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NO LEGAL AGE FOR DRINKING CULTURE APICIUS CONFERENCE 2016 UNDERWATER Exploring Sicilian seascapes

COMMUNITY

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ARTS

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LABORATOR-Y Interview with Antonio Labroca

BREAKING BOUNDARIES IN FASHION Unisex, tattoos & ageism

TRAVEL WRITING The writing process

FOOD Bistecca alla Fiorentina

FASH ION & STY L E

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LITERATURE

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T R AV E L

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FOOD

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ALUMNI


Florence University of the Arts Where studies transform CULINARY ARTS

FASHION

into real-world GANZO* is a school but with non-traditional classrooms where the Apicius students and faculty develop seasonal menus and share them with the general public.

INGORDA* The J School campus press creates books on gastronomy, design, travel, and lifestyle in collaboration with FUA students and faculty.

Via dei Macci, 85red tel +39 055 241076

Via dell'Oriuolo, 43 tel +39 055 0332745 jschoolfua.com

FLY* Fashion Loves You supports the FAST fashion academics and collaborates with emerging Italian designers. Borgo Pinti, 20red tel +39 055 0333174 fly.fashionlovesyou.it

PUBLISHING

experiences

* Ganzo, FLY and Ingorda are respectively the CEMI of the Apicius, FAST, J School academic divisions at FUA. CEMI stands for Community Engagement Member Institution, and represents integration projects that are a part of FUA’s academic campuses and open to the greater community. It is where students and faculty can put into practice and experiment with their academic coursework.


Culture is the widening of the mind and of the spirit. JAWAHARLAL NEHRU Real cultural diversity results from the interchange of ideas, products, and influences, not from the insular development of a single national style. TYLER COWEN We live now in a global village and we are in one single family. It’s our responsibility to bring friendship and love from all different places around the world and to live together in peace. JACKIE CHAN Peace is not unity in similarity but unity in diversity, in the comparison and conciliation of differences. MIKHAIL GORBACHEV Our cultural strength has always been derived from our diversity of understanding and experience. YO-YO MA There are no great limits to growth because there are no limits of human intelligence, imagination, and wonder. RONALD REAGAN To become truly immortal, a work of art must escape all human limits: logic and common sense will only interfere. But once these barriers are broken, it will enter the realms of childhood visions and dreams. GIORGIO DE CHIRICO

Ph. Emily Shearman

The human mind will not be confined to any limits. JOHANN WOLFGANG VON GOETHE


Blending is a semesterly magazine created with and for students of Florence University of the Arts. The magazine is published by FUA’s campus press Ingorda, a member of the Fondazione di Partecipazione Palazzi - FAIE. For information contact blending@fua.it.

Foto di copertina / Cover Photo By Yu Rin Koh

Semestrale / Semesterly Magazine Reg. Trib. di Firenze n° 5844 del 29 luglio 2011 Anno 6 – Numero 2 – Primavera-Estate 2016 Year 6 – Issue 2 – Spring-Summer 2016

Pubblicità seconda e terza di copertina Inside Front and Back Cover Advertisement Pages Concept and Design by Paola Carretero Photographs by Thakorn Jantrachot

Direttore Responsabile / Editor-in-chief Matteo Brogi

Ringraziamenti / Special Thanks To Simone Ballerini, Isabella Martini, Gaia Poli, Nicoletta Salomon

Caporedattore / Editorial Director Grace Joh Coordinamento editoriale / Managing Editor Federico Cagnucci

Illustratori / Illustrators Julia Raines

++++++++++++ Editore / Publisher Florence Campus per INGORDA Editore Via Alfonso La Marmora, 39 - 50121 Firenze

++++++++++++ In redazione / Masthead Redazione / Copy Editors Leanora Karnath, Morgan O’Reilly Progetto grafico e impaginazione Graphic design and layout Federico Cagnucci Team di studenti / Student Magazine Team led by Federico Cagnucci: Daniela Anselmo, Barbara Delaney Blanton, Garrett Day, Alyssa Espuga, Sarah Focone, Michelle Galvan, Christina Marie Garcia, Elizabeth Moreno, Chau Thai Thi Minh

Sede editoriale / Editorial Headquarters Via dell'Oriuolo, 43 - 50122 Firenze Tel. 055 0332745 Stampa / Printer Grafiche Martinelli s.r.l., via dello Stelli, 2b 50010 Bagno a Ripoli (FI) Il numero è stato chiuso in redazione nel mese di maggio 2016 This issue was completed in May 2016 Copyright © 2016 by Florence Campus, Firenze All rights reserved. ISSN 2284-063X

Fotografi / Photographers Ricki Abrams, Daniela Anselmo, Harley Bode, David Budnick, Erin Daly, Garrett Day, Theresa De Palma, Margaret Desjardins, Adelina Fischer, Camila Ibarra Callego, Christina Marie Garcia, Jenna Galan, Stephanie Gallucci, Emily Gordon, Jordan Hochberg, Marcus Hoskins, Julia Larson, Kaila Lewis, Caymin Lutze, Courtney Malone, Adrian Mattei Mendez, Kristina McNamara, Chau Thai Thi Minh, Allison Patrina, Mia Pitsironis, Zahara Pruitt, Bianca Rosa, Anastassia Sciaraffia, Nicole Sciarra, Emily Shearman, Saige Sheets, Courtney Sterns, Lauren Sullivan, Lina Vélasquez, Jenna Wilen, Emily Wooster

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spring-summer 2016 Tattoos: From Subculture to Fashion Statement 35

Letter from the Editor 5

The Secret Life of Straw Hats 36

APICIUS annual conference

FAST & The Medici Dynasty Show Collaboration 38

Apicius Conference Recap 6

FLY’s Vintage Week 41

COMMUNITY Unification in Diversity 10 Italian Portraits 14 Humans of Italy 15

literature

On Writing 44

TRAVEL

ARTS

Let’s Sea Culture 48

FUA iPhoneography #1: Arts 16 Charting New Depths of Expression 18

FOOD

Art Therapy:

FUA iPhoneography #2: Food 50

Unnoticed Growth 22

Bistecca: Tuscany with an English Twist 53

Loss Diptych 23

alumni

FASHION Laborator-Y: Antonio Labroca Interview 24 Ageism Dons Attire 30 Breaking Gender Boundaries 31 Global Fashion: Florence vs. NYC 32 Street Expressions: Androgynous Movement 34

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Wine Studies Alum Chase Renton 54 Fashion Alum Courtney Caccavelli 56


Letter from the Editor

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imits are a part of daily life, we come to see them as either safe boundaries for some things or negative obstacles for others. Age, for driving or voting rights and alcohol

consumption, or experience, seen in something as basic as a pre-requisite for an academic course or job level, are common limits with varying requirements throughout the world. Especially in the case of alcohol, the legal age concept has various implications as seen in the tension between the opposing poles of practices related to prohibitionism and moderation. Is there a common zone for humanity to embrace without demographic limits? Thanks to the recent Apicius academic conference held in Spring 2016, the topic of “No Legal Age for Drinking Culture� brought together international academics, professionals, and students to explore how culture represents a common space in which all individuals can absorb ideas and spread knowledge regardless of age, place, faith, sex, and personality. The authors featured in this issue have tackled diverse topics united by the ever-present possibility of experiencing culture and the deconstruction of limitations. Or in some cases, transforming limitations into opportunity. As one author discovered in the oxygen-less world of the underwater realm, culture can be seen, perceived, and practiced everywhere.

Happy reading,

Ph. Christina Marie Garcia

FEDERICO CAGNUCCI & GRACE JOH

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Apicius Annual Conference

APICIUS CONFERENCE RECAP

NO LEGAL AGE FOR DRINKING CULTURE

LEANORA KARNATH AND MORGAN O’REILLY Photographs by ZAHARA PRUITT

Consuming culture derives from the active reach for new experiences in order to become a part of different ways of life. On March 12 at the Spring 2016 Apicius Conference Teaching Traditions: No Legal Age for Drinking Culture, guests were able to physically and symbolically consume Italian food and hospitality culture through tastings and speeches from academic speakers, a Michelin Star chef, local producers, and food bloggers. In this issue of Blending Magazine, the reader will explore the various ways culture can be consumed and digested.

ichael Skufca, Chef Instructor at Johnson & Wales University, began the conference with an informative lecture focusing on the cultural and religious significance of bread all throughout the world. He stated, “Bread is a living, breathing thing. And, it’s constantly changing.” He shared the differences of how bread is treated in diverse places. In the Tuscan region, people use unsalted bread as a grabbing device for a main dish while others eat it before a meal. Although some view bread as a product that simply lies bare on dinner tables, Skufca explained that its rich history proves it is more than meets the eye. His lecture even taught participants how to braid challah bread with different colors of play-doh strands. The live demonstration emphasized one of his main points that learning is more than just listening and reading about something. He argued that it is necessary to “engage the hands, eyes, and brain” during the learning process. Michelin starred Chef Cristiano Tomei spoke next, captivating

