injection well through which one of these substances is introduced to the reservoir. That builds the pressure that allows the oil to move and be drawn out. Wo, who first came to UW as a student in 1993, has worked with software like this and this particular software while employed at China National Petroleum Corporation and at the Idaho National Laboratory, and as a researcher at UW. He tested several demonstration packages before contacting Schlumberger in 2004. That relationship resulted in the purchase by EORI of a computer cluster, which has 15 nodes with two CPUs (central processing units) for each node.

“We cannot easily develop this kind of tool,” says Wo. “This program is easier to use. It has more options and more graphics interface.” For him, using this software is like making the leap from DOS with its rudimentary commands to an operating system like Windows, which offers users many options. With the 30 software licenses, students and researchers can take advantage of a powerful, industry standard, software package. Parallel processing allows larger simulation models to be run, which results in better descriptions of reservoirs. It also takes less time to complete the computations. Schlumberger officials hope the relationship doesn’t stop there. “We’re allowing these researchers the opportunity to use these tools to help advance their research,” Shelton says. They do that by learning the nuances of the program. “It’s not really a push-button kind of thing,” Steidtmann says. Users have to factor in variables such as geology and make decisions along the way. “We wouldn’t be able to do reservoir modeling without this kind of gift,” he says. With the software, geoscientists, engineers, and economic analysts can study the state’s oil fields and gather the information they need for a welldesigned project. EORI researchers have studied the Grieve field, outside Casper, Wyoming, and concluded that injecting a certain amount of carbon dioxide at specific points and at specific rates will result in more oil production.

Software makes recovery possible Wyoming is known for its vast reserves of energy—it’s a leading domestic producer of coal and natural gas. While it also produces oil, its oilfields have become less productive over time. That doesn’t mean they’re exhausted; it means the technology to produce the oil and get it out of the ground economically hasn’t been applied yet. Some estimates put the remaining reserves in Wyoming’s oilfields at billions of barrels. While other forms of energy are being explored at UW and elsewhere, fossil fuels such as oil still support the world’s economy.

(above) An outcrop with oil-stained sandstones is taken as an analog for resevoir modeling. (below) Detail of permeability model. (All photos and illustrations for this story are courtesy of EORI unless otherwise noted.)

Schlumberger Limited’s ECLIPSE Parallel software main user interface shows the ternary view of CO2 flooding at the Grieve resevoir.

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(top) Outcrop studies help predict the resevoir characteristics. (middle) A 3-D representation of porosity of the Grieve reservoir generated by ECLIPSE. (bottom) Graduate student in Mathematics Michael Presho and Research scientist Shaochang Wo analyze an oil reservoir using a 3-D model generated by the ECLIPSE Parallel software. (Photo by Trice Megginson.)

About 52 million barrels of oil are produced annually in Wyoming. Of that, 10 percent to 15 percent is produced from some form of enhanced oil recovery. About 85 percent of that fraction is produced through carbon dioxide injection. “If 8 billion barrels remain in the ground, somewhere between 5 percent and 15 percent could be recovered by enhanced oil recovery,” Steidtmann says. “Even 5 percent over 20 years would mean that at $70 a barrel, about $4 billion goes to the state of Wyoming in taxes. That’s why the state funds us.” A question of efficiency Michael Presho might be one of the researchers who engineers change in how subsurface oil reservoirs are viewed. The research assistantship for this UW doctoral candidate is paid for by EORI, and through it, he’s required to learn to use the Schlumberger software. “I’m studying mathematical models of fluid flow,” Presho says. With both bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from UW, Presho is now working on a doctorate in applied mathematics. He’s been learning to use the software for the last nine months and will continue to work with it. “It’s an efficiency thing. You have to maintain pressure to get production,” he says. “When the pressure in a reservoir declines, a well produces less. When the pressure increases, the volume produced increases. He’s starting to measure uncertainties, which are variables in the calculations. Aside from knowing how porosity, fractures, and faults will affect the flow of oil and therefore production, there’s another important use for the information researchers derive—oil companies base their value on their recoverable reserves. “When I started, I didn’t know it would be this useful,” Presho says. More and more graduate students are using the software for research as part of their education. “It’s a valuable tool.” With his studies and his work on the ECLIPSE Parallel software package, Presho says he has some options when he completes his degree, probably in December 2009. “Ideally, with my degree and this simulation work, I could advance my cause in industry or academia.” v

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If you can’t resist the urge to make a joke at Jeff Lockwood’s expense, he doesn’t seem to mind. ¶ Lockwood has just finished leading 11 students in a semesterlong creative writing class, “Interstellar Message Composition.” That’s right: He wants to talk to E.T.

Considering the Void

11 students explore humanity, aliens, and reaching another mind By Jessica Lowell

“It sounds unfortunately nutty,” Lockwood, a professor of natural sciences and humanities at the University of Wyoming, admits. “‘Would you like to be deep fried or fricasseed by an alien?’ That’s the question, isn’t it?” But communication with space is serious business, and it doesn’t rest solely in the hands and imaginations of science fiction fans. For years, the heavens have been monitored through the technology of passive SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) to try to detect signals from intelligent life. The United Nations has an Office for Outer Space Affairs, which among other things maintains a Register of Objects Launched into Outer Space, and its interest adds a layer of politics to talking to extraterrestrials. On that UN register are the Pioneer 10 and 11 missions. The sister spacecraft were sent on exploratory missions of the universe more than three decades ago. They transmitted information about what they carried on plaques coded with information in case they should be intercepted. The plaques bear unclothed images of a man and a woman and details of Earth’s position in the solar system. In 1977, the Voyager 1 and 2 missions joined the register. Their message from Earth was the Voyager Golden Record, which contains images and sounds of life on Earth. Both images and sounds are recorded on a gold phonograph record. “Most of the discussion has been in the hands of astronomers and engineers and computer scientists when it gets to, ‘Should we reply? What should we say?’” Douglas Vakoch says from his office at the SETI Institute. He’s the director of Interstellar Message Composition, and the only social scientist—a psychologist—employed by the institute. The idea for the class stems from a conference Lockwood and Vakoch attended about 18 months ago. With a grant from the Wyoming NASA Space Grant Consortium, Lockwood developed the curriculum for the writing workshop in the university’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing program. The class is an exercise in active SETI, or sending messages to space. When he designed it, what the class could or would be about wasn’t entirely clear. Three serious themes emerged—communicating with an audience you don’t know anything about and taking responsibility for creating one’s reader; the essence of what being human means; and understanding the nature of the “alien” in modern life. In some ways, Lockwood has an advantage in understanding you don’t have to go far before you hit a wall in

interspecies communication. As an entomologist, he knows that insects, which can’t see the color red, can see into the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. Humans can’t see ultraviolet, but they can see red. On what basis do they communicate visual information and experiences? Students worked through a series of what ifs: What if humans and E.T. shared only a single sense? What if messages like music and lyrics were paired? What if there are no givens? What if the alien is just a future version of the writer? “The advantage of this kind of work is that it forces us to reflect on what we most value, and it forces us to try to figure out what we mean by that,” Vakoch, who visited Lockwood’s class early in the semester, says. At the close of the class, Lockwood asked his students to offer up examples in their portfolios of writing of both their successes and their failures. [See next page] The path to failure may have already been sketched out. If you consider the Pioneer plaque and its message, it shows only one species—human—and it shows a version of a solar system that contains nine planets. Pluto was recently demoted. In the unlikely event that either Voyager spacecraft returns to Earth intact, consider how the message will be played. The notion of failure doesn’t worry Lockwood. “We learn from failures. If we’re not failing, we’re not pushing hard enough.” v

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This piece attempts to express to an E.T. how we discuss peoples’ lives after they’ve died, what mourning might sound like, and what humans choose to remember, pay tribute to or get angry about. This piece assumes that the E.T. can understand our language, and infer meaning, even if E.T. can’t understand every word or expression. Also, by giving E.T. multiple eulogies to read, E.T. might begin to see what eulogies for very different people have in common and ways in which they might be distinct. Setting: A family—mother, father, daughter of age five, and son of age 4—stand next to a priest in a cemetery overlooking a small coffin. The father, encouraged by the priest, speaks. “Mario, even though you were only with me and your mother for six weeks on this Earth, you were a true gift. When I held you in my arms right after you were born, I swore you were smiling at me. I want you to know that even though you were only with us a short while, we will always remember and honor your life. It’s a miracle to be born, and you were our miracle. Your mother and I love you. We’re heartbroken about what could have been, but it wasn’t God’s will. We know the angels are taking care of you now. God, please take care of our Mario.”

a record that’s out of this world (below) The cover of the Voyager Golden Record contains diagrams that show how to play the record, decode the video portion, our sun’s position relative to 14 pulsars, and the two lowest states of the hydrogen atom.

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Spencer Pittman Human consciousness is individualistic. We do not share a singular perspective with any other of our species. We cannot convey actual thoughts, only mutually understood symbols for these thoughts. Through an empathy that is composed mainly of shared body language such as body movements or gestures, tone of voice, posture, and facial expressions, we come to a social understanding of common human emotions. Once this understanding is accomplished in individuals, symbols can almost fully replace this body language. Some expressions of feeling, however, can never be replaced by a language of symbols. Some of these feelings are evoked by physical contact, or the seeming luminance of love …

science’s next generation

Meagan Ciesla There is love. Everyone says you will know when it happens and you do. You feel high, you hardly sleep. Love is fleeting but heartbreak lasts. You spend long stretches in bed with your arm over your eyes, waking each time with a sucker punch to the gut. You forget the pain and try again. You get a job. It can be decent. It can be bad, but it’s a job and it’s how you buy your food, your clothes, a space to live. The more money you make, the more you buy, the more options you have. Instead of a loaf of white bread you buy 5-grain. Instead of a pencil, you write with a fine point light blue Uniball. You have friends and they are important to you. They are like a family without the same blood. They don’t have to love you, but they do. If they betray you, they are sent packing. There is the option to forgive; it is up to you to decide. During your lifetime there will be a war, or two, hopefully no more; the way things are going it doesn’t look good. This is inevitable, everyone around you says, and you wonder if that is true. Some battles are thousands of miles away and you don’t see their details, but hear of the bodies being shipped back home. Some battles are in your city, your town, your village. Some are riots just outside your window while you are shaking beneath a table praying to something you cannot see.

Think of a scientist. What do you see? A frazzled brainiac? A goofy genius? A geek? The Science Posse, a group of University of Wyoming graduate students whose primary goal is to raise awareness and understanding of science among middle- and high-school students across Wyoming, has heard all the stereotypes. “I think a lot of people think scientists are just weird and nerdy,” Shawna McBride, a UW doctoral candidate in neuroscience who is neither weird nor nerdy, says. Neither is Sherry Adrianos. She’s a wife and mother who possesses an extraordinary knowledge of molecular biology. And Scott Carleton is a regular guy who knows a lot about human and animal physiology, not to mention stable isotopes. “They could be your neighbors,” Laramie High science teacher Teresa Strube, who has invited the Science Posse to her classroom on many occasions, says. “They just happen to be absolutely passionate about science. “The Science Posse has enriched my classroom and enriched my teaching. They come in and excite the students and give them some hope or some idea of how science can fit into their future, no matter what they do. They’re absolutely amazing.” As the members of the Science Posse travel this far-flung state–from Newcastle to Casper, Gillette to Torrington– they’re doing more than enhancing students’ knowledge of biology and physics at each stop. They’re breaking the stereotype of what it means to be a scientist. After watching Carleton’s 90-minute presentation for Cheyenne Central High’s 10th-grade science class, student Kelsey Anderson says, “I didn’t see him as one of those ‘crazy’ scientists. He was cool.” A great experience In August, McBride visited Laramie High as part of the Science Posse’s “Wanted: Science ALIVE!” a traveling outreach program designed to engage students through demonstration and experiment. “When we were done, we just asked the students if they’d be interested in joining one of our labs,” McBride recalls. “And Han contacted me right away.” A few weeks later, Han Li, 18, was working alongside McBride, helping her study the effects of salt-based diets during the pre- and post-natal periods of pregnancy. On average, Li spent six to 10 hours a week through the end of December in the UW lab. “Neuroscience was kind of new to me, but I’d always been interested to learn how the brain controls the rest of your

When peace comes, you or someone you know, someone across the world, someone on TV has lost friends, is missing family. You try not to think about them after long; it causes pain you cannot control. You are meant to have children so you do. The babies enter with a scream, dangle by a cord. You teach them what you can; they learn the rest on their own. They start to babble, to speak, to ask for a cup of water. They develop personalities. They like the color red and are frightened by animals with wings. Your body shrinks. Parts of it stop working. You can’t remember things, have trouble walking, your vision blurs. It is like you are becoming a child again yourself. You think about death and push against. It scares you, not knowing what comes next.

by Steve Kiggins

(opposite) Laramie High Senior Han Li works in the lab alongside Shawna McBride, a graduate student in neuroscience.

body,” Li, who balances his senior year at Laramie High with calculus classes and lab work at UW, says. “I thought, ‘Neuroscience would be a good place to look into the modern development of human bodies.’ “I’ve had a great experience with the Science Posse,” he says. “If it wasn’t for Shawna, I wouldn’t have been able to learn about neuroscience with the depth that I have. I wouldn’t have even known there was a research lab at UW. I wouldn’t have had this opportunity.” Li developed his own research project on salt manipulation during the early development stages of life for the Southeast Wyoming Regional Science Fair in February. Li won his division and earned an automatic bid to the 2008 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Atlanta in May. The culminating event for a network of science fairs held around the world, it’s widely considered the Olympics of science competitions. “It’s been a lot of fun having Han in the lab,” McBride, one of 10 members of this year’s Science Posse, says. “It’s fun to see people take an interest in science, to see that spark, that desire to learn.” Li, who is captivated by experimentation and exploration, understands the importance of science in today’s everchanging world. Imagine, for a moment, the world without science. Disease would run rampant. The use of DNA for identification would be impossible. Groundwater supplies would be contaminated

What Is the Science Posse? The Science Posse, funded by the University of Wyoming Graduate School through grants from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, brings together graduate students from various research fields. The Science Posse has four goals: • To increase Wyoming students’ appreciation and understanding of research complexities, knowledge, and issues. • To increase Wyoming students’ interest in science courses and in choosing a related career in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. • To increase the sustainable expertise of Wyoming science teachers. • To increase community awareness of research processes, complexities and outcomes.

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eXpLoratIons with arsenic. High-rise buildings would collapse, luxurious cruise ships would sink, and the Boeing 777 wouldn’t exist. Without science, Li says, our world would be but a shell of what it is today. “Our society has developed because somebody came up with a question and said, ‘Why can’t this happen?,’ and then later on proves that this can happen, and a new drug or machine is developed,” Li, who was born in China and lived in Israel before moving with his family to the United States when he was 11, says. “That’s the way the world works. In Columbus’ time, people rejected his idea of the world being round and, eventually, his theory was proved correct. “Science,” he says, “makes our lives better.” Still, Li says, a lot of students don’t care about science. A world of hurt Is it that students don’t care, or that they aren’t being given the opportunity to care? The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, passed into law in 2001, required educators in American public schools to place an increased emphasis on reading and mathematics. Science testing under the NCLB began only last year. Curtailing science-related education concerns Kim Parfitt, a science teacher at Cheyenne Central High. “Science literacy is key for our country. And I don’t mean that kids can say ‘stomata’ for a leaf opening. What they need to know is how to take a claim and evaluate it and make sure that they have valid evidence to link it to broader scientific understanding. That’s science literacy to me,” Parfitt, says. “Whether that’s being done in astronomy or biology or chemistry, there are elements of critical thinking and problem-solving that are key to life. “If we have students walking out of schools who aren’t able to ferret information, then they’re not going to be able to work in today’s workforce where jobs change constantly,” she says. “They’re not going to be able to understand half of the stuff that’s going on with the media. Look at global warming. Part of the problem of why it took so darn long [to address] is because nobody understood it. People still don’t understand it.” Statistics bear out Parfitt’s concern. Research!America, the nation’s largest non-profit public education and advocacy alliance working to improve health research, conducted a poll in 2007 that found 85 percent of Americans believe science is extremely important in today’s society. But 52 percent of those polled don’t believe the United States is performing well in science education compared to other nations.

The National Assessment of Educational Progress’ 2005 report card was also disturbing. The percentage of students performing at or above basic level in science fell in every grade but fourth. The organization provides the only continuing assessment of what U.S. students know and what they can do in many academic subjects. This year, the Wyoming Department of Education began testing science literacy through the Proficiency Assessments for Wyoming Students, a system used by the state’s Department of Education to focus on individual student growth and performance. “I think you’re going to see a huge decline,” Strube says. “We’re not inspiring students, and we’re not asking questions because of testing. Science has been put on the back burner. I am really concerned about what we’re going to see in the next five or 10 years, because the elementary students coming up now have had no science background, and their interest in science has not been stimulated at an early age. I think we’re going to be in a world of hurt.” Wyoming is already hurting, Science Posse program coordinator Jesse Anderson says. Of the thousands of students who enroll at UW each year, Anderson says, “only a very small percentage” go into a science-related field of study. “The state of science in this country is at risk,” she says, “and in Wyoming, especially.” Science can be fun Science Posse members hope to help swing the tide in Wyoming by strengthening youngsters’ knowledge of science and by altering inaccurate perceptions. “I think people believe science is really complicated,” McBride, of Buffalo, says of a common misconception. Not all experiments are complex. Since January 2006, the University of Wyoming’s Science Posse has visited schools in these communities:

University of Wyoming students who have worked with the Science Posse or who were part of the project that led to its creation. Using whiffle balls as models, Science Posse graduate student Scott Carleton (left) demonstrates to Kim Parfitt’s 10th grade science class at Cheyenne Central how isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen are distributed in water.

