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INSIDELOOK

The independent student newspaper at The Florida State University™. Established 1915.

THURSDAY APRIL 21-25, 2011

W W W. F S U N E W S . C O M

VOLUME XX ISSUE XXX

A plug for ’Nole power FSU among the most energy efficient schools in the state

GOP EYES ’12 ELECTION Writer Chad Squitieri takes a look at some of the conservative competitors in the running for the presidential ticket VIEWS | 15

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Senior Staff Writer Florida State University is the city of Tallahassee’s No. 1 user of cityproduced energy; as a whole, FSU annually uses 6.5 percent of the energy produced in 2010. According to Jim Stephens, FSU is one of the most efficient universities in the state. “When stacked against our peers in the state of Florida, we’re definitely in the top one or two,” Stephens said. “If you look at the raw data by itself, it may look like we’re a little higher, but we have so many research buildings that are going to use more energy than if you have a lot of classroom buildings.” All of FSU’s energy comes from the city of Tallahassee’s power plants. The Hopkins plant burns fossil fuel to produce 500 million

CLASSIFIEDS 16 BON APPETIT 9 STUDY BREAK 17

works. “The gas turbine is basically a jet engine attached to a generator,” said Singh. “So, just like

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Students dance away stress CCF hosts jazzercise in Strozier for finals week RENEE JACQUES Contributing Writer

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ARTS & LIFE SPORTS VIEWS

TURNER COWLES

a jet engine, you put gas in it, it fires off and the turbine spins and there’s a generator attached to it. They’re not the most efficient but they can get you power quickly. Then we have a steam turbine where FSU’s Energy Policy by you burn Reid Compton and Matt Clegg. natural gas in a boiler and you boil water, and you get it super heated. Then you send that super-heated steam to a steam turbine; that spins and is connected to a generator to create power that way.” The jet engines are actually GEmanufactured 747 engines. They start up, produce heat and that heat is captured and used to boil water; this is a system called combined power. The plant uses its natural gas to spin the turbine and then funnels the exhaust heat into a chamber to boil water. That water boils and the steam created spins yet another turbine, creating more energy. With all of the university’s power coming from the City of Tallahassee, it may be difficult to see Reid Compton/FSView how FSU could excel at Pictured above: a pressure gauge from the Central Utilities Plant at energy efficiency. ElizaFSU. Florida State receives most of its power from the City of TalSEE POWER 2 lahassee’s natural gas supply.

watts per hour, which is 60 percent of the power used in Tallahassee. Of those 500 million watts per hour, FSU uses over 20 million. Triveni Singh, the plant manager of the Hopkins plant, explained how their natural gas plant

The Christian Campus Fellowship (CCF) at Florida State University is hoping to provide some relief for stressed out students in Strozier Library during the final weeks of the semester. This past Tuesday, the organization hosted a twohour “Dance Extravaganza.” At 8 p.m., students in smart room 107 were treated to three 20-minute jazzercise classes taught by members of the fellowship. Dressed in ’80s exercise garb, members of the fellowship led the students in several energizing dance routines to boost students’ spirits. Close to 10 students were invited to participate in a dance contest. Allowed to freestyle for one to two minutes to music of their choice, a winner was announced at the end of the hour and received a $5 gift card to Starbucks. The winner, Jorge Gallo, was chosen based on the creativity, originality and “swag points” of his performance.

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Jackie Juaristi

Noelle Kennady

Cody Gusto

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Will Stone

J. Michael Osborne

Michael Shea

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‘Kudzu’ hosts release party Magazine holds a public reading at Club Downunder EMILY OSTERMEYER Contributing Writer

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Visit fsunews.com for more from the CCF’s ‘Dance Extravaganza.’

Freshman and CCF member Lance Devore dances to the music at the Jazzercise Study Break in Strozier SEE DANCE 2 Library on April 19.

CRUST

Dantiel Wynn

Carry-out

11am-4pm

The Kudzu Review, Florida State University’s undergraduate literary magazine, held its annual issue release party at Club Downunder on Tuesday night. Kudzu publishes in print every spring and hosts a release party that features a reading from all of the students featured in the issue.

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“It’s just an opportunity for [student writers] to showcase their work in public,” said Michael Shea, editor-in-chief of The Kudzu Review. “It’s a really great experience for them.” Brian Eltomi, a senior studying English and philosophy, read his poem, “King of the Ants.” Eltomi liked the idea of having a release party for the Kudzu. SEE JUMP 2


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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | APRIL 21, 2011

College Dems win Chapter of the Year 850-561-6653 Editorial Fax: 850-574-2485 Advertising Fax: 850-574-6578 General Manager Eliza LePorin 850-561-1600 eleporin@fsview.com EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Adam Clement 850-561-1612 editor@fsview.com Managing Editor J. Michael Osborne 850-561-1613 managing_editor@fsview.com News Editor Jesse Damiani 850-561-1614 news@fsview.com Assistant News Editors Bailey Shertzinger Ana Rebecca Rodriguez Arts & Life Editor Agata Wlodarczyk 850-561-1615 artsandlife@fsview.com Assistant A & L Editors Ana Renee Rodriguez Nicki Karimipour Sports Editor Brett Jula 850-561-1616 sports@fsview.com Assistant Sports Editor Nick Sellers Photo Editor Melina Vastola 850-561-1617 photo@fsview.com Assistant Photo Editors Reid Compton Joseph La Belle Digital and Multimedia Editor Reid Compton 850-561-1617 webeditor@fsview.com Assistant Multimedia Editor Matt Clegg multimedia@fsview.com Assistant Web Editor Duncan Graham ADVERTISING STAFF Bob Fulton 850-561-1603 National rfulton@fsview.com Kristina Greenlee 850-561-1609 Housing & Auto kgreenlee@fsview.com Emily Bohnstengel 850-561-1601 Retail ebohnsteng@fsview.com Patrick Toban 850-561-1611 Restaurants & Student Organizations ptoban@fsview.com Sales Assistant Corey Calhoon 850-561-1605 salesassistant@fsview.com DISTRIBUTION Distribution Coordinator Karl Etters 850-561-1608 distribution@fsview.com PRODUCTION STAFF 850-561-1606 Production Manager Justin Christopher Dyke productionmanager@fsview.com Assistant Production Manager Danielle Delph ddelph@fsview.com Production Designers Glenishia Gilzean ggilzean@fsview.com Emealia Hollis ehollis@fsview.com Yves Solorzano ysolorzano@fsview.com The FSView & Florida Flambeau is a Gannett newspaper published by FSView & Florida Flambeau, Inc. Member, Florida Press Association Associated Collegiate Press College Media Advisers Office Location: 954 W. Brevard St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Mailing Address: P. O. Box 20208 Tallahassee, FL 32316 Single copies are free; additional copies are available for $1 per copy. The editorials that appear within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the editorial writer. Any other column that appears in the newspaper is the expressed opinion of the columnist and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers. All correspondence to Editorial can be considered for publication, unless indicated otherwise by letter writer. In accordance with The Associated Press guidelines obscenities, vulgarities and profanities will not be published. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters may be edited for clarity and content, or for space purposes.

FSU organization recognized as best in state at conference COURTNEY ROLLE Contributing Writer The Florida State University College Democrats proved they were a force to be reckoned with last weekend, winning the Chapter of the Year Award at the 2011 Florida College Democratic Conference. According to Zachary Zermay, FSU student and director of Political Affairs for the Florida College Democrats, winning the College Chapter of the Year Award headlined their priority list this year. Zermay said that the FSU College Democrats wanted to

exemplify that they are a strong force that is ready to work hard in strengthening the ties between the Florida Democratic Party and the voters of the Tallahassee community. “We won the Chapter of the Year Award because of our dedication to America and Democratic values that we demonstrated during the 2010 midterm elections, where we took a leading role in a coalition of colleges that registered thousands of students all over the state of Florida,” said Zermay. “On top of that, we took an active role in numer-

ous philanthropy projects, such as unilaterally cleaning up and improving Mission San Luis, to joining up with other clubs on campus to put on The Big Event.” The FSU College Democrats also invited Congressman Allen Boyd to address the students and were able to take an unprecedented 24 members, more than any other chapter in the state of Florida, to attend the College Democrats of America Winter Conference in Washington, DC. The FSU College Democrats have been making landmark strides in other areas as well, securing

three out of seven of the positions on the Florida College Democrats executive board. Zermay was elected director of Political Affairs, Kelly Kibbey was elected director of membership, and in a close battle, Matty Budesa was elected secretary of the Florida College Democrats. “These positions are very influential in regard to setting and making policy for the youth wing of the party that will not only affect college students here in Tallahassee but all throughout the state of Florida,” said Zermay. Though the FSU Col-

lege Democrats have made tremendous strides in the past year, they continue to say that their work is never done. Zermay said that their chapter would like to increase the political involvement of the Florida State student population, educate the students about local and federal politics, and continue to help more Democrats become elected. College Democrats meet weekly at the HCB on Thursdays at 7 p.m. They can also be found on Facebook at FSU College Democrats and on Twitter at Twitter.com/ FSUDems.

