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MONDAY MARCH 28-30, 2011

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VOLUME XX ISSUE XXIII

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END OF THE ROAD FSU stung by upsetminded VCU in Sweet 16 SPORTS | 6

Photos by Bryan Vallejo/FSView

Left: Marsha Toi-GB of the Thai Community of Tallahassee stands in front of a booth of displaying typical Thai desserts during the International Bazaar hosted at Oglesby Union Ballrooms on Saturday, March 26. Center: The FSU Belly Dancers entice the audience’s interest with a performance. Right: Children of India Association of Tallahassee members perform a native dance at the bazaar.

Bazaar promotes worldly flair Community exposition encourages cultural awareness

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EMILY OSTERMEYER Contributing Writer The 16th annual International Bazaar was held on Saturday, March 26, at the Florida State University Union Ballrooms. The bazaar was sponsored by the Center for Global Engagement and served as an exposition of food and performances representing various cultural groups in the Tallahassee community. “The purpose is to allow the community to explore, interact with and be exposed to different cultures,” said Steven Rieg, assistant director of Bryan Vallejo/FSView Intercultural Programs at A member of Cuong Nhu Martial Arts Sports Club demonstrates how to break a board the Center for Global Enduring the bazaar. gagement. Among the participating cultural organizations which is affiliated with raise money for the Japa- ganizations in the community and within FSU was the Japanese Com- the Asian Coalition of Tal- nese Red Cross. “We have different or- tabling and doing permunity of Tallahassee, lahasse, which worked to

Students and public employees protest legislation around Florida Staff Writer

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Fighting against budget cuts KARLANNA LEWIS

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formances, doing crafts, raising money for the Japanese relief fund,” said Colleen Seeber, organizer of the event and senior interdisciplinary social sciences major. Seeber is also a part-time employee at the Center for Global Engagement. The event included 11 different performers. Local restaurants catered food that attendants could purchase at $1 per food item. There was also a kids’ corner for entertaining children. “The purpose of it is to kind of just share, share about culture, share about knowledge,” said Seeber. Seeber said that the event provided a fun way for different cultures to appreciate, respect and

Thousands of students and state workers participated in rallies throughout the state of Florida on Friday, March 25, fighting Gov. Scott’s extensive budget reductions. The event, “Fight Back Florida,” organized public workers to protest legislation that will cut funding to different programs. The primary targets of new legislation, like the Teacher Merit Pay Bill, are public workers. “What really made my

blood boil is the fact that this legislature and this governor said that we need to target the people who I consider to be some of the most hardworking people in the state of Florida,” said UF student David Schneider, one of the three founders of Fight Back Florida. “They want to say that the people who are responsible for this economic crisis, the people who should have to bear the full burden are teachers, firefighters, public

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Photos by Bryan Vallejo/FSView

Left: FSU Student Zach Stanton rides an exercise bike for a free pizza at the ‘Kick Butts’ event held on the Union Green. Right: FSU Belly Dancer Alexandra Coughlin dances during the ‘quitting day’ event. The event was held on Thursday, March 24.

A day to clear the smoke Students kick butt in order to ‘Breathe Easy’ RENEE JACQUES Contributing Writer Florida State University’s Breathe Easy organization hosted “Kick Butts Day,” on March 24, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., where different student groups and community

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members set up booths and handed out information about smoking cessation services, quitting tips and other available resources. Relay for Life and the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital were some of the different organiza-

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tions present at the event. The groups held demonstrations on the Union Green that highlighted the medical hazards and effects of smoking cigarettes. One display was of a healthy pig lung and SEE SMOKE 2


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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