“You don’t have to do a big, complicated experiment to answer every question, but I think people see science as this wild, scary, complicated thing. It can be fun. We can design all kinds of cool experiments.” The second misperception: Asking questions is dumb. By the fifth grade, Strube believes many students keep to themselves because they feel asking questions is a sign of stupidity or weakness. It’s not, she says, particularly in science, a field of study based on question and experiment. Li credits his willingness to openly quiz teachers and challenge theories as being instrumental to his development as a scientist. “I like to ask a lot of questions, especially in mathematical fields and science fields,” he says and smiles. “I always go, ‘Why is this?’ I don’t trust what the book says, nor do I trust some of the teachers. I have to look into it myself. I usually go into some professors and say, ‘Can you prove this formula for me?’ “Just because somebody has a different theory or asks questions, that’s not wrong,” he says. “That’s how we can develop a better world.” Then there’s that other wrong-headed perception—the one about scientists being absent-minded, strange, and neurotic. “When a lot of people think of a scientist, I think there’s the element of the mad scientist, somebody who is trying to create Frankenstein’s monster all the time,” Adrianos, of Kemmerer, says. “When the students see a real scientist in the classroom and see that we’re not the messy-haired, tongue-sticking-out Einsteins that some people will associate with scientists, I think that helps them feel more comfortable with the idea of science. “I think a lot of students feel that science is just too hard,” she says “But it’s not. Science can be fun.” Anderson, the Central High 10th-grader, agrees. “I enjoyed the Science Posse coming into the classroom,” Anderson, who aspires to be a forensic scientist, says. “I learned a lot, and it was a lot of fun.” v

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Graduate Students sherry adrianos - molecular biology olalekan ajayi - pharmacy Lisa akbari - psychology eric anderson - zoology and physiology travis anderson - electrical and computer engineering sarah Bachman - botany tracy Baldyga - renewable resources tim Brothers - electrical and computer engineering sabrina Cales - physics and astronomy scott Carleton - zoology and physiology Xin (Cindy) Fang - molecular biology Liz Flaherty - zoology and physiology Brittney Hahn - family and consumer sciences Dylan Houghton - chemistry Jacque Keele - molecular biology Jeremy Long - electrical and computer engineering shawna McBride - neuroscience Carolynn Moore - physics and astronomy Brandon Munk - zoology and physiology Maggie renken - developmental psychology Yvonne schlaman - interdisciplinary studies Matthew stratton - zoology and physiology nancy Van Dyke - natural science/ environment and natural resources Levi Wilmott - biology Communications Specialists Brendan Magone - creative writing Ken steinken - creative writing Spring 2008 • 27

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“When you look into the sky and you can’t see anything,

Reaching for the stars By Steve Kiggins

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he sofa inside the control room of the Red Buttes Observatory doesn’t have much going for it. That’s probably why it’s exiled to the University of Wyoming observatory south of Laramie rather than in someone’s living room. It’s ugly. Golden yellow may have been a popular color in the 1970s, but it’s not today. It’s old. Take a seat and listen to the springs creak beneath your weight. It’s small, unless you’re 4-foot-10 or shorter, that is. It’s uncomfortable. Would you want to sit on 30-year-old stuffing? But it’s also a critical piece of the success of Andy Monson, who has draped his 6-foot frame across this beat-up sofa more than a few times this year. He’s not too cheap to pay his rent. It’s just that he works nights—on a $1.5 million project funded mostly through a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant. Pointing to the sofa sitting along the far wall of the observatory’s control room that’s otherwise filled with tables, chairs, desks and computers, Monson says, “That’s where I slept last night. I usually go back into town, but I was just too tired to drive.”

MONSON ISN’T COMPLAINING. While he’d certainly prefer more restful sleep on a real bed, his research has been well worth the few nights of tossing and turning. Under the guidance of Mike Pierce, an associate professor in the UW Department of Physics and Astronomy, Monson has successfully built a test version of a 7-foot-long, 1,000-pound infrared camera that will study the brightest stars in the night sky, study the birth of stars, and help calibrate the scale of the universe. “When you look into the sky and you can’t see anything, optically, that doesn’t mean there isn’t anything there,” the third-year UW graduate student from Mankato, Minnesota, says. “You’re only seeing the tip of the iceberg without infrared.” Monson has been working with Pierce on the project for about 18 months. Pierce submitted a proposal to the NSF to build the infrared camera system, because, he says, “This is a project that’s fallen through the cracks [in astronomy research].” While Monson has been working on the test version of the camera for about 18 months, his work stretches back even farther. To determine how to build the test camera, Monson had to understand what the large-scale camera would include. The design of the larger camera dictated the construction of the smaller one. The full-size version will be built later this year. With a smile, Pierce looks at Monson and says, “I’m so proud of him.” Monson designed much of the software needed to control and monitor the temperature inside the 2-foot-long, 70-pound test camera. The equipment is held within the dewar, a type of vacuum flask cooled with liquid nitrogen to keep the mechanism at −200 degrees Celsius, or −328 Fahrenheit. The extreme cold helps preserve the accuracy of the instrument.

“It’s been a great opportunity for me to learn everything about a camera. Most projects like this would usually entail … I can’t even imagine how many people, graduate students, undergraduates, postdocs, just a huge assortment of people with different backgrounds and technical skills,” Monson says. “Being at a smaller university like this has given me the opportunity—and responsibility—to put this together largely by myself. “I’ve had to overcome a lot of technical difficulties … but to put that all together has helped me learn a lot and learn to persevere,” he says. “That’s going to be a great advantage to me in the future, in the classroom and in the workplace.” Monson has also endured more than a few awkward nights of sleep on a sofa that’s seen better days. “I don’t exactly fit on it. I usually sleep with my calves perched on the far armrest and with my legs inclined,” Monson says. “I usually sleep good for about two or three hours before I curl up to one side or the other. “I am glad I don’t have to sleep there every night,” he says. MONSON’S WORK HAS drawn attention in the ultracompetitive world of astronomical research. In January, he presented and demonstrated the test camera at the American Astronomical Society’s biannual meeting in Austin, Texas. The project won rave reviews from astronomers from across the country, and Monson was a hot commodity among industry employers. “Andy was approached by people who will be doing the systems integrations for the next space telescope, and they were recommending that he apply for a job there,” Pierce says. “I think this has been a really great opportunity for him, because he’s sort of been forced to take on all these roles.”

seeing the invisible (left) A comparison of the Orion Nebula in the visible and near-infrared. The near-infrared image reveals features and stars hidden from view in the visible image. (right) Jupiter and some of its moons and Saturn (inset) as seen in the near-infrared. Images courtesy of Andy Monson and Chris Rodgers.

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Working inside a clean room to prevent dust and dirt from contaminating his equipment, Andy Monson wipes down the inner surfaces of a dewar with acetone before assembly.

That breadth of experience makes Monson a highly desirable candidate for jobs, and that explains the close attention he and his work are getting from prospective employers, Pierce says. As Monson begins to consider life after UW—where he hopes to earn his Ph.D. by May 2009—he hopes his future is much like the present. “I would love to continue doing what I’m doing now. As soon as I finish here, I can take everything I’ve done and apply it immediately to a job, either professionally or academically,” Monson says. “There are a lot of instruments and cameras for space missions that are being built now that are huge projects that I would love to be a part of. “This,” he says, “is exactly what I want to do.” WITH THE TEST camera deemed a success, Monson is now working on gathering data for his thesis until the time comes to build the full-sized version of the camera. Among the parts on order are optics worth $250,000 and the 1,000-pound camera shell, which makes up the dewar vessel.

At UW’s Red Buttes Observatory, Andy Monson fills the vacuum flask surrounding his camera with liquid nitrogen, assuring it maintains a temperature of −200 degrees Celsius.

Spring 2008 • 29

optically, that doesn’t mean there isn’t anything there.”

Pierce predicts the camera will become a popular piece of equipment once it’s completed. The Astrophysical Research Consortium, which consists of researchers from seven universities—including Johns Hopkins, Princeton, and the University of Washington—has already expressed great interest, the professor says. The consortium plans to use the camera at its Apache Point Observatory in the Sacramento Mountains of New Mexico. The camera also will be available for UW undergraduate and graduate research at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory, located about 25 miles southwest of Laramie on Jelm Mountain. It also figures to boost the university’s Research Experience for Undergraduates, a National Research Foundation-sponsored summer research program directed by Ron Canterna, an associate professor in UW’s Department of Physics and Astronomy. “This instrument will add a powerful research capability to our programs here at UW,” Pierce says. “I look forward to the day when the instrument is complete and in regular use by our faculty and students.” v

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GaLLerY

(opposite page)

Andy Warhol: Sylvester Stallone, 1980, Polacolor Type 108 (this page)

Thomas Berger, undated, silver gelatin print All photos for this story are from The Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, Collection of the University of Wyoming Art Museum

Learning from the Masters: Andy Warhol Photographs at the University of Wyoming Art Museum

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ndy Warhol (American, 1928–1987) is one of America’s iconic 20th century artists. He became a household name through such familiar works as his images of Campbell’s Soup cans, Brillo Pad boxes, Hollywood personalities such as Marilyn Monroe, and political figures including Mao Tse-Tung. Trained in pictorial design, Warhol gained notoriety during the 1960s when he introduced appropriated images from commercial sources into his work. He favored screen printing as a process that could mass produce images, although he moved easily between this and painting, photography, and film.

Warhol challenged traditional definitions of fine art and influenced a generation of young artists. Upon his death and through the wishes stated in his will, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts was established. The foundation has fostered innovative expression and the creative process through grants to cultural organizations totaling more than $200 million. To commemorate its 20th anniversary, the foundation established the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, gifting 150 original photographs each to 183 college and university art museums

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across the United States. The University of Wyoming Art Museum was selected to participate in this program and earlier this spring received 100 Polaroids and 50 silver gelatin prints by Andy Warhol. The images donated to UW include recognizable personalities—Sylvester Stallone; Wayne Gretsky; Pia Zadora; Paul Anka; and Caroline, Princess of Monaco among others—as well as unidentified sitters. Looking at these images, each with its own personality and conscientious response to the artist, one might imagine the potential

transformation into Warhol’s brightly painted, large-scale screen prints. Jenny Moore, curator of the Photographic Legacy Program, said of Warhol’s photographs: “A wealth of information about Warhol’s process and the interactions with his sitters is revealed in these images…. Through his rigorous—almost unconscious—consistency in shooting, the true idiosyncrasies of his subjects were revealed. Often, he would shoot a person or event with both cameras, cropping one in Polaroid color as a ‘photograph’ and snapping the other in black and white

as a ‘picture.’ By presenting both kinds of images side by side, the Photographic Legacy Program allows viewers to move back and forth between moments of Warhol’s art, work, and life inseparable parts of a fascinating whole.” The collection significantly enhances the UW Art Museum’s collection of 20th century art and of Andy Warhol artwork. It offers research opportunities that will contribute to this little-researched area of Warhol’s creative process. It also forms the basis for future research and periodic exhibitions of Andy Warhol and his influence on American art. v

Unidentified Woman (Plaid Shirt), 12/1980, Polacolor Type 108, Gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. Wayne Gretzky, 1983 or 1984, Polacolor ER Caroline, Princess of Monaco, 1983, Polacolor ER Linda Wachner, 3/1986, Polacolor ER Pia Zadora, 1983, Polacolor ER Linda Wachner, 3/1986, Polacolor ER Ladies and Gentlemen (Pink Tank Top), 1/1974, Polacolor Type 108 Paul Anka, After Aug. 1975, Polacolor Type 108

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CAMPUS RECREATION SPRING/SUMMER 2008

Campus Recreation

3

Contact us Building & pool hours

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Schedules & exceptions Membership Membership fees

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UW family recreation Additional services & other information

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Reserving facilities with Campus Recreation

9

Open Recreation

selections from Spring/Summer Open Recreation

Intramural Sports Half Acre Room 206 766-4175

Half Acre Room 206 766-6396

Club Sports

Outdoor Adventure

www.uwyo.edu/rec

www.uwyo.edu/imsports

www.uwyo.edu/clubsports

www.uwyo.edu/oap

2008 Campus Recreation Half Acre West Lobby 766-3370

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Spring & summer 2008 schedules Classes & programs General class information Group fitness classes spring 2008 Aerobics instructor training courses Introductory classes Group fitness classes summer 2008 Personal training Aquatic instruction

Half Acre South Lobby 766-2402

Intramural Sports Program Campus Recreation Dept. 3604 1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071-2000

11 12 12 12 14 15 15 16 16

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Intramural event information Spring 2008 description of events

18 19

2008 Intramural Sports spring semester schedule

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www.uwyo.edu/rec

Disclaimers

Accidents and injuries can and do occur during sport, recreation, and exercise activities. Notice is hereby given that the University of Wyoming is not responsible for accidents, injuries, and/or illnesses that may be incurred while on and/or during the use of university property; nor is the university responsible for any costs or expenses incurred as a result of any accident and/or injury that may occur on university property. The University of Wyoming is not responsible for any items lost/stolen in conjunction with the use of university facilities. Participants understand and agree that their use of university facilities and/or services is at their own risk. Persons seeking admission, employment or access to programs of the University of Wyoming shall be considered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, veteran status, sexual orientation, or political belief. Photos courtesy of UW Photo Service, the Branding Iron, Student Media, and Campus Recreation.

CAMPUS RECREATION SPRING/SUMMER 2008 Outdoor Adventure Program

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General outing information

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Spring outing schedule Spring outing descriptions Avalanche safety/first aid Camping Canoeing Caving Diving Fly-fishing Mountaineering Rock & ice climbing Skiing & snowshoeing Special programs Water sports

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Rental equipment and prices

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Rental equipment policies Climbing wall information

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Campus Recreation Campus Recreation www.uwyo.edu/rec

www.uwyo.edu/rec

www.uwyo.edu/rec

Campus Recreation

Our Mission Our mission is to provide recreational opportunities to a diverse campus community that enhance the learning and workplace environment and promote mental and physical health via quality facilities, equipment, and programs. Our programs, which include Open Recreation, Intramural Sports, Club Sports, and Outdoor Adventure, offer a broad range of coordinated activities for individuals and groups that promote health awareness, a sense of community, and a lifelong appreciation for wellness and recreational activities. Supporting the value of student development, our programs strive to offer opportunities to students that develop leadership skills and promote responsibility while maintaining a balance between personal, professional, and academic pursuits.

Contact us

Facility hours

Campus Recreation

Half Acre building hours

Dept. 3604, 1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071

Jan. 12–May 9 Mondays–Fridays 6 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturdays 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Sundays noon–8 p.m.

Half Acre (307) 766-5586 fax (307) 766-6720 halfacre@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/rec

May 12–Aug. 23 Mondays–Fridays 6 a.m.–8 p.m.

Half Acre Pool hours

Open Recreation

Pokes’ Spoke Bike Library

Half Acre, West Lobby (307) 766-3370 halfacre@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/rec

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Intramural Sports Program

Club Sports Program

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Mission statement & philosophy Club sports information

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Currently active club sports

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University of Wyoming Wellness Center

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Campus map Half Acre map

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6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

9 a.m.–5 p.m.

1–4 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Closed

Jan. 21

MLK/Equality Day

noon–8 p.m.

1–4 p.m.

5–8 p.m.

Closed

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m. only

Closed

Exception

Corbett Pool Hours Closed

March 15 & 16

Spring Break

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

May 12–Aug. 23 Mondays–Fridays 6–8 a.m., 11 a.m.–1 p.m., and 5–7 p.m.

March 17–21

11 a.m.–1 p.m. M, W, F 5–8 p.m., T, Th

Closed

Half Acre family swim Climbing wall

Jan. 12–May 9 Mondays–Fridays 11 a.m.–1 p.m. and 5–10 p.m. Saturdays 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Sundays 5–8 p.m.

206 Half Acre (307) 766-6396 www.uwyo.edu/clubsports Hours: Mondays–Fridays 8 a.m.–6 p.m.

May 12–Aug. 23 Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays 4–8 p.m.

Wellness Center

For more information on the climbing wall, please see page 35.

Corbett Pool hours

Jan. 14–May 9 Mondays–Thursdays 7–9 p.m. Fridays 6–8 p.m. L-shaped Corbett pool is 25 yards by 25 meters with a diving well and three diving boards including a three-meter board.

Corbett open volleyball

Jan. 12–May 2 Corbett Gym is open for recreational volleyball on Tuesdays and Fridays from 4–6 p.m. This program is included with campus recreation membership or participants can pay $5 per day.

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Climbing Wall

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

Regular hours resume

Date

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

Tuesdays and Fridays 5–7 p.m., Saturdays 1–4 p.m., and Sundays 1–4 p.m.

Other Information

Half Acre Pool Hours

Winter Break

Jan. 12

Spring Break begins

Outdoor Adventure Program

Half Acre, North Lobby (307) 766-3546 wellness@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/wrc Hours: Mondays–Fridays 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Half Acre Facility Hours

Jan. 7–11

March 14

Half Acre pool is primarily used for lap swim, but recreational swim is allowed in the shallow pool during family swim hours.

Club Sports Program

Recreation schedules are available 24 hours a day by calling (307) 766-3370 or via the Web site at www.uwyo.edu/rec.

Jan. 12–May 9 Mondays–Fridays 6–8 a.m., 11 a.m.–1 p.m., and 5–7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays 1–4 p.m.

206 Half Acre (307) 766-4175 www.uwyo.edu/imsports Hours: Mondays–Fridays 8 a.m.–6 p.m. Half Acre, South Lobby (307) 766-2402 oap@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/oap Hours: Mondays–Fridays 8 a.m.–6 p.m.

Spring semester schedules and exceptions

Spring Break

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

March 22

Spring Break/Easter Break

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

March 23

Easter Sunday

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

May 9

Spring semester ends

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m. only

Closed

May 10

Summer Session begins

Closed weekends through August 23

Racquetball courts are reserved for classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays 2–3 p.m.

Summer session schedules and exceptions Recreation schedules are available 24 hours a day by calling (307) 766-3370 or via the Web site at www.uwyo.edu/rec. Date

Exception

Half Acre Facility Hours

Half Acre Pool Hours

Climbing Wall

Corbett Pool Hours

May 12

Summer Hours Begin*

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Closed

May 26

Memorial Day

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed Closed

July 4

Independence Day

Closed

Closed

Closed

Aug. 23

Regular Hours Resume

9 a.m.–5 p.m.

1–4 p.m.

CLOSED

Aug. 24

Regular Hours Resume

noon–8 p.m.

1–4 p.m.

5–8 p.m.

Closed

Aug. 25

Classes Resume

6 a.m.–10 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m. and 5–10 p.m.

7–9 p.m.

Closed

*Half Acre building is closed weekends throughout the summer. During the annual steam shutdown (August 8–August 22) Half Acre Pool will be closed for maintenance and pool hours moved to Corbett.

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magaines

www.uwyo.edu/rec

Open Recreation

Campus Recreation

www.uwyo.edu/rec

www.uwyo.edu/rec

Reserving Facilities with Campus Recreation How do I reserve recreation facilities?

• University of Wyoming groups/organizations

• Pick up a facility request form at the Campus Recreation office, located in the west lobby of Half Acre.

• Nonuniversity groups/organizations

Campus Recreation employs more than 200 student employees in a variety of positions. You will have the opportunity to work with your peers and enhance your resume. Student staff positions include lifeguards, office assistants, recreation assistants, program assistants, sports officials, climbing wall monitors, trip leaders, intramural supervisors, and recreation supervisors. Those eligible for work-study aid typically receive priority. Applications are taken any time; however, most employees are hired prior to each semester. Pick up an employment application at Half Acre.

Half lockers: $25 per semester

Lost and found

Box lockers: $7.50 per semester

Lost and found items are kept in the equipment rooms at Half Acre and at Corbett for 30 days.

UW employees may rent lockers on an annual or semester basis. UW employees renting semester lockers must clear or renew their lockers by the last day of the month at the end of each semester.

Rec Store As a service to our customers, Campus Recreation has a limited supply of personal and recreation items for sale in the retail store.

UW students may rent lockers on a semester or academic year basis. Students must clear or renew their lockers by the last day of finals week.

athletic tape bath scrubbies batteries chalk combs deodorant ear plugs heart rate monitors lifting straps locks lotion nose clips pedometers Q-Tips racquetball goggles racquetball racquets racquetballs

Towel service Free towel service is available at Half Acre during building hours and at Corbett during scheduled recreation hours.

Other Information Tours Self-guided tours are available during all hours of operation. Visitors can pick up tour instructions at the Campus Recreation office. All visitors are required to sign in at the Campus Recreation office before beginning their tour.

Parking All parking areas on campus are posted with signs indicating the type of parking permit required. Parking is available east of Half Acre for an hourly fee in the Day Lot. Permits are required in most areas from 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Half Acre participants may park in the commuter lot for no charge and ride the Campus Shuttle during shuttle hours. Parking is regulated throughout the year.

• Call (307) 766-6740 to request information about reserving recreation facilities.

What activity areas can be reserved?

Need a job?

razors shampoo and conditioner shuttlecocks soap socks squash balls swim caps: latex and silicone swim diapers swim goggles T-shirts toothbrush w/toothpaste

Spring 2008 Group fitness schedule

Who can reserve campus recreation facilities?

• Nonuniversity affiliated individuals or groups must provide a proof of insurance certificate indicating single-liability insurance in which the University of Wyoming is named as additional insured in the amount of $1 million covering bodily injury, including death, and property damage.

Half Acre

• Pool (capacity = 45) • Main gym (non-spectator area) three courts: basketball, volleyball, and badminton

• Exercise rooms/dance studio two rooms: a dance studio and an exercise room with wood floors and mirrors

How much is this going to cost?

• Climbing wall 75’ x 22’: bouldering and top rope climbing Instruction required: call (307) 766-6488 for more information.

Employee costs

• Employees $10/hour • Climbing wall instructors $10/hour

Corbett

• Employees will be paid for the 15 minutes before and after each reservation to prepare/secure facilities.

• Pool (capacity = 92) 25-yard by 25-meter L-shaped pool with three diving boards

• Employees costs are doubled 11 p.m.–8 a.m.

• Gym two courts: basketball and volleyball

Facility costs

• Half Acre pool $40/hour

Recreation Fields

• Exercise rooms $15/hour

• Fields located at 22nd and Willett can be reserved by calling (307) 766-6740.

Processing will take approximately five working days once a facility request form has been completed. Confirmation may take longer.

Open Recreation

www.uwyo.edu/rec

This is your chance to get 30 minutes of a solid abdominal workout. Lower, upper, and oblique abdominal muscles will be strengthened and conditioned. Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Tuesdays, 8:30–9 p.m. Thursdays, 7:30–8 p.m. Locations: Exercise Room 3 south (T.) Exercise Room 3 north (Th.)

Eligibility Classes are available to all UW students, faculty, staff, and spouses who have purchased access to Half Acre. Participants must be at least 18 years old (or a college freshman) to participate in instructional programs.

Refunds Registration fees for classes that do not fill will be refunded or transferred to the next class date if applicable. All other refunds must be requested in writing through the Campus Recreation office. Refunds are not available once an introductory class has started. Refunds are not available after the first two weeks of group fitness classes.

Buns and Legs

Group fitness classes spring 2008

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays, 8:30–9 p.m. Wednesdays, 7:30–8 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

New for the Spring 2008 semester this thirty-minute class focuses on lower body strength, toning and flexibility. A variety of equipment will be used to sculpt and tone your lower half including resistance bands, exercise balls and general mat work. Join us and strengthen your quadriceps, hamstrings, calves, and glutes.

Fitness Class Pass

Boot Camp

Pilates

For a less choreographed, more intense workout, Boot Camp is the perfect choice. Basic training and conditioning activities will be exercised in this class at a quick pace. These activities include jump roping, push-ups, sit-ups, jogging, sprinting, jumping jacks, lunges, and squats.

Pilates is a form of exercise that focuses on flexibility, breathing, and muscle control. Pilates, when practiced frequently, can yield increased lung capacity, better coordination, increased core strength, and improved bone density and joint health.

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays & Wednesdays, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Thursdays, noon–12:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays & Wednesdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 north

Balls and bands This class is structured around exercise balls and resistance bands to provide a fun and different way to tone all muscle groups. Equipment will be provided; come join us for a great workout.

Daily Drop-in Pass

Daily drop-in passes are available for $3 a class; receipt must be presented to the instructor. Times are subject to change; please check with the Half Acre front desk for final class times. Classsize limit is based on a first come, first served basis.

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays, 6:30–7:30 a.m. Tuesdays, noon–12:50 p.m. Wednesdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Cardio kickboxing Kickboxing consists of cardio exercises such as kicking, punching, jumping, jogging, and jabbing drills. It is a great workout, come join the fun!

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Kickboxing 11 a.m.–noon Ex R 3 S

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Boot camp 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Kickboxing 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Boot camp 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Variety Express 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Power Toning 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Step/Weights 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Balls and Bands 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Kickboxing 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Variety Express noon–12:50 p.m. Ex R3 S

Yoga noon-12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Pilates 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Yoga 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Pilates 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Yoga 6:30–7:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

TBC 7:30–8:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Variety Express 7:30–8:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Buns and Legs 7:30–8:00 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Power Toning 7:30–8:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Flexibility 7:30–8:10 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Variety Dance 7:30–8:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Flexibility 7:30–8:10 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Abs 7:30– 8:00 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Buns and Legs 8:30-9 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Abs 8:30–9 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Yoga 11 a.m.-noon Ex R 3 N

Step aerobics

Variety Dance is a new class for 2008 that introduces movements from aerobic dance, traditional Tahitian and Polynesian dancing as well as belly dancing. This versatile class allows participants to use the movement and weight of their own bodies to produce a fun aerobic workout. If you are interested in learning these dances, or just looking for a new and fresh way of working out come check out this class! No prior dance experience necessary.

Variety Express Variety Express gives you the chance to experience multiple exercise types within the hour-long class. During this class you can expect to do a little kickboxing, step, Pilates, Yoga, boot camp, or circuit. Each class will be a different mix; yet a full cardio workout can be expected every time.

Yoga is an ancient natural method for achieving and maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health. This class will include yoga postures (exercise routines), warm-ups, breathing techniques, and relaxation methods. Benefits include stress release, body strength and weight control, improved body alignment and flexibility, and better concentration. Dates: Jan. 28–May 3 (No class March 15–22) Monday–Friday 6:30–7:30 a.m. Mondays & Wednesdays, noon–12:50 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Saturdays, 11 a.m.–noon Location: Exercise Room 3 north

This class is a basic–intermediate step class. Taking this class will give you a cardio and toning workout. One class per week will use hand weights in order to increase the intensity.

Thursday

Friday

TBC noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Boot camp noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Water workout 12:10–12:50 p.m. Half Acre Pool

Boot camp 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Step/toning 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Boot camp 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Step/toning 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Yoga 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Yoga 5:30–6:30 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

Aerobics Instructor Training Course

Total body conditioning (TBC)

Flexibility is an essential component of fitness that is often neglected or left out in preference for developing other areas of fitness. This class uses a variety of stretching methods to gradually increase muscle strength and extend the range of movement at the joints.

This class provides a total body workout. The class will combine various forms of kickboxing, step, hi-low, and circuit training with some weight lifting and abdominal toning to give you a complete workout. No previous experience required. Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Thursday, 6:30–7:30 a.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Classes will be held: TBA $20 per person Sign up at the Half Acre service window. More information will be given at the time of sign-up.

For information and to sign up for this event stop by the Wellness Center or the Intramural Sports office.

Group Fitness Classes Summer 2008

Introductory classes are basic informational classes on specific exercise equipment. Classes are limited to three to five people, last 30 minutes, and are $10 per class. Sign up for all three classes for $25 and save $5.

Boot Camp For a less choreographed, more intense workout, Boot Camp is the perfect choice. Basic training and conditioning activities will be exercised in this class at a quick pace. These activities include jump roping, push-ups, sit-ups, jogging, sprinting, jumping jacks, lunges, and squats.

Intro to cardio Learn how to use a variety of cardio equipment in the infield area.

Dates: May 27–Aug 1 Mondays & Wednesdays, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Fridays, noon–12:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Date: By appointment Times: 6:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. Location: Infield

Total body conditioning (TBC)

Intro to circuit training

This class provides a total body workout. The class will combine various forms of kickboxing, step, hi-low, and circuit training with some weight lifting and abdominal toning to give you a complete workout. No previous experience required.

Learn to use the Half Acre Cybex circuit machine weights. This class will teach you how to use the circuit to improve muscular strength and endurance. Great for those with little time to workout!

Dates: May 27–Aug 1 Tuesdays & Thursdays, noon–12:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Water workout is an aquatic circuit training class that will occur in the shallow end of Half Acre pool. We will include fun new challenges for different fitness levels. Come join us for this fastpaced class that will include warm-up, strengthening, cardio, and cool-down exercises that fit into your lunch hour.

Iron 101–intro to free weights

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays & Wednesdays, noon–12:50 p.m. Tuesdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. (With weights) Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Events Include: Indoor Duathlon (individual competitive) “Fit to Fight” Army Physical Fitness Test “Battle of the Biceps” Muscular Endurance Competition Aerobic Non-competitive Event Group Exercise Sampler

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Water workout

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays–Thursdays, 12:10–12:50 p.m. Location: Half Acre pool

Flexibility

The event is cosponsored by Campus Recreation, Kinesiology and Health, and the Wellness Center.

Wednesday Balls and Bands noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Date: By appointment Times: 6:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. Location: Infield

Are you interested in becoming a fitness instructor? This class will teach you the fundamental skills of fitness instruction including how to lead a variety of different classes (i.e. step, kickboxing, toning, etc.) and populations through a safe and effective workout. This fun and energetic class will prepare you for a national certification and provide the skills necessary to teach group fitness classes at the University of Wyoming. Sign-up begins Jan. 14. (Sign-ups are limited.)

Saturday, March 1 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Half Acre gym

Tuesday TBC noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

www.uwyo.edu/rec

Water workout is an aquatic circuit training class that takes place in the shallow end of Half Acre pool. We will include fun new challenges for different fitness levels. Come join us for this fastpaced class that will include warm-up, strengthening, cardio, and cool-down exercises that fit into your lunch hour.

Variety Dance

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays & Wednesdays, 7:30–8:10 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 north

Monday Balls and Bands noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Introductory Classes

Yoga

Water workout

Dates: Jan. 28–May 3 (No class March 15–22) Tuesdays, 6:30–7:30 a.m. Tuesdays, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Thursday, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Saturdays, 11 a.m.–noon Location: Exercise Room 3 south

3nd Annual Fitness Day

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Yoga 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 N Boot camp noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Open Recreation

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Tuesdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Thursdays, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Fridays, noon–12:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Tuesdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 north

The Fitness Class Pass is available for $55. Purchasing this pass allows you to attend any group fitness class listed at any time during the semester. Times are subject to change; please check with the Half Acre front desk for final class times. Class-size limit is based on a first come, first served basis.

Yoga 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 N Step noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

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Open Recreation

Registration for classes begins on the first day of classes, Monday, January 14. Come to the Half Acre service window to register for each class. Payment is required at the time of registration to reserve a spot in each introductory class, and is required before each group exercise class. If a daily pass is purchased, a receipt must be presented to the instructor prior to the class. Class-size limit is based on a first come, first served basis in the group exercise classes.

Yoga 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 N Balls and Bands noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

www.uwyo.edu/rec

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Abs only

Yoga 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 N Step noon–12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 S

Saturday

Summer 2008 Group fitness schedule

• Recreation fields Call (307) 766-6740 for fees

• Campus Recreation office 101 Half Acre During open building hours

For complete facility policies and procedures, please refer to the Campus Recreation Policy and Procedure Guide at www.uwyo.edu/rec.

Registration

Friday Yoga 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 N

• Corbett pool $60/hour

Accidents and injuries can and do occur during sport, recreation, and exercise activities. Notice is hereby given that the University of Wyoming is not responsible for accidents, injuries, and/or illnesses that may be incurred while on and/or during the use of university property; nor is the university responsible for any costs or expenses incurred as a result of any accident and/or injury that may occur on university property. The University of Wyoming is not responsible for any items lost/stolen in conjunction with the use of university facilities. Participants understand and agree that their use of university facilities and/or services is at their own risk.

General class information

Thursday TBC 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 S

• Climbing wall $40/hour

Disclaimer

Classes and Programs

Wednesday Power Toning 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 S

• Courts $15/hour

Where do we go for information about reserving recreation facilities?

8

Tuesday Kickboxing 6:30–7:30 a.m. Ex Room 3 S

Yoga noon-12:50 p.m. Ex Room 3 N

• Refunds are available for one-day and short-term reservations if cancellation is made at least 24 hours in advance of the rental date except for employee costs. For long-term rentals there are no refunds.

• Racquetball courts eight courts: racquetball, squash, handball, and wallyball

Monday Balls and Bands 6:30–7:30 am. Ex Room 3 S

Are you intimidated by free weights or unsure how to use them correctly? Come join us in this introductory class that will teach you about free weights and help you become more comfortable with them.

Dates: May 19–July 31 (No class May 26, Memorial Day) Mondays–Thursdays, 12:10–12:50 p.m. Location: Half Acre pool

Step aerobics/toning

Date: By appointment Times: 6:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. Location: Infield

This class is a basic–intermediate step class. Taking this class will give you a cardio and toning workout. One class per week will use hand weights in order to increase the intensity. Dates: May 27–Aug 1 Tuesdays & Thursdays, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Balls and bands This class is structured around exercise balls and resistance bands to provide a fun and different way to tone all muscle groups. Equipment will be provided; come join us for a great workout. Dates: May 27–Aug 1 Monday & Wednesdays, noon-12:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Power toning Power toning will add an element of cardio to your strengthening routine. Hand weights and bands will be used to strengthen muscle groups while various movements will be incorporated for cardiovascular conditioning.

Yoga

Yoga is an ancient natural method for achieving and maintaining physical,mental, and emotional health. This class will include yoga postures (exercise routines), warm-ups, breathing techniques, and relaxation methods. Benefits include stress release, body strength and weight control, improved body alignment and flexibility, and better concentration.

Dates: Jan. 28–May 2 (No class March 17–21) Mondays, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, 6:30–7:30 a.m. Thursdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

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Dates: May 27-Aug. 1 Mondays & Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 north 15

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jim fuerholzer

design

Open Recreation

Intramural Sports Program www.uwyo.edu/imsports

Aquatic Instruction Customized swim lessons are available for nonswimmers, intermediate swimmers, and lap swimmers looking for everything from beginning lessons to stroke refinement. We can even help if you’re training for a triathlon! Our certified swimming instructors can meet individual needs and are some of the best around. Schedule a time when it is convenient for you. Stop by the Half Acre service window for more information. You must have recreation access to participate. See the personal training table for prices.

Want to reach your ultimate fitness goals, but need help getting there? Hire a personal trainer! Whether you want to modify your physique or improve your overall health, our certified personal trainers can help you reach your goals! Schedule a time when it is convenient for you. Stop by the Half Acre service window for more information. You must have recreation access to participate.

Registration deadline: Wednesday, March 26 Class Dates: Friday, March 28, 6–8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, March 29 & 30; 10 a.m.–6 p.m.; Friday, April 4; 6–8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, April 5 & 6, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Location: Corbett pool You must attend all class sessions to meet ARC requirements. Price: $75 (includes textbook)

Cost

Sessions are 1 hour in length 1 session

$20.00

2 sessions

$38.00

3 sessions

$54.00

4 sessions

$68.00

5 sessions

$82.00

6 sessions

$96.00

7 sessions

$109.20

8 sessions

$121.60

9 sessions

$135.00

10 sessions

$140.00

11 sessions

$147.40

12 sessions

$156.00

Pick up an entry packet consisting of an information sheet, entry form, and team roster in the Intramural Sports office located in 206 Half Acre. Packets are generally available one-and-a-half weeks prior to the entry deadline.

2.

Read over the information sheet to find out competition dates and times, rules, and the entry deadline. Completely fill out the entry form.

University of Wyoming is an equal opportunity employer. For complete Intramural Sports policies and procedures, please refer to the Intramural Sports Handbook at www.uwyo.edu/imsports.

The Intramural Sports Program provides paid work opportunities for sports officials, intramural supervisors, and office assistants.

Spring 2008 Description of Events Basketball

Co-Rec Wallyball

4.

Co-rec teams consist of four players on the court, while men’s and women’s have five players. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination postseason tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

Wallyball is best described as playing volleyball in a racquetball court, where players may use the walls during normal game play. Each team has two male and two female players. The wallyball tournament is a double-elimination tournament.

Game rules will be distributed at representatives’ meetings, which will be held after entries are taken for most team sports.

Schedules and information for each sport will be posted on both intramural bulletin boards prior to the start of competition. Bulletin boards are located inside the Intramural Sports office and at the bottom of the north stairwell of Half Acre. Tournament brackets will also be available online at www.uwyo. edu/imsports.

Players without a team (free agents) For programming purposes, the Intramural Sports Program only accepts complete teams during the entry process for team sports. Free agents are participants who wish to take part in intramural competition but are unable to field a complete team. These competitors may sign up on the free-agent list in the Intramural Sports office. Free agents are then asked to attend the representatives’ meeting for their particular sport, where they will be added to a team.