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the audience with his energetic personality and passion for the culinary world. His speech focused on how he operates his restaurant L’Imbuto which is located in Lucca. Unlike other restaurants, Tomei challenges customers to step out of their comfort zone with the absence of a menu. Dishes depend on Tomei’s feelings and inspiration that day. Each diner has a tailored menu. Although Tomei operates his restaurant in an unconventional manner, he stressed that “there should be no revision on traditional dishes.” He respects quality ingredients and strives to provide his customers with a memorable dining experience. Four local producers, Frantoio Pruneti, Pastificio Artigiano Fabbri, Acetaia Malpighi, and Riso Acquerello, joined the conversation to speak about their products, highlighting their importance in Italian cuisine and culture. Frantoio Pruneti, located in San Polo in Chianti, produces and sells nine different types of organic extra-virgin olive oil in addition


A P I C I U S A N N UA L C O N F E R E N C E

Monica Righi, Acetaia Malpighi

Michael Skufca, JWU

to other high quality products. The company controls all phases of oil production during the year. Their representative expressed passion for the product: “Our work is not only to make a good product but to let the land speak for the product.” Pastificio Artigiano Fabbri, located in the main square of Strada in Chianti, has produced pasta made with semolina for over five generations. Differing from other pasta production, Pastificio’s products undergoes a lengthy process. It takes three to six days to complete a natural drying process. Throughout time, the company has gained experience which has lead to the creation of a high quality, artigianal product. Located in Modena, Acetaia Malpighi has produced balsamic vinegar since 1850. The balsamic vinegar is aged in five different wooden barrels. Unlike other balsamic vinegars that use additives, Acetaia Malpighi only uses the juice of the grapes. Riso Acquerello produces aged rice in the heart of Vercelli prov-

Cristiano Tomei, L'Imbuto

ince. Through a combination of tradition and innovation, the company has discovered the most effective means of production to create a healthier product with a richer taste. Midway through the conference, participants had the opportunity to taste how the producer’s high quality ingredients could be incorporated into four dishes prepared by Apicius’s own students. The first was a shrimp dish, topped with a balsamic vinegar gelatin. Next, attendees tasted the traditional Tuscan dish cacio e pepe which was made with the Pastificio Artigiano Fabbri semolato spaghetti, Pruneti olive oil, aged pecorino, and sprinkled with black pepper. The third dish was risotto with red onions and candied lemon rind, deep-fried cabbage flakes, and pine nuts. The tasting ended with baba, a decadent dessert made with an extra virgin olive oil infused cream and chocolate ganache. After the tastings, Radesh Palakurthi, professor and school director of Hospitality and Resort Management at the University of

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Morgan O'Reilly and Leonora Karnath - conference reporters

Consuming culture derives from the active reach for new experiences in order to become a part of different ways of life.

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A P I C I U S A N N UA L C O N F E R E N C E

clockwise from top/left: Piero Rondolino, Riso Acquerello - Reps from Frantoio Pruneti - Blind wine tasting panel - Food bloggers Simona Cherubini and Nadia Taglialatela

Memphis, greeted conference attendees over Skype to speak about the results of his research survey. He selected a group of hospitality or related program major college/university students from the United States that participated in at least one experiential learning Study Abroad Program during the previous six years of their study. His ultimate aim was to understand how “the learning style of students relate to the expected learning outcomes from the international experiential learning programs in hospitality.” His findings reveal how important it is for students to participate in experiential learning because it enhances their learning outcomes. Food bloggers Simona Cherubini and Nadia Taglialatela discussed the accessibility of food for everyone. Cherubini’s blog entitled Simona’s Kitchen began six years ago. She focuses on symbolic and psychological aspects of food as well as easy to follow recipes that “make the reader want to try;” giving her audience the confidence that “if I can do it, you can too.” Taglialatela’s blog, Vita da Precisina, follows a similar symbol-

ic theme as her love of food derives directly from her family. Her philosophy includes in-depth attention to the products and communicating with the producers, and she explained her quirk among her students as the “happy hen,” where she stresses the importance of the quality of life of the chicken, found on the egg’s barcode, to signify the quality of the egg. Although their styles are different, they both aim to gain an authentic relationship with their readers through their love and appreciation for food. The day ended with a blind wine tasting conducted by FUA’s own Wine Studies students. Both the participants and Wine Studies students tasted 12 wines of various varieties including sparkling, white, and red. The Wine Panel rated each wine in several categories. At the end of each tasting of one variety, the students shared their opinions about the wine. The room buzzed with chatter as everyone waited in anticipation to learn which wine they had just tasted. Participants learned first-hand how labels can affect personal perception of the quality of a given wine.

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UNIFICATION IN DIVER ITY KAYLIN FOARD

Ph. Lina VĂŠlasquez

lorence, Italy is the cradle of the Renaissance and home to much Italian pride. A city seeping with so much culture and history would be expected to stand firm in tradition, but the opposite is true with the city of Florence. With a booming tourism industry and an unbeatable study abroad reputation, Florence has evolved into a city beyond willing to share its culture with any and all who are interested. This limitless expression of culture has resulted in a unique diversification in a city that is no stranger to new ideas, new creations, and new people. The city of Florence and Italy itself are very familiar with the idea of diversification. Tourism is the number one industry in Italy and the country sees about 50 million tourists each year. German, American, and French tourists are the most popular in Italy with an increasing number of British, Swiss, and Chinese visitors choosing the country as their preferred destination. These travelers, more often than not, make their way to Florence to experience the art and culture available in museums, galleries, restaurants, and shops all across the city. Taking a walk around Florence near any of the major tourist attractions proves the industry to be thriving. Areas like the Piazza del Duomo become a mixing pot of languages, ages, and origins. Tour groups can be seen perusing the city streets, often set apart by the different flags or the array of languages spoken on the tours. Restaurants offer menus in a variety of different languages and are even beginning to incorporate menu items from various cultures. Businesses post on their doors about what languages they are able to communicate in. There is no limit on the culture that visitors and locals alike are able to experience in Florence. The artwork, history, food, wine, and architecture are accessible to anyone that is interested in learning more about the qualities that make Florence so unique. The Grand Tour of Europe in the 18th and 19th century sparked the spread of culture from Italy to the rest of the world. During this tour, young elite students experienced the cultural differences of European cities. Since the Grand Tour, Italy has continued to be a top desti-

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COMMUNITY

Ph. Bianca Rosa

Diversification results in a sense of unification among those who experience the Florentine culture together.

Ph. Ricki Abrams

nation for students of all economic backgrounds - Florence is the second top destination for study abroad students with over 8,000 students flocking to the Renaissance capital each semester. Students take classes with other young adults from all over the world and get to collectively experience the cultural gifts that the city has to offer. Art history classes utilize the opportunity to visit the plentiful monuments, while hospitality classes embrace the rich Tuscan geography at their fingertips. The blend of cultures between the students and the places they visit manifests the idea of diversification among the lifestyles and values of those involved. Cultural diversification does not begin and end the moment these tourists and students pass through the city limits of Florence. In fact, this is one of the biggest elements of sharing culture - the continual expansion and unification of cultural knowledge. Tourists will share their newfound insight with friends and family back home who then, in turn, have an understanding of different values and culture without even directly experiencing it. Students will continue to use their cultural knowledge throughout the rest of their studies and in their everyday lives, comparing and contrasting other new traditions and values along the way. This diversification results in a sense of unification among those who experience the Florentine culture together. Place of origin, age, and language do not limit the ability for anyone in the world to experience the wonders that Florence has to offer.

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COMMUNITY

Ph. Bianca Rosa

Ph. Emily Wooster

Ph. Jordan Hochberg

Ph. Kaila Lewis

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COMMUNITY

Ph. Adelina Fischer

Ph. Emily Gordon

Ph. Adelina Fischer

Cultural diversification does not begin and end the moment these tourists and students pass through the city limits of Florence.

Ph. Jenna Galan

Ph. Adelina Fischer

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COMMUNITY

ITALIAN PORTRAITS

DANIELA ANSELMO

Through a digital lens, I explored the idea of breaking barriers by experimenting with the renowned style of Garry Winogrand, a street photographer from the Bronx, NY (1928-1984). His style is quite difficult to replicate, as it made him as one of the central photographers of his generation. By working with Winogrand's aesthetic technique, we are able to go beyond the limits of time and place by sharing his style with the world in 2016 from Florence, Italy.

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COMMUNITY

Photographs by the author

HUMANS OF ITALY JENNA WILEN

My Facebook and Instagram newsfeeds constantly present Brandon Stanton’s “Humans of New York,” which encompasses small quotes of personal stories alongside portraits of people on the streets of New York City. Since the beginning of his project in 2010, there has been an international inspiration to create “Humans of” blogs. From the first day I arrived in Florence, I noticed the vast diversity of those inhabiting and participating in the Italian culture and daily life. Inspired by this, I have created my own “Humans of Italy.” By observing these specific individuals in Florentine and Italian society, I have taken portraits accompanied by quotes of personal stories that I imagined the person would’ve shared.

A STUDY ABROAD STUDENT ORDERING GELATO IN THE MERCATO CENTRALE“I’m a non-US study abroad student. Don’t tease me when I say one of my favorite aspects about studying abroad here is being able to treat myself to gelato. I like trying new places, mostly the shops on the streets have been my favorite, but today I decided to try gelato inside the Mercato Centrale. I’m sure I won’t be disappointed; I love the density and richness of each new flavor I’ve tried so far in Italy.”