alarm clock, a refrigerator and a microwave or two. With 6,500 kids living on campus and 6,500 iPods to compete with, we’re drawing a lot of energy from that.” As the second largest public university in Florida, FSU officials have their hands full when it comes to energy use. There is a central control room located in Mendenhall—the building right by Starbucks—that houses computers monitering the air conditioning and other vital systems across campus. It is staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. “FSU really got its energy conservation started 15 years ago or more,” Stephens said. “Several million dollars were put into upgrade lighting, upgrade air conditioning systems and really got a jump ahead of many universities nationally. So, today, we’re still finding more ways to save energy.” There have been opportunities to change the lighting in buildings to light-emitting diodes (LED), but those projects have a significantly higher payback timeline. The payback is the amount of time it would take to get a return on your investment: the energy saved by the money spent on the lights. The university opted to install a less efficient lighting system than LED, but one that is more efficient than the previous fluorescent system. “LED lighting, which is new and exciting, has a 12 or 15 year payback—

it takes that long to get your money back from the energy you save,” said Stephens. “But, upgrading to a more efficient fluorescent system has a five-year payback.” It’s this lengthy payback that has kept FSU from installing newer and flashier energy sources on campus. “We’re going to do the quicker return projects first,” said Stephens. “What that does is, every piece of energy we save really helps us reach our goals of reducing energy and impacting our sustainability. The faster we can do that, by selecting the projects that have the higher returns, the more impact that FSU can have campus wide, but also leading the way within all the universities.” Air conditioning is likely the most energy-costly service at FSU. Keeping the campus cool requires nearly 40 percent of all the energy on campus. The smokestack in the middle of campus, for example, is not only a historical landmark of FSU, it’s actually functional as well and used to function as a chimney back when FSU burned coal. Nowadays, there is a great deal of air conditioning equipment back there, and the smokestack provides a natural draft that keeps the equipment cool. The boilers and chillers in the smokestack building send steam or cooled water through underground pipes across campus. Stephens compared it to a standard neighborhood underground pipe-

line. The boilers heat the water and send steam all throughout campus, which heat the coils in each building’s heater. Similar actions occur to cool a building. The chiller cools water and sends the cold water in underground pipes all over campus. This cold water cools a coil in the air conditioning in each building. The pipes can provide 40 thousand gallons of water per minute. Engineering professors and assistant professors at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering acknowledge that there is a wealth of sources that can create energy: the water, the wind, nuclear reactions, the sun, et cetera. Each source comes with its own set of faults, however. Hydroelectric energy from dams can alter its surrounding environment; windmills create unnecessary noise and can kill birds; nuclear reactions can have dangerous meltdowns; and solar panels require large areas of land to create legitimately useful amounts of energy. “We do have some very limited solar on campus; most of it is in a test mode,” Stephens said. “The main thing a lot of people don’t understand about solar cells and where the technology is to generate an equivalent amount of electricity for any of our uses, [is that] it has about a 40-year payback. Or we could improve the efficiency of the air conditioning system; maybe it takes five to seven years to pay it

back.” Stephens said that there is generally a sevenyear payback maximum. Most projects that take more than seven years to pay back are declined by officials. “We’re big supporters of alternative energy,” said Stephens, “but we expect that alternative energy needs to meet that underseven-year hurdle to be doing the right thing and for us to be good stewards of FSU’s money.” When it comes to solar energy, FSU is located in the capital of the Sunshine State. Officials at the university said they are not opposed to the idea of using the sun’s energy. Energy officials at FSU are planning to install a solar water heater at the Leach Center— something Stephens said will be paid back in less than five years and will provide 90 percent of the heat required for the swimming pool. FSU is no doubt growing. New residence halls are being built on campus, the William Johnston building was recently gutted and remodeled and there is a new wellness center being constructed. “Despite the addition of many more buildings, we’re staying fairly flat on our energy usage,” said Stephens. “We’re investing now to see that we can drive that down. As construction is slowing up a little bit, we actually think in the next year or so things will be more favorable as we’re putting more energy saving projects in place.”

Juaristi said the release party was a good way to promote Kudzu. “It’s definitely attention for the review,” Juaristi said. Juaristi also said she is an advocate for poetry and arts awareness in communities. “I think things like this of course are really needed in a community, because a lot of people will come to these things,” Juaristi said. “Like when I was a freshman, I would come to this, and you don’t know what you’re getting into, and then you really enjoy it.” According to Juaristi, Kudzu provides a way for busy undergraduate writers to get their name in print. Juaristi said she has been writing for a

long time, but is so busy that it’s hard to find time to submit her own work to reviews. “So this one was a more easy availability to get published, and everybody wants to be published before they graduate,” Juaristi said. Dantiel Wynn, a junior studying creative writing, read an excerpt from her short story entitled “Butterfly Garden.” Wynn said that the Kudzu release party provided an opportunity to showcase the talented writers at FSU. “This is cool just because these are people you go to school with, and they’re talented and you get to showcase that,” Wynn said. The Kudzu has open submissions for any un-

dergraduate students and collected work from last November through February for this edition. Submissions and selection for the review undergo an extensive editorial process run exclusively by undergraduates. “We like to think of it as the best undergraduate writing on campus,” Shea said. Undergraduates’ work published in The Kudzu Review last year was selected for inclusion in a national anthology for undergraduate writing called “plain china.” “We’re really happy about that, and we’re hoping to get some more in the spring,” Shea said. This spring, Kudzu published nearly 600 copies of the print edition. More

than 400 submissions this past fall were collected, with 29 selected to be featured in the print issue. “It was a really great year,” Shea said. In the past, the Kudzu release party has been held at the Warehouse, a local venue popular with graduate student readings. Shea said holding the party at Club Downunder helped make it more undergraduate-friendly. “This was really nice to be on campus in the Union,” Shea said. Shea said the party was a success. “I’ve been here for four of our readings and I think it was our best,” Shea said. “We had a great turnout, we got a great crowd and I’m really pleased with it.”

finding a fun and creative outlet that we can show the students at FSU that we care about them and we want to be there for them,” Young said. Others believe it is a good way to help students continue to study. “It’s a good stress reliever for finals week,” said Gustav Mahler, a member of CCF. “Once you get all your energy out, you can

study for six more hours.” Young said she believes that this event will help foster a better studying environment for students. “You know when you’re in the library for hours, you start to just look for distractions,” Young said. Students may have already seen another distraction that the CCF has created. Young explained that some days, a person

dressed in a banana suit being chased by somebody in a gorilla suit can be seen in Strozier. Instead of just providing a spectacle, the bananasuited person hands out free bananas to students, adorned with a CCF sticker in order to spread the word about the fellowship. The fellowship will be handing out bananas during the evenings of

Sunday, April 24, and Wednesday, April 27. Another dance event will occur this Tuesday at 8 p.m. in smart room 107 of Strozier. The Christian Campus Fellowship house on College Avenue will also be available as a study space for the public during finals week. The house will be open 24 hours and offers free Wi-Fi.

POWER from 1 beth Swiman, director of FSU Campus Sustainability, said that the current relationship between the university and the city has caused some struggle in energy production. “Our current contract with our energy provider doesn’t allow us to generate a large percentage of our energy, so that’s a conversation that’s taking place at universities across the country.” That conversation is regarding how much focus should be placed on energy efficiency at colleges nationwide. Stephens acknowledged the city knows that there needs to be research in alternative energies. “They’re recognizing the need for change too, so really, the big barrier to doing a lot of these different alternative energy things is that whether we do it or they do it, it’s still not financially feasible,” said Stephens. Energy efficiency is more than just what type of power plant produces the energy used. Energy efficiency relies heavily on the energy user—those who live in residence halls on campus, teachers who leave their computers turned on while out of their offices, even habits as simple as turning lights off. “The residence halls are as efficient as [residents] want to make them while living there,” said Swiman. “When you have 700 people living in one place, it’s hard to control when every person living in that building has an iPod charger, an

KUDZU from 1 “I think it’s always good to help have more opportunities to get poetry read and fiction and nonfiction as well,” Eltomi said. “We should be having opportunities to read them as much as possible.” Eltomi said it’s important to have a literary magazine such as The Kudzu Review at FSU. “It’s something that can really make the idea of getting published not so daunting,” Eltomi said. “I think that there is a sense of community also that’s available at the Kudzu.” Jackie Juaristi, a senior art and creative writing major, read a poem called “plainsong,” which she described as a simple, image-driven poem about emotions and relationships.

DANCE from 1 “I think it’s great that they are getting people out here to have fun in the middle of a very stressful time,” said Gallo, the president of C.Y.P.H.E.R. Hip-Hop Culture Club. CCF’s mission statement is “Devoted to Christ, Devoted to Campus,” so the event is in large part a way to serve the campus. “Our main goal is just


NEWS

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NEWS

FSU alumnus runs birthday scholarship KARLANNA LEWIS Staff Writer This year, John Crossman, who graduated from Florida State University’s real estate program in 1993, is celebrating his birthday in an alternative fashion. Instead of a typical party or vacation, he’s running a scholarship drive to support real estate programs at universities nationwide. The scholarship drive, run in conjunction with the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC), is John’s own initiative. “John is the co-chair of the scholarship committee, part of the ICSC foundation,” said Valerie Cammiso, ICSC executive director. “One of our charges is to fundraise for 25 universities. We have the undergraduate real estate award, and we give $1000 to each of the universities. This was purely John’s idea, to use his birthday to kick off fundraising.” For many, birthdays are times of reflection. This period of introspection led Crossman to the idea for the scholarship fund. “I thought to myself, ‘What do I want the next 30 or 40 years of my life to be about?’ and I thought, ‘I really want them to be about making an impact on Florida State,’ and that’s what I’m going to do,” said Crossman, FSU alum and director of Crossman Co. Though this year’s effort is special, such humanitarian projects are nothing out of the ordinary for Crossman. “My wife and brother wanted to do something big for me on my 40th birthday, but that didn’t feel like me,” said Crossman. “I wanted to do something that was re-

ally meaningful to me, and what’s meaningful to me is college scholarships. We have a scholarship fund in our company name at FSU. It seemed like a good way to really bring attention to a scholarship fund and help raise money for students. I told a friend my idea, and he said, ‘That sounds like you,’ and that felt really good, because it’s really indicative of things that are important to me.” For Michael Havens, who heard Crossman speak as a student, the scholarship drive is yet another way of extending Crossman’s beneficence toward students. “John has a really good heart for giving back,” said Havens, FSU alum and retail leasing manager for Golfpark Properties. “He’s tremendously successful. He runs one of the largest retail leasing and property management firms in the country, but he’s always been really involved at the collegiate level, giving back to students. He has a certain thing for Florida State because he went there, and the school was really good to him. For his birthday, instead of going on a cruise or vacation, he felt a strong

desire to give back. When I was in school and I met John, he took me under his wing and said, ‘I believe in you, I think you can do a lot with a real estate degree and go on to great things.’ I think John puts that belief in other people.” This is not the first time Crossman has worked for the next generation of FSU students. Because he participated in the track and real estate programs as a student, his company fundraises and donates scholarships to both. “I was the track team captain in 1993 and majored in real estate,” said Crossman. “Since I left, they’ve gotten ridiculously good at both. I don’t think going back I’d even make the track team or be in the real estate program; they’re awesome. I’ve always tried to stay in close touch. I’ve gone back and taught a class and we’ve hired a number of students as well. Every way we can, we want to give back.” From now until Crossman’s birthday, Crossman and ICSC are seeking donations of $10 and up. The goal is to raise $10,000 by May 11.