FSU aims to ‘Cover the Uninsured’ 850-561-6653 Editorial Fax: 850-574-2485 Advertising Fax: 850-574-6578 General Manager Eliza LePorin 850-561-1600 eleporin@fsview.com EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Adam Clement 850-561-1612 editor@fsview.com Managing Editor J. Michael Osborne 850-561-1613 managing_editor@fsview.com News Editor Jesse Damiani 850-561-1614 news@fsview.com Assistant News Editors Bailey Shertzinger Ana Rebecca Rodriguez Arts & Life Editor Agata Wlodarczyk 850-561-1615 artsandlife@fsview.com Assistant A & L Editors Ana Renee Rodriguez Nicki Karimipour Sports Editor Brett Jula 850-561-1616 sports@fsview.com Assistant Sports Editor Nick Sellers Photo Editor Melina Vastola 850-561-1617 photo@fsview.com Assistant Photo Editors Reid Compton Joseph La Belle Digital and Multimedia Editor Reid Compton 850-561-1617 webeditor@fsview.com Assistant Multimedia Editor Matt Clegg multimedia@fsview.com Assistant Web Editor Duncan Graham ADVERTISING STAFF Eliza LePorin 850-561-1600 National eleporin@fsview.com Kristina Greenlee 850-561-1609 Housing & Auto kgreenlee@fsview.com Emily Bohnstengel 850-561-1601 Retail ebohnsteng@fsview.com Patrick Toban 850-561-1611 Restaurants & Student Organizations ptoban@fsview.com Sales Assistant Corey Calhoon 850-561-1605 salesassistant@fsview.com

to community needs, especially through services to elderly, rural, minority and underserved populations. “There is an overwhelming amount of research demonstrating that folks without insurance live sicker and die quicker,” said Dr. Daniel Van Durme, the chair for the Department of Family Medicine and Rural Health in an earlier interview, on how the mission relates to the goals set forth by “Cover the Uninsured Week.” “At this, point we have over 50 million people who are uninsured in the U.S., not even considering how many people are

underinsured; hopefully, with a week like this, we can emulate these ideals,” said Natalie Williams, a medical student and “Cover the Uninsured Week” coordinator. “My hope is that our week will drive people to action—even if it’s in a small way.” On March 26, FSU’s College of Medicine students and faculty also provided free preventative health screenings at Cascade Village and the Wal-Mart on West Tennessee Street from noon until 4 p.m. Information was also provided to the public about the challenges impacting health care.

cession for those rights and services, because those public goods are being killed in Florida and it’s up to us to make sure that doesn’t happen.” Another set of rallies occurred on March 8. Due to the date conflicting with universities’ spring breaks, however, many of those concerned with education were not able to participate. Upcoming rallies on April 7 and April 15 are additional opportunities for students to make their voices heard. “One of my concerns is the merit pay bill that’s already passed,” said Meri Culp, English and humanities professor at TCC. “I don’t think we’re going to

be able to attract and keep good teachers. I think it’s going to have some repercussions on our students in Florida, and they’re going to come in even more underprepared than they already are, and it’s just kind of a ripple effect.” Shepherd said he believes the current battle between the legislature and education advocates is one that should concern all people, regardless of party affiliation. “It’s not about Republican, Democrat,” Shepherd said. “It’s about anti-students and working people, and pro-students and working people. That should be the line that’s drawn.” Whether it’s by participating in rallies, calling legislators or writing letters, Shepherd said he also believes it is up to citizens to show the government they are not in favor of the ever-shrinking budget policies. “Unfortunately, those who are trying to push forward this legislation that is destroying our democracy have super-majorities in both the House and Senate,” said Shepherd. “That means everything outside the Capitol we have to be completely

united on, and come together to show that what’s going on in there does not represent us.” Shepherd, who hopes to become a teacher, worries that this legislation is encouraging the wrongheaded notion of teaching to standardized tests. Public employees’ unions and student groups have all pledged their support of a petition against the budget cutbacks. According to Shepherd, students who hope to graduate and enter the workforce should be at the frontline of any rallies. “As students, in a very direct way, anything that happens in our society affects us.” said Shepherd. “We’re going to graduate and we’re going to move on to take those jobs that are being destroyed right now.” More than that, with all the reductions, students might also be concerned about whether or not there will still be jobs for them to take. “As students, what’s not to worry about it?” asked Shepherd. “This is our country and we’re going to be the ones running it soon, and I want it to look better when I get there.”

a tobacco-damaged pig lung. Another demonstration displayed a collection of cigarette butts in a box gathered from three different campus buildings. A band and DJ were also present at the event. As the students visited different booths, they were allowed to collect tickets that they could redeem for pizza, cotton candy and popcorn. “It’s pretty cool,” FSU student Bill Tackett said. “I’ve never liked smoke. Coming from the North, where you’re often not allowed to smoke in places, it reminds me of home.” Another major focus point of the event was promoting awareness of FSU’s “Breathe Easy” campaign. “The ‘Breathe Easy’ policy is optional for campus buildings, so if they want to be a ‘breathe easy’ building they must agree to create a ‘breathe easy zone’ that prohibits smokBryan Vallejo/FSView ing within 25-50 feet of A local band performs during Kick Butts Day at the Union the building,” said Breath Green on Thursday, March 24. Easy Outreach Coordinator Ali Polsky. Already, 79 out of 149 and Control, said that use, it is a college campus’ total eligible buildings those who smoke should responsibility to inform on the FSU campus have not be seen as “bad” peo- and educate its students adopted “breathe easy ple, but that they should about these risks. “For us not to do anyzones” and four to five are recognize the impact of in the process of becom- their decision and pre- thing is irresponsible,” vent damaging the health Frentz said. “It’s a public ing “breathe easy.” health responsibility of “Our whole punch line of others. “I’m looking at it from the university, because we is that ‘breathe easy’ is a policy of mutual re- this perspective: If you are the centers of learnspect,” Polsky said. “We got addicted to cigarettes ing for the country. So if don’t want to tell smok- when you were 15, 16 or we educate young people ers that they can’t smoke 17, you were too young that smoking is harmful, because we understand to really make a respon- not only to the person that it’s a hard addiction sible choice,” Frentz said. who smokes, but also the to deal with, but we just “I say, let’s show smokers secondhand smoke to want them to do it away some respect and empa- other people, then they from the building doors thy, but at the same time should take the message so that, when people go let them know that they about ‘breathe easy’ and to class, they don’t have need to reciprocate that.” protect people’s rights Frentz said he believes that are non-smokers.” to be exposed to secondPolsky, a public health that, because the No. 1 hand smoke.” Dr. Kevin Frentz, a preventable cause for graduate, said that the health educator for To- illness and death in this next step for the Breathe bacco Use Prevention country is due to tobacco Easy organization is to try

and make FSU a smokefree campus. The organization has been conducting research in order to prepare a report for the vice president and president of the university. “We’ve been doing a lot of survey research on campus, as well as some air quality testing using geographic information systems to map air quality on campus,” Polsky said. “We really just wanted to see if ‘breathe easy’ is effective. So we focused on Bellamy, HCB, Strozier and Thagard. Of those four buildings, Bellamy was the only one at that point that was not ‘breathe easy’ and you could see a significant difference in the air quality between it and the other three.” The University of Florida has already changed to a smoke-free campus. While UF made the decision based on the president’s choice, Frentz said that FSU is taking a different approach, focusing on getting an ample amount of student support so that it can be a widely accepted decision. “We want to take a phase transition approach to a tobacco-free campus that meets the needs of the values and opinions of our students, faculty, and staff,” said Frentz. Frentz revealed that a recent survey they took shows that 80 percent of FSU students support going to a “breathe easy” campus, while over 60 percent support going to a tobacco-free campus. Given these statistics, the Breathe Easy organization created “the breathe easy challenge” back in November to try and gather more student support in their efforts. “We want to put a plan together to give to the

president and we don’t want it to just be from the faculty and administration,” said Frentz. “We wanted to get the students’ voice.” The contest called for students to either create a video or speech in support of “breathe easy,” conduct a campus cleanup of cigarette-butt litter and write a campaign on how to keep the campus cigarette-free or how to transition from the campus’ current tobacco policy to a completely smoke-free campus. The best submissions won monetary prizes. On Thursday, the winners were announced. Karlanna Lewis, 19, a senior creative writing and Russian major, was the $250 winner of the Breathe Easy Speech/Video Contest and a runnerup for the Campus Cleanup Campaign. The Omega Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., won the $300 prize for the Breathe Easy Campus Cleanup Campaign. “I feel like it’s really important for campuses to go to ‘breathe easy’, and it’s not hard to do,” Lewis said. “While it’s a personal choice to smoke, there are plenty of places you can smoke besides campus. “The amount of cigarette litter is pervasive and hard to remove. Considering that UF has already adopted such a policy, it is up to FSU to show us as an institution at the fore-guard of students’ rights and health. To respect our amazing campus and institution, I believe the best policy is tobacco-free.” For more information, visit their Facebook page at facebook.com/ pages/FSU-BreatheEasy/287719911015.

Events raise awareness, elicit support CHAD SQUITIERI Staff Writer In an effort to address the problems impacting health care in America, “Cover the Uninsured Week” aims to raise awareness of the growing problem of uninsured Americans. “Cover the Uninsured Week” is planned to elicit support of and spread information about the key issue of quality and affordable coverage. “Cover the Uninsured Week,” which is a national

event, has two main goals, the first of which is to highlight the large portion of Americans living without health insurance. The second goal is to enroll those Americans into available coverage programs. Throughout the week, several events took place in the community—helped in part by the College of Medicine at Florida State University. On Friday, March 25, at the Student Life Cinema phantom theater, the College of Medicine held a

screening of Unnatural Causes, an acclaimed documentary series that explores the ideas that affect our health in more than just bad habits and genes. The documentary series suggests that the social circumstances in which we were born in and live in can affect our physiology as much as genes or a virus. The mission of the FSU College of Medicine is to develop exemplary physicians who are responsive

FIGHT from 1 employees.” Education is one area that will be impacted. Students are already seeing less public funding for education. Cuts to programs like Bright Futures will continue in the future. “The Florida State legislature has already done as much as they can to weaken public education, and now they want to deal it the death blow,” said Schneider. “Students by and large across the board are very much opposed to this legislation.” Many are concerned that with continued decreases in public funding, education will be forced to rely on private businesses. “Once all the funding dries up for our universities, then what does it look like?” asked Patrick Shepherd, director of FSU’s Center for Participant Education. “Does it all go through a private company that has to make money from it, and thus has a bottom line to fulfill? That’s not what it should be. Education should exist for education.” Fight Back Florida was born out of a cooperation between university students like Shepherd, Schneider and others across

Photo Courtesy of Patrick Shepherd

The protestors march at the Florida Capitol to voice their opinions on the recent budget cuts. the state. Rallies on Friday occurred in all the major cities in Florida. In several cities, people gathered at the Chambers of Commerce, the place they saw as responsible for the financial attacks on working people. Because of the Capitol’s location, the march in Tallahassee—which began at Kleman Plaza and proceeded to the Capitol—was of special importance. “We constructed coffins and in the coffins were things like democracy, workers’ rights, health care, the environment,” said Shepherd. “The march itself has taken on the tone of a funeral pro-

SMOKE from 1 DISTRIBUTION Distribution Coordinator Karl Etters 850-561-1608 distribution@fsview.com PRODUCTION STAFF 850-561-1606 Production Manager Justin Christopher Dyke productionmanager@fsview.com Assistant Production Manager Danielle Delph ddelph@fsview.com Production Designers Glenishia Gilzean ggilzean@fsview.com Emealia Hollis ehollis@fsview.com Yves Solorzano ysolorzano@fsview.com The FSView & Florida Flambeau is a Gannett newspaper published by FSView & Florida Flambeau, Inc. Member, Florida Press Association Associated Collegiate Press College Media Advisers Office Location: 954 W. Brevard St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Mailing Address: P. O. Box 20208 Tallahassee, FL 32316 Single copies are free; additional copies are available for $1 per copy. The editