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Rosetta E. Ross is Professor of Religion at Spelman College where she led renewal and transformation of the institution’s study of religion. As a teacher and scholar she constructs womanist theory by investigating religion and identity in black women’s experiences and public practices. She is author of Witnessing and Testifying: Black Women, Religion, and Civil Rights, the first book-length study of religion in the lives of black women civil rights activists. An ordained elder in the United Methodist Church, Ross serves as convener of the Denomination’s Women of Color Doctoral Scholars Program. In addition to her other professional obligations, she serves as convener of the Women of Color Doctoral Scholars Program for the United Methodist Church’s General Board of Higher Education and Ministry. This program provides scholarship support and mentoring for women of color pursing the Ph.D. or Th.D. in religion. The WOC Program is deliberate in providing a supportive and critical mentoring context that challenges scholars to think constructively about their intellectual identities and contributions as women of color.

Anne Joh Associate Professor of Systematic Theology, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary Evanston, IL

My parents immigrated to the U.S. in 1976. I became a translator early in my life and that has shaped the many perspectives that have informed my formation as an Asian American feminist theologian. I'm a theologian teaching in a United Methodist seminary. I'm committed to academic activism and to teaching and research. As a teacher, I believe that transformative praxis begins with each of us in our everyday lives. Theological reflection is crucial because the meaning of our lives is often understood through the prism of religious experience. Therefore, theological reflection must be bold and imaginative as well as grounded in the material reality of history of peoples' lives. Furthermore, theological reflection is constructive as it examines the conditions of our present reality even as we dare to construct and hope in conditions that would be emancipatory for all. This means that theological reflection be in conversation with one another. I believe that we learn best from one another through listening and what Gayatri Spivak refers to as "non-coercive rearrangement of desire." My hope is that through this learning from one another, our own desire for change emerges from within each person.

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Profile for FTE Leaders

FTE Christian Leadership Forum Information  

2014 CLF information for participants.

FTE Christian Leadership Forum Information  

2014 CLF information for participants.

Profile for fteleader