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W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 5

1. Graduation When you first enter college, you think that graduation will never come. When faced with the prospect only mere weeks away, however, many begin to feel some strange emotions. At times, most students have wished they could just get out of college as soon as possible (often, when academic responsibilities get too difficult), and sometimes they hope college will never end (especially on those ridiculously fun nights out on the town). As I prepare to leave the place where I spent four amazing years behind, I can’t help but wonder what I will miss about Florida State. For me, graduating means no more long nights spent in the basement of Strozier Library, no more exhausting treks across campus to the Williams Building, and no midday snack from the Mom and Pop’s hot dog stand. However, despite the bittersweet emotions I feel right now, I will always cherish the good (and bad) times I had in college. 2. Summer I could lie and say this school semester was a good one, but I’m not much of a liar. To be honest, it was one of the most difficult in SEE 5THINGS 9

EXTRA LIFE!

Xbox 360’s answer to ‘Minecraft’ leaves much to be desired COLLIN MIRANDA Staff Writer Chances are you’ve heard about Minecraft, the hit indie PC experience that has taken the world by storm. Without even being “officially” released yet (that date is slated for 11/11/11), Markus “Notch” Persson has already sold well over 1 million copies of a game that is still in its beta phase of development. I have also mentioned in the past that anyone with a compatible computer needs to at least try this fantastic game for themselves. But where does that leave those without compatible computers? If you happen to own an Xbox 360, new Xbox Live Indie game FortressCraft might be just the substitute you’re looking for. Since the game was first announced along with screenshots and gameplay videos, it has been apparent to anyone with eyes that FortressCraft is basically a rip off of Minecraft, a point that the developers constantly whine about and deny up and down. It’s extremely difficult to take their side on that one, though. As with Minecraft, Fortresscraft features a randomly generated world (albeit a much smaller one than the infinite expanses in Minecraft) built entirely out of texSEE EXTRA LIFE 6

How to survive an all-nighter A few helpful hints for making it through finals week AGATA WLODARCZYK Arts & Life Editor

semester again when many It is that special time of the s, cover they have four final students wake up and dis It’s s: day ts all in the next 7 three papers and two projec ts who have not budgeted den stu se game time. For tho naged to fit school, a social their time just right and ma r hour package, the all-nighte life and sleep into a neat 24is for you. are bad. They are long, Keep in mind: All-nighters rd for your health, but as Fo stressful and in no way goo so ks, tric its has de tra ery Ev rest Gump says: It happens. the sleepless nights: h wit p hel to few a are e her

Drink water The body is composed of 60 percent water, the brain 70 percent and the recommended daily intake is eight eight-ounce glasses a day. Water is awesome, and for those looking at a long night, hydration is key. If nothing else, most students will find themselves frequenting the bathroom enough to stay awake. Go easy on caffeine Coffee, tea, Red Bull and those famed 5-Hour Energy shots will provide a temporary boost. They will also end in a crash. Many

students have come to rely on Starbucks or some form of caffeine for their morning pick-me-up or a little afternoon push through the day. At 3 a.m., however, that little boost may not be enough to keep the engines running. It’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon, so pace the caffeine intake (see: “Drink water”) and avoid the overcaffeinated jitters. Eat something On a normal daily schedule, three meals a day will suffice, but when packing on extra hours, pack on some extra grub. Many students might recall this lesson from high school biology: The body converts the

food you eat into energy. Try to stay away from the tempting burgers and fries; they might offer some oomph, but it won’t last. Instead, try some good ol’ carbs, like cereal or pasta, to keep the energy going and going. Keep a pace Remember: marathon, not a sprint. It’s important to stay focused and keep at it. Many students find it helpful to alternate topics every so often (if working on multiple assignments) to avoid getting burnt out on any one subject.

If there is time... nap Many students need the extra hours to work, but some might have an hour or two to spare somewhere in the middle. Rather than get distracted with TV or Facebook, try to take a real nap. A typical sleep cycle is about 90 minutes long; if that much time is available, set an alarm (or two) and kick it pre-school style with a muchneeded nap. This is not meant to be confused with “Don’t lay your head down”—this is a scheduled nap lasting (hopefully) no more than two hours, not “just five minutes.” Shower

Take a break Keeping a steady pace doesn’t mean skipping breaks. As a matter of fact, many students find that timed breaks are not only rewarding, but help to curb wandering minds. Try to set up a working schedule. Study for 50 minutes, then break for 10 to clear those mental pipes. Keep your head up More often than not, students’ attempts to “rest their eyes” end in full-blown sleep. To avoid temptation, many students find it easier to study at the kitchen table, or better yet, the library. Try to stay away from the bed, couch or other various soft and cozy areas.

No one wants to be the smelly kid at the library, and showers are amazing in that wake-youup sort of way. Use the buddy system Last but not least, grab a buddy. Study partners are great not only for trading notes and asking questions, but also for accountability (staying on track) and moral support. If they really like you, they might even wake you up from that nap. And, hopefully, you will do the same for them.

Staying healthy during finals Avoid putting health on the back burner during final exams RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor With finals approaching, Florida State University students have been occupying places such as Strozier Library, All Saints and other local late-night spots as their second homes. During such a hectic time, many may have forgotten what constitutes

a proper meal or the importance of having a clear mind. As a result, their nutrition and wellness have been placed on the back burner. What many might not consider, however, is that this kind of negligence plays a significant role in how one is able to properly study and, more importantly, how well they do on an exam. Accord-

ing to Thagard Registered Dietician Amy Magnuson, there are a few tips to remember that will go a long way. The most important thing to remember is to eat breakfast—foods such as bagels, pancakes, toast and waffles are recommended as they contain adequate carbohydrates, which are the body’s primary source of energy.

“Many research studies have found that kids who eat breakfast in the morning perform better in school—that goes for big kids, too,” Magnuson said. In a similar vein, proper fluids are also necessary as preventing dehydration is imperative to one’s wellness. Lack of water may result in fatigue (which is

obviously detrimental for finals), but simply remembering to carry a water bottle can help ensure maintaining adequate fluid intake. Still, some might argue they don’t have enough time for a proper meal and, instead, choose to reach for snacks such as greasy chips or cookies to SEE FINALS 7

‘Bridesmaids’ are fun, but lacking Superb cast elevates an otherwise dull concept ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer Use the empty space around this review to write down your five favorite American comedies of the past 10 years. When you finish, look up each of your choices online and find out who the producer is. Chances are, you have chosen at least one film produced by Judd Apatow. Screenwriter, director and former roommate to Adam Sandler, Apatow has had his fingers on the pulse of every popular comedy from Anchorman and Talladega Nights to Superbad, The 40 Year Old Virgin and Knocked Up—he’s kind of a big deal. Bridesmaids, the latest addition to the Apatow legacy, might not be the Universal Pictures

‘Bridesmaids,’ the newest film by producer Judd Apatow, plays much like a female version of ‘The Hangover.’

SEE BRIDEMAIDS 7


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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | APRIL 21, 2011

GroopEase offers music deals for fans Members-only website offers indie albums, songs on the cheap

GRACE NORBERG Senior Staff Writer Ever wondered why there isn’t a Groupon. com to get discounts on music? Three business partners from Los Angeles did. With the creation of GroopEase.com, Matthew Firlik, Damien Amey and Andrew Bratt aspired to offer indie music fans up to 75 percent off featured albums using their website by featuring an album for sale at a mere $4 to $5 two to three times a week, as well as opportunities for free songs. “Some of our past offers have been exclusive pre-releases or re-

releases with new tracks of existing albums,” said co-founder Bratt. “A lot of these bands, to be honest with you, are looking mostly for attention, and for fans. They’re not making that much money on their albums, even if we sold them at full price.” Co-founder Amey is mainly in charge of what bands are featured on GroopEase. As a former music manager, Amey knows a network of bands and has a sophisticated ear for music. The types of bands featured on GroopEase are somewhere between those that might play at Coachella and one’s typical local band. Live performances are also a factor in which indie artists are featured as “Groop of the Day.” “What we’re doing is solving a problem for artists that want to get their name out there, but they

don’t really know how,” said Bratt. “What we do is we’re giving them a platform that gives them our entire audience’s attention for however long the promotion is. Whether it’s one to four days, they have the entire audience’s attention, and that’s really hard to come by.” For the most part, members of indie bands often grapple with fulltime jobs on top of playing their music and don’t have time to publicize themselves. In exchange for GroopEase getting their tunes out there, bands will sell their music for cheaper than normal. GroopEase can be a tool for students to stay in the know about the latest trends in music, but it’s also a way to discover bands that one wouldn’t normally hear on the radio. “People love to know about these new bands so

In the real world, there’s always going to be two groups of people: the people who know about stuff first, and the people who know about stuff later, and we’re trying to create as large a group as possible of people who know about stuff first. Andrew Bratt Co-founder of GroopEase

that they can be the one who tells their friends, ‘Hey, do you know about this band?’ and their friends say ‘No,’ and they’re like, ‘Well, check them out,’ ” said Bratt. “There are a lot of people who really value that. It’s really just a way for people who want to know about things first to know

about them.” Another feature that might interest college students is that for every person they invite to use GroopEase, they receive $1 credit when an invitee makes his or her first purchase, which can be used to buy songs on the site. GroopEase is membersonly, but it is completely

free to sign up. “In the real world, there’s always going to be two groups of people: the people who know about stuff first, and the people who know about stuff later,” said Bratt. “And we’re trying to create as large a group as possible of people who know about stuff first.”

Be kind and unwind at Club Downunder Union Productions sponsors an afternoon stress-buster for students

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more from Be Kind, Unwind on April 20. Kristen Alberico/FSView

A student get a free massage at Be Kind, Unwind, at Club Downunder on Wednesday, April 20.