Location: Half Acre racquetball courts Dates: Feb. 4–Feb. 20

Location: Half Acre gym Dates: Jan. 27–Feb. 28

Slam Dunk/Hot Shot Contest Participants my take part in either or both competitions. The top scorers in the first round of each competition will advance to a second round, after which a winner will be determined. Location: Half Acre gym Date: Thursday, Jan. 24

Table Tennis Singles and Doubles Tournaments The table tennis tournaments follow a single- or doubleelimination format, depending on the number of participants. Matches will be decided by a best-of -three game format, unless time restrictions limit matches to one game. Location: Wyoming Union Family Room Dates: Jan. 25 (singles) and Feb. 1 (doubles)

Racquetball Doubles The racquetball tournament follows a double-elimination format. Location: Half Acre racquetball courts Dates: Feb. 4–Feb. 28

Tube Water Polo

Pairs Training bring a friend for $5 more per session

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www.uwyo.edu/imsports

Intramural Sports Program

Eight-Ball Singles and Doubles Tournament

Location: Half Acre pool Dates: Feb. 3–Mar. 6

Location: Wyoming Union Gardens Dates: Feb. 8 (singles) and Feb. 15 (doubles)

The eight-ball tournaments follow a single or double elimination format, depending on the number of participants. Matches will typically be decided by a best-of-three game format, unless time restrictions limit matches to one game.

Intramural Sports Program

Indoor Track Meet

NCAA Men’s Basketball Pool For those students who can’t get enough of the NCAA Tournament, the intramural office runs a Men’s Basketball Pick ‘em. The competition is run through a free online vendor, and participants compete for an intramural champion T-shirt.

2008 Intramural Sports spring semester

Location: Intramural Sports office Date: March 20

All entries are due by 4 p.m. on the entry deadline day. All dates are subject to change. Check our Web site for the most current information: www.uwyo.edu/imsports.

Wrestling

Teams have six players in the water, and players use innertubes at all times. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination postseason tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

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Speed, distance, and jumping events will all be held during our first indoor track meet in the UW Fieldhouse. Competitors will be allowed to participate in multiple events. Location: Fieldhouse Date: Feb. 9

Badminton Doubles

Weight classes are created before the start of the wrestling meet. Classes are based on the number of participants entered and how those participants can be grouped into similar weight classes.

The tournament follows a single- or double-elimination format, depending on the number of participants. Location: Half Acre gym Date: March 28

Location: UNIWYO Sports Complex Date: Feb. 10

Home Run Derby Prior to the spring softball tournaments, male participants get their chance to swing for the fences, while female participants swing for the 200-foot co-rec line painted in the outfield.

Whiffleball Tournament Swing for the fences in the middle of winter during our first whiffleball tournament in Half Acre Gym. The tournament follows a double-elimination format.

Location: Sandy Aragon Softball Complex Date: April 11

Softball

Location: Half Acre Gym Date. Feb. 23

A men’s and women’s tournament is played out during the first weekend, and a co-rec tournament is played during the second weekend. Teams consist of 10 players. Location: Aragon Softball Complex Dates: April 11–13 (men’s and women’s) and April 18–20 (co-rec)

Four-on-four Volleyball This tournament is a co-rec event, held in anticipation of the Co-Rec Volleyball Leagues, which begin after spring break. The tournament follows a double-elimination format.

Intramural Champion T-Shirt Design Contest

Swim Meet

For those students with some artistic talent, the intramural champion T-shirt design contest allows them to submit their ideas for next year’s T-shirt design. Design ideas should incorporate some school spirit, some fun and active artwork, and should highlight the Intramural Sports Program.

The Intramural Swim Meet features many events common to high school swim meets, along with a few fun events involving innertubes, wet sweatshirts, and the diving boards.

Location: Half Acre gym and Corbett gym Date: March 8

Location: Corbett pool Date: March 29

Tennis Doubles

Location: Intramural Sports office Date: April 18

Indoor Soccer Tournament

The tournament follows a double-elimination format.

Golf Scramble

Teams typically play one game in pool play, followed by a single elimination tournament. A team consists of seven players on the field.

Location: UW outdoor tennis courts Dates: April 11-13

The final intramural event of the year is a golf scramble. Participants enter in two-person teams. Students are responsible for purchasing green fees at a reduced rate for the intramural tournament.

Location: UW Fieldhouse Dates: March 30–April 15

Location: Jacoby Golf Course Date: April 18

Co-Rec Volleyball Co-rec teams feature three male and three female players. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination postseason tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams. Location: Half Acre gym Dates: March 30–April 30

Dodge Ball League Each dodge ball team has four players on the court. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination postseason tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

Sport (Divisions)

Entry Period

Captain’s Meeting

Game Days

Play Begins

Slam Dunk Contest (MW)

Jan. 14–Jan. 24

N/A

Thurs

Jan. 24

Hot Shot Competition (MW)

Jan. 14–Jan. 24

N/A

Thurs

Jan. 24

N/A

Fri

Jan. 25

Jan. 23, 5 p.m.

Sun–Thurs

Jan. 27

N/A

Fri

Feb. 1

Jan. 21–Jan. 30

Jan. 30, 5 p.m.

Sun–Thurs

Co–Rec Wallyball (C)

Jan. 21–Jan. 30

N/A

Mon–Thurs

Feb. 4

Racquetball Doubles (MWC)

Jan. 21–Jan. 30

N/A

Mon–Thurs

Feb. 4

8–Ball Singles Tournament (MW)

Feb. 4–Feb. 8

N/A

Fri

Feb. 8

Table Tennis Singles Tournament (MW)

Jan. 22–Jan. 25

Basketball (MWC)

Jan. 14–Jan. 23

Table Tennis Doubles Tournament (MWC)

Jan. 28–Feb. 1

Tube Water Polo (MWC)

Track Meet (MW)

N/A

Sat

Wrestling (MW)

Jan. 28–Feb. 10

N/A

Sun

Feb. 10

Feb. 11–Feb. 15

N/A

Fri

Feb. 15

Whiffleball Tournament (MW)

Jan. 28–Feb. 9

20

Feb. 3

8–Ball Doubles Tournament (MWC)

Feb. 11–Feb. 20

Feb. 20, 5 p.m.

4 on 4 Volleyball Tournament (C)

Feb. 25–March 5

Mar. 5, 5 p.m.

Sat

Mar. 8

March 5–March 12

N/A

N/A

Mar. 20

Badminton Doubles (MWC)

March 24–March 28

Fri

Mar. 28

N/A

Sat

Feb. 9

NCAA Men’s Basketball Pool (MW)

Feb. 23

Swim Meet (MW)

March 24–March 29

N/A

Sat

Indoor Soccer Tournament (MW)

March 10–March 26

Mar. 26, 5:00 p.m.

Sun–Sat

Mar. 30

Co-Rec Volleyball (C)

March 10–March 26

Mar. 26, 5:30 p.m.

Sun–Thurs

Mar. 30

Mar. 29

Dodgeball League (C)

March 10–March 26

Mar. 26, 6 p.m.

Mon–Thurs

Mar. 31

Tennis Doubles (MWC)

March 31–April 9

N/A

Fri–Sun

Apr. 11–13

Home Run Derby (MW)

March 31–April 11

N/A

Fri

Softball Tournament (MW)

March 31–April 9

Apr. 9, 5 p.m.

Fri–Sun

Apr. 11

Softball Tournament (C)

March 31–April 9

Apr. 9, 5 p.m.

Fri–Sun

Apr. 18–20

Intramural T–Shirt Design Contest (MW)

April 7–April 18

N/A

N/A

N/A

Golf Scramble (MWC)

April 7–April 16

N/A

Fri

Apr. 18

Apr. 11

Outdoor Adventure Program

Key: M = Men, W = Women, C = Co-rec

Location: Half Acre racquetball courts Dates: March 31–April 24

54

Previous experience as an official is desired but not required. Training clinics are offered before the start of each sport in order to teach the required skills. Intramural employees may also participate in intramural activities.

Intramural sports employment opportunities

3. Enter the team in the desired league, day, and time listed on the bulletin board inside the Intramural Sports office. Sign-ups are based on a first come, first served basis. The earlier the entry is taken, the more choices available for playing times.

Entering an intramural event

1.

Application forms are available in 206 Half Acre.

Students are given the opportunity to introduce new activities to be included in the Intramural Sports Program Calendar of Events. Approval will be based upon the philosophy of the program, facilities required, student interest, cost of equipment, personnel needs, and safety considerations.

The Intramural Sports Program offers University of Wyoming students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of individual, dual, and team sports at various levels of competition. Intramural Sports strives to provide structured and organized programs that promote teamwork and mutual respect, while assisting in the fulfillment of basic needs such as relaxation, socialization, achievement, and physical wellness. It is the goal of the Intramural Sports Program to provide the University of Wyoming community members the opportunity to participate in a sport of their choice in a fun, friendly, and safe environment.

Intramural activities consist of team, individual, and dual competitions. Most intramural team sports are divided into three leagues by gender: men’s, women’s, and co-recreational. UW Intramural Sports provides both competitive and recreational levels of participation to encourage individuals of all skill levels to compete. The levels of play vary with each sport. The following are the steps involved in signing up for intramural competition:

call 766-3236.

Personal Training Fees Personal Training

Proposal for new activity/event

All University of Wyoming students, faculty, staff, and spouses are eligible to compete in intramural activities provided they have access to all facilities and can present a valid WyoOne Card upon request. Intramural sports are free of charge to all enrolled full-time students.

Plan on being a Lifeguard this summer? Now is the time to get certified. Learn NEW and updated Lifeguard materials in this class. Attendance is required at all class times. Register, pick up books, and pay fees at the Campus Recreation service window (Half Acre, 766-3236). This class includes Lifeguard training, CPR for the Professional Rescuer, Standard First Aid Training, and Automated External Defibrillator. For more information

Personal training

Session

Mission Statement

Eligibility

American Red Cross Lifeguard Class

Program

www.uwyo.edu/imsports

Intramural Sports Program

www.uwyo.edu/oap 21

22


magaines

www.uwyo.edu/oap

Outdoor Adventure Program

Avalanche safety/first aid

www.uwyo.edu/oap

Outdoor Adventure Program

Diving

Classic or skate cross-country ski technique clinic

Avalanche rescue beacon clinic

PADI open water SCUBA course

This quick-and-dirty clinic is designed for people with little to no prior experience with rescue beacons. We will review the basic principles, using them when we practice. The clinic will introduce a few different types of transceivers. Participants will receive a gift certificate for a discount on one weekend rental of an avalanche rescue beacon from the OAP (restrictions apply). This clinic is limited to 10 participants without transceivers, and five additional participants with their own transceiver. Please come prepared to be outside for an hour or more. We do not recommend that you attend this clinic if you plan on signing up for the Level I avalanche class.

The earth is composed of more than 70 percent water. Why not explore more of it? This comprehensive course is the first part to receive your lifetime open water diving certification from Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI). Upon completion of the course, students have six months to take the open water dive component (additional fees for open water certification dives). Course fees include instruction, Crew-Pack with manual, dive table, log book, DVD, and complimentary use of all gear for pool dives. Certain medical conditions may require a physician’s approval; participants must pass a swim test and practical skills test before moving on. Advanced homework must be completed before class, call or stop by for more information. Please bring a swimsuit and a towel. Limit: 10 participants.

Camping Winter camping trip to the Snowies

Clinic date: Wednesday, Jan. 23, 5–8 p.m., OAP office Price: free!

Join us for a trip to the Little Brooklyn Lake Guard Station in the Snowies for a weekend of playing in the snow. Saturday we’ll snowshoe or ski two miles into the guard station and build a snow cave. Brave souls will sleep in the cave; some may opt for the cabin. On Sunday, we’ll head out for a hike. No prior snow camping experience necessary, most equipment and meals, transportation, and instruction will be provided. Limit: 7 participants.

Are you new to the area? Have you been climbing in other places? Do you know how to off-width climb (not that you really would want to)? We specifically designed this program to introduce you to Vedauwoo, to give you a chance to meet other climbers, and to try out some of Vedauwoo’s best climbs. You must have prior climbing experience. We can provide equipment if you don’t have your own. OAP leaders will be setting all topropes. Transportation provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Registration deadline: Monday, Feb. 4 Course dates: Friday, Feb. 15, 7–9 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 16 & 17, 8 a.m.–4 p.m.; 202 Corbett (enter through the north doors of Corbett on Sat. and Sun., by the Fine Arts Center parking lot) Price: $239 students, $265 all faculty/staff

Winter snowshoeing series We’ve scheduled four fantastic snowshoe trips to various areas around the region. Come join us for one or all four!

Mountaineering Fundamentals of mountaineering two-day course

Classroom sessions: Mondays & Wednesdays, March 31, April 2, 7, 9; 6–10 p.m.; OAP office Price: $49 students, $62 faculty/staff

Caving trip to Tongue River Cave, Wyo.

Spring break canoe trip through Labyrinth Canyon, Green River

Tongue River Cave is located west of Sheridan, Wyoming. Join us as we take the time to explore (and help clean) the cave. The cave contains rooms as big as auditoriums and small constrictions where you go through on your belly. Come explore the depths of this special place with our experienced instructors. No prior caving experience necessary. Transportation, equipment, and most meals provided. Limit: 9 participants.

Join Emilene and friends for a spectacular trip down the Green River, south of Green River, UT floating through Labyrinth Canyon. Huge spectacular sandstone walls follow the river towards it’s confluence with the Colorado River. We’ll take some time to hit side canyons for hikes on a layover day and/or along the way. No prior canoeing experience necessary. Equipment, meals and transportation provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Classroom sessions: Tuesdays & Thursday, Jan. 29, 31, Feb. 5, 6–10 p.m., Classroom Building, room 222 Field sessions: 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays, Feb. 2 & 9, locations TBA Price: $42 students, $49 faculty/staff (price includes textbook, $5 discount for NSP members)

Caving

Canoeing

(Please note that this trip will be cost sharing; excess trip monies, if any, will be returned to trip participants)

Pre-trip meeting: Monday, March 10; 5–6 p.m. Date: Monday, March 17–Sunday, March 23 Deposit: $100 (final due at the pre-trip meeting)

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Jan. 31; 5–7 p.m.; OAP office (It is strongly recommended that you participate in the avalanche rescue beacon clinic on Wednesday, Jan. 23 or the level I avalanche class) Departure date: Saturday, March 1 Price: $22 students, $29 all faculty/staff

Have you ever wanted to learn the skills necessary to scale the world’s highest peaks? This introductory course will cover the basics of ropeteams, snow anchors, crampon technique, and self-arrest over a two-day period while camping in the Little Brooklyn Lake Guard Station. The pre-trip meeting will be used to introduce theory and discuss basic knots, etc. Equipment, instruction, food, and transportation provided. Proficient basic rock-climbing skills are necessary to participate. Limit: 8 participants.

If you spend time in the backcountry, you need to be prepared for whatever emergency may come your way. This class will teach you everything from patient assessment and trauma care to wilderness-specific injuries to hazards and protocol. With a hands-on approach, this class will complement any experience you may already have in the outdoors. Upon successful completion, participants will receive certification through the American Red Cross. Limit: 20 participants. Price includes textbooks. Please come prepared each night to go outside for up to an hour.

This class is a must for anyone venturing into avalanche terrain in the winter. Taught by the coordinator of the Outdoor Adventure Program and National Ski Patrol (NSP) instructors, this comprehensive course is an NSP class; upon successful completion, participants will receive a certificate from the NSP. Topics covered: avalanche hazards and mechanics, route selection, slope analysis, weather, snow pack, transceiver use, probing techniques, self-rescue, and buddy rescue. Weekend sessions will be used to practice techniques. A very good level of physical fitness is required and familiarity with some form of human-powered backcountry winter travel is strongly recommended. All sessions are required. Limit: 20 participants. No transportation provided.

Winter snowshoeing series: Happy Jack Happy Jack is our local snowshoe destination, located just 15 min. to the east. We’ll head out for a half-day of snowshoeing to check out some of the best trails up there and give you information about others. No snowshoeing experience necessary. Snowshoes and transportation included. Limit: 10 participants.

Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, April 3; 6–8 p.m. Date: Saturday–Sunday, April 5–6 Price: $41 student, $51 faculty/staff

Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Jan. 17; 5–5:45 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Jan. 19 Price: $10 student, $15 faculty/staff

Winter snowshoeing series: Lake Agnes, Colo.

Fly-fishing Fly fishing trip to the North Platte River The North Platte River is a Blue Ribbon trout stream; join us for an awesome overnight trip to fish some of the best walk-in spots available. We’ll camp out by the river on Saturday night and hopefully hit the hot springs in Saratoga, too. Personal flies and Wyoming fishing license not included (though we can provide most all other equipment). Transportation, instruction, and food provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Pre-trip meeting: Tuesday, April 8; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Friday, April 12 (evening departure; time TBD) Return date: Sunday, April 13 Price: $69 students, $82 faculty/staff

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, April 9, 5–6 p.m. Dates: Saturday–Sunday, April 12–13 Price: $49 students, $61 faculty/staff

26

www.uwyo.edu/oap

Gear swap: Saturday, March 8; 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Gear drop off: Friday, March 7; 6–8 p.m. & Saturday, March 8; 8–10 a.m. Gear pickup: Saturday, March 8; 2–4 p.m. Location: Yellowstone Ballroom, Wyoming Union

Water sports

White water kayaking class Taught by seasoned kayakers, this comprehensive class is a great way to get started in this fun and challenging sport. Learn the roll, paddling and bracing techniques, river dynamics and terminology, swimming techniques, and river safety. The pool sessions will be used for practicing techniques, while the classroom sessions will be used to learn river dynamics and safety techniques. This class is a great value with 8 hours of scheduled pool time, and six hours of classroom time! Limit: 8 participants. Participants must attend all sessions.

Learn-the-kayak-roll clinic Do you want to learn how to roll a kayak? This quick introduction to rolling will get you started. The classroom session will be used to explain the basics; the pool sessions will be used to learn the roll and “wet exit.” This class will not teach you river dynamics or river safety for white water kayaking. Individuals interested in gaining more kayaking skills should sign up for the introductory white water kayaking class. Instruction and equipment are provided for this clinic. No prior experience necessary. Limit: 8 participants.

Class dates: Tuesdays, April 1, 8, 15; 6–8 p.m.; OAP office Pool session dates: Sundays, April 6, 13, 20, 27; 7–9 p.m.; Corbett pool (southeast entrance only) Price: $24 students, $30 faculty/staff

Class session: Wednesday, Feb. 27; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Pool sessions: Sundays, March 2 & 9; 7–9 p.m.; Corbett pool (enter through the southeast doors only) Price: $9 students, $15 faculty/staff

Introduction to playboating clinic Join us for a fun day of instruction on the fundamentals of freestyle kayaking. Participants must have ample kayaking experience; either OAP white water kayak class graduates or by approval of the instructors. Learn to play on river features using fundamental moves as your foundation to playboating. Front surf, side surf, spin, cartwheel, stern squirt, and endless others. Personal gear must be appropriate for cold water and weather paddling; wetsuit or dry suit is necessary (the OAP does not have this equipment to rent). Transportation and equipment including kayak, skirt, paddle, helmet, and lifejacket provided. Location to be determined; possible locations include the whitewater parks in Steamboat, Colo.; Casper, Wyo.; or Golden, Colo., in that order. Limit: 6 participants.

Drop-in kayak pool sessions (Please bring your Campus Express ID to Corbett)

These sessions are for individuals who have prior kayaking experience. There is no instruction available in the pool; you must know how to safely exit from a kayak before using the pool. Practice your kayaking technique or roll in Corbett pool. These popular sessions are a fun way to meet other boaters and just play around. Open to the community. Bring your own kayak. No advance registration required, just show up! The sessions are held at Corbett pool (enter thru the southeast doors only). Dates: Sundays, March 2, 9, 30, April 6, 13, 20; 4:30–6:30 p.m. Price: Free for full-time students and active members of Half Acre, $5/person for nonmembers. (Please bring exact change to the pool, no credit cards allowed.)

Pool session: Sun., April 20; 4:30–6:30 p.m.; Corbett Pool (southeast doors only), during the drop-in kayak pool session Pre-trip meeting: Fri., April 25; 5–6 p.m.; Corbett Pool (no pool practice) Departure date: Saturday, April 26 Price: $39 student, $49 other

Rental equipment and prices

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Jan. 30; 5–5:45 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Feb. 2 Price: $10 student, $15 faculty/staff

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Feb. 6; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Feb. 9 Price: $14 student, $19 faculty/staff

UW student

Faculty/staff

Deposit

day $

+1 day $

7 day $

day $

+1 day $

7 day $

$

backpacks (internal frame Osprey®)

6

2

13

8

3

18

100

bear canisters

2

1

6

3

1

6

50

Backpacking

compression stuff sack

1

1

5

3

1

6

15

cook pots (lightweight backpacking set)

3

1

6

4

1

7

30

2

12

6

3

17

35

1

6

3

1

6

cook stove & fuel bottle (MSR Whisper Light®)

5

fuel bottles (MSR®)

2

Special programs Banff Mountain Film Festival “World Tour” Two days of FREE, exciting mountain adventure and culture films! The Banff Film Festival, held annually in Banff, Alberta, draws films from all over the world. Shortly after the winners are announced, you see only the “Best of the Fest” as they tour the country and the world with the show. Don’t miss this wonderful opportunity that usually costs $20 or more a ticket! This event is made possible by the generous support of the Student Activities Council and Cross Country Connection. Movies are not rated by the MPAA. Screened movies will not be selected until the night of the show. Please call for more information.

Winter snowshoeing series: full-moon trip to the Snowies

Dates: Saturday & Sunday, Feb. 23 & 24; 7 p.m. Location: Arts & Sciences auditorium Price: Free

Join us for a spectacular opportunity to snowshoe under moonlit skies! We’ll head out in the evening on Thursday and hopefully be in good position for the moonrise over the Laramie Range Mountains. We’ll hit the Bear Tree for dinner, too (on your own). Snowshoes and transportation provided. No prior snowshoeing experience necessary, although you will need warm clothes! Limit: 10 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Tuesday, Feb. 19; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Thursday, Feb. 21, (approximate departure time of 5 p.m.) Price: $11 students, $15 faculty/staff

Fundamentals of mountain bike maintenance Learn to do basic repairs on your bike, and get a free tune-up! Taught by mechanics at The Pedal House, this clinic will cover basics and offer you a chance to tune your own bike (limit: one/person) with the help of their tools and mechanics! Perfect for getting your mountain bike ready for spring break; this clinic will cover fixing a flat to gear adjustments and many other things in between. Limit: 4 participants. Date: Wednesday, March 12; 6:30–8 p.m. Location: The Pedal House, 207 S. 1st St. Price: $19 student, $23 faculty/staff 31

Pokes’ Spoke Bike Library www.uwyo.edu/oap/bike.asp

Club Sports Program www.uwyo.edu/clubsports

Mission The bike library’s mission is to encourage alternative means of transportation on the UW–Laramie campus and in the Laramie community. By providing a cost-effective and environmentally friendly incentive for people to commute by bicycle, the Pokes’ Spokes Bike Library cuts down on unnecessary car use while helping to create a bicycle culture in Laramie that supports a healthy lifestyle for all members of the community. This program is sponsored by the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming (ASUW), and the UW Outdoor Adventure Program.

15

tent, lightweight backpacking (2-person)

7

2

14

8

3

18

125

tent, lightweight backpacking (3-person)

8

3

18

9

4

23

150

Camping, general compass (Brunton® mirrored with clinometer)

1

1

5

3

1

6

20

cook stove (Coleman®)

4

2

11

5

2

gaiters

1

1

5

3

1

6

15

GPS (Garmin eTrex Vista Cx®)

5

2

12

7

3

18

200

headlamps (Petzl® Myolite 3)

3

1

6

4

1

7

20

sleeping bag (0 degrees)

7

2

14

9

3

19

100

3

18

4

23

125

sleeping bag (–15 degrees)

8

9

12

sleeping bag upgrade (inserts into sleeping bag to increase warmth)

2

1

6

3

2

10

sleeping pad (closed-cell foam)

2

1

6

3

2

10

20

75 15

tarp (NOLS Dart Fly)

4

1

7

6

2

13

10

tent, car camping (2-person)

6

2

13

8

2

14

100

tent, car camping (4-person)

8

2

14

10

3

20

125

40

10

72

50

12

88

900

Canoeing/kayaking canoe (Old Town Discovery® 169; incl. 3 PFD’s, throw rope, bilge pump, car rack, and 3 paddles) Dry bag (NRS Bills Bag® 2.2 and 3.8 ft.3)

2

1

6

3

1

6

50

fire pan (approved for river use)

4

1

7

6

2

13

50

PFD (Type III, Extrasport® and NRS®)

2

1

6

3

1

6

50

kayak, white water (includes PFD, throw rope, helmet, spray skirt and paddle)

25

5

40

28

7

50

500

kayak helmet with face mask

2

1

6

3

1

6

50

kayak or canoe paddle

3

1

6

4

2

11

25

kayak spray skirt

3

1

6

4

2

11

15

throw rope

2

1

6

3

1

6

25

Eligibility

Deposit $100 deposit with a check or credit card

University of Wyoming students have priority to rent bikes. Faculty and staff are eligible to rent after the second week of the semester if any bikes remain (please call or stop by to find out).

Deposits are not charged to the credit card or check unless the equipment is not returned or is returned damaged. Renters can use their bikes during the designated rental period, and return the bikes in good condition to get their deposit returned or shredded.

Semester price

Fly-fishing fly-fishing rod, reel, and line (4 pc. St. Croix rod) with carrying case

5

2

12

7

3

18

175

waders and boots (breathable with wading belt and felt-bottomed boots)

5

2

12

6

2

13

75

®

continued >>

32

We’ll hike up along the ridgeline of Libby Creek canyon and break for lunch, overseeing a spectacular view of the Laramie Valley. The trail descends into Libby Creek and ties into Barber Lake Trail. The whole loop is roughly 6 miles with some moderate elevation gain. No prior snowshoeing experience is necessary. Transportation and equipment is provided. Limit: 10 participants.

30

Outdoor Adventure Program

Sell your old gear or find some “new to you” gear! We will sell your gear for you (and take a percentage of the sale). Set your own price. Pick up your money or gear that did not sell after the swap. Checks and cash are the only forms of acceptable payment. Checks are made out directly to the seller. Call for more details.

Winter snowshoeing series: Libby Creek Trail, Snowies

Come with us to Lake Agnes, a beautiful highmountain cirque north of Rocky Mountain National Park. We’ll spend part of the day out on a hike. The hiking will be on a 2.5 Mi. out-and-back trail gaining over 1000’ in elevation. A good level of physical fitness is important. Limit: 10 participants. Snowshoes and transportation provided.

27

Spring outdoor gear swap

The Snowies are home to awesome backcountry skiing! Come and explore some of it with us. An advanced level of skiing/snowboarding experience is required, and a very strong level of physical fitness is important. Participants will practice evaluating backcountry terrain and snowpack for avalanche potential and learn the importance of educated decisions. Backcountry skiing/snowboarding is dependent upon conditions, no guarantees will be made as to the safety of the snowpack; we may not be able to ski. Transportation and some equipment will be provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Skiing and snowshoeing

Wilderness first aid

Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Feb. 21; 6–7 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Sunday, Feb. 24 Price: $19 students, $24 faculty/staff

Backcountry ski/ snowboard trip

Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, May 15; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Date: Saturday & Sunday, May 17 & 18 Price: $22 students, $29 faculty/staff

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, March 26; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, March 29 (morning) Return date: Sunday, March 30 (late afternoon) Price: $41 students, $53 all faculty/staff

Level I avalanche class

Focus on your technique and learn helpful tips to improve your skills. This clinic is taught by the UW Nordic Ski Team and is used as a fundraiser for the team. Typically there is a very low student to instructor ratio; there should be a lot of individualized instruction. All skill levels are encouraged to attend. Transportation provided; ski equipment must be rented separately. Limit: 10 participants.

Two-day rock-climbing workshop, Vedauwoo

33

$15 students, $35 faculty/staff Rentals are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Anyone wishing to extend the check-out period can simply pay an additional semester fee to extend the rental. The cost pays for maintenance and repairs, though this program is subsidized by the ASUW and the Outdoor Adventure Program.

Available bikes and accessories The bike library offers two options of bikes: the Giant Simple Single Springer and the Atlas Industrial Cruiser, both models offer easy cruising around campus and town and come in both a men’s and women’s models. Helmets and locks come standard with every rental. 36

55


jim fuerholzer

design

www.uwyo.edu/clubsports

Club Sports Program

Mission Statement and Philosophy The purpose of the University of Wyoming Club Sports Program is to provide students the opportunity to participate in competitive sport clubs against intercollegiate teams. Club teams compete against opponents from the Rocky Mountain region along with universities across the country. Club sports are recognized student organizations (RSOs) that are affiliated with the Campus Recreation Department. The teams are administered by students under the supervision of the club sports coordinator. Emphasis is placed upon student leadership and involvement. The following statements define the Club Sports Program and its philosophy: •

Club sports are recognized student organizations and must abide by all RSO policies and procedures.

Club sports are voluntary in nature.

Club sports are nonprofit organizations. The members must assume much of the financial responsibilities according to their interest.

Club sports adhere to regulations governing travel, budget, practices, conduct, and records filed with the club sports coordinator.

Club sports are designed to accept members of any skill level, but may determine the composition of traveling squad(s) defined by skill level.

Currently Active Club Sports

The level of competition within the club framework depends on the desires of the membership and obligations agreed to by club members.

Club sports are not mandated to follow intercollegiate athletic guidelines. A club must adhere to a national governing body and do so for the stability offered by such organizations.

Club sports are not affiliated with the University of Wyoming Athletic Department and do not emphasize recruiting practices, financial aids, scholarships, letters of intent, profits, or expanded road trips.

Emphasis is placed on student leadership and the most successful clubs are those with outstanding student leaders. The club strives and thrives only by means of active student involvement and participation.

www.uwyo.edu/clubsports

Club Sports Program

Nordic ski racing

Badminton

Competition The highly competitive Club Sports teams travel to various locations in the Rocky Mountain region and throughout the nation for competition purposes. Rival competitors in the region include Colorado State University, University of Colorado, University of Utah, and University of Northern Colorado. For national competitions and championships, travel across the country is often necessary. In recent years, UW Club Sports teams have traveled to California, Nevada, Michigan, New Hampshire, Vermont, Georgia, Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Florida, Maine, and Virginia to compete.

Eligibility

The Club Sports office provides encouragement, guidance, and supervision, but the success of the club depends on the involvement of students. The club will not maintain an active status without sufficient membership commitment.

Club sports are offered to students, faculty, and staff who meet the eligibility requirements under the rules of each individual club’s governing body. Individual clubs require a participation fee that aids in covering the cost of travel, rooms, equipment, awards, and other necessary expenses. Club fees vary depending on the nature of the club.

Joining a club To join a club, participants can contact the Club Sports office for more information on each individual sport and contact information for club representatives. When this is done, individuals should attend practice and meeting times and complete the required participation paperwork to become an official member of the club.

Baseball Club Baseball competes in the Rocky Mountain Conference of the National Collegiate Baseball Association (NCBA) along with Colorado State University, University of Colorado–Boulder, Ft. Lewis College, University of Northern Colorado, and Western State College. The club participates in both fall and spring semesters and practices three to five times per week.

Men’s ice hockey The Men’s Hockey team scrapes the ice from early November to March with practices held two to three times a week and games scheduled regularly against area schools. The team was crowned the 2001 Division III National Champions and runner-up in 2002. The team is a member of the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA).

Cycling The Cycling Club offers both mountain- and road-biking opportunities to the campus community. Members of the National Collegiate Cycling Association (NCCA), the Rocky Mountain Cycling Federation (RMCC), and the United States Cycling Federation (USCF), the Cycling Club participates in various contests around the region as well as hosting their own road and mountain races in Wyoming.

The Men’s Lacrosse Club is a member of the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate Lacrosse League and competes against several regional schools in Division II. The club practices four to five times per week. They play nonleague games in the fall semester and take part in league competition and playoffs in the spring.

Fencing requires endurance, agility, quick thinking, as well as sound strategy and competitive spirit. Fencing equipment used by the team includes foil, saber, and epee. The Fencing Club frequently enters both teams and individuals in United States Fencing Association (USFA) tournaments. The club generally holds practice and instruction three times per week.

Starting a new club

Women’s ice hockey

If there is enough student interest in a sport currently not offered, contact the Club Sports staff to guide you through the necessary approval steps. Approval will be based upon the philosophy of the program, facilities required, student interest, cost of equipment, and safety considerations. If there is approval, the Club Sports staff will assist you in holding an informational meeting for all interested participants.

A recent addition to the Club Sports Program, Women’s Hockey presents an opportunity for women to continue playing competitively at UW. The club practices two to three times per week and competes against area collegiate and city teams.

Shotgun sports The Shotgun Sports Club provides shooting opportunities for individuals with all degrees of experience. Practices are held weekly at the Cheyenne Trap Club. Competitive shoots against other collegiate teams are held in both fall and spring semesters. A newly formed Rocky Mountain League will match teams from Colorado and Wyoming in head-to-head competition once a month at fields around the region. The Shotgun Sports Club also competes annually at the ACUI National Championship. The club participates in international trap/ skeet, American trap/skeet, five stand, sporting clays, and doubles trap.

Most clubs operate with some level of coaching. Some Club Sports teams operate with student coaches, while others elect to seek the assistance of an external volunteer coach. It is necessary for all coaches to maintain the same philosophy of student development incorporated into the Club Sports Program. The coach must allow the students to take on the administrative requirements of the Club Sports Program and concentrate his/her efforts toward the “on-field” coaching decisions. The Club Sports office supports the philosophy that volunteer coaches should not be paid for their contribution to the Club Sports Program. The Club Sports coordinator reserves the right to refuse or revoke a coaching application if Club Sports Program philosophy and policies are not followed. All coaches must submit a new coaching application each academic year. The selection of coaches is the responsibility of the individual club, but is subject to approval by the Club Sports coordinator.

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Men’s soccer The Men’s Soccer Club provides students the opportunity to compete with schools in the Rocky Mountain region during the fall semester. They generally practice three to five times a week during their season. The club is a member of the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate Soccer League (RMISL).

Men’s lacrosse

Fencing

Club Sports coach

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The Nordic Ski Club is a competitive club for the more advanced skier. Nordic Ski Club members participate in United States Collegiate Ski Association (USCSA) sanctioned races. The club annually sends participants to the national championships and has become a dynasty on the national stage, where the women were National Champions in 2003, 2004, 2007, and the national runner up in 2005 and 2006; the men were the national runner up in 2003, 2005, 2007, and national champions in 2006.

The world’s fastest racquet sport has been a fixture as a UW club sport since 2001. The club enters several area tournaments as well as playing every Friday at 7 p.m. in the Half Acre main gym. All skill levels are invited and encouraged to participate.

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Intercollegiate Horse Show Association The Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) promotes competition for riders of all skill levels, who compete both individually and as teams in shows at regional and national levels. Students of all riding levels are encouraged to participate.

Men’s rugby Be part of one of the best rugby teams in the country. Join the Cowboys who were the National Runner-up in 2000; a Sweet 16 participant in 2001, 2005, and 2006, and who advanced to the Final Four round of competition in 2002. Both experienced and inexperienced players are welcome. Competitions are held in the fall and spring. The club is a member of the Eastern Rockies Rugby Football Union (ERRFU).

Shorin-Ryu and Kobudo Practice traditional martial arts with members of the campus Shorin-Ryu and Kobudo Club. Members practice Okinawan karate, kobudo (the art of ancient Okinawan weapons), ShinjoRyu lijitsu (sword techniques), Dai Yoshin-Ryu Kempojutsu, and Kobujutsu (throwing and grappling art). The club is affiliated with Juko-Kai International, the Okinawa Martial Arts Union, and Seiyo no Shorin-Ryu Karate/Kobudo Kai. No experience is necessary as the club has several instructors.

Water polo Water polo is an aggressive, fastpaced sport. The club practices two to three times per week and encourages men and women of all experience levels to come play. The club will compete in the Collegiate Water Polo Association’s (CWPA) fall tournament series as well as nonleague games with regional schools.

Alpine ski racing The Alpine Ski Club promises excitement and excellent competition for all participants. The Alpine ski team practices at nearby Snowy Range Ski Resort and sends participants to the USCSA National Championships annually. This club is for the more advanced skier with expert skiing ability encouraged.

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CAMPUS RECREATION FALL 2007

Campus Recreation

Campus Recreation

3

Contact us Building & pool hours

4 4

Exceptions & winter break schedules Membership Membership fees

6 7 7

UW family recreation Additional services & other information

8 8

Reserving facilities with Campus Recreation 10

Open Recreation

11

Classes & programs General class information Group fitness classes Aquatic instruction Introductory classes Personal training

selections from Fall 2007

12 12 12 15 16 16

Campus Recreation TIN

Intramural Sports Program

G

RS YEA 0 1

E CEL

BR A

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Intramural event information Fall 2007 description of events

18 19

2007 Intramural Sports fall semester schedule

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Disclaimers

Accidents and injuries can and do occur during sport, recreation, and exercise activities. Notice is hereby given that the University of Wyoming is not responsible for accidents, injuries, and/or illnesses that may be incurred while on and/or during the use of university property; nor is the university responsible for any costs or expenses incurred as a result of any accident and/or injury that may occur on university property. The University of Wyoming is not responsible for any items lost/stolen in conjunction with the use of university facilities. Participants understand and agree that their use of university facilities and/or services is at their own risk.

FALL

CAMPUS RECREATION FALL 2007 Outdoor Adventure Program

23

General outing information

24

Fall outing schedule Fall outing descriptions Avalanche safety/first aid Backpacking/hiking Canoeing Caving Cycling Fall hiking series Fly-fishing Mountaineering Rock-climbing Skiing & snowshoeing Special programs Water sports

25 26 26 26 26 26 26 27 27 28 28 30 30 32

Rental equipment and prices Rental equipment policies

33 34

Climbing wall information

35

Campus Recreation Campus Recreation www.uwyo.edu/rec

www.uwyo.edu/rec

Persons seeking admission, employment or access to programs of the University of Wyoming shall be considered without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, veteran status, sexual orientation, or political belief.

2007

Photos by UW Photo Service, the Branding Iron, Student Publications, and Campus Recreation.

www.uwyo.edu/rec

Campus Recreation

Our Mission Our mission is to provide recreational opportunities to a diverse campus community that enhance the learning and workplace environment and promote mental and physical health via quality facilities, equipment, and programs. Our programs, which include Open Recreation, Intramural Sports, Club Sports, and Outdoor Adventure, offer a broad range of coordinated activities for individuals and groups that promote health awareness, a sense of community, and a lifelong appreciation for wellness and recreational activities. Supporting the value of student development, our programs strive to offer opportunities to students that develop leadership skills and promote responsibility while maintaining a balance between personal, professional, and academic pursuits.

Contact us

Facility hours

Campus Recreation

Half Acre building hours

Dept. 3604, 1000 E. University Ave. Laramie, WY 82071

Aug. 25–Dec. 14 Mondays–Fridays 6 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturdays 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Sundays noon–8 p.m.

Half Acre (307) 766-5586 fax (307) 766-6720 halfacre@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/rec

Half Acre Pool hours

Aug. 25–Dec. 14 Mondays–Fridays 6–8 a.m., 11 a.m.–1 p.m., and 5–7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays 1–4 p.m. Half Acre pool is primarily used for lap swim, but recreational swim is allowed in the shallow pool during family swim hours.

Open Recreation

Pokes’ Spoke Bike Library

Half Acre, West Lobby (307) 766-3370 halfacre@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/rec

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Half Acre family swim

Tuesdays and Fridays 5–7 p.m., Saturdays 1–4 p.m., and Sundays 1–4 p.m.

Intramural Sports Program 206 Half Acre (307) 766-4175 www.uwyo.edu/imsports Hours: Mondays–Fridays 9 a.m.–6 p.m.

Climbing wall

Aug. 25–Dec. 14 Mondays–Fridays 11 a.m.–1 p.m. and 5–10 p.m. Saturdays 11 a.m.–1 p.m. Sundays 5–8 p.m. For more information on the climbing wall, please see page 35.

Outdoor Adventure Program

Club Sports Program

37

Mission statement & philosophy Club sports information

38 39

Currently active club sports 40 Club sports informational meeting schedule 44

Half Acre, South Lobby (307) 766-2402 oap@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/oap Hours: Mondays–Fridays 9 a.m.–6 p.m.

Corbett Pool hours

Aug. 27–Dec. 14 Mondays–Thursdays 7–9 p.m. Fridays 6–8 p.m. L-shaped Corbett pool is 25 yards by 25 meters with a diving well and three diving boards including a three-meter board.

Club Sports Program

206 Half Acre (307) 766-6396 www.uwyo.edu/clubsports Hours: Mondays–Fridays 9 a.m.–6 p.m.

Corbett open volleyball

Aug. 28–Dec. 14 Corbett Gym is open for recreational volleyball on Tuesdays and Fridays from 4 to 6 p.m. This program is included with campus recreation membership or participants can pay $5 per day.

Wellness Center

Half Acre, North Lobby (307) 766-3546 wellness@uwyo.edu www.uwyo.edu/wrc Hours: Mondays–Fridays 8 a.m.–5 p.m.

Other Information University of Wyoming Wellness Center

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Campus map Half Acre map

46 48



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www.uwyo.edu/rec

Campus Recreation

Schedules

Membership

Exceptions Recreation schedules are available 24 hours a day by calling (307) 766-3370 or via the Web site at www.uwyo.edu/rec. Date

Exception

Half Acre Facility Hours

Half Acre Pool Hours

Climbing Wall

Aug. 25

Regular hours resume

9 a.m.–5 p.m.

1– p.m.

11 a.m. –1 p.m.

Sept. 1

Corbett Pool Hours Closed

UW Football vs. Virginia

9–11:30 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

Closed

Sept. 3

Labor Day

noon–8 p.m.

1– p.m.

5–8 p.m.

Closed

Sept. 8

UW Football vs. Utah State

9–11:30 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

Closed

Oct. 6

UW Football vs. TCU

9–11:30 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

Closed

Oct. 13

UW Football vs. New Mexico

9–11:30 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

Oct. 27

UW Football vs. UNLV

9–11:30 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

Nov. 17

UW Football vs. BYU

9–11:30 a.m.

9–11 a.m.

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

Nov. 20 & 21

Thanksgiving Break

9–11 a.m.

Closed

9–11 a.m.

Closed

9–11 a.m.

Closed

11 a.m.–1 p.m. only

Closed

Nov. 22–2

Thanksgiving Break

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Nov. 25

Regular hours resume

noon–8 p.m.

1– p.m.

5–8 p.m.

Closed

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m. only

Closed

Dec. 1

Open Recreation

Fall semester ends

Half Acre will close at 11:30 a.m. on all home football game days. Racquetball courts are reserved for classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays 2–3 p.m.

Winter Break Date

Half Acre Facility Hours

Half Acre Pool Hours

Climbing Wall

Corbett Pool Hours

Dec. 15 & 16

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Dec. 17–21

6 a.m.–8 p.m. *

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Closed

Dec. 22–25

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Dec. 26–28

8 a.m.–2 p.m. *

Closed

Closed

Closed

Dec. 29–Jan. 1

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Jan. 2–

6 a.m.–8 p.m. *

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Closed

Membership is required to use UW’s recreational facilities. Membership privileges include use of all activity areas in Half Acre including the climbing wall and use of the Corbett pool and gym during scheduled hours. Individuals must present a valid WyoOne card to purchase membership and to enter the facility.

Students and employees may register dependents five years and older through high school graduation for a membership by presenting their WyoOne card and the dependent’s WyoOne card. See the UW family recreation information for details pertaining to dependent access.

Membership eligibility

University of Wyoming Board retired employees may obtain membership by presenting their WyoOne card. There is no charge for Board retired employees, but lockers have additional fees. Board retired spouses are eligible to purchase membership with a current WyoOne card.

Currently enrolled full-time UW students have automatic membership to recreation facilities. They must present their WyoOne card to enter the facility and to participate in programs offered by Campus Recreation.

Guests with a photo ID may use Half Acre for $5 per day when sponsored by a UW community member with a valid WyoOne card. UW students, faculty, staff, and cooperating agency employees and spouses may sponsor themselves for a daily guest pass.

University of Wyoming part-time students, employees, and cooperating agency employees may purchase a membership by presenting their WyoOne card. Student and employee spouses are eligible to purchase access with a current WyoOne card.

Reserving Facilities with Campus Recreation Who can reserve campus recreation facilities?

How do I reserve recreation facilities?

• University of Wyoming groups/organizations

• Pick up a facility request form at the Campus Recreation office, located in the west lobby of Half Acre.

• Nonuniversity groups/organizations

• Call (307) 766-6740 to request information about reserving recreation facilities.

What activity areas can be reserved?

• Nonuniversity affiliated individuals or groups must provide a proof of insurance certificate indicating single-liability insurance in which the University of Wyoming is named as additional insured in the amount of $1 million covering bodily injury, including death, and property damage.

Half Acre

• Pool (capacity = 45) • Main gym (non-spectator area) three courts: basketball, volleyball, and badminton

• Refunds are available for one-day and short-term reservations if cancellation is made at least 24 hours in advance of the rental date except for employee costs. For long-term rentals there are no refunds.

• Racquetball courts eight courts: racquetball, squash, handball, and wallyball

Membership fees Annual

Semester

Summer

Daily

Part-time student Student spouse Student dependent

Customer

N/A N/A N/A

$50 $58 $15

$37.50 $58 $15

$5/day $5/day $5/day

Faculty/staff Spouse Employee dependents

$174 $174 $30

$87 $87 $15

$87 $87 $15

$5/day $5/day $5/day

Cooperating agency employee Spouse Cooperating agency dependents

$200 $200 $60

$100 $100 $30

$100 $100 $30

$5/day $5/day $5/day

UW Board retired Spouse

Free $174

Free $87

Free $87

$5/day $5/day

Please contact Campus Recreation at (307) 766-5586 during building hours for more information concerning membership and eligibility.

Membership and service expiration dates Membership Type

UW Status

Membership and Locker Rental Ends

Annual

Employee and/or spouses

One year from month of purchase

Fall Semester

Employee and/or spouses

Jan. 31, 2008

• Exercise rooms/dance studio two rooms: a dance studio and an exercise room with wood floors and mirrors

How much is this going to cost?

• Climbing wall 75’ x 22’: bouldering and top rope climbing Instruction required: call (307) 766-6488 for more information.

Employee costs

• Employees $10/hour • Climbing wall instructors $10/hour

Corbett

• Employees will be paid for the 15 minutes before and after each reservation to prepare/secure facilities.

• Pool (capacity = 92) 25-yard by 25-meter L-shaped pool with three diving boards

• Employees costs are doubled 11 p.m.–8 a.m.

• Gym two courts: basketball and volleyball

Facility costs

• Half Acre pool $40/hour

Recreation Fields

• Exercise rooms $15/hour

• Fields located at 22nd and Willett can be reserved by calling (307) 766-6740.

• Courts $15/hour • Climbing wall $40/hour

Where do we go for information about reserving recreation facilities?

• Corbett pool $60/hour • Recreation fields Call (307) 766-6740 for fees Processing will take approximately five working days once a facility request form has been completed. Confirmation may take longer.

• Campus Recreation office 101 Half Acre During open building hours

Jan. 5 & 6

Closed

Closed

Closed

Closed

Spring Semester

Employee and/or spouses

May 31, 2008

Jan. 7–11

6 a.m.–8 p.m.

6–8 a.m.; 11 a.m.–1 p.m.; 5–7 p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Closed

Summer Session

Employee and/or spouses

Aug. 31, 2008

Disclaimer

Jan. 12

9 a.m.–5 p.m.

1– p.m.

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Closed

Fall Semester

Student

Dec. 15, 2007

Jan. 13

noon–8 p.m.

1– p.m.

5–8 p.m.

Closed

Spring Semester

Student

May , 2008

Summer Session

Student

Aug. 2, 2008

Accidents and injuries can and do occur during sport, recreation, and exercise activities. Notice is hereby given that the University of Wyoming is not responsible for accidents, injuries, and/or illnesses that may be incurred while on and/or during the use of university property; nor is the university responsible for any costs or expenses incurred as a result of any accident and/or injury that may occur on university property. The University of Wyoming is not responsible for any items lost/stolen in conjunction with the use of university facilities. Participants understand and agree that their use of university facilities and/or services is at their own risk.

* Main gym and track are closed for maintenance. Opportunities for pickup basketball games are available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at Corbett gym from Dec. 17 to Jan. 4 from 11 a.m.–1 p.m.

Open Recreation

For complete facility policies and procedures, please refer to the Campus Recreation Policy and Procedure Guide at www.uwyo.edu/rec.

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www.uwyo.edu/rec

Open Recreation

Abs only This is your chance to get 20 minutes of a solid abdominal workout. Lower, upper, and oblique abdominal muscles will be strengthened and conditioned.

Hip-Hop An experienced dancer and aerobics instructor will lead you through a new hip-hop dance routine every class or build on the choreography of a previous class. Come and try out your dance skills while receiving a light cardio workout.

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Mondays & Wednesdays, 8:30–8:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Mondays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 north

Aquatic instruction

Pilates Pilates is a form of exercise that focuses on flexibility, breathing, and muscle control. Pilates, when practiced frequently, can yield increased lung capacity, better coordination, increased core strength, and improved bone density and joint health.

Customized swim lessons are available for nonswimmers, intermediate swimmers, and lap swimmers looking for everything from beginning lessons to stroke refinement. We can even help if you’re training for a triathlon! Our certified swimming instructors can meet individual needs and are some of the best around. Schedule a time when it is convenient for you. Stop by the Half Acre service window for more information. You must have recreation access to participate. See the personal training table for prices.

Water Workout Water Workout is an aquatic circuit training class that will occur in the shallow end of Half Acre pool. We will be introducing fun new challenges for different fitness levels. Come join us for this fast-paced class that will include warm-up, new water Pilates moves, strengthening, cardio, and cool-down exercises that fit into your lunch hour.

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Mondays & Wednesdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6:30–7:30 a.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 north

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 6 (No class Nov. 19–22) Mondays–Thursdays, 12:10–12:50 p.m. Location: Half Acre pool

Yoga Yoga is an ancient natural method for achieving and maintaining physical, mental, and emotional health. This class will include yoga postures (exercise routines), warm-ups, breathing techniques, and relaxation methods. Benefits include stress release, body strength and weight control, improved body alignment and flexibility, and better concentration.

Aerobics Instructor Training Course

Intro to cardio

Are you interested in becoming a fitness instructor? This class will teach you the fundamental skills of fitness instruction including how to lead a variety of different classes (i.e. step, kickboxing, toning, etc.) and populations through a safe and effective workout. This fun and energetic class will prepare you for a national certification and provide the skills necessary to teach group fitness classes at the University of Wyoming. Sign-up begins August 27. (Sign-ups are limited.)

Learn how to use a variety of cardio equipment in the infield area. Date: By appointment Times: 6:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. Location: Infield

Classes will be held: TBA $20 per person Sign up at the Half Acre service window. More information will be given at the time of sign-up.

Date: By appointment Times: 6:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. Location: Infield

Introductory classes Introductory classes are basic informational classes on specific exerise equipment. Classes are limited to three to five people, last 30 minutes, and are $10 per class. Sign up for all three classes for $25 and save $5.

Personal training

This class is a basic–intermediate step class. Taking this class will give you a cardio and toning workout.

Personal Training Fees

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays noon–12:50 p.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:30–7:30 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south

Program Personal Training

Total body conditioning (TBC)

Iron 101–intro to free weights

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Tuesdays & Thursdays, noon–12:50 p.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south Variety Express gives you the chance to experience multiple exercise types within the hour-long class. During this class you can expect to do a little kickboxing, step, Pilates, Yoga, boot camp, or circuit. Each class will be a different mix; yet a full cardio workout can be expected every time.

Date: By appointment Times: 6:30 a.m. or 6:30 p.m. Location: Infield

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Mondays & Wednesdays, 7:30–8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, 6:30–7:30 a.m. Location: Exercise Room 3 south 1

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Cost

Sessions are 1 hour in length 1 session

$20.00

2 sessions

$38.00

3 sessions

$54.00

4 sessions

$68.00

5 sessions

Are you intimidated by free weights or unsure how to use them correctly? Come join us in this introductory class that will teach you about free weights and help you become more comfortable with them.

Variety Express

Session

$82.00

6 sessions

$96.00

7 sessions

$109.20

8 sessions

$121.60

9 sessions

$135.00

10 sessions

$140.00

11 sessions

$147.40

12 sessions

$156.00

Pairs Training bring a friend for $5 more per session

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Intramural Sports Program www.uwyo.edu/imsports

Intro to circuit training Learn to use the Half Acre Cybex circuit machine weights. This class will teach you how to use the circuit to improve muscular strength and endurance. Great for those with little time to workout!

Want to reach your ultimate fitness goals, but need help getting there? Hire a personal trainer! Whether you want to modify your physique or improve your overall health, our certified personal trainers can help you reach your goals! Schedule a time when it is convenient for you. Stop by the Half Acre service window for more information. You must have recreation access to participate.

This class provides a total body workout. The class will combine various forms of kickboxing, step, hi-low, and circuit training with some weight lifting and abdominal toning to give you a complete workout. No previous experience required.

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Open Recreation

Step aerobics

Dates: Sept. 10–Dec. 7 (No class Nov. 19–23) Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 6:30–7:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays, 6:30–7:30 p.m. Saturdays, 11 a.m.–noon Location: Exercise Room 3 north

www.uwyo.edu/rec

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www.uwyo.edu/imsports

Intramural Sports Program

Mission Statement

Proposal for new activity/event

The Intramural Sports Program offers University of Wyoming students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of individual, dual, and team sports at various levels of competition. Intramural Sports strives to provide structured and organized programs that promote teamwork and mutual respect, while assisting in the fulfillment of basic needs such as relaxation, socialization, achievement, and physical wellness. It is the goal of the Intramural Sports Program to provide the University of Wyoming community members the opportunity to participate in a sport of their choice in a fun, friendly, and safe environment.

University of Wyoming is an equal opportunity employer. For complete Intramural Sports policies and procedures, please refer to the Intramural Sports Handbook at www.uwyo.edu/imsports.

Intramural sports employment opportunities The Intramural Sports Program provides paid work opportunities for sports officials, intramural supervisors, and office assistants.

All University of Wyoming students, faculty, staff, and spouses are eligible to compete in intramural activities provided they have access to all facilities and can present a valid UW identification card upon request. Intramural sports are free of charge to all enrolled full-time students.

Entering an intramural event Intramural activities consist of team, individual, and dual competitions. Most intramural team sports are divided into three leagues by gender: men’s, women’s, and co-recreational. UW Intramural Sports provides both competitive and recreational levels of participation to encourage individuals of all skill levels to compete. The levels of play vary with each sport. The following are the steps involved in signing up for intramural competition:

Read over the information sheet to find out competition dates and times, rules, and the entry deadline. Completely fill out the entry form.

3.

Enter the team in the desired league, day, and time listed on the bulletin board inside the Intramural Sports office. Sign-ups are based on a first come, first served basis. The earlier the entry is taken, the more choices available for playing times.

4.

Game rules will be distributed at representatives’ meetings, which will be held after entries are taken for most team sports.

Miniature Golf Participants are responsible for purchasing green fees at a reduced rate for the event.

Location: Half Acre Gym Dates: Nov. 5–Nov. 9

The tournament follows a double-elimination format.

Badminton Singles

Bouldering Competition

Outdoor Soccer Men’s, women’s, and co-rec teams consist of seven players on the field. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination post-season tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

Location: Half Acre climbing wall Date: Friday, Sept. 7

Location: Little League Complex Dates: Sept. 10–Oct. 13

Location: Sandy Aragon Softball Complex Date: Friday, Sept. 21

Disc Golf The disc golf tournament is played on a course throughout the UW-Laramie campus.

Teams consist of three players and games are played on half-size basketball courts. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination post-season tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams. Location: Half Acre Gym Dates: Oct. 22–Nov. 26

Location: Cowboy Baseball Field Dates: Sept. 9–Oct. 13

The fall golf tournament is an individual tournament, with the top 10 percent of participants receiving championship T-shirts. Students are responsible for purchasing green fees at a reduced rate for the intramural tournament.

Fantasy Football League For those students who can’t get enough of the NFL, the intramural Fantasy Football League runs during the NFL regular season. The competition is managed by a free online vendor, and participants compete for an intramural champion T-shirt.

Location: Jacoby Golf Course Date: Friday, Sept. 14

Location: Intramural Sports office Dates: Sept. 9–Dec. 29

Wallyball is best described as playing volleyball in a racquetball court, where players may use the walls during normal game play. Each team has three players on the court. The wallyball tournament is a double-elimination tournament.

This double-elimination tournament is a blast for all participants. All equipment is provided.

Teams consist of seven players on the field, while the co-rec teams must have at least two women and two men on the field during play. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination post-season tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

Location: Corbett Gym Date: Friday, Oct. 5

Location: Little League Complex Dates: Sept. 19–Oct. 16

Homecoming 5K Fun Run

Test your skills at throwing, punting, and kicking field goals during the flag football season. Championship shirts are awarded for each individual event, as well as to an overall winner.

To kick off Homecoming-week festivities, the 5K Fun Run is free to students, faculty, and staff; and it is $5 for the general public. Held on a course designed by Campus Recreation, participants can enjoy snacks and raffle prizes donated to the event. Event Tshirts are also available for a nominal fee.

Location: Recreation Fields Dates: Wednesday & Thursday, Sept. 19 & 20

Location: Recreation Fields Date: Saturday, Oct. 6

Punt, Pass, Kick Contest

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Sports Trivia Bowl Put your knowledge of sports to the test in our written sports trivia exam. All major men’s and women’s sports are covered; the test also includes a few questions on the minor sports and some Wyoming athletics history.

Location: Half Acre racquetball courts Dates: Oct. 22–Nov. 12

Racquetball Singles

Location: Intramural Sports office Dates: Dec. 3–Dec. 7

The racquetball tournament follows a double-elimination format. Location: Half Acre racquetball courts Dates: Oct. 25–Nov. 15

Bench Press Competition Measure your strength against the strongest people in the gym! Weight classes are established at the competition, with championship shirts awarded to the winners of each class, as well as participants with the highest percentage lift. Location: Half Acre infield Date: Friday, Nov. 2

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Intramural Sports Program

Location: Laramie Lanes, 1270 N. 3rd St. Date: Saturday, Dec. 1

Wallyball

Ultimate Frisbee® League

Players without a team (free agents)

The one-day bowling tournament is a doubles event. Participants can elect to bowl in a traditional two-person format (bowlers each bowl three games and add up their scores for an overall total) or follow a scotch-doubles format (bowlers take a turn each frame and combine to bowl three total games). Participants are responsible for purchasing their games and shoe rental at a discounted price for the event.

3-on-3 Basketball

Floor Hockey

Golf Tournament

Bowling

Location: Half Acre Gym Dates: Oct. 22–Nov. 26

Location: Meet in front of Half Acre Gym Date: Saturday, Sept. 29

Location: Two Chicks Paintball, off Highway 287 on the Colorado/Wyoming border Date: Sunday, Sept. 16

Co-rec teams consist of eight players on the field, while men’s and women’s teams have seven players. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination post-season tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

Location: Half Acre Gym Date: Friday, Nov. 9

Men’s and women’s volleyball teams feature six players on the court. During the regular season, teams sign up to play once a week at the same time (for example: Mondays at 6 p.m.). A single-elimination post-season tournament follows league play, and game times will vary for all teams.

Male participants get their chance to swing for the fences, while female participants swing for the 150-foot co-rec line painted in the outfield.

Held in cooperation with the Outdoor Adventure Program at the Half Acre climbing wall, the Bouldering Competition is the first event on the intramural calendar. Participants can compete at several different skill levels, with new routes designed specifically for the competition.

The tournament follows a single- or double-elimination format, depending on the number of participants.

Volleyball

Home Run Contest

Flag Football

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Shooters can participate in the free throw contest at any time during the week of the event. Participants shoot two rounds of 20 shots each.

Tennis Singles Tournament

Participants from Colorado State University and the University of Northern Colorado join us for a day of competition with multiple settings at an outdoor paintball arena. A cost, which includes all equipment, is associated with the event.

For programming purposes, the Intramural Sports Program only accepts complete teams during the entry process for team sports. Free agents are participants who wish to take part in intramural competition but are unable to field a complete team. These competitors may sign up on the free-agent list in the Intramural Sports office. Free agents are then asked to attend the representatives’ meeting for their particular sport, where they will be added to a team.

Free Throw Contest

Location: Oasis Mini Golf, 15th and Skyline Rd. Date: Friday, Sept. 21

Location: Sandy Aragon Softball Complex Dates: Sept. 14–16 (men’s and women’s), Sept. 21–23 (co-rec)

Paintball vs. CSU and UNC

Schedules and information for each sport will be posted on both intramural bulletin boards prior to the start of competition. Bulletin boards are located inside the Intramural Sports office and at the bottom of the north stairwell of Half Acre. Tournament brackets will also be available online at www. uwyo.edu/imsports.

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www.uwyo.edu/oap

Outdoor Adventure Program

2007 Intramural Sports fall semester All entries are due at 4 p.m. on the entry deadline day. All dates are subject to change. Check our Web site for the most current information: www.uwyo.edu/imsports. Sport (Divisions)

Entry Period

Captain’s Meeting

Game Days

Play Begins

Bouldering Competition (MW)

Aug. 27–Sept. 7

N/A

Fri.

Sept. 7 only

Flag Football (MWC)

Aug. 27–Sept. 5

Fantasy Football League (MW)

Aug. 27–Sept. 5

N/A

N/A

Sept. 9

Outdoor Soccer (MWC)

Aug. 27–Sept. 5

Sept. 5, 5 p.m.

Mon.–Thurs.

Sept. 10

Golf Tournament (MW)

Sept. 4–Sept. 12

N/A

Fri.

Sept. 14 only

Sept. 5, 5:30 p.m.

Sun.–Thurs.

Softball Tournament (MW)

Sept. 4–Sept. 12

Sept. 12, 5:30 p.m.

Fri.–Sun.

Sept. 14–16

Sept. 4–Sept. 12

N/A

Sun.

Sept. 16 only

Ultimate Frisbee League (MWC)

Sept. 4–Sept. 12

Sept. 12, 5 p.m.

Mon.–Thurs.

Sept. 19

Punt, Pass, and Kick Contest (MW)

Sept. 10–Sept. 20

N/A

Wed.–Thurs.

Sept. 19 & 20

Miniature Golf (MW)

Sept. 10–Sept. 20

N/A

Fri.

Sept. 21 only

Sept. 10–Sept. 20

N/A

Fri.–Sun.

Softball Tournament (C)

Sept. 4–Sept. 12

Sept. 12, 5 p.m.

Fri.–Sun.

Sept. 21–23

Home Run Contest (MW)

Sept. 10–Sept. 21

N/A

Fri.

Sept. 21 only

Disc Golf (MW)

Sept. 24–Sept. 28

N/A

Sat.

Sept. 29 only

Floor Hockey (MW)

Oct. 1–Oct. 4

N/A

Fri.

Oct. 5 only

5K Fun Run (MW)

Oct. 1–Oct. 6

N/A

Sat.

Oct. 6 only

Volleyball (MW)

Oct. 8–Oct. 17

Oct. 17, 5 p.m.

3-on-3 Basketball (MW)

Oct. 8–Oct. 17

Oct. 17, 5:30 p.m.

Mon.–Thurs.

Oct. 22

Oct. 8–Oct. 17

N/A

Mon.–Thurs.

Mon.–Thurs.

Oct. 22

Racquetball Singles (MW)

Oct. 15–Oct. 24

N/A

Mon.–Thurs.

Oct. 25

Bench Press Competition (MW)

Oct. 29–Nov. 2

N/A

Fri.

Nov. 2 only

Free Throw Contest (MW)

Nov. 5–Nov. 9

N/A

Mon.–Fri.

Nov. 5–Nov. 9

Nov. 5–Nov. 9

N/A

Bowling (MWC)

Nov. 12–Nov. 28

N/A

Sat.

Dec. 1 only

Sport Trivia Bowl (MW)

Dec. 3–Dec. 7

N/A

Mon–Fri.

Dec. 3–Dec. 7

Key: M = Men, W = Women, C = Co-rec

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Fri.

Nov. 9 only

Avalanche rescue beacon refresher clinic

This fall, join us for four spectacular hikes around the region. Sign up for individual hikes or for all four.

Turtle Rock Trail

Canoeing Canoe trip, North Platte River—NEW This fall we’ll take our inaugural paddle down the North Platte River near Saratoga during the Labor Day weekend. We’ll camp out for two nights on this beautiful stretch of river. We’ll spend part of Saturday practicing canoeing skills (paddling strokes, rescue, and boating safety) before we hit the river. No prior canoeing experience required. Transportation, equipment, and meals provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Wilderness first aid If you spend time in the backcountry, you need to be prepared for whatever emergency may come your way. This class will teach you everything from patient assessment and trauma care to wilderness-specific injuries to hazards and protocol. With a hands-on approach, this class will complement any experience you may already have in the outdoors. Upon successful completion, participants will receive certification through the American Red Cross. Limit: 20 participants. Price includes textbooks. Please come prepared to go outside for up to an hour.

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Aug. 29; 5-7 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 1

Cycling Ride the range!

Classroom sessions: Mondays & Wednesdays, Nov. 5, 7, 12, 14; 6–10 p.m.; OAP office Price: $32 students, $39 faculty/staff

Come cycle over the beautiful Snowy Range Mountains to Saratoga with the UW club cycling team. The ride will start in Laramie and head along Highway 130 over the Snowy Range to Saratoga. The distance is approximately 80 miles with well over 4,500 feet of elevation gain throughout the ride. After arriving in Saratoga, we will stop for lunch and then take a relaxing dip in the hot springs. A support vehicle will follow the riders to Saratoga and transport everyone, and their bikes, back to Laramie. Riders of intermediate and advanced abilities are welcome, and a good level of physical fitness is very important.

Backpacking/hiking Backpacking and camping trip to the Snowy Range Mountains Learn the fundamentals of backpacking with us! This outing will focus on many aspects of backpacking safely and effectively; minimum impact camping, stove use and backcountry cooking, hiking techniques, campsite and route selection. We’ll learn all of these skills in the Snowies, a beautiful alpine area with lakes and great fall scenery. Transportation, meals, equipment, and instruction provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Oct. 22

Badminton Singles (MW)

Fall hiking series

Classroom session: Wednesday, Nov. 28; 5–8 p.m.; OAP office Field session: Saturday, Dec. 1 Price: $5 students, $7 faculty/staff

Sept. 21–23

Wallyball Tournament (MW)

Avalanche safety/first aid This quick-and-dirty clinic is designed for people with prior experience with rescue beacons. We will use the classroom to review the basic principles of beacon/avalanche rescue. The field day will focus on reducing search times, practicing companion rescue, and multiple burial scenarios. Participants will receive a gift certificate for a free weekend rental of an avalanche rescue beacon from the OAP (restrictions apply). Limited to 10 participants without transceivers, five additional participants with their own transceiver. Equipment provided; transportation is not.

Sept. 9

Paintball vs. CSU & UNC (MW)

Tennis Singles Tournament (MW)

Softball Tournament A men’s and women’s tournament is played during the first weekend, and a co-rec tournament is played during the second weekend.

Location: UW Outdoor Tennis Courts Dates: Sept. 21–23

Pick up an entry packet consisting of an information sheet, entry form, and team roster in the Intramural Sports office located in 206 Half Acre. Packets are generally available one-and-a-half weeks prior to the entry deadline.

2.

www.uwyo.edu/imsports

Intramural Sports Program

Fall 2007 Description of Events

Eligibility

1.

Application forms are available in 206 Half Acre. Previous experience as an official is desired but not required. Training clinics are offered before the start of each sport in order to teach the required skills. Intramural employees may also participate in intramural activities.

Students are given the opportunity to introduce new activities to be included in the Intramural Sports Program Calendar of Events. Approval will be based upon the philosophy of the program, facilities required, student interest, cost of equipment, personnel needs, and safety considerations.

Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Aug. 30; 5–7 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 1 Return date: Monday, Sept. 3 Price: $59 students, $65 faculty/staff

Outdoor Adventure Program www.uwyo.edu/oap

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Aug. 29; 6–7 p.m.; Wyoming Union Fireplace Lounge Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 1; 8 a.m. Cost: $10 students, $18 faculty/staff

Caving Caving trip to Cave Creek Come explore the depths of the underworld as we head to the Shirley Mountains to go spelunking. Participants will spend the day caving and in the evening head to the Saratoga hot springs for a dip. This trip is a great way to learn about a very pristine and fragile environment. No experience is necessary. Transportation, camping/caving equipment, and meals provided. Limit: 10 participants.

Join us for a hike at Vedauwoo on Turtle Rock Trail, a three-mile hike around the most prominent rock formation in the Laramie Range. We’ll spend time talking about some of the rock climbing areas and local flora and fauna. We will also take a brief van tour of some of the other hiking areas in the Laramie Range Mountains, located just to the east of Laramie. No prior experience necessary. Limit: 12 participants. Please bring a lunch. Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Sept. 6; 5–5:30 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 8 Price: $10 students, $18 faculty/staff

Medicine Bow Peak Join us for a beautiful hike to the top of Medicine Bow Peak (weather permitting). We’ll depart from the Lake Marie Trailhead. The hike will climb more than 1,800 feet from the parking lot (six miles round-trip) to the summit at 12,013 feet. Transportation provided. Limit: 12 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Sept. 13; 5–5:30 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 15 Price: $11 students, $19 faculty/staff

Fly-fishing Fly-fishing trip to the Flaming Gorge, Utah Come with us to the Flaming Gorge, home to some of the best fly-fishing the area has to offer. The pre-trip meeting will cover the basics of fly-fishing. The trip will consist of two days of fishing on the tail waters below the Arch Dam. No fly-fishing experience necessary. Most meals, camping, and fly-fishing equipment will be supplied (participants must purchase their own flies). Participants must also purchase a Utah fishing license. Limit: 7 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Tuesday, Oct. 2; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Oct. 6 Return date: Sunday, Oct. 7 Price: $49 students, $62 faculty/staff

Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Oct. 4; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Oct. 6 Return date: Sunday, Oct. 7 Price: $49 students, $62 faculty/staff

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jim fuerholzer

design

www.uwyo.edu/oap

Outdoor Adventure Program

Rock Creek Trail, located on the northern toe of the Medicine Bow Mountains, is a beautiful canyon hike that follows Rock Creek. This hike should contain the beginnings of spectacular fall color. This out-and-back hike could be up to six miles in total length. Transportation provided. Limit: 12 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Sept. 20; 5–5:30 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 22 Price: $11 students, $19 faculty/staff

Laramie Peak The final hike of the series takes us to Laramie Peak, located in the northern portion of the Laramie Range. This hike will be our most physically demanding, climbing over 2,700 feet in four miles. This out-and-back hike packs spectacular views of the region upon gaining the summit at over 10,200 feet. Transportation provided. Limit: 12 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Sept. 27; 5–5:30 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 29 (this will be an early departure time) Price: $12 students, $20 faculty/staff

Mountaineering Fundamentals of mountaineering two-day course Have you ever wanted to learn the skills necessary to scale the world’s highest peaks? This introductory course will cover the basics of rope-teams, snow anchors, crampon technique, and self-arrest over a two-day period while staying in the Little Brooklyn Lake Guard Station. The pre-trip meeting will be used to introduce theory and discuss basic knots, etc. Equipment, instruction, food, and transportation provided. Proficiency in basic rock-climbing skills is required. Limit: 8 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Oct. 24; 6–8 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Oct. 27 Return date: Sunday, Oct. 28 Price: $39 student, $51 faculty/staff

Rock-climbing Intramural bouldering competition This event is cosponsored by Intramural Sports and Outdoor Adventure. Come try out your climbing skills; you do not need prior experience to participate! We have four categories for beginners and intermediate climbers both male and female. New climbing routes will be set specifically for this competition. You do not need to be a certified climbing wall member, but you MUST be a UW student, faculty, staff, spouse, or dependent. Registration begins Monday, Aug. 27, in the Intramural Sports office (Half Acre, 2nd floor, north lobby) and continues until the competition starts. Competition: Friday, Sept. 7; 6–9 p.m.; Half Acre climbing wall Price: free!

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Pokes’ Spoke Bike Library www.uwyo.edu/oap/bike.asp

Rock Creek

Mission Two-day rock-climbing workshop, Vedauwoo Are you new to the area? Have you been climbing in other places? Do you know how to off-width climb (not that you really would want to)? We specifically designed this program to introduce you to Vedauwoo, to give you a chance to meet other climbers, and to try out some of Vedauwoo’s best climbs. After climbing on the first day, we’ll stop by the Fat Crack Festival, Laramie’s local climbing festival. You must have prior climbing experience. We can provide equipment if you don’t have your own. OAP leaders will be setting all top-ropes. Transportation provided. Limit: 10 participants.

The bike library’s mission is to encourage alternative means of transportation on the UW–Laramie campus and in the Laramie community. By providing a cost-effective and environmentally friendly incentive for people to commute by bicycle, the Pokes’ Spokes Bike Library cuts down on unnecessary car use while helping to create a bicycle culture in Laramie that supports a healthy lifestyle for all members of the community. This program is sponsored by the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming (ASUW), the UW Cycling Team, and the UW Outdoor Adventure Program.

Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Sept. 12; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Date: Saturday & Sunday, Sept. 15 & 16 Price: $22 students, $29 faculty/staff

Multipitch climbing trip to Sweet Water Rocks, Wyoming Sweet Water Rocks is an incredible place to bag a big wall. One day will be devoted to single-pitch climbs, while the other will be devoted to a five-pitch 5.8 climb. Our instructors will do all the lead climbing. Participants must be proficient climbers and possess a strong level of physical fitness. Transportation, meals, and equipment will be provided. Limit: 6 participants. Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Sept. 26; 5–6 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 29 Return date: Sunday, Sept. 30 Price: $76 students, $89 faculty/staff

Friday-night bouldering series The Friday-night bouldering series (FNBS) is our fun, low-key competition series open to the community. New routes will be set for every competition for all abilities from beginner to advanced. Prizes will be awarded for top female and male finishers in four different categories (beginner, intermediate, advanced, Fundamentals of rock-climbing, and marathon), along with a general raffle Vedauwoo for all participants. These comps will be a great way to get introduced to the competiThis is a great way to learn how to climb at our premiere climbing spot just tion arena. No preregistration. east of Laramie. Get a start in climbing or just freshen up your skills. Learn some helpful techniques from knowledgeable and friendly instructors. We’ll Registration: 5–6 p.m. (before the competition), use the pre-trip meeting to go over the basics of climbing at the indoor wall; at the Half Acre climbing wall we’ll spend the whole day climbing on Saturday. Please come to the pre-trip Date: Fridays, Oct. 5, Nov. 30; 6–9 p.m.; Half Acre meeting dressed to climb. No prior experience necessary. Climbing equipment, climbing wall instruction, and transportation provided. Limit: 10 participants. Price: free for Half Acre members, $5 for nonmembers Trip I Pre-trip meeting: Wednesday, Sept. 5; 5–7 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 8 Trip II Pre-trip meeting: Thursday, Sept. 20; 6–8 p.m.; OAP office Departure date: Saturday, Sept. 22 Price: $12 students, $17 faculty/staff 29

Club Sports Program Eligibility

Deposit $100 deposit with a check or credit card

University of Wyoming students, faculty, and staff are eligible to rent.

Deposits are not charged to the credit card or check unless the equipment is not returned or is returned damaged. Renters can use their bikes during the designated rental period, and return the bikes in good condition to get their deposit returned.

Price $15 per semester Rentals are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Anyone wishing to extend the check-out period can simply pay an additional $15 per semester to continue the rental. The $15 charge per semester pays for maintenance, management, and repairs.

Available bikes The bike library offers two options of bikes: the Giant Simple Single Springer and the Atlas Industrial Cruiser. Both models offer easy cruising around campus and town and come in both a men’s and women’s model. Helmets and locks come standard with a rental. 36

www.uwyo.edu/clubsports


magaines

www.uwyo.edu/clubsports

Club Sports Program

The purpose of the University of Wyoming Club Sports Program is to provide students the opportunity to participate in competitive sport clubs against intercollegiate teams. Club teams compete against opponents from the Rocky Mountain region along with universities across the country. Club sports are recognized student organizations (RSOs) that are affiliated with the Campus Recreation Department. The teams are administered by students under the supervision of the club sports coordinator. Emphasis is placed upon student leadership and involvement. The following statements define the Club Sports Program and its philosophy: •

Club sports are recognized student organizations and must abide by all RSO policies and procedures.

Club sports are voluntary in nature.

Club sports are nonprofit organizations. The members must assume much of the financial responsibilities according to their interest.

Club sports adhere to regulations governing travel, budget, practices, conduct, and records filed with the club sports coordinator.

Club sports are designed to accept members of any skill level, but may determine the composition of traveling squad(s) defined by skill level.

The level of competition within the club framework depends on the desires of the membership and obligations agreed to previously.

Club sports are not mandated to follow intercollegiate athletic guidelines. A club must adhere to a national governing body and do so for the stability offered by such organizations.

Club sports are not affiliated with the University of Wyoming Athletic Department and do not emphasize recruiting practices, financial aids, scholarships, letters of intent, profits, or expanded road trips.

Emphasis is placed on student leadership and the most successful clubs are those with outstanding student leaders. The club strives and thrives only by means of active student involvement and participation.

www.uwyo.edu/clubsports

Club Sports Program

Currently Active Club Sports

Mission Statement and Philosophy

The Club Sports office provides encouragement, guidance, and supervision, but the success of the club depends on the involvement of students. The club will not maintain an active status without sufficient membership commitment.

The world’s fastest racquet sport has been a fixture as a UW club sport since 2001. The club enters several area tournaments as well as playing every Saturday at 9 a.m. in the Half Acre main gym. All skill levels are invited and encouraged to participate.

Competition The highly competitive Club Sports teams travel to various locations in the Rocky Mountain region and throughout the nation for competition purposes. Rival competitors in the region include Colorado State University, University of Colorado, University of Utah, and University of Northern Colorado. For national competitions and championships, travel across the country is often necessary. In recent years, UW Club Sports teams have traveled to California, Nevada, Michigan, New Hampshire, Vermont, Georgia, Arizona, Texas, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Florida, Maine, and Virginia to compete.

The Men’s Hockey team scrapes the ice from early November to March with practices held two to three times a week and games scheduled regularly against area schools. The team was crowned the 2001 Division III National Champions and runner-up in 2002. The team is a member of the American Collegiate Hockey Association (ACHA).

Cycling The Cycling Club offers both mountain- and road-biking opportunities to the campus community. They are members of the National Collegiate Cycling Association (NCCA), the Rocky Mountain Cycling Federation (RMCC), and the United States Cycling Federation (USCF). The Cycling Club participates in various contests around the region as well as hosting their own road and mountain races in Wyoming.

Eligibility Club sports are offered to students, faculty, and staff who meet the eligibility requirements under the rules of each individual club’s governing body. Individual clubs require a participation fee that aids in covering the cost of travel, rooms, equipment, awards, and other necessary expenses. Club fees vary depending on the nature of the club.

Intercollegiate Horse Show Association The Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) promotes competition for riders of all skill levels, who compete both individually and as teams in shows at regional and national levels. Students of all riding levels are encouraged to participate.

Men’s lacrosse

Baseball

Joining a club

Club Baseball competes in the Rocky Mountain Conference of the National Collegiate Baseball Association (NCBA) along with Colorado State University, University of Colorado–Boulder, Ft. Lewis College, University of Northern Colorado, and Western State College. The club participates in both fall and spring semesters and practices three to five times per week.

To join a club, participants can contact the Club Sports office for more information on each individual sport and contact information for club representatives. When this is done, individuals should attend practice and meeting times and complete the required participation paperwork to become an official member of the club.

Starting a new club If there is enough student interest in a sport currently not offered, contact the Club Sports staff to guide you through the necessary approval steps. Approval will be based upon the philosophy of the program, facilities required, student interest, cost of equipment, and safety considerations. If there is approval, the Club Sports staff will assist you in holding an informational meeting for all interested participants.

The Men’s Lacrosse Club is a member of the Rocky Mountain Intercollegiate Lacrosse League and competes against several regional schools in Division II. The club practices four to five times per week. They play nonleague games in the fall semester and take part in league competition and playoffs in the spring.

Men’s rugby Be part of one of the best rugby teams in the country. Join the Cowboys who were the National Runner-up in 2000; a Sweet 16 participant in 2001, 2005, and 2006, and who advanced to the Final Four round of competition in 2002. Both experienced and inexperienced players are welcome. Competitions are held in the fall and spring. The club is a member of the Eastern Rockies Rugby Football Union (ERRFU).

Women’s ice hockey

Club Sports coach

A recent addition to the Club Sports Program, Women’s Hockey presents an opportunity for women to continue playing competitively at UW. The club practices two to three times per week and competes against area collegiate and city teams.

Most clubs operate with some level of coaching. Some Club Sports teams operate with student coaches, while others elect to seek the assistance of an external volunteer coach. It is necessary for all coaches to maintain the same philosophy of student development incorporated into the Club Sports Program. The coach must allow the students to take on the administrative requirements of the Club Sports Program and concentrate his/her efforts toward the “on-field” coaching decisions. The Club Sports office supports the philosophy that volunteer coaches should not be paid for their contribution to the Club Sports Program. The Club Sports coordinator reserves the right to refuse or revoke a coaching application if Club Sports Program philosophy and policies are not followed. All coaches must submit a new coaching application each academic year. The selection of coaches is the responsibility of the individual club, but is subject to approval by the Club Sports coordinator. 38

Men’s ice hockey

Badminton

Fencing

Women’s rugby

Fencing requires endurance, agility, quick thinking, as well as sound strategy and competitive spirit. Fencing equipment used by the team includes foil, saber, and epee. The Fencing Club frequently enters both teams and individuals in United States Fencing Association (USFA) tournaments. The club generally holds practice and instruction three times per week.

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UW women can also get in on the fast-paced, exciting action of rugby. Experienced and inexperienced players are welcome to join Women’s rugby for competition in the fall and spring semesters. The Women’s Rugby Club is a member of the Eastern Rockies Rugby Football Union (ERRFU)

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jim fuerholzer

design

Wellness Center

For information contact 766located in @uwyo.edu • www.uwyo.edu/

Why is this student smiling?

Orientation 2007

is a publication of the Branding Iron & Student Publications Wyoming Union, 3rd floor 307-766-6190 wyomedia@uwyo.edu Layout & design Michell Winchell Kristen Leis Photography assistance Justin Joiner

selections from University of

Sales reps Emily Krabbenhoft Lindsey Peterson Desiree Lopez Becca Ruble Will Winkler

Wyoming 2007 Orientation Guide

Student Publications Staff Cary Berry-Smith General Manager Barbara Thorpe Advertising & Circulation Manager Jim Fuerholzer Design Advisor Gayla Trammell Accounting

INSIDE:

Photos courtesy of the Branding Iron, UW Photo Service, Campus Recreation, and Student Publications

Your keys to success at UW

© 2007 by the Branding Iron & Student Publications. All rights reserved.

A message from ASUW 3 Welcome from President Tom Buchanan 5 ASUW Freshman Senate 6 Honors Program  Student’s Attorney 3 Dean of Students Office 5 Judicial Affairs 20 STOP Violence Project 25 International Students and Scholars Office 27 Center for Advising and Career Services 28 Office of the Registrar 3 Outdoor Adventure Program (OAP) 32 Student Publications 36 ASUW Safe Ride 39 University Disability Support Services 40 Associated Parents of the University of Wyoming (APUW) 44 Family Weekend 45 The Wyoming Union 48 Residence Life & Dining

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Looking For Answers sustainability at UW

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Recycling at UW 57 Student Financial Aid 59 Campus Recreation 64 Wellness Center 67 Student Health Service 68 Information Technology 7 Residence Life & Dining 73 Student Financial Operations 76 WyoOne ID Office 79 International Programs Office 80 FYI! – First Year Initiative 82 Multicultural Affairs 85 Campus Activity Center 90 Center for Volunteer Services

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Hitting the old dusty trail in Moab alternative spring break

Greek Life

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Resource Centers

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Dining Guide Directory of Colleges 2 Directory of Recognized Student Organizations (RSO) Helpful Phone Numbers 37 UW Campus Map 38

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Wellness Center ASUW

For information For information contact contact 766-5204 766located in Room 020, Wyoming Union, lower located level in asuwpres@uwyo.edu @uwyo.edu • www.uwyo.edu/asuw • www.uwyo.edu/

Freshman Senate

Wellness Center

For information contact 766-5204 located in Wyoming Union, Room 020 dos@uwyo.edu • www.uwyo.edu/DOS/programservices/leadership/freshmansenate.asp

For information contact 766located in @uwyo.edu • www.uwyo.edu/

Freshman Senate

Dear Incoming Students:

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Welcome to the University of Wyoming!

voice of the freshman student body

elping first-year students acquire the resources necessary for success at the University of Wyoming is what Freshman Senate is all about. As the active voice of the freshman student body, Freshman Senators serve as leaders on campus and in the community, broadening their first-year experience. They make valuable contacts with administrators on campus and are allowed to provide feedback to various campus departments on what is working and what makes the transition to college

part in homecoming, the College Bowl, and Family Weekend. The students are also involved in community activities such as Little Kickers soccer, the WYOAIDS walk, and supporting other campus activities. Involvement in Freshman Senate is also a good step toward participation in Associated Students of the University of Wyoming (ASUW), the student government on campus. Freshmen Senators get a head start on learning how to draft and propose legislation that improves the University of Wyoming campus, one of the purposes of ASUW. The Freshman Senate President serves as an ex-offi“Freshman Senate is a unique cio to ASUW, which allows organization dedicated to helpthe voice of freshmen to be heard on a weekly basis at ing freshman students acquire the ASUW meetings. Freshman Senate members also the skills, information, attihave the opportunity to partudes, and resources necessary ticipate in the ASUW mentor program prior to ASUW for success at the University of elections. They often attend ASUW meetings together Wyoming.” throughout the year. – Preamble of the Freshman Constitution At the conclusion of the year, Freshman Senators meet with the President of life difficult. By contributing their ideas, the University of Wyoming. They also Freshmen Senators improve the campus present a letter to the President annuwhile also helping to meet the demands ally expressing their concerns and recof the students. ommendations about the university. Freshman Senate introduces the stu- Freshman Senate is an outstanding way dents to the more than 200 recognized to become an involved student leader student organizations and the services while learning what the University of that are provided on campus. It also Wyoming has to offer. Freshman Senhelps members to create a new network ate meets every Wednesday at 4 p.m. in and make new friends. Students take Wyoming Union Senate Chambers.

We’re glad that you decided to make UW the destination for your education. There has never been a more exciting time to be on campus than now! From new academic initiatives to new campus facilities, we continue to build an even better university. As a student at UW, you will have some of the very best professors in the country instructing you in top academic programs. Outside of class, the university community has many outstanding opportunities – everything from student government to Pilates – to help you connect to campus. We encourage you to learn as much as you can about these resources during Orientation 2007. When you look around, you will see that you are part of a diverse group of incoming students. Your backgrounds and your interests vary. Some of you come from big cities while others are from rural communities. You are future scholars, musicians, leaders, athletes, and more. Amidst all this diversity, remember that this is a university – a place to meet people who are very different from you, a place to challenge and to be challenged, and a place to strengthen your mind and enhance your abilities. As two students who have been on campus for a few years, we encourage you to look outside yourself and your comfort zone. We are both from very small communities in western Wyoming and completely understand that coming to a large university can be quite a change. Connecting to and becoming part of the campus community is essential to a successful college career. We invite you to explore all that the University of Wyoming has to offer. Your journey begins today during Orientation 2007 as you become a part of the community by meeting new people, becoming familiar with the services available to you, and learning about the organizations of which you would like to be a part. Best wishes as you begin your journey to “Destination UW.” Please let us know what we can do to make this the best trip possible. Again, welcome to campus! We look forward to seeing you.

David Kiren ASUW President asuwpres@uwyo.edu Zach Guier ASUW Vice President asuwvp@uwyo.edu

Orientation 2007

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University of Wyoming

Students of ASUW attend the United Multicultural Council Forum.

Orientation 2007

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magaines

Dining Guide

Honors Wellness Program Center

Dining Guide

For information For information contact contact 766-4110 766located in Merica Hall, Room located 102 in honors@uwyo.edu @uwyo.edu • www.uwyo.edu/honors • www.uwyo.edu/

Honors program prepares for excellence students engage in innovative courses, independent research

Mercy Englewood, Colo.

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nationally-acclaimed program, the University Honors Program crosses all disciplines to bring students together for innovative courses, a variety of activities and opportunities for independent research. Energetic, academically-talented students in the program choose five honors courses during their undergraduate years. These courses fulfill university and college requirements, are designed and taught by some of UW’s best faculty, and are kept small to encourage discussion and interaction among all students and faculty. Culminating in an independent senior research project, the program provides students the opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor and gives them an extra edge in job interviews and

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Orientation 2007 107

graduate school applications. Students with at least a 3.25 college GPA, may join the program up to the beginning of their junior year. To enter as a first-year student, a 3.7 high school GPA, a composite ACT score of 28 or a combined SAT of 1240 is required. Students in the honors program are eligible for one of 72 stipends which are approximately the value of in-state tuition, 18 of which are awarded each year, and several other scholarships including support for study abroad. In addition, honors students enjoy a mix of social, cultural and service activities. Honors students have the option of living in honors housing, either on the honors floor in White Hall or in the Honors House on Fraternity Row. Orientation 2007



Students’ Attorney Program

For information contact 766- 6347 located in Knight Hall, Room 128 www.uwyo.edu/studentatty

Students’ Attorney offers advice free legal advice to students

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ree help is available to students who need legal advice or some information about the law through the Students’ Attorney’s Program. The students’ attorney can provide students with legal advice on issues such as wills, auto accidents, criminal matters, traffic violations, consumer complaints, landlord and tenant matters, and court procedures. While the information and assistance is free, there is a $20 charge for the preparation of binding legal documents such as wills. The Students’ Attorney Program will also prepare informative programs for students and student organizations on any legal topic requested. Be aware, however, that the university does place some limitations upon the students’ attorney. The attorney, Elizabeth Goudey, cannot represent students in court nor can she represent any student group nor advise students on matters in conflict with the university or other students. Consultations with the students’ attorney are by appointment only. To schedule an appointment, call 766-6347, or stop by Room 128, Knight Hall. The Students’ Attorney Program is funded by the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming (ASUW).

Know Your Rights If you are stopped while in a vehicle: In order to stop a vehicle, an officer must have a reasonable suspicion that criminal activity is occurring or has occurred. You have the right to refuse consent if the police ask to search your vehicle, but an officer may look through the windows at anything in “plain view” and if an officer has probable cause to search the vehicle, he may search it and any containers in it which might conceal the object of the search without consent or a warrant. If an officer stops you for DUI, you may refuse a breath or other chemical test. The officer must advise you,

however, of the consequences of your refusal, that is, that your Wyoming driver’s license or privilege to drive in Wyoming will be suspended for six months for a first offense or 18 months for a second offense. If you are stopped on the street: You have the right to know why you are being stopped. You must accurately identify yourself to the officer if he has a reasonable suspicion to believe that you have been involved in criminal activity. After identifying yourself, you may, however, decline to answer further questions and you may request that you be allowed to go on your way.

If an officer has lawfully initiated an investigatory stop and suspects that you have a weapon, you may be “patted down.” Unless you are under arrest, however, the officer does not have the right to further search you without consent or a warrant. If you are under 21 years of age and there is probably cause for an officer to suspect that you have been drinking, you may be issued a citation without the officer giving you a breath test, even if you ask for one. This information is not a substitute for legal advice. Information provided by: the Students’ Attorney Program, 766-6347

Orientation 2007

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jim fuerholzer

design

po box 1458 Laramie, Wyoming 82070 307•343•0264 contact@fuerholzerdesign.com www.fuerholzerdesign.com

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