A CHEF WORKING AT IL TARTUFO DI LUCIANO SAVINI AT THE MERCATO CENTRALE “I have been working inside the Mercato Centrale for six years now. Specifically, I work at Il Tartufo di Luciano Savini, which specializes in truffles. I’ve always dreamed of opening my own truffle-based restaurant. My wife just gave birth to a little girl, and with the popularity of the Mercato Centrale, I don’t think this is the right time to follow my dream.”

A PAINTER AT THE UFFIZI MUSEUM “I sit outside the Uffizi everyday. I use watercolor to show the surrounds architecture as well as the people visiting the museum. Many tourists go inside to see famous works such as “The Birth of Venus” by Botticelli or “The Dukes of Urbino” by Piero della Francesca. While I admire these works, I sit outside and paint the people and the environment of the most popular tourist attractions of Florence. I wait for donations to support my passion as an artist, but I hope people see more than just that. I hope they see the beauty that constantly surrounds them through the detailed architecture, as well as how many different, beautiful individuals come together to appreciate art.”

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Ph. Adelina Fischer

Ph. Emily Shearman

Ph. Emily Shearman

Ph. Courtney Malone

Ph. Julia Larson

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FEED YOUR EYES / /FEED YOUR MIND

FUA IPHONEOGRAPHY SPRING 2016 CLASS led by ISABELLA MARTINI

Ph. Adelina Fischer

Ph. Nicole Sciarra

The visual comprehension of our surroundings is one of the very first steps taken to understand a new place. Visual landmarks like signs, monuments, perspectives, details, lines, and textures create a personal microcosm to navigate a new city, and to learn how to decode its spirit in order to structure the sense of the amount of time to be spent there — be it either for a holiday, for a study abroad semester, for work, or for life. The Spring 2016 class of iPhoneography was invited to explore and to make sense of the new temporary environment in Florence and Italy by processing visual stimuli: de-structured, absorbed, and recombined in order for each Ph. Margaret Desjardins

student to express his or her own visual cosmos. Ph. Emily Gordon

Ph. Kaila Lewis

Ph. Emily Wooster

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By the Words, Painting, and Emotions course The students led by Prof. Nicoletta Salomon explored new depths in the processes of how we express ourselves. Joyce Fehlau discovers how various states of being lead to an infinite

STATES OF BEING AND BECOMING: (RE)CONSTITUTING LIFE JOYCE FEHLAU

y path throughout the Words, Paintings, and Emotions course has revealed the depth, structure, and static nature through which I process my history, my philosophy, and my attraction towards that which is transforming - being born. Oscillating through my internal and external realms, studying my self-portrait as an artist exposed my path: a timeline of memories and intensities of transitions of my life from my childhood to now. This immediate self-reflection fostered the challenging of my identity: as an artist, as a writer, as a thinker, and as a woman. From this reflection, I was drawn to the word pregnancy. To be pregnant (Lat. praegnantem) is to be in-birth; a heavy, fierce, and physical word, while also warm, intimate, and full-weighted. Dichotomies carry many the many energies that I respond to: their conventions and structures. I am always collecting, challenging, and moving with and towards energies: colors, gestures, textures, sounds, words, structures, emotions, memories, thoughts. I attempt to trace relationships, paradoxes, and the process of birth visually through patterns. I carry these things around with me: they become part of me. Returning inward, I confront the confluences of these relationships with my life: my identity, my childhood, my family, my memories, my relationship to disease and motherhood, and my desires. Reconstituting everything again, I move to points of pregnancy, stretching deeply backward and forward across my lifeline, internal and external, from geological times to unknowing futures. I dance towards points of tension - patterns, relationships, dichotomies -

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revealing points of focalization, building intensities, transitions. Meditating on my philosophical, psychological and emotional states is intrinsic to my process. As a writer, I am fascinated by writing structures - arguments, sentences, words - as source of challenges to contexts, social and political tensions, and ways of being, thinking, and growing. This is a visual-literary process of being aware of the birth of ideas. As a writer, I generate "wordscapes": lists born from one word, and instinctively writing word after word by responding to patterns and relationships to the word before. This process demands a natural reconstitution of philosophical, emotional, scientific, material, and abstract words into a body of words imbued with new relational meaning. My process is a form of absorbing, collecting, watching, borrowing words, gestures, ways of being, and then reconstituting everything to transform my inner realm related to living. My body of work and the sketchbook process in this class visually illustrates my process of collecting and moving to colors, lines, words, emotions, and spaces. Writing is a fundamental aspect to my work — as markers, alongside, within, shapes, an art form — evident of my non-linear, poetic tendencies. My sketchbook records a raw processing. A whole instinctive body stretched across all parts of my inner word. My process is an indefinite state of birth — swelling, expanding, intensifying. Collecting, reconstituting and processing again. History and births and anticipating futures are always in dynamic tension: all is in-birth.


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birth of the artist's self, Joshua Fraas discusses the importance of the other in the personal creative process, and Piper Torsilieri takes on the seemingly impossible task of crossing over from realism to the abstract.

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THE ROLE OF OTHERS IN THE PERSONAL JOURNEY JOSHUA FRAAS y experience during the Words, Painting, and Emotions course has had a great impact on my personal growth as an artist. It has been helpful to finding what art means to me and the things that I want to express through my work. I have been making art throughout my life and through this class I have been able to hone in on how my life experiences have influenced what I choose to create. I have also been able to look towards what I find inspiring and figure out why I make certain decisions in the creative process. All of the people in my life, especially my grandmother, have helped my work to develop. My own inner artistic world is centered around the business I have created through making art. Being able to sell the things that I create as one of my income sources has been extremely meaningful to me, and it has given me many opportunities in my artistic journey including studying abroad in Florence. In class, however, I have been able to make art for myself and not for commerce. This has created a tremendous sense of freedom and expression that I don’t usually have in my artistic life because most of my time is focused on working. I've shared my work in group settings during my studies, but I have never gone as deep as this semester. It is important not only to put ideas on paper, but also to explain what you are trying to express. I'll admit I was somewhat afraid of selecting this course but I am so glad I went through with it. My work and my artistic process will be forever changed. I hope that I can use my experience to continue to grow the side of art as my profession and sustenance, without forgetting the importance of making art for myself.

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THE DISCIPLINE OF CREATIVITY PIPER TORSILIERI  ost of my art consists of realism and portraiture, painted from life or photographs, and leaves little room for interpretation. Often times, I find myself longingly admiring a piece of abstract art and wishing my artistic side could somehow break out of its one-sided, technique-based zone. Don't get me wrong, I love painting portraits and realism, but sometimes I wish to express a feeling, a whim, or something fleeting. When I signed up for Words, Painting, and Emotions, I had pinned great hopes to the course's suggestive title. I have always wanted to embrace abstraction in my art and to be that expressive and vibrant artist who can turn two colors into a masterpiece. As the course started, I was hopeful that my inner abstract self would emerge immediately in an amazing, genius way. Thankfully, I was disappointed. One of the first lessons I learned was that in order to exercise one’s creativity, time must be invested, and I was initially resistant to putting time into painting and writing. Yet as I dutifully followed course assignments and inputs, I began to see a change. My journaling, writing, and watercolor painting started to become a necessity. I found myself wanting to express myself on the page in new ways. Sometimes the results looked terrible, but other times they were truly harmonious. I experimented and pushed myself, and my outlook on making and creating started to change. I truly believe that every individual needs to exercise their creativity, and that if making and forming are not exercised, they dissipate. In each of our little bodies, there is a totally individual mind and beautifully unique soul. Each of us is destined to be solidly different in thought and expression. This means that there are billions of artists who all see the world differently; imagine if each of us took the time to figure out an ideal way of expressing emotions through word, painting, music, or any creative discipline. How colorful the world would be! This course encouraged me to find a deconstructed, abstract, and creative side that I did not know was within me. Throughout the semester, I have created works that I feel passionately about, and have gained invaluable skills that I will carry with me through my career as an artist.

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ART THERAPY UNNOTICED GROWTH

MCKENZIE PADDOCK

hroughout my time abroad, I was starting to feel more independent and confident about myself. The reason behind my new self-image went unnoticed until our Art Therapy assignment, “Where does your time go?” For this assignment, we were asked to assess the things to which we dedicate most of our time. In doing so, I was happy to notice most of my time going to pleasure. Dedicating my time to doing things I enjoy, on my own, is my unnoticed growth. Back home I struggled with being alone. I did all that I possibly could to surround myself with others, even if it meant doing something I did not enjoy. Loneliness was a feeling that controlled my actions negatively. After assessing where my time goes, now that I am abroad, loneliness is no longer felt because the things that I love occupy my time. This self-discovery makes me proud to be who I am. Before I came to Italy, I rarely felt proud to be me. “Where does your time go?” helped me learn what activities are healthy for me. I am fond of studying, cleaning, eating/cooking, painting/drawing, and photography. These five activities were how I spent most of my time during the week of our assignment. They are the starting point of what I enjoy. Due to the assignment, I now know what kinds of activities are right for me; I respect myself by taking nature walks and writing in my journal while outdoors; I dance and exercise when my energy level is high; I keep in touch with loved ones from home. Because of the assignment, I rarely let myself wallow in self-pity- a habit I took part in far too often at home. “Where does your time go?” made me aware of my unnoticed growth.

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LOSS

The following diptych describes an experimental activity based on feeling and sharing loss conducted by the Art Therapy course taught by Prof. Nicoletta Salomon.

PROCESSING LOSS TOGETHER

CAROLYN D'OLYMPIO

rt therapy has allowed me to understand the importance of slowing down and taking the time to connect with the deepest parts of ourselves, which we all too often dismiss as unimportant. One of the most integral components of the class, keeping a visual journal, has allowed me to process and express my subconscious thoughts and feelings on something as tangible as paper. Visual journaling has allowed me to gain some of the most valuable knowledge about myself by connecting my subconscious with my conscious during an in-class activity. The activity required the class to pair up into partners, hold the other’s hands, and genuinely connect with the other’s loss through emotionally sympathetic eye contact. My conscious thought immediately feared the situation. I remembered that society had taught me to not let others see when I’m not strong and to certainly not interact with a near stranger on such an intimate level. Through my visual journal, I was able to connect with my subconscious, which I later discovered desired to break free from the societal influence I have learned in the past. I learned that my conscious thought is easily influenced by societal norms of pretending the activity is silly and that emotional vulnerability, especially in front of people we don’t consider our closest friends, is wrong. The most important thing I learned from this experience, however, came from my unconscious: that it was an overwhelmingly beautiful moment, for two practical strangers, not knowing any details about each other’s lives or struggles, to look into each other’s eyes and feel each other’s loss. Creating a visual journal to process this experience in art therapy and connect my subconscious with my conscious has taught me to be more vulnerable, to love more freely, and to begin to unlearn the notion society has taught us: that letting others see our pain and interacting intimately with those other than our closest friends must be difficult, uncomfortable, or incorrect.

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A PEBBLE IN THE RAIN DOMINIQUE RAMPOGU nderstanding the unconscious is just as important as understanding the conscious. I realized this during a particular class that discussed the topic of loss. The exercise focused on rain and its relation to loss, and the assignment was to depict our loss through drawing rain with watercolors. At first, I started with simple rain-like movements and a light blue shade, but as time went on, I felt inclined to choose various colors. At one point, I would even just add water and watch the colors combine together. Some of the thoughts I wrote down included: helplessness, sadness, heartache, and hopeless. Following this, we used pebbles collected earlier in the day. I gathered the pebbles, and painted them with similar colors of the rain. I placed the pebbles on my paper, and some of the thoughts I jotted down were: serene, calm, and peaceful. I could sense a change in my feelings; I felt like I was coming to peace with the other emotions I was feeling. I understood that the colors I had chosen played an important role in interpreting my unconscious feelings. When realizing this, it was heartening to see that I had accepted emotions that I was previously unaware of. I still carry these pebbles around with me as a reminder of this experience. There are times when I think about my loss, and remember this exercise. I look at my pebbles, and think about the purple and blue watercolors blending together as the tears of water fell down the page. In that moment, it was not that I was cured of my feelings of loss, but it gave me a sense of comfort.

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Fa s hi o n An Interview with

i s

Antonio Labroca

Fashion Magazine Project students met with up-and-coming designer Antonio Labroca to discuss his newest venture, LABORATOR-Y. The interview explores his background, his unisex pants collection, and his ideas for the future.

ur fashion magazine project course visited FUA’s retail management experiential learning store, FLY, to conduct an in-depth interview with LABORATOR-Y’s creative director, Antonio Labroca. Antonio was born in Puglia, Italy. He earned a degree in visual merchandising and window dressing, and his first eight years in the fashion industry were spent in Milan, London, and Florence as a lead visual merchandiser and window dresser for multiple international retailers including Inditex Group and the H&M Group. Antonio launched his own LABORATOR-Y label in 2015, naming his first collection Monochrome.

Ph. Harley Bode

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FA S H I O N

o r E v e r Text and Layout by

GARRETT DAY, ALYSSA ESPUGA, MICHELLE GALVAN

Y

o n e Photo portraits by GARRETT DAY

You have a very rich background and have lived many places. How does that play into your designs? My inspiration comes from the cities and the places I've visited and lived in. After living in London, and Milan, I am now based in Florence. I wanted to be an artist until one day my friend made me realize that perhaps my true calling was fashion. So, I said “OK, let's do fashion.” I feel very close to Yamamoto's philosophy and working method because he prioritizes art over fashion.

Are there any other designers that inspire you? What is your favorite collection? Yamamoto is a singular figure for me. Beyond fashion, I pull inspiration from other areas such as cinema. Notebooks and Cities and Clothes is a movie about Yohji Yamamoto that really inspired me. I look for inspiration from images, art, and filmmakers. I watch films four or five times in a row before I think about a collection. I don’t listen to the actors; I fully concentrate on the film visuals.

Were there any difficulties in transitioning from visual merchandising, a corporate structure, into your design world? Several. Being a visual merchandiser in a big fashion company is an important role. As a visual merchandiser, you manage elements such as store display, colors, textures, shapes, etc. It has helped me to understand the customer's approach to clothing, and I feel confident designing for myself and for customers. I love the idea of growing and moving on to bigger things.

What is the meaning behind your logo, especially the emphasis that you have placed on the ‘Y’? The Y was a mistake, to be honest. I like mistakes because people makes them all the time. Mistakes are part of us, so they can be part of my collection or logo. When designing the logo with my graphic designer, I told him I wanted to start with the shape of the box, which contains all of my ideas. He asked me, “What about the Y?” It did not fit in the box, so I asked him to do something with it. I liked the Y in the logo, and I knew its significance would be revealed sooner or later.

Since starting your own business, what is the biggest lesson that you have learned? The most difficult? The biggest lesson has been balancing commerciality and image. You have to pay attention to numbers in terms of finances, but you can never forget who you are and who you want to be. Through the numbers are a part of the job, never forget the people who are working for you, the quality of the product, and who you are as a designer. We know that Yohji Yamamoto is one designer that you hold in mind for inspiration. What are some important aspects of Yamamoto that you have taken inspiration from, not only within your designs, but also in your design philosophy? He designs for everyone and not a single customer, and it doesn't matter if you are a child, adult, woman, man, rich, or poor. He creates art. He puts clothes on a person, and then he works on the garment.

Studio photoshoot by Introduction to Fashion Photography class (Instructor: SIMONE BALLERINI)

Interviewer: Coincidentally it could stand for Yohji Yamamoto. I hadn't thought of that, honestly. The mistake of the Y made me think that it represented an important element and now it represents a part of me. The graphic designer was concerned about displaying a “mistake,”

“okay, let's do fashion.”

Model and makeup: LARA QUERCIOLI Shooting coordination: NAOMI ROOTS, NOAH KING, QUINN HENNESSY Garments and styling: LABORATOR-Y

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FA S H I O N

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FA S H I O N

“My inspiration comes from the cities and the places I've visited and lived in..”

but it's precisely what I like about the logo. As for writing out the name on social media, when I typed it for the Facebook page a dash made its way into the word before the Y. I liked the way it looked and decided to keep it. What do you envision your designs being styled and paired with? I style them in the way they want to be styled. The reason I started with pants is because that's how things work, from the bottom before making their way to the top. Think about working on a project. You start from the foundation. Then you think about what to add on. I have an idea of what my next project may be. Gaia [Poli] knows, but it's still under wraps. What were your thoughts for the color spectrum that you have chosen for your designs? My palette color comes from the way I see fashion. Fashion for me doesn’t mean color. I usually start with navy, black, and gray. I think they are very elegant. Something I learned from being a visual merchandiser is that customers don't always want to be disturbed by other colors. The aforementioned colors are commercially viable, don't confuse customers, and match well with any wardrobe.

Ph. Daniela Anselmo

Ph. Kristina McNamara

Because your clothes seem to appear to mirror the structure of the Florence opera house seen in the LABORATOR-Y video, do you draw inspiration from minimalist architecture? Why did you choose that specific location? The location was chosen with the help of one of my close collaborators and emerging filmmaker, Enrico Poli. Enrico was able to express what I had envisioned: how we can touch fabrics, move in them, fold and manipulate them. They create a great combination with the background of architecture, which is a finite and immobile space. The idea came purely from the video brainstorming since I don't reference architecture when designing. We chose the opera theater location because of the interesting and contemporary combination of architecture, shapes, and colors. Do your designs challenge the idea of a strict and constricting, almost business-like culture? Do they challenge any other social or fashion cultures? They do. I try to be honest about where society is headed. I don't seek to apply differences when dressing a man or woman. This could be controversial to the culture of fashion in a broader sense. In the real world, I don't see why you can't wear the pants I'm wearing now. You can, because they are simply a pair of pants. The shapes I design are geometric and loosely fitted, so we can both wear them. If you were my partner, we could split the pants with the same purchase.

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FA S H I O N

Ph. Adriana Mattei Mendez

Ph. Courtney Sterns

Ph. Harley Bode

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FA S H I O N

We could both wear them for ten years. There's an interesting and intimate quality to this mode of thinking, and I believe that young designers should acquire philosophies that listen to the soul. Is it important to you that your line be unisex? Would you consider this idea something that unites people? Definitely. What's important is how you act and move in a piece of clothing. That’s why in the video you see someone standing, someone dancing, and so on. Two individuals in two different completely states, wearing the same things. Who is your target market for your designs? LABORATOR-Y doesn’t have a specific target market. I see everyone wearing my designs from 12-year-old boys to senior citizens. For now the sizes range from extra small to large, and extra large is on the way. The sizes of the collection range from extra small to large and will soon be creating an extra large. Anyone can wear an item, in their own comfort and fashion. What do you see as the future of LABORATOR-Y? Where do you see your collection in the next couple years? I hope to expand my designs and cultivate a better network of small family factories for production. By pursuing young people who believe in my project, it would be great to establish a creative studio. Ultimately, my work philosophy tells me that it takes a good you to establish a good career. The right mindset makes all the difference in creating the best possible product.

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FA S H I O N

AGEISM DONS ATTIRE In the past, attire has been used as a form of segregating the masses. We have seen clothing represent one’s class and economic stature. A person’s attire has also been a symbol of his or her style and personality. What some do not focus on is the use of attire in making ageist presumptions. Clothing has been symbolic of a person’s age for a very long time, but with new trends and varying accessibility to certain styles, those barriers have been undoing themselves.

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ELIZABETH MORENO Photographs by CHRISTINA MARIE GARCIA


FA S H I O N

Breaking Gender Boundaries

Text and Layout by

BARBARA DELANEY BLANTON

THE RISE OF UNISEX CLOTHING

Photographs courtesy of BJØRK

In the mid 1960’s, his and her collections became popular, creating a gender-neutral style of clothing. For a short period of time, women and men purchased the same items. Eventually, the trend faded and women and men’s departments separated once again. However, unisex clothing has resurfaced in the past few years, but this time it looks as though the trend is here to stay.

Clothing for “everyone” has taken on a whole new meaning in the past few years. Unisex clothing, pieces that can be worn by both men and women, is becoming increasingly popular throughout the fashion world. The line between women and men’s apparel is no longer a strict divide but rather a blurred line. The necessity for articles of clothing to fall under one specific category is becoming less important. Many designers are no longer making collections for a specific gender. This gender-neutral fashion encourages individuals to feel comfortable in their own skin and allows for free expression. High-end brands such as Prada are not the only ones taking notice of the increasing popularity of unisex clothing. The London-based department store Selfridges replaced its separate men and women’s departments with three floors of gender neutral clothing. The key elements that define unisex clothing are the color and cut. Neutral colors such as black, navy, white and beige are frequently worn by both men and women. The cut of the garment should be loosely fitted so that the shape is not geared towards either gender. Unisex clothing can be found in stores all over the world including here in Italy. Bjørk, an independent concept store based in Florence, recently began carrying unisex collections. Bjørk opened its doors in 2014 and offers contemporary apparel brands as well as a variety of international publications. The collections include items such as trousers, sweaters, button downs and jackets that can be worn by both men and women.

Designers are making collections for people, Not A specific gender.

BJØRK Via dello Sprone, 25R 50125 Firenze www.bjorkflorence.com

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FA S H I O N

Text and Layout by

SARAH FOCONE

Global Fashion

Florence vs. NYC

“Steet Style� is a term known by fashion lovers all over the world. It is fashion seen on the streets all over the globe and captured by photographers who photograph fashionable women wearing the latest trends. In fashion, trends can trickle down from the runways to the streets or influence designers from the bottom up. Trends, fads, and classics can differ all over the world.

Ph. Adelina Fischer

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Ph. David Budnick


FA S H I O N

Ph. Stephanie Gallucci

THE DIFFERENCE I examined Florence and New York City fashion through my personal experiences and street style images. In terms of Florentine elegance, I noticed a more essential style with higher necklines, minimalist colors, and sleek designs. Women in New York City often wear more revealing clothing, especially in the summer time, and also adopt casual wear in everyday dressing. Leggings, yoga pants, and sneakers throughout the day are normal to see in NYC, whereas in Florence, flip flops tend to be a taboo even in the summer. Although these are differences between the two cities, fashion around the world is becoming cohesive as the world of technology expands.

Technology has plastered fashion all over our computer screens, phones, and tablets. With a click of a button, you can see what women are wearing in Milan, Paris, Tokyo, etc. Fashion magazines all over the world have their digital versions online so you can always stay updated on what everyone is wearing. In Florence, fashionable sneakers mixed with elegant pieces have popped up around town, while NYC fashionistas are spotted with more detailed shoes such as loafers, oxfords, and heeled boots. Culture is meshing everyday and you can visually see this through fashion.

Photos David Budnick

Ph. Emily Gordon

Ph. Kaila Lewis

Ph. Stephanie Gallucci

THE SIMILARITIES

“Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.� - Coco Chanel

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FA S H I O N

Androgynous, grungy and urban, a little preppy; these are the attributes that describe none other than Prince Puck, also known as one of my closest friends, Brea Timmons. “I look like either a fancy pants dandy, or a gender indeterminate hobo.”

STREET EXPRESSIONS AN ANDROGYNOUS MOVEMENT CHRISTINA M. GARCIA Everywhere you turn, you can find people that stand out amongst the crowd. Street fashion has become a way to express yourself in ways that were once impossible. Self-expression has no limits; one such limit that has been surpassed is gendered clothing. Why does clothing have to be for a man or for a woman? It wasn’t until after the 60s that the idea of unisex was acceptable; it emerged on the runway with Rudi Gernreich, who is considered the inventor of unisex fashion, Yves Saint Laurent with his creation of a masculine look for women, and Jean Paul Gaultier, who, inspired by the Orient, held one of the first co-ed runway shows. Many more designers, artists, and musicians, began to experiment and push the limits of femininity and masculinity until those lines have been blurred all together.

Self-expression has no limits; one such limit that has been surpassed is gendered clothing.

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Photographs courtesy of BREA TIMMONS


FA S H I O N

MICHELLE GALVAN

Photographs by CHRISTINA MARIE GARCIA

TATTOOS FROM SUBCULTURE TO FASHION STATEMENT

Over the decades, tattoos have taken the turn for a rebirth. Once used as a sign of rebellion, tattoos are now a main mass form of style and expression.

ubcultures consist of a group of people who steer clear of anything mainstream, and resist any expectations by the higher society. For tattoos, it wasn’t until the late 1900s when society started to view them as a form of disapproval. Typically, the groups of people who would proudly show off their “new skin” were sailors, gang members, and inmates. Ironically, tattoos once held a more sophisticated meaning before stereotyping came into play. It is believed that the earliest tattoos date to 3,000 B.C. The numerous amounts of usage include, but are not limited to, medical, ceremonial, and symbolistic purposes. Fast forward to modern-day tattoos; it is generally more accepted in today’s society and culture, yet there still lays a division between the tattoo subculture and those who identify with mass society who have them. Placement and styles are two very important factors to this idea. It may be safe to say that someone with a full sleeve and

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neck tattoo is more inclined to the subcultural aspect, as opposed to someone with a heart on their ankle. There are many reasons why one may get a tattoo, but the main one will always stand out. Tattoos are a form of style. Moving forward within the fashion industry, it comes down to the debate of opinion. How can one tell us what is wrong, when this market is about aesthetics and creating yourself? Designer Marc Jacobs is heavily inked yet highly respected and admired in the industry. Also, Don Ed Hardy, considered to be one of the most skilled tattoo artists today, was far from well-known by the mainstream market until he struck a licensing deal with Christian Audiger. Audiger then purchased the rights to a clothing line featuring Hardy’s Designs. Upon combining the two, the mass market quickly picked up this new style. To this day, tattoo art is incorporated into many fashion designs.

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FA S H I O N

Ph. Anastassia Sciaraffia

A third of the Tuscan region started to produce this type of wheat, and the city of Florence became the first manufacturer of quality straw hats in Western Europe.

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FA S H I O N

THE SECRET LIFE OF STRAW HATS CAMILA IBARRA CALLEGO Illustration and Layout by JULIA RAINES

Photographs by the author

While fashion and creativity may always go hand in hand, at times, fashion identified with place may conjure usual specialties, brands, or techniques. Florence and its renowned leather industry, for example, often overshadows the city's longstanding relationship with straw accessories. Camila Ibarra Callego examines a lesser known material and a milliner from southern Italy who's set up his laboratory in Florence, to share how diverse experiences and stories can expand one's perception and interaction with fashion in the city. he urge to splurge on leather is a common impulse when in Tuscany and especially in Florence, whose cityscape is dotted with leather stores left and right. Yet the region has been the hallmark for many creative and innovative artisanal craftsmen with diverse specialties. Craftsmanship is a part of the historical roots here, which can be seen through the fine examples of Etruscan jewelry that predate Roman dominion. The city of Florence has been and still is the home of many artisans from silversmiths to tailors and dressmakers and to the very interesting and enchanting hat makers. The word milliner, which is a person that makes, trims, designs, or sells hats, originated in northern Italy, in regions that were famous for producing ribbons, gloves, and straw. Straw hats started in Signa, a town just outside of Florence, in 1714 when a farmer, Domenico Michelacci, began to produce a variety of wheat that would be able to provide high quality and strong straw for weaving. A third of the Tuscan region started to produce this type of wheat, and the city of Florence became the first manufacturer of quality

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straw hats in Western Europe. The straw hats became very fashionable for the wealthy elite of Italy. Along the way, hats became a fashion statement. They became an accessory that enhanced the fashion industry. New designs for hats started emerging from the shadows and soon everyone started to wear them. But, there is a big different between being a milliner and being just a hat maker or hat seller. Since the city of Florence has kept the tradition, many people decided to enter the world of hat making, but not just anyone could take up the job like Antonio Gatto. As you wander around the historic neighborhood of Palazzo Pitti, you will find a narrow little shop called Cappelli Antonio Gatto. Here, Antionio puts his magic to work in every single, unique, hat he makes. What is most interesting is that he does not only make the hats, but he also invents and creates every little thing that goes into the making of the hat, such as the different ironing boards and molds he uses to iron the hats into shape. All those materials are invented by his own creative mind, and made by his artistic hands.

Antonio was born in Calabria, where he later taught himself the art of tailoring before moving to Florence to pursue a career. When he got to Florence, he was asked to work as a hat designer for theater. He fell in love with hair, fashion, and most of all, hats, so he decided to open his own hat shop. Even though Antonio keeps this tradition, he does not make traditional hats. Browsing around the shops you can see that every single hat is different. He says that making the hats isn’t difficult; he can usually finish one in less than an hour. He also says that he feels so fortunate to be able to work at something that he is so passionate about. It is inspiring to see how people take advantage of living in a country and city with so much history and culture. Handcrafters, such as Antionio Gatto, are passionate about keeping tradition of ancient times and modernizing them to fit into modern times. The elegance and precision of their work through time has maintained the aspect of art. Their dedication and passion for tradition is what makes it so enchanting and it is what makes people fall in love with their work.

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FA S H I O N

Photos by Anastassia Sciaraffia

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FA S H I O N

FAST Collaborates with the Medici Dynasty Show CHAU THAI THI MINH The Medici Dynasty show is a popular local production about the history of the Medici family in Florence, Italy. This production is seen by over 70,000 people a year and the organizers plan to expand the show and e-commerce business to the United States and China in 2017-2018. FUA fashion students collaborated with the show on a costume design project during the Spring 2016 semester.

Photos by the author

CRISTIANO BRIZZI

THE COLLABORATION

Cristiano Brizzi was born and raised in Massa e Cozzile, Italy. After spending a significant amount of time in both Madrid and London and working in hospitality as a Sales and Marketing Manager, he decided to return to his roots by accepting an invitation to collaborate with The Medici Dynasty Show. Since then, Cristiano has been driven by his passion for Italy and its many unique qualities, especially its artisanal culture. Aiming to create a bridge between Italian history and contemporary culture, he developed a significant knowledge in this area that guides his marketing and communication strategies. With the crew, he has made the show one of the most successful English-speaking productions ever in Italy, with 150 spectacles performed per year.

The Medici Dynasty show collaborated with FUA’s Apparel Design students from the FAST fashion department to create a piece that can be worn by the theatre staff. The academic mission of FUA in Florence is the main reason for this collaboration. On behalf of The Medici Dynasty Show, Cristiano Brizzi stated that he “was looking for the different perspective from the international students about the fashion for the show.” The expectation for the candidates would be to bring out their ideas and to create something wearable. The primary focus of design for the staff outfit is gender fluidity; functionality also comes into play with an emphasis on color and structure of the garment. Inspirations can be drawn from the 17th century classics, the Renaissance, and Florentine architecture but contain a modern and contemporary twist. Regarding his collections, Brizzi shared a “personal belief of the fact that history and our traditions continually inspire what they create.”

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Ph. by the author

Ph. Anastassia Sciaraffia

Project representative: CATLIN MILLER The Medici Dynasty Show’s representative was excited to witness the results of collaborating with Florence University of the Arts students. This project is a key to providing fashion students at FAST real industry experience to build their skills and talents. Gaining this exposure helps them to strengthen their portfolios and continue with their career development in apparel and product design and construction. The project is also a chance for FUA's students to be thoroughly knowledgeable about a historic Florentine family who had a huge impact on European politics. Vice versa, the theatre show has an opportunity to communicate its value to international students at FUA. Furthermore, the creations of the candidates can bring a new energy to the show.

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Catlin Miller, one of the apparel students involved in the design process, shared with Blending her perspective of the overall experience. Because students must familiarize themselves with Florence's fashion background and research Italian designers for inspiration, Catlin gained valuable knowledge about the Medici family – an indispensable feature of Florence's history. Catlin was “strongly motivated by Emilio Pucci, who put a modern twist on the style of the Medici family and Renaissance fashion.” It was a great experience for her and other students to join a practical project and to work as a professional designer. Above all, they have observed and studied Florence from cultural and historical angles which make the city become even more attractive and academically meaningful.


FA S H I O N

What was old is new again…Vintage fashion is taking the fashion industry by storm. FUA’s retail store Fly offers one of the best vintage clothing selections in all of Florence. Students recently hosted the Vintage Week, an exciting event for fashion lovers in Florence.

FLY'S VINTAGE WEEK Student-produced photographs supervised by fashion photography instructor Simone Ballerini

ALYSSA ESPUGA

Ph. Harley Bode

UA’s very own retail store, FLY Fashion Loves You, hosted a Vintage Week at the end of the Spring 2016 semester. During Vintage Week, FLY promoted its unique vintage collection at a discounted price with an individual designer showcased each day. This business promotion was also a cultural experience to further educate people on the works of these designers and their place in Italian fashion. FLY welcomed those attending Vintage Week to purchase items, browse the vintage selection, learn more about vintage Italian fashion, and enjoy a light refreshment of tea and gourmet cookies. Vintage Week included the entirety of FLY’s vintage collection with a special emphasis on the featured designer of the day within the window display, which changed daily to capture the essence of featured designers. FUA fashion retail management students were trained to spotlight designers and serve as liaisons between the designer and customers to educate those interested in the collections.

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Featured designers included: Roberto Cavalli, known for his bold prints. His collections are composed of contrasting patterns, textures, and colors. Cavalli integrates styles of the past into his modern designs to give a perpetual vintage feeling to his lines. The pieces within each outfit harmoniously juxtapose one another. Emilio Pucci, renowned for bright colours and interesting patterns. The menagerie of colors, patterns and textures can at first glance overwhelm the eye but quickly dissipates into a profound appreciation for his works. Pucci offers vivacious pieces that brighten any wardrobe. Dolce & Gabbana, which exudes luxury and class and completely embodies the desirable and affluent Mediterranean lifestyle. The sleek lines and chic patterns create staples for every closet. Fontana Couture Milano, the pinnacle of Italian luxury. The collections are colorful, yet sophisticated. Fontana creates one visual focus point by combining one print with an aesthetically pleasing color scheme. The collections are not as bold as Cavalli’s or Pucci’s, but have an admirable simplicity and softness. Fontana is also renown for luxury leather goods.

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Ph. Harley Bode

FA S H I O N

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Ph. Lina Vélasquez

FA S H I O N

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Literature

ON WRITING Ph. Allison Patrina

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L I T E R AT U R E

The following texts are reflections on the act of writing as a tool to process culture. Travel Writing students share their reflections on how and why they write, and how writing shapes their inner selves.

PROOF OF TRAVEL

ALLISON PATRINA

coaster, a restaurant receipt, a business card, a flight-boarding pass, and a city map. The meaning of travel is what you turn out of your pockets at the end of a single day. No person goes about their day not noticing or touching or even taking an object that proves what they did that day. To then display these objects out and begin to write is what completes your proof of travel. The story behind the object is what makes the object meaningful and important. Being able to take an object and see it, feel it, and then read about it makes a journal important to a person. The feeling of writing a journal on the proof of actual experiences is powerful. An object that is so present and central to the reader backs the words. The words on the page could never be made up because the journal is non-fiction by nature. I write to complement the image, to explain why I ate at the restaurant I did, what I liked about it, and what I ate. The non-fiction journal is a story of experiences, never in a flowing order, but more of a choppy sea of objects and words. This organization reflects what traveling is: a moving sea of footsteps, photos, and objects collected around the world around us.

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TRAINS AND PAGES

JACQUELINE SHANDLER

step onto the train in Siena and find a seat in the back left corner. I perch my feet and bend my knees to act as a writing board. I feel safe inhabiting this corner of the train. I see the backs of strangers’ heads in front of me and feel at ease knowing no one is reading my writing. I take out my journal, flipping through the pages filled with black ink in my clear handwriting. I open to the next blank page, write the date at the top and as the train begins to move, I begin writing. With sturdy walls surrounding me, and a wide window to my left, I take turns writing and looking at the vibrant green grass and trees that comprise the countryside. My hand moves fluidly across the page and after months of practice, I simply write my thoughts. Writing does not require me to think consciously anymore. I do not have to think about what to write before I begin writing. When I open my journal, I take a deep breath, exhale, place my pen to the paper, and my hand begins to move fluidly from the left to right, my thoughts filling the page. One thought may lead to a couple pages of writing without me being aware of it. I feel myself growing and maturing as I spill my thoughts and emotions onto the page through the ink of my pen. By writing my thoughts and engaging in this process every day, I cultivate ideas and nurture my mind. Similar to a flower, when I first began writing in my journal, I had to grow by writing daily. Writing in my journal is like the water that a flower needs to grow. If I fail to write, there will be no growth of my mind or body, just like a flower without the guidance and growth that the water provides. By the time the train arrives at the Santa Maria Novella train station in Florence, I have discovered another side to myself. I traveled to a new dimension within my own thoughts and also journeyed across Italy, cultivating my mind and enhancing the connection between mind and body.

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Ph. Caymin Lutze

Ph. Mia Pitsironis

Ph. Caymin Lutze

Ph. Erin Daly

Ph. Kristina McNamara

L I T E R AT U R E

(center) Ph. Caymin Lutze

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L I T E R AT U R E

Ph. Theresa De Palma

MOMENTS AND ARTIFACTS

KRISTINA MCNAMARA

toss and turn in my small bed with my eyes wide open, staring at the fan whirling above me. I often experience restless nights and have trouble falling asleep because I am either filled with excitement or worry, depending on the day. Without hesitation, I pull my spiraled journal out of my backpack and begin to write. I scribble down my thoughts and don’t think about whether it makes sense or not. I write about my fears, my hopes, and all that I’ve accomplished. Sometimes, my head is too full to put to sleep and writing helps to ease my restless mind and soul. My journal is filled with things I would never expect anyone to read. Personal jottings of places I’ve been, things I’ve eaten, and what I think. Sometimes I don’t even know what I think, so how would I expect others to comprehend the mumblings that I record on paper? Most of the time, I don’t know what I think until I read what I say. My journal collects moments. It’s a cultural artifact of the things I witness throughout my journey. One day, I saw a man and a woman on a date at Piazzale Michelangelo. They looked so content. Not with each other, but with life. She was scribbling in a journal while he was painting a watercolor landscape of the panoramic view. I wrote about them in my own journal, about how I want to find someone just to sit and create things with. Before journaling, I knew very little about myself. I was unaware of my unique patterns, what I notice, and what I tend to focus on every day. I used to only write occasionally to document something great that happened or if I was having a bad day. Now writing has become a valuable coping tool. I find that a blank piece of paper makes a good listener. All the things I can’t say to people, I simply spill out onto as many blank pages as I need until I have nothing left to say. I tell all of my friends that their worlds matter. Their silence matters, too. So when I can’t find a way to untangle my tongue, I untangle my hands and write about what hurts until the pain fades away into peace.

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SEEING MY VOICE

STEVEN CROWLEY

eaning forward at an acute angle over my wooden table with carvings of initials decorating the sides, I begin to write in my travel journal. I have learned that the less distractions surround me, the better I sync my mind with my hand. As a result of this I have begun to write later in the day when my roommates are occupied with other tasks or heading to bed. This hour is usually a time of calmness in the city: once the market stands are stored away for the night and people have left the restaurants below me. I take a moment to think about my day and what I have learned, experienced for the first time, or people who I found interesting. Once this thought process is finished, I put pen to paper and let my mind guide my pen. I have begun to gain a skill of synchronized thought with writing speed, which has allowed me to think slower. I find this as a positive trait because when I type I am thinking sentences ahead of where I am typing, but when I write at the speed of my thought I can really see my voice on paper. I keep my face close to the paper because I see every word as I think it up. One hand holds down the opposite side because one distracting page flip could throw me out of the zone. The act of writing by hand has nurtured me in the way that food does. It helps me to grow stronger and more creative as a writer. When you start learning how to make meals for yourself, you gradually gain a better sense of the cooking process. You start to add a touch of spice here and there, to tweak a recipe or cooking method according to your palate; there's always something to discover and the process never becomes a boring task. I challenge myself record things in my journal push me out of my comfort zone. An entry may be about writing very personal feelings about my family that I would not normally put on paper, or an attempt at adding sketches despite my lack of drawing ability. I try to use unconventional methods that may not make sense to others but are purposefully meaningful to me. My travel journal is full of my perspective, and rereading it helps me to grow step by step, similarly to how constantly adapting one's repertory of recipes improves cooking skills. I see what I have done and where my growth will take me, thanks to the focus and intimacy recorded in my writings. I remain close to my travel journal throughout the writing process to block out everything except for the blank horizontal lines that lie before me. This is how I have grown as a writer and how the culture of handwriting is intimately important to me.

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Travel

A E C S U S ’ LTURE T LE SAIGE SHEETS t’s not hard to look around and immediately perceive that Italy is distinct from Egypt, China, and the United States. Like all countries, Italy has its unique traits such as a pronounced regionalism that results in diverse subcultures, which are immediately palpable in architectures and cuisines across the country. There’s more to culture than looking around. It’s also under you, not just on land but in water as well. History tells of civilizations past and what makes them unique, and this goes for not only the story of peoples but also communities that thrive underwater. What many may not realize is that there are no height or age barriers to explore what's beneath us. I had the opportunity to visit Sicily, a place that has historically been a melting pot. Giardini Naxos is a beautiful spot along Sicily’s eastern coast that lends itself to diverse types of explorations. The town is home to both the archeological site of the Naxos people and fields of coral reefs brimming with sea creatures.

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At first glance these two cultural worlds, above and below the sea, wouldn’t necessarily coincide. However, the discovery of Naxos' ancient civilization is linked to marine explorations. Naxos, located between Catania and Messina, is the first place where the Greeks landed and started a settlement on Sicilian territory. In the past 50 years, the area has been excavated to unearth traces of the original Greek presence. As cities changed throughout the centuries, original settlements stratified and transitioned into new historic eras. Naxos, however, is one of the few archeological sites where nothing has been built above it. As I walked along the beaten paths of the ancient town, I could almost picture the homes, temples, and roads emerge from the ruins. The initial above-ground experience was a stepping-stone for the next culture I was about to experience: the marine environment that hold to this day remnants of the town's founding elements.


T R AV E L

them e e e s w re, a ey h t s a “ We d o n o t s e e t h i n g s

a s w e a r e .”

Photos by the author

Most people assume that scuba diving requires you to be a good swimmer, love the water, and be certified through diving courses. This is partially true. What you really need is the desire to explore. Scuba diving can be practiced at any age, from special children's courses all the way to advanced levels for those have gone on hundreds of dives. I’ve always been likened to a fish but only recently have I been certified. I did it for the love of water and, more importantly, to photograph life underwater. Beneath the liquid surface, an entire ecosystem of marine live awaits to be explored – fish living as humans in schools, working together, living amongst each other. When I explored the underwater realm during my trip to Sicily, the diving season was on the early side so the water was approximately 15 degrees Celsius. A bit chilly, but the sea life was intensely active. For the three dives held in different locations, each had a unique sense about it. The diversity of each location reminded me of how regional diversity such as the difference between Tuscany and Friuli-Venezia Giulia is something to consider in the aquatic realm below us.

The first was near the edge of a cove and presented smaller and more colorful fish in addition to abundant sea grass. The second was home to a sunken boat near the harbor, and used to be a restaurant a few decades ago ago until a storm caused it to crash. It now serves as a place for fish to congregate rather than being served on dishes. The third and final dive was closer to Taormina had the most marine life other than fish; I saw countless moray eels, starfish, and fireworms. The chance to explore the underwater regions of Sicily allowed me to understand how culture can truly go beyond geographic limits. Anyone can visit an archeological site or dive into a whole new world with the appropriate swimming skills. History is the storyboard of how communities and places can differ from each other. This difference is exactly what makes a culture thrive and lend itself to new journeys in ways that surprise and challenge our perception.

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Ph. Lina VĂŠlasquez

50 * S P R I N G - S U M M E R

2016


Ph. Lina Vélasquez

Ph. Margaret Desjardins

Ph. Stephanie Gallucci

#

2

FEED YOUR EYES / /FEED YOUR MIND

FUA IPHONEOGRAPHY SPRING 2016 CLASS led by ISABELLA MARTINI

Ph. Emily Gordon

Ph. Kaila Lewis

Ph. Jordan Hochberg

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Photos by Adelina Fischer

FOOD

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FOOD

DANIELA GAGLIANO

Bistecca

Photos by ANASTASSIA SCIARAFFIA

Tuscany with an english twist While in Florence or any area of Tuscany, travelers and locals alike know to look for la bistecca alla fiorentina, a local favorite for meat lovers. The name itself clearly traces the dish’s origins, but did you know that its roots involve an international, Anglo-Saxon twist? his famous Tuscan contribution to Italian gastronomy derives from the British term “beef-steak.” It originated in the 16th century in Florence’s Piazza San Lorenzo. According to the local legend, the dish was created on March 23 for the wedding of Paolo Orsino and Isabella de’Medici, the daughter of Cosimo I, Duke of Florence. An entire ox was ordered to be roasted in the square to feed the hungry guests. During the Medici rule, Florence was as a major crossroads for travelers. During the festivities, a group of English knights passing through the square caught sight of the beautiful cuts of meat and exclaimed “Beef-steak! Beef-steak!” The Florentines subsequently renamed the steak bistecca. La bistecca alla fiorentina is prepared with the loin of a 15 to 16-month-old female cow that has not yet been pregnant. The T-bone cut between the sirloin and tenderloin is always used. The meat must be hung to dry age for 15-21 days. The cutting of the Florentine steak is a ancient technique in Tuscany. The weight of the loin must be at least 1 kilogram while the cut is 4-6 cm tall. The steak is cooked enough to obtain a beautiful brown exterior while the inside must remain rare. Traditionally, the cut side is unseasoned and is thrown on the grill for about five minutes, making sure not to puncture the meat. After it’s flipped over, the cooked side is then salted. Before being portioned, the meat is left to rest in a warm environment to con-

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tinue cooking off the fire for about 10 minutes. Next, it can be drizzled with some olive oil and pepper before being sliced and served. FUA’s Chat Pal program has connected me with a 25-year-old local Florentine, Francesca Grandi. She works at a vineyard as a grape analyst in an area south of Florence. During our time together, I took the opportunity to ask her a few questions about this famous Florentine dish that is commonly prepared at home. According to Francesca, “The steak is eaten about once a week. I usually cook it for about seven minutes. Most households prepare it at home because going out to eat can be very expensive, up to ¤100 versus ¤15-20 when you buy the meat from a good butcher.” She also added that she prepares it on a grill pan in her kitchen because she doesn’t have a barbecue grill. After talking with Francesca, I was inspired to try it myself and prepared the recipe for my roommates after stopping by the macelleria down the block from my apartment. I was more than satisfied with my results. A few days later when my mother was in town, we spent our last meal together at a local restaurant. The properly aged meat was cut and cooked to perfection; it was one of the best meals I’ve ever had. La bistecca alla fiorentina is a great example of Tuscan cuisine with a surprising background, serving as a perfect way to end a special day in Florence.

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Alumni

UPDATE WITH WINE STUDIES ALUM, CHASE RENTON, GENERAL MANAGER AND WINEMAKER AT L’ANGOLO ESTATE

SCHOOLING HIS WAY THROUGH WINE LAUREN FROMIN

Photographs courtesy of CHASE RENTON

For this issue's theme of “No Legal Age for Drinking Culture,” we caught up with Chase Renton, an Apicius Wine Studies Alum. Students coming from abroad sometimes focus more on the fact that where they are from, they are unable to legally consume wine. The important discovery to make while abroad is embracing the culture of wine, as opposed to just its consumption. Chase's experience truly sums up how a passion for a culture can strike at anytime, regardless of age or experience. Pouring his efforts into a wine-related career has enabled him to live his dream of bringing culture to those around him, from the roots to the glass.

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A LU M N I

hase completed his wine studies at Apicius in Spring 2011. Upon graduating from his home university, he had contemplated graduate studies. However, his love of wine culture and the opportunity to open his very own vineyard directed him towards Florence. In fact, Chase has described the entire process of setting up shop as a form of graduate school in itself, considering that the experience has been a full exposure to the world of business, wine, hospitality, and a learning-by-doing approach to work. It all started as a general interest which led him to working in a wine bar that eventually led to wine sales. The interest in wine landed him at Apicius to study the industry. When asked about his studies and what stood out, he stated, “The opportunity to take classes focusing on Old-World wines made it apparent why wine is part of daily life. It is not simply a beverage, but a way of life.” In addition, even though he prefers the physical labor of harvesting as well as food and wine pairing, the wine service aspect was a benefit to have experienced through his studies at Apicius, where he gained a complete understanding of wine culture. Chase took advantage of his time in Florence and of the time he was given by his professors. To this day, he views Prof. Mas-

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simo Coppetti as a friend and mentor and acknowledges the benefits that lie in the relationships created within academic environments. In fact, Prof. Coppetti has been a great contact to have within the wine industry and has offered his guidance during the development of Chase’s winery. The result is L’Angolo Estate, located in the Dundee Hills of Oregon and described as “a family-owned, organic vineyard and boutique winery.” The inaugural vintage will be released in fall 2016, and will feature two Pinot Noirs and one Chardonnay that are exclusively harvested from the estate. When asked about the positive aspects of Oregon as the location choice, Chase shared that the Willamette Valley has a cool climate and is good for mimicking Old-World styles; the area shares the same latitude and growing days as France where he spent time working in Burgundy, hence the choice of the blend. Additionally, the vineyard is organic with a noticeable difference in the soil, an important element since so many soil types can be tarnished with fertilizers. Chase and his family are extremely excited for the first harvest. A tasting room was built recently on top of one of the slopes facing eastward toward the hills to capture the moment that all of their hard work has

provided. This is just the beginning, because Chase has plans to expand his brand through a partnership in Italy. During his studies at Apicius, Chase met his partner and their mutual interest in wine bonded their friendship. The two will co-produce a 100% Sangiovese Chianti Classico in Radda, Chianti. The purchase of three tons of fruit will result in 300 cases of wine during the first harvest in 2016. The harvesting in Oregon and Chianti will take place simultaneously and Chase will revisit Italy for a final tasting before the final production stage. Chase’s time at Apicius has paid off because he was able to establish the knowledge and relationships needed to fulfill his dream in his home country and in Italy. Before we wrapped up the interview, Chase had some advice for future FUA students: “When you come to Florence, embrace the Italian way of life, don’t take it for granted and seek to understand why it's beautiful place that's different from anywhere else. Value the culture.” If you are interested in learning more about L’Angolo Estate, visit the website langoloestate.com where you can sign up for the mailing list to get the latest updates, or look up the winery on Facebook and Instagram: L’Angolo Estate.

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A LU M N I

FUA Fashion Alum COURTNEY CACCAVELLI “If you are willing to put in 100%, you deserve it” is the motto of FUA Alum Courtney Caccavelli who is now employed at LuLulemon Athletica. Courtney elaborates on the benefits of Experiential Learning and FUA’s

GARRETT DAY Photographs courtesy of COURTNEY CACCAVELLI

impactful presence on her life. Because of her time here she has grown as a professional and is better prepared for a career in the fashion world.

How was your experience collaborating with FLY as a Experiential Learning student? How did it better prepare you for your future in Fashion Merchandising? My experience at FLY was life changing. It really showed me where I want my future in fashion to go, and it introduced me to my love of working as the stylist in photo shoots. I helped with store operations as well as planning store events. It benefitted me in many ways, mainly to get the full feel of running a whole store from top to bottom. Prior to FLY, I had only received a few opportunities of this kind. During my time there, the opportunities to cultivate my passion were numerous. Learning the ins and outs of a retail store from the vintage and emerging designer perspectives was incredibly fascinating for me and will concretely help me in the future if I plan to open my own store.

When did you attend FUA and how long did you stay at FUA? I attended FUA in March 2014 for a weeklong fashion course as well as Spring 2015 where I stayed for approximately five months. What was your major? Fashion Merchandising and Management.

What inspires you? What drives you to do what you do for Lululemon? Seeing what I do makes an impact on others lives and drives me to succeed. I’ve always been very passionate. It can even come off as a bit intimidating, but when there is a vision I see for myself I will go after it. I have always believed that if there is something you want and are willing to work for it, never go a day without thinking about it, you will achieve it. I believe that can be considered for many aspects in life, work, school, love life, anything. If you are willing to put in 100%, you deserve it.

Tell us about your company. Lululemon Athletica is an athletic fashion apparel company that specializes in yoga, running, and other athletic clothing focuses to meet the needs of a “sweaty” lifestyle.

Where do you see yourself in five years? Are you planning on visiting Florence any time soon? In five years, I see myself working as a Regional Manager for a company I love. I will definitely be traveling back to Florence, hopefully before five years go by. I discovered so much about myself while I was there. As someone special to me once put it, Florence was where I started my journey. It opened so many doors for me and showed me what I love about my life and what I am passionate about. So in five years, I hope to start seeing some of my dreams coming true. And I definitely see myself adopting a puppy.

Did you you always know that you wanted to work in the fashion industry? I originally wanted to be a fashion designer. I made my own school dance and prom dresses growing up. I loved being different. As I got older, I started to appreciate the role of management in fashion and realized that I love the satisfaction of order and success in a company. From that moment I turned my fashion focus to the business side of the industry.

How has your life changed from before you come to Florence and now? In other words, how did your experience here change you? My life has definitely changed since attending FUA. My outlook on life is completely different, but different in a good way. I find that I appreciate more the little things in life from living in Italy. I truly lived a fairytale while attending FUA, and was indulged by the quality and the attention of the professors and mentors I had while there.

What is your job now? Educator at Lululemon Athletica as well as Community Leader at Lululemon Athletica.

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Florence University of the Arts

encourages students

to keep

a MIND & BODY

balance

LA PALESTRA OFFERS FREE CLASSES WITH GYM EQUIPMENT/MACHINES FOR FUA STUDENTS

LA PALESTRA - FUA Corso Tintori, 21 - FLORENCE contact: sld-studentservices@fua.it


BLENDING Magazine Spring/Summer 2016  
BLENDING Magazine Spring/Summer 2016  
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