EXTRA LIFE from 5 tured blocks, a first person perspective with your character holding a pickaxe and, of course, the suffix “-craft” in its name—a baffling choice, considering the developer’s intent to prove the game is not just a ported clone. ProjectorGames even claims that they built their own game engine from scratch. Aside from a few negligible differences, and despite ProjectorGames’ protests, FortressCraft’s first chapter is basically a watered-down console version of Minecraft’s Creative mode. Players have a choice of playing single-player mode or joining a server that allows up to four people to build within the same world. For some reason, you’ll spawn in a shallow pool at the top of a tower made up of gray blocks. The first things gamers will notice are the glitchy graphics and frequent lagging. I’m not saying the graphics are bad in particular; they’re actually pretty good by Xbox indie game standards. But the water will mysteriously disappear, then reappear looking somewhat different than before, and sometimes, when you’re breaking or creating blocks, many blocks will become black with neon green lines, making it look like something out of The Matrix while your screen fills with television static, resembling a broken Xbox. Chunks of the environment will also de- and re-

render, as well as bounce up and down into the sky. None of these things really affect your gameplay in a major way, per se, but it can get quite unpleasant and even tiring to look at. Having said that, there are tons of graphical options to play around with in the game, including more technical options, such as render distance and shadow quality, as well as some pretty fun graphical filters, such as the surprisingly impressive outline mode, which makes it seem as though you’re in a Minecraft comic book. As I said before, gameplay is nearly identical to Minecraft’s creation mode, in which you’re given an infinite supply of assorted blocks to build whatever you want. The block variety is severely limited when compared to Minecraft’s, but there should be enough variety in there to spark creativity. With the exception of one block, there is nothing too surprising you wouldn’t already find in Minecraft. That exception, and the one thing that made me say, “Oh, wow, I actually wouldn’t mind if Minecraft stole this idea,” is the simple, yet fun trampoline block. As you would imagine, after placing this on the ground, you can jump on it and perpetually bounce—each bounce higher than the last until you’re soaring into the sky. The other main difference is an assortment of relics, which are items you can

find hidden throughout the map that grant you abilities, such as speed boots, a ray gun and night vision goggles. While these may play a bigger role in subsequent chapters, relics are pretty useless as of now. Sure, you have a ray gun, but without anything to shoot at, its entertainment value fades quickly. It’s hard to write a review about a clone of a game without constantly making comparisons to the original iteration. Quite simply, FortressCraft is not, and will likely never be, even close to the genius that is Minecraft thanks to lack of ingenuity, frequent glitches and questionable physics. If you really don’t have access to anything that could possibly run Minecraft, however, FortressCraft might be worth a shot for $3, though you might want to wait for the next few chapters to be released if you want a game with more variety than placing and breaking blocks.

FORTRESSCRAFT: CHAPTER 1, CREATION Xbox Live Indie Games Developer: ProjectorGames

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ARTS&LIFE

APRIL 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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BRIDESMAIDS from 5

FINALS from 5

at her best friend Lillian’s wedding. Initially thrilled with Lillian’s proposal, our protagonist soon finds that she has a rival for her friend’s affection: the beautiful, rich and virtually flawless Helen (Rose Byrne). Annie retains responsibility to begin with, but after competition gets ugly and metaphorical punches are thrown, difficult decisions need to be made. For the most part, director Paul Feig’s first venture into R-rated comedy is consistently funny and engaging. Wiig’s undeniable knack for physical comedy provides plenty of highlights and the supporting cast is spectacular. In particular, Gilmore Girls star Melissa McCarthy is hilarious as Megan, Lillian’s soon-to-be sisterin-law with pronunciation issues and awkward social skills who joins the rest of the bridesmaids on their misadventures.

BRIDESMAIDS DIRECTOR

Paul Feig STARRING

Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne SCREENPLAY

Annie Mumolo, Kristen Wiig MOVIE STUDIO

Universal Pictures RATED R

HHHHH producer’s best, but it’s far from his worst (Year One takes that dunce crown). Starring Saturday Night Live starlet Kristen Wiig, Bridesmaids tells the story of Annie, a 30-something with relationship issues who’s invited to be maid-of-honor

Sound familiar? That’s because Megan is essentially Alan (Zach Galifianakis) from The Hangover with PMS. Despite her overly apparent influences, the character still works. Where the movie truly falters is in it’s pacing. At roughly two hours, Bridesmaids is far longer than the plot warrants it to be, especially considering most of that time is spent dragging mildly funny gags to merciless lengths. This is a particularly frustrating flaw when considering a little bit of chopping in the editing suite could have easily fixed it up and elevated the entire film. For every great punchline is a series of misfires and dragged on skit-like sequences that really should have been left on the cutting-room floor. To wit, I found myself checking the time regularly. In addition to pacing issues, the film also takes

itself a bit too seriously. The key to making a successful comedy is to find a balance between drama and humor (Knocked Up) or be consistently funny throughout (Anchorman). Bridesmaids never seems to decide what kind of comedy it wants to be. Because the majority of the film is intended for laughs, the various dramatic moments sprinkled throughout are difficult to take seriously. Between sporadic moments of hilarity, Annie’s developing relationship with a highway patrol officer is left underdeveloped and not particularly involving. Overall, Bridesmaids features more laughs per minute than the average chick flick and benefits from a great cast, but poor pacing and an imbalanced tone prevent it from being the female version of The Hangover that it is so desperately hoping to be.

Universal Pictures

‘Bridesmaids’ follows best friends Annie (Kristen Wiig) and Lillian (Maya Rudolph) on a pre-wedding Vegas adventure.

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adequate sleep seems like a tired clichĂŠ, actually following it is easier said than done. Losing sleep is never fun, so imagine being drowsy during a final. Planning time to sleep is vital, according to Magnuson, and if there is no way of getting around an all-nighter, a nap later on is necessary to function properly. Another source of much-needed energy comes from well-balanced meals. This doesn’t mean going on any extreme veggie diet. Rather, it is recommended to avoid “fat-freeâ€? meals and instead opt for foods containing proper fat calories and protein (such as beans, meat, poultry, eggs and nuts) because they are what provide the body with adequate energy to make it through the week. Aside from avoiding certain foods and drinks, Magnuson advises all students to avoid harmful substances. Unless a student has a legitimate prescription, finals week is possibly the least opportune time to experiment with certain attention boosters. “Besides the fact that there is no ‘magic pill,’ some products may have harmful side effects that you don’t need during finals week,â€? Magnuson said. No matter which semester it is, finals week always seems painfully endless; for the sake of one’s sanity, however, keep in mind that it eventually must come to an end and, when it does, Magnuson believes in rewarding oneself. “You’ve studied and worked hard; you deserve a reward,â€? Magnuson said. “Relax and enjoy a semester well-done.â€?

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quiet their growling stomachs. This kind of hunger, however, is the result of a lack of proper nourishment during a time of stress. Magnuson argues that planning meals around study and test times is vital behavior for students to put into practice. “ ‘I forgot to eat’ is not an acceptable excuse,� Magnuson said. If one is going to snack, Magnuson advises to stick to things such as ham-and-cheese or peanut-butter-and-jelly sandwiches, fruit, pretzels, energy bars, veggies and dip, bagels or baked chips. Exercise is often placed at the bottom of a student’s list of priorities during this time, but it can also prove another helpful way to manage stress, as stress hormones naturally release from one’s body through physical activity. Magnuson recommends allowing a break from studying for a short walk, at the very least. While it may be difficult for regular partiers to take a break from the nightlife, in the long run, it’s better to give up alcohol for a week as important as this. “Alcohol can slow your brain activity, dull your thinking and cloud your judgment—enough said,� Magnuson said. Anything containing loads of caffeine is also on the list of drinks to avoid. The seemingly miraculous jolt of energy they provide typically doesn’t last very long and can even make one feel worse after consuming it. Magnuson urges students not to rely on heavy doses of caffeine to replace sleep as it may lead to more serious sleep disorders. This is where sleep comes in. While getting

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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | APRIL 21, 2011


ARTS&LIFE

APRIL 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

5THINGS from 5 terms of academics, so it comes as no surprise, then, that I’m obsessed with the idea of getting a break from it all this summer. Much to my dismay, however, I won’t be basking in the South Florida sun and enjoying drinks by the beach. Instead, I’ll be taking summer classes and working part-time on the side, but that still beats the hectic schedule that is currently taking over my life.

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Sandy Noel is a junior international affairs major, minoring in social welfare. She has had a variety of domestic and international service experiences that have led her to dream about assisting communitybased organizations in developing countries. Photo by Melissa Meschler

Profiles of Service 2011

Sandy Noel

Sandy Noel credits Florida’s high school I learned from service is that I cannot do it all.” Sandy service requirements for her very first experiences learned this lesson most recently when her Habitat in the community. Despite being required to have for Humanity construction project in Ghana was such experiences, serving shortly became habitual left incomplete. “On site, I met Raymond, a worker for her, “the thing to do.” Today, community for Habitat, he told us about his village. He kept service makes up the majority of Sandy’s time and telling us that he felt grateful that we were at least energy. “I serve because I want there to support the villagers to make an impact on my “II bbecause ecau ec ause aus au se I w want ant an nt to to in improving the village. He future, our future.” While knew the houses we were on m on myy building were not going to in college, she has made this impact through a number of fu ffuture, utu turre re, re, . ........ IItt is is aallllll be fishined the day we came. activities, including acting as However, our service helped the Community Ambassador further complete the house. ..”” for the Emergency Care Help It is all about progress.” Organization, mentoring students in the College Sandy’s goal is to eventually work with an Reach Out Program, and serving the Dalits/ international organization that strives to serve and Untouchables of India by helping to add to their advocate for people living in developing countries. women’s center construction projects and mentoring She wants to empower residents in rural and lowteenage girls that lived in their village. income regions and promote community-based “I have learned and gained innumerable skills organizations. from service. Learning is never-ending,” Sandy Written by Taylor Newsome expressed. But, she says, “The most significant thing

serve serve make m ake a an n impact impact oour ur ffuture uture about a bout progress progress

T learn To learn ear ar more mor m re about about o community ou communit comm omm m unit mm uni y service servic rvic rv rvi i e opportunities op pport portunit po unitie nities ies e and and d the th he Student Stu Stud tud udeent en en nt Profiles Profi ofi files les le e off Service Servi e cce Award, Award ward, contact wa ward, coontac n act nta nt a t the the Center th Ceenter nte t for fo Leadership Lead Lea ders ders ersh hip hip p&C Ci Civic vi vic Education Educ Ed Edu ducatio ation atio tion at 644-3342 644 64 4 -334 334 3342 342 or htt http://thecenter.fsu.edu. h ht tp:// p //thec p:/ th h ente he enterr.fs en r ffsu.ed u eed du. For For alte alternative a lte ternat rn rnat native ivee form ive format, fo at, please at ple p plea lease lea se email email mai the thecenter@admin.fsu.edu. h cent center@a ter@a er@admin @admin dmin.fsu dmi ffssu.edu ed du..

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TOURNEY TURNAROUND? M e n’s t e nni s l o o k s t o r i ght t he i r si nk i ng shi p a s t he A C C t o ur na m e nt k i ck s o f f T hur sda y PAGE 11 FSView & Florida Flambeau

APRIL 21, 2011

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 0

’Noles easily dispose of FGCU Strong pitching performance fuels victory over Eagles ERIC ZERKEL Staff Writer On the heels of a wild and wacky Atlantic Coast Conference series win over Virginia Tech this past weekend that featured 30mile per hour winds and two Seminole rallies for victories, Florida State took a welcomed break from the drama, cruising to a 13-2 victory over Florida Gulf Coast Tuesday night at Dick Howser Stadium. The Seminoles (27-10) used solid pitching from starter Gary Merians and a hitting frenzy from a slew of batters to overcome the Eagles. Merians struck out four batters while allowing four hits and one earned run through four innings of work. “I thought our pitching was pretty good tonight, and when you don’t make an error, you certainly feel good,” Florida State head coach Mike Martin said. “We were able to get a lot of guys in the ball game. We haven’t had a game like this in a long time.” The No. 10 Seminoles jumped out to an early 4-1

lead through the first two innings. In the first inning, first baseman Jayce Boyd brought home Mike McGee and Devon Travis with a double to right-center field. In the second, doubles by Parker Brunelle and Sherman Johnson each brought runners across the plate to add to the Seminoles’ lead. After a mild third inning, the Seminoles responded with an eight-run scoring assault over the fourth and fifth innings, silencing any hope for the beleaguered Eagles (19-18). A series of mistakes by the Florida Gulf Coast pitching staff opened up the game in the fourth inning. Eagle pitcher Harrison Cooney hit James Ramsey with a pitch with the bases loaded to score a run, then issued a walk to the ensuing batter, Justin Gonzalez, to score another. Cooney then brought home another Seminole base runner with a wild pitch. Taiwan Easterling capped off the inning with a two-run double to stretch Florida State’s lead to 9-1, giving FGCU very little hope in mounting a comeback. Batters continued to con-

nect in the fifth inning on the FSU side. Ramsey brought home Johnson with an single to left field. Gonzalez followed up Ramsey’s effort by plating two base runners with a single of his own to left field, extending the lead out to 11 runs at 12-1. After the fifth, the Seminoles used a strong relief effort from a host of pitchers to further silence the Florida Gulf Coast batters. David Trexler pitched two innings of relief, allowing no hits and striking out four batters while Robert Benincasa and Tye Buckley each pitched one inning, while striking out two batters. In total, Florida State pitchers struck out 12 batters and allowed just two earned runs. The game marked the first meeting between the two teams since 2009, when the Seminoles topped the Eagles 11-3 and 11-9 in a two-game series sweep. Game two of the short series begins Wednesday night at 6 p.m. at Dick Howser Stadium. For a complete recap of Wednesday night’s game and continuing coverage of Florida State baseball, check fsunews.com.

Zachary Goldstein/FSView

Jayce Boyd and his fellow Seminoles handled their business against the Florida Gulf Coast Eagles, winning by a wide margin on Tuesday night.

Krikorian praises team for strong spring Florida State soccer coach talks spring season, looks ahead to fall SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer

Nikki Unger-Fink/FSView

With a number of key players returning from last season’s team, head coach Mark Krikorian and the Seminoles have high expectations for 2011.

Florida State soccer coach Mark Krikorian took some time on Tuesday afternoon to talk about his team’s progress after the ’Noles wrapped up spring practice this week. Krikorian sounded very pleased with his team’s performance since the beginning of spring practice back on Feb. 26. “It’s been a very good spring,” Krikorian said. “Our players worked very hard, maybe harder than we’ve ever worked here in the spring before.” Krikorian believes that spring is a crucial time for player development, and this year was especially

Surging Seminoles ready for postseason Women’s tennis hopes to ride wave of momentum into ACC Championships HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer A recent surge in momentum has produced a discernible change in the Florida State women’s tennis team’s swagger. After enduring a season filled with injuries and adversity in the competitive Atlantic Coast Conference, the Seminoles now emerge with a particular bounce in their step and hold a confidence that they can hang with anybody as they prepare for the upcoming ACC Championships. “We are on a wave of momentum unlike any we’ve ever had before,” a smiling head coach Jennifer Hyde said. “The girls are compet-

ing like absolute warriors right now, and I think we are in the perfect mindset heading into the ACCs.” The No. 18 Seminoles (12-7, 7-4 ACC) head into this weekend’s ACC Championships after having knocked off two of the top four teams in the nation in No. 4 North Carolina and No. 3 Duke, which are the most recent additions to their longest winning streak of the season. Florida State typically fares pretty well at the ACC Championships. The Seminoles hold an all-time 21-19 record, and have reached the conference semifinals in the past three tournaments. Last season, the Semi-

noles advanced past Maryland in the first round and then shocked No. 10 Duke, but eventually lost to topranked North Carolina in the semifinals. As most sports fans know, however, the postseason brings an entirely different perspective on where a team stands. “There is not a weak link in this conference,” said Hyde. “We just have to keep our heads down, and we have to stay humble and take those last few big wins and put them in our back pockets.” The ACC makes a strong case for the most difficult conference in the NCAA, SEE TENNIS 13

important given that the Seminoles had three early enrollees—the most in program history—participating in spring drills in Connor Zwetsch, Jamia Fields and Kristen Grubka. To take full advantage of the spring window, the team added a new element to its preparations: position-specific drills that were run on top of the usual team-oriented practices that ensured maximum player development. “Not only have we done some work in terms of the team tactics, but two days a week, we did a little extra work with specific areas of technical development with players,” Krikorian said. “I think we saw great

improvement from those players in those areas.” One player who stood out especially was midfielder Tori Huster. “I think Tori Huster has been very sharp,” Krikorian said. “It seems as though she gets better and better. [She] spent a lot of time doing some work in the weight room. She is very quick, very agile, but she is kind of slight, and I think that she has made some physical gains. […] She could be very good for us next year.” After finishing last year tied for second in the conference, the ’Noles will return six All-ACC players in 2011. On top of the returning All-ACC standouts, Flori-

da State will benefit from the return of All-American juniors Jessica Price and Tiffany McCarty, who both suffered season-ending injuries last season. “It’s nice to see Jessica Price and Tiff McCarty back on the field,” Krikorian said. “Obviously, they were two huge holes for us to have to fill last year. Fortunately, some of the other players stepped forward, took responsibility and did a good job. […] But when you take 33 or 35 goals they scored between the two of them and put them on the bench, that’s a pretty good-sized void.” FSU participated in five SEE SOCCER 11

FSU eyes critical series with Terrapins Softball looks to continue winning ways this weekend against Maryland

NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports So much in the world of sports is based on momentum: how hot your team is at any given moment, how confident that streak makes you, and how long you can ride that wave, and right now Florida State softball is on fire. The Seminoles (2521, 7-7 Atlantic Coast Conference) have won eight of their last nine games—including seven in a row—and haven’t

dropped a conference game since losing the second game of a doubleheader to Virginia on April 9. Supplement that outstanding team effort with the great individual performances of Sarah Hamilton, who broke the school’s career strikeout record on Saturday, and Shayla Jackson, who finished last weekend with eight RBI, and the Seminoles are on quite a roll. When the ’Noles meet Maryland (30-13, 5-4) in Tallahassee on Saturday, April 23, they aren’t exactly running into the class of the conference. By virtue of having played fewer games in conference than the Seminoles, Maryland is

ahead of Florida State in the conference standings based on their higher winning percentage, but two of those wins came against cellar-dweller Virginia, and the other three came against Boston College, a team Florida State also swept this season. In terms of offense, Maryland ranks near the middle of the pack in most statistical categories, and when they face elite pitching, they tend to struggle. When the Terrapins faced the conference’s second-best pitching staff, Georgia Tech, Maryland was only able to muster five runs in three games. SEE TERRAPINS 11


APRIL 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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‘Go time’ for the Seminoles Men’s tennis faces possible do-or-die situation in ACC Tournament HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer After facing a rather tough schedule, including the numerous close 4-3 matches they dropped, the No. 44 FSU men’s tennis team (9-13, 4-7 Atlantic Coast Conference) still has a chance to make a postseason run with a strong performance in the ACC Tournament. Many believe the Seminoles have dug themselves a hole, as their schedule was among one of the hardest in the nation. They have played 10 matches against teams ranked in the top 25, including one against top-ranked Virginia and two against thirdranked USC. “I think we might have over-scheduled a bit this year, but that tough schedule has generally worked for us,� said head coach Dwayne Hultquist. “Hopefully the committee takes into effect that we’ve played all those top25 teams and most of our losses are in that range. “We could have played directional schools, or

lower-ranked schools, or schools unranked altogether, but we’ve taken on the top teams and ultimately, I think that’s the right thing.� Among those matches against top-25 teams, the Seminoles lost three consecutive games in the seventh and deciding point. Each of those matches were lost by underclassmen and were played in the first half of the spring season. Since then, the Seminoles have seen a remarkable jump in play from their younger players. Sophomore Jordan Kelly-Houston has won his last four singles matches, with three of the wins coming in straight sets. He is 7-4 in ACC singles play, and 5-2 in doubles since teaming up with freshman Blake Davis. Davis has been key for the Seminoles, as he typically occupies the third or fourth court. His status for this weekend is uncertain, however, as he is battling through an elbow injury. Leading the Seminoles is none other than Vahid

Mirzadeh, who has been the Seminoles’ most consistent player. He leads the team with a 21-10 singles record, which includes a 10-match winning streak he posted earlier in the season. He and sophomore Connor Smith make up the No. 12 doubles team in the nation, who are 19-8 this season and 8-3 in ACC play. Joining Mirzadeh is Clint Bowles, who is ranked No. 99 in singles. Bowles has typically provided strong performances for the Seminoles, as he is one singles win away from being second all-time in school history for that category. Bowles has struggled as of late, however, losing nine of his last 11 matches. “Clint always comes through in big matches, and I expect him to do the same this season,� Hultquist said of the twotime All-ACC team member. “He’s a ‘big-match player,’ and I expect that title to follow him.� Bowles has picked up rather impressive wins in his Seminoles career: he

quarterfinal appearances for the ’Noles, expectations will be high once again entering 2011. “The expectations are always high here,� Krikorian said. “If we aren’t competing to go to the Final Four, then it’s not Florida State.� Krikorian leaves the

spring with a sense of optimism, knowing his team has the pieces in place to make a serious postseason run. Even still, he believes ole’ Lady Luck will still play a role—albeit a small one—in determining just how far his team goes in 2011.

clinched in a 3-3 match against Georgia to go to the Finals Site, has earned a win over Pepperdine when they were ranked in the top 10, and picked up three straight singles wins in the third-set this year against Florida, Texas and Miami. “[Clint] just needs to have the right mindset coming in,� said Mirzadeh of the fellow senior. “He’s that established and that talented of a player to where he can just turn that switch and become dominant again.� The eighth-seeded Seminoles open tournament play against the ninthseeded Maryland Terrapins (11-11, 3-8), a team also competing for a spot in the NCAA Tournament. In their last meeting, the Seminoles won 4-3 after Mirzadeh clinched the match on Senior Day. “I think we do [control our own destiny],� said Hultquist. “Maryland’s another bubble team, so if we beat them twice in the same season, we should be in good position to clinch an NCAA bid.�

Joseph La Belle/FSView

The FSU men’s tennis team is anxious to get postseason play started with the ACC Championships.

SOCCER from 10 spring scrimmages against the likes of Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, LSU and the Atlanta Beat of Women’s Professional Soccer. The Seminoles finished with a record of 3-1-1 in those exhibition matches, falling only to the Beat. After six-straight NCAA

“You can prepare for everything and feel that you have every contingency looked after, but at the end of the day, there’s still that small percentage of luck that will make a difference for you,� Krikorian said. “If we have good luck, it could be a very special season.�

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TERRAPINS from 10 Just behind Georgia Tech’s second-place 2.03 team ERA is Florida State, led by the senior Hamilton, who is 15-13 on the season with a 1.74 ERA and 231 strikeouts. Additionally, teams are batting a lowly .174 against her. Rising in the ranks on the Seminole pitching staff is redshirt freshman Jessica Nori, who threw six innings and earned her fifth win of the season against Boston College. Look for Nori to continue to make contributions from the circle, especially during this series. If Florida State’s pitching can control the game like it has done in recent

(Near Red Lobster) contests, they should easily be able to silence the Maryland bats. With GT and FSU two and three in the conference in ERA, resepctively, the top spot is reserved for the Terrapins, who have a team ERA of 1.74 and an opponent’s batting average of .177. Maryland also has the most strikeouts by a staff in the conference with 362. The Terrapins share the load between three aces on their staff: Ashley Czechner, Kerry Hickey and Kendra Knight, with Czechner and Hickey in the double-digit win column and all three pitchers having recorded more

than 100 strikeouts this season. The Seminole bats will have to be active, and the FSU hitters might have to play a little bit of small ball to produce runs against the tough Maryland pitching staff, as runs could prove hard to come by. The ’Noles rank third in the conference in stolen bases with 72 and may have to utilize their speed on the base paths to put runs on the board. If Florida State can put some early runs on the board against the stout Maryland pitching staff, their aces should have no trouble sewing up some wins. Look for FSU to protect their home turf

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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | APRIL 21, 2011


SPORTS

APRIL 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

SPORTSBRIEFS

ACC

Date set for ACC men’s golf championship The Atlantic Coast Conference announced Tuesday that the ACC men’s golf championship will take place April 20-22 at the Old North State Club in New London, N.C. It is the 10th straight year the Old North State Club has hosted the event, and the 15th time overall. The course is a par-72 and is a total distance of 7,102 yards. Last year, it was Georgia Tech who conquered the course and the competition by winning the team championship for a second consecutive season, giving them four conference titles in the last five years. Chesson Hadley led the charge for the Yellow Jackets, earning medalist honors by shooting a 10-under 206 for the three-day AP Photo event. Florida State has tasted Terrance Jones is one of three Wildcats that are NBA bound. success at the Old North ers have signed with an State Club as well. It is NCAA agent, however, leaving where the Seminoles the option open for them claimed their first and to return to school after only conference champitesting the waters of the onship back in 2008. FSU will be looking to repeat draft. Liggins, Knight and the success of that seaJones helped lead the son, led by senior standWildcats to their first Fi- out and All-American canKentucky men’s basket- nal Four in 13 years this didate Drew Kittleson. The first ever ACC golf ball coach John Calipari past season before loshas developed a reputa- ing to eventual champion championship was held in tion of being one of the Connecticut. Knight and 1954. In that tournament, nation’s best recruiters. Jones were the team’s Duke took home the team In the modern era of col- leading scorers at 17.5 crown, but it was Wake lege basketball, that rep- and 15.3 points per game, Forest’s Arnold Palmer utation comes with the respectively, while Lig- who won stood atop the leaderboard expectation that many gins averaged 8.6 points individual of the recruited players per game and shot 39 per- at the end of the tournament. won’t be in a college uni- cent from 3-point range. It is the second time unform for very long before taking their talents to the der Calipari that Kentucky FSU has had multiple freshprofessional level. That expectation ap- men declare for the draft. pears to hold true for Cali- In 2010, Calipari’s first pari again after his second season, the Wildcats lost season in Lexington, as ju- the services of John Wall, nior DeAndre Liggins and DeMarcus Cousins and freshmen Brandon Knight Daniel Orton to the NBA and Terrance Jones each after just one season. All declared themselves eli- three players went on to Coming off the progible for the NBA Draft be first-round selections, gram’s first Sweet 16 with Wall being the top appearance since in 18 Wednesday morning. None of the three play- overall pick. years, the Florida State

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men’s basketball team will welcome a new assistant coach to the bench for what they hope will be an even more successful 2011-12 season. Dennis Gates, whose most current coaching stop was at Nevada, will be the new addition to head coach Leonard Hamilton’s staff, as was announced Tuesday afternoon. Gates brings with him a bevy of coaching experience, which includes a stint with the NBA’s Los Angeles Clippers, where he worked extensively with players in skill development. “Dennis Gates is a great addition to our staff,” Ham-

ilton said. “He is familiar with our system and has been a successful coach and recruiter at three very strong programs during a relatively short beginning to his coaching career. [...] Dennis’ experiences have allowed him to develop into a solid coach and an outstanding teacher who has built a national recruiting base that will help our program continue to attract players who will help to raise our national profile.” Gates has proven success with coaching offense, something the Seminoles have been inconsistent with in recent years. In

2009, Gates helped Nevada finish in the top-15 nationally in scoring and field goal percentage while breaking school singleseason records for scoring and field goals made and attempted in the process. Gates’ familiarity with the FSU program stems from his experience as a graduate assistant under Hamilton during the 200405 season. In his only season in Tallahassee, Gates helped coach future NBA players Al Thornton, Alexander Johnson and Von Wafer. — Compiled by Brett Jula

For anything more painful than exams.

Three UK players declare for NBA Draft

Seminoles add Gates to men’s basketball staff

TENNIS from 10 as it currently features six teams ranked in the top16 and has won two of the last four national championships. The fifth-seeded Seminoles open the tournament against 12th-seeded Wake Forest (6-15, 0-11), a team the Seminoles defeated 6-1 earlier this season. The Seminoles picked up two ranked wins in that match, including senior Katie Rybakova’s 6-3, 6-1 win over then-No. 24 Martina Pavelec, and Federica Suess and Noemie Scharle’s point-clinching win over then-No. 14 Kathryn Talbert and Kayla Duncan. Pavelec comes into this weekend’s match at No. 37, with Talbert and Duncan ranked 21st. Rybakova’s win in that match was part of her team-leading 21-13 record

in singles on the season. Her 21st win came in last weekend’s match against Duke’s No. 38 Nadine Fahoum, which counted as her 100th career singles win, ranking her fourth all-time at Florida State. Also among the Seminole elite is the fellow senior Suess, who has 102 career singles wins and is just one win away from holding the all-time school record. Rybakova is currently ranked at No. 35 and is also 7-4 in ACC singles matches. Joining her is No. 56 Scharle, and the No. 81 doubles team in Francesca Segarelli and Ruth Seaborne, who are 11-7 this spring. While the road through the ACC is an arduous one, coach Hyde will be the first person to respect the process of hard work

Melina Vastola/FSView

Federica Suess is just one of the many contributors to the success of the Seminole women’s tennis team. FSU opens the ACC Championships Thursday against Wake Forest.

and resiliency—two things on which the Seminoles pride themselves. “The giant’s been sleeping, and the last two weekends’ play has finally woken us up,” Hyde said. “The team is finally seeing the reward of all the hard work they put in and everything they have bought into. Everything they’ve been waiting for is finally coming together.”

13

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‘That’s just, like, your opinion, man ...’ The editorials and cartoons within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the writer or illustrator. Any opinion that appears in the newspaper is exclusively that of the writer or illustrator and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers.

Have something to tell us? FSView & Florida Flambeau

APRIL 21, 2011

To subit a letter to the editor, shoot us a line via e-mail: managing_ editor@fsview.com. Please include full name, year in school, city and state.

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PA G E 1 5

Making sense of education HEATHER MCQUEEN Staff Writer As the end of the semester draws near, as well as the impending lack of sleep and marathons of studying for finals, I am more aware than ever of just how critical and fleeting this period of time really is. After all, I am graduating at the end of this month. But while considering these upcoming bouts of sleeplessness, caffeine highs and cumulative exams, I have also considered the purpose of it all—attending college, that is—and, no, I’m not going to get philosophical and ponder the meaning of life, so continue read-

ing. Many people throw around the word “education” with the apparent understanding that everyone defines the word in the same way. I, for one, am guilty of this. (See my March 28 article titled “In defense of teachers, and education,” for example.) It’s difficult to define it for anyone, but as students, it seems necessary that we make a concerted effort to gradually define and understand this abstract term over the course of our schooling, so that we may never cease to welcome the prospect of learning. In the news lately, there have been disputes regarding teachers’ pay, professors’ tenure, length of academic terms, budgets and funding—the list goes on. Yet there are various ideologies at play that are causing these conflicts. The fluidity of

the term “education” also contributes to this lack of consensus, which is understandable, as there are differing conceptions about what education is, what it should be doing and what students should be preparing for. Additionally, a recent article published in The New York Times has drawn attention to the debate over the validity and usefulness of specific majors, and in particular, business majors. The article suggested that the business major is the most commonly chosen major for undergraduates, yet study habits and preparation for realworld careers seems to be lacking. Though this is a generalization and the article is more thoroughly detailed, the premise remains that there is an apathy and a lack of enthusiasm in this generation’s college students.

What is unfortunately unavoidable, however, is the automatic comparison of majors and degrees, and thus their difficulty, easiness, applicability and overall significance to the world outside of academia. I would not doubt that close to every student has heard some form of argument (i.e., insecurity) being voiced, no matter what major or college the student belonged to. For many, it helps to ease the uncertainty of what occurs post-graduation, and specifically, helps to defend the majors that supposedly earn the most money. But consider this: Why are you here? It’s a daunting question, one that could be answered in a variety of ways—or perhaps none at all. But this is something that we must consider as

students. There is a difference between education and just getting a degree because it is a gateway to a high-paying job, which is honestly unlikely for many of us right now. There is also a difference between education and attending college simply because it is the next step in the series of expectations dictated by society. Going through the motions is doing a disservice to oneself, because without passion and purpose, there seems to be no real payoff. FSU—and the university setting in general— is intended to foster the development of its students—intellectually, socially and emotionally, among others. But this ideal is often undermined or forgotten for one reason or another. It is possible that the emphasis on quantitative factors (i.e., grades,

GPA, et cetera) is often weighed more heavily by society than the qualitative factors (personal growth, development, exploration, et cetera). But, if that is the case, what are we to do as students? Remember that there are opportunities to be had in the social and cultural aspects of the university via extracurricular activities, though a disconnect remains: There is passivity in the classroom setting, yet excessive activity outside. But if there were more interconnectedness of all aspects of the university, a broader conception of education could be fostered, allowing for growth toward the betterment of society. So, does that leave me with a definition of education? Hardly—but if there is no intrinsic value to your education, I once again pose the question: Why are you here?

Potential 2012 GOP candidates stand out Look at It This Way by Daniel Ackerman

CHAD SQUITIERI Staff Writer The November 2012 elections are not until another 19 months, but already some possible Republican contenders have been making their way into the headlines as potential presidential candidates to take on President Obama and the Democrats for the White House. Picking out which potential candidate will win the Republican nomination next year would just be pure speculation at this point in time. However, it is important to start reading up on the frontrunners. Donald Trump, who is perhaps the most well known of all the potential candidates, has been dropping hints that he would attempt to run for several weeks now. What Trump appears to be waiting for in officially declaring himself as a candidate is for the season of his hit television show The Apprentice to come to an end. If Trump were to officially start campaigning as a presidential candidate, The Apprentice would have to be taken off the air, something Trump has said would be unfair to NBC. Trump has slowly but surely started creating a platform to run on, including repealing President Obama’s health care law and fixing America’s economy by no longer allowing foreign investors

such as China and OPEC to take advantage of America’s current trade policies. United States representative from Texas Ron Paul also appears to be a frontrunner. Paul, who ran for the GOP nomination in 2008, could potentially receive much support from the Tea Party movement sweeping the nation. Paul has long believed in small and limited government, a key value of the Tea Party movement. Paul is sometimes referred to as “Dr. No” because of his vow to never vote in favor

Letter to the Editor Israel, Palestine and freedom of speech It should be no surprise that the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution is dedicated to the notion of free speech. One of the foundations of our country that ensures a free society is the ability for one to state their opinion. This leads to a free flow exchange of ideas so that all sides of an issue may be debated and fully

analyzed. It was with the greatest of pride that I had the honor of partaking in the great American tradition of expressing my opinion when I sent in a letter to the editor on April 11. In that letter, I did express my passionate beliefs about the true nature of certain aspects of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. My comments were intended to bring attention to the fact that the

of any legislation unless Congress is authorized to do so in the Constitution. Mitt Romney, who also made a run for the Republican Presidential nomination in 2008, is counting on his career in business as well as experience as a former governor of Massachusetts to put him above the rest for the 2012 nomination. In a video released by Romney just last week, the former governor mentioned some of the current economic problems Americans are facing, and pointed out how

“President Obama and virtually all of the people around him have never worked in the real economy,” and “just don’t know how jobs are created in the private sector.” In the video, Romney then points out that the private sector is where he spent much of his career. Unlike some of the other potential candidates, former Governor of Minnesota Tim Pawlenty has not been afraid to place himself in the middle of national media attention. Attending meetings with College Republicans, Tea Party rallies and

even playing ice hockey in Minnesota, Pawlenty seems to be serious about starting his run for the presidency sooner rather than later. Pawlenty, who was elected twice as a Republican governor in Minnesota, a progressive state, was thrust into the national spotlight in 2008 when he was declared as a finalist to run on the McCain ticket as vice president. Pawlenty seems to see the economy as one of the biggest issues of the 2012 election, and has continually stated that spending needs to be reined in and

has criticized Obama for his lack of urgency in fixing the economy. In addition to the potential candidates just mentioned, there are many other names to look out for in 2012. Mike Huckabee, Sarah Palin, Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Michelle Bachman are all also potential candidates. I urge everyone, despite his or her political party, to start reading up on these potential candidates, and any others of importance, in order to be prepared to make an educated decision in 2012.

manner in which certain segments of the Palestinian community conducts itself endangers its own people while pursuing unjustified and inhumane attacks on the citizens of the state of Israel. While I was writing as a counterpoint to the points made in a letter by Mr. Gabriel Paez, the expression of my countervailing opinion was apparently taken as a personal attack. That is unfortunate. Specifically it is unfortunate that Mr. Paez took my words

as a personal attack, instead of recognizing the fact that I was addressing some very important and troubling issues. It is also unfortunate that Mr. Paez, instead of engaging in intellectual discourse on difficult issues that affect many, has chosen instead to personify this debate and to engage in an aggressive personal attack on me through various mediums ranging from Facebook to the FSView & Florida Flambeau. There are no easy an-

swers to the struggles that engulf all aspects of the Middle East. The divide that has existed between the Palestinian and Israeli people has spanned many generations. If there is one certainty that has proven true, directed attacks instead of meaningful dialogue will only continue to pour oil on the flames of discontent. I am pleased that the recent exercise of First Amendment freedoms through the FSView pages have brought this debate to

the forefront of the attention of many. I am disappointed that Mr. Paez has seized upon this exercise of freedom of speech as a platform for an offensive and over-the-top personal attack. I can only hope that, upon further reflection, he will join me in engaging in a respectful dialogue on the true issues that pervade the daily lives of my extended Israeli family and the Palestinian people. —Harrison DuBosar


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BURT REYNOLDS 215 HAYDEN RD 1BR/1BA FROM $475 5766758 MGR OVER 100 HOUSES AND TOWNHOMES REGIONALPROPERTYSERVICES.COM

8932500 The Cottages @ Country Club Unfurnished 3br/3ba with Washer/ Dryer in each home $325.00 per B/R or $850 all total. Manager 850-224-0980 Walking distance to FAMU. Now leasing for fall, too. firstpropertyservices.com

For updates on events, pricing, and specials “Like” us at www.facebook.com/commonsfsu Follow us on Twitter @ TheCommonsFL 1325 W Tharpe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32303 ( 850) 523-1000

$300 off 1st Month’s Rent! DUPLEX

312 Mayo St 3BR House $1350

2184 Timberwood Cir 3/2.5 Townhouse $1000

1892 Pepperhill Ct 3BR House $975

Savannah Crossing 3/3 Starting at $1050

1605 Sunset Lane 3BR House $1050

2412 Almond Dr 3/2 House $1050 Town & Country

214 Westridge Dr 3BR House $1250

1951 Flipper 4/3 House $1200

850-521-0306

Scenic Heights 4BR $1300-$1700 5/3 $2500

Walk to class! 414 Fairbanks

2301 Geri Ann 3/3 House $1350 Like new! 4/3 House $2000 Close to FSU/ FAMU!

FSU Graduation Tickets, April 29th, 7:30PM NEED 5 EXTRA TICKETS FOR GRADUATION. WILL PAY $25.00 A TICKET!!!!! 1-561-704-9246 Email chuckmancuso@mail.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO CHECK

Omnimerc $18 starting. College students. Flexible schedule. Conditions apply. Submit resume/inquiry to career@omnimerc.com

OUT ALL OF

TIMBER RIDGE CAMPS We are a traditional summer camp in West Virginia. We are looking for both male and female counselors. Visit www.trcamps.com or call 410-833-4080 for more information.

OUR ADS GO GREEN! RECYCLE YOUR NEWSPAPER TODAY!

http://www.CommonsFSU.com

192 Botany Dr 3BR House 3129 Allison Marie $1250 3/3 Townhouse $875 www.fi www.fi rstpropertyservices.com rstpropertyservices.com 813 Buena Vista Dr 2403 Hartsfield Rd 3/3 Townhome $925 3BR House Hartsfield Green! $1350

1315 Pinellas 3/3 Duplex $960

TICKETS

www.fsunews.com/classifieds

Callen Woods 3/2 House $800-$960

KINGSTON SQUARE

HAYDEN ARMS 319 HAYDEN RD 1BR/1BA FROM $435 8932500 MGR

Fully furnished • Individual leases • Internet • Cable w/HBO • Computer Center • 24 Hr Fitness Center • Full size washer/dryer • Lighted basketball court • Resort-style pool and jacuzzi • Game lounge • Sand volleyball court • Tanning bed

1102-G Greentree Ct 2/2 Apartment $770

Carolina Terrace 2/2 Townhome $950

Townhouse 2BR 2.5BA W/D 2-car garage, security gate. Walk to stadium. $825 mo. 1 mo. Dep. 1 yr lease. Avail. 8-1. No pets. 933-6960

Earn Extra Money Students needed ASAP. Earn up to $150 per day being a Mystery Shopper. No Experience Required. Call 1-877-758-2859

850-644-1598

Nena Hills Dr 3/3, 1 Car Garage $990-$1100

Wanted: 29 Serious People to Work from Home using a computer Up to $1,500-$5,000 Part-time/Full-time www.yes2homebiz.com

day potential. No Experience necessary. Training provided. Age 18+ ok. 800-965-6520 ext 135

115 N Lipona 2/1 Apt $650 Close to FSU!

Wolf Creek Town Homes

Walk to FSU! 4br/2ba, tile floors W/D, sec sys., pest control, lawn maintainence, ample off-street parking 716 W. Brevard. $1200/mo 443-2649

Bartenders wanted $250 a

2/1 Quad $650 CLASSIFIEDS Myers Park!

W Tennessee Street 3/3, pet friendly $1250

MISCELLANEOUS

<Mens Gymnastics Coaches needed with experience at Trousdell Gymnastics Center. Call 891-4908 after 1pm for info.>

CONDOS CONDOS FOR FOR RENT RENT

ADVERTISE IN1208 S Gadsden

University Green TownHomes

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

1817 S Gadsden 2/1.5 Townhouse $615

FOR RENT

PAGE 16

www.firstpropertyservices.com

2625 B Graves Rd Cute 2/1, hardwood floors in wooded setting off Old Bainbridge $590 334 E. Palmer Ave Cute 2/1, hardwood floors, W/D, covered parking, $750

TOWNHOUSE The Edge 2/2.5,W/D, high speed internet and security systems paid by owner, walk to campus, (827 Richmond) $750 Pre-leasing for Fall

2629 Old Bainbridge Rd. 3/2 $1200/mo 1423 Devils Dip 3/2 $1200/mo 719 E. 6th Ave. 1/1 $650/mo 508 Shephard St. 2/1 $550/mo

Available ASAP 509 W. 6th Ave. 3/2 $900/mo 408 W. 9th Ave. 2/2.5 $800/mo 742 Preston St. 2/1 $550/mo For more details call 850-222-6690 or visit www.rsatlh.com

It’s easier than ever!

3181 Allison Marie Ct $300 off 1st Mo. 3/3, W/D, Big BRs, microwave, $900. Deposit reduction.

HOUSE 11334 Comanche Ln 2/2 Mobile Home w/ big yard, W/D $650 1654 Atkamire cute 3/1, W/D, sec system, newly remodeled bath, corner lot, lawn included, $930 2780 Oak Park Crt 3/2, laminated floors, carpet, fenced yard, all appliances, $950 1110 Missionwood Lane W/D Frence yard & lawn $1200, Ready May

www.spiritrealtyinc.com

877-4343

RSA

Available August 1, 2011

FSView Classifieds are Available online!

1/1 Downtown Condo

Granite Counters, High Ceilings, Wood Floors, Stainless Appliances, Walk to Doak, Capitol, FSULaw, MedSchool, and more!

LOOKING FOR RELIABLE PART-TIME HELP FOR YOUR BUSINESS? PLACE AN AD IN THE FSVIEW HELP WANTED SECTION

CALL 850.644.5163 850.644.1598 CLASSIFIEDS@FSVIEW.COM

Email cliftongilchrist@gmail.com

For Complete Listing Visit

dardenrealestate.net

906-0800 Hillside Apartments 2BR/2BA @ $415 per bdr. Short Term Lease Available. Free Satellite TV & Internet. On-site manager 513-1515 600 Eugenia St. across from FAMU. firstpropertyservices.com

Share a 3 bedroom apartment across from FSU Music building Available now or summer session. Call Jon 407-921-9966

TOWNHOMES FOR RENT 2BR/2.5BA CLOSE TO FSU & TCC! W/D, SECURITY SYSTEM, FULL KITCHEN, FIREPLACE, MANY EXTRAS! 850-508-7944

1 bedroom apartment across from the FSU Music Building. Available now, summer session or fall.

Call Jon 407-921-9966 3BR/1BA Near colleges & Stadium. 608 Kyle St. $825/mo. Avail Aug 1 Wood floors, W/D, CHA. Call 850-443-9582 June or 850-566-6564 John Go to fsunews.com/classifieds to look for more ads.

ADVERTISE ADVERTISE IN IN

CLASSIFIEDS 850-644-1598 850-644-1598


Study Break APRIL 21, 2011

PAG E 1 7

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is a 7 -- Move quickly to get a good deal. Devise a plan with your partner or mate. By now you should know how much you can spend. Accept a gift. Follow a strong recommendation. You’re learning fast.

This week’s prize is a gift certificate from

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Today is a 9 -- You have no trouble getting your message across. Keep team communication channels open. Accept a pearl of wisdom from a friend who can guide past fears that have detained you.

What anti-cancer drug was developed at FSU?

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

Today is a 9 -- It’s a good time to ask for money, whether it be a raise, an invoice or a donation for a fundraiser. Use some of what you personally earn to feather your nest.

(850) 561-1605 Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Today is a 9 -You’re entering a highly creative, artistic phase, which advances your career over the next month. Work out a plan for the future you want, and share it with loved ones.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is a 7 -- Stick to the old rules. Good manners get you forward faster. Self-discipline’s the best kind, but don’t let guilt get out of hand. Send support to someone on the leading edge.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is an 8 -Create something beautiful. For the next month, your assets gain value. Helping someone else with their finances is actually fun. Offer advice when asked.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Today is a 9 -- Romance is brewing. Friends help you understand. It may require a compromise or use of your hidden resources. There’s plenty of good work ahead.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is an 8 -- It’s easy to get distracted by financial obligations and forget about loved ones. Find a way to balance it all. Take a walk and give thanks for what you’ve got.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Today is a 7 -- Art and creativity take over. Work/ play with a loved one and you’ll get more satisfaction. Replace something volatile with something secure.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is a 7 -- The next four weeks are good for wrapping yourself in arms of sweet romance. Discuss esoteric subjects with a friend. Loving words come back multiplied.

Aquarius

Word Search: FINALS! P

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(Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is a 7 -- The following four weeks are perfect to fall in love with a research project. Find satisfaction with cost-effective solutions for routines. The work is challenging, but profitable.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is a 7 -- Your words have great power now. Accept well-earned compliments. Study and learn with a partner. Business is good and travel is better. Try a new perspective. Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

Adderall Anxiety Calculator Cheat Sheet

Coffee Final Library Notes

Pencil Practice Redbull Review

Schedule Scrap Paper Sleep Deprived Study

On April 21, 1910, author Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, died in Redding, Conn., at age 74. On this date: In 1509, England’s King Henry VII died; he was succeeded by his 17-year-old son, Henry VIII. In 1649, the Maryland Toleration Act, which provided for freedom of worship for all Christians, was passed by the Maryland assembly. In 1836, an army of Texans led by Sam Houston defeated the Mexicans at San Jacinto, assuring Texas independence. In 1910 Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the German ace known as the “Red Baron,” was killed in action during World War I In 1930, a fire broke out inside the overcrowded Ohio Penitentiary in Columbus, killing 332 inmates. In 1940, the quiz show that asked the “$64 question,” ‘’Take It or Leave It,” premiered on CBS Radio. In 1960, Brazil inaugurated its new capital, Brasilia, transferring the seat of national government from Rio de Janeiro. In 1971, Haitian President Francois “Papa Doc” Duvalier died at age 64; he was succeeded by his son, JeanClaude “Baby Doc” Duvalier. In 1986 a rediscovered vault in Chicago’s Lexington Hotel that was linked to Al Capone was opened during a live TV

special hosted by Geraldo Rivera; aside from a few bottles and a sign, the vault turned out to be empty. Ten years ago: Riot police laid siege to Slobodan Milosevic’s (sloh-BOH’-dahn mee-LOH’shuh-vich-iz) villa in an attempt to bring the former Yugoslav president to justice. But a defiant Milosevic rejected a warrant, reportedly telling police he wouldn’t “go to jail alive.” Five years ago: Auto parts supplier Delphi Corp. unveiled a broad restructuring plan that would cut 8,500 salaried jobs and shut or sell a third of its plants worldwide. Seventy deaths were reported after three strong earthquakes struck western Iran. One year ago: Pope Benedict XVI promised “church action” to confront the clerical abuse scandal. Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger was suspended for six games for violating the NFL’s personal conduct policy. (Commissioner Roger Goodell handed down the punishment after prosecutors decided not to bring charges in a case involving a 20-year-old college student who’d accused Roethlisberger of sexually assaulting her.) Juan Antonio Samaranch, 89, who’d served as president of the International Olympic Committee for 21 years, died in Barcelona, Spain. Former Nuremberg prosecutor Whitney Harris, 97, died in Frontenac, Missouri.

Today’s Birthdays Today’s Birthdays: Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II is 85. Actress-comedian-writer Elaine May is 79. Actor Charles Grodin is 76. Singermusician Iggy Pop is 64. Actress Patti LuPone is 62. Actor Tony Danza is 60. Actress Andie MacDowell is 53. Rock singer Robert Smith (The Cure) is 52. Rock musician Mi-

chael Timmins (Cowboy Junkies) is 52. Actor John Cameron Mitchell is 48. Rapper Michael Franti (Spearhead) is 45. Rock singer-musician Glen Hansard (The Frames) is 41. Comedian Nicole Sullivan is 41. Rock musician David Brenner (Theory of a Deadman) is 33. Actor James McAvoy is 32.

Thought for Today “I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work the more I have of it.” — Stephen Leacock, Canadian economist and humorist (1869-1944). — The Associated Press


S TUD ENT

H OUS ING

400 Putnam Drive 850.402.3800

• Direct Shuttle to FSU, FAMU, TCC • Private Suites with New Furniture including 42” Flat Screen TV’s • Gated Community with Covered Parking • Washer and Dryers, Mini Kitchens and Lounge Area in each Suite • Basketball, Pool, & Fitness Center

1600 Old Bainbridge Rd. 850.222.3696

• Brand New Furniture Package! • Free Shuttle to FSU, FAMU, TCC • 2, 3 and 4 Bedrooms with Washer and Dryer • Gated Community on Bus Route • Awesome Pool and Volleyball • Cable and Internet Included • Direct bill utilities

Apartments

Down Under

2677 Old Bainbridge Rd. 850.514.400

• Free Shuttle all Campuses • 2, 3, and 4 Bedrooms with Washer and Dryer • Cable and Internet Included, Direct Bill Utilities • Pool, Volleyball, Basketball, Fitness Center, and Party Pavilion • Furnished Screened in Porches

VISIT US ONLINE AT: www.tarantinostudenthousing.com

18

Tarantino

...YOU BRING YOUR BALLS

WE’VE GOT THE POOL AND THE NET...

FROM $400

FROM $299

FROM $310

PAGE FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | APRIL 21, 2011

04.21.11  

E-Edition from our April 21, 2011 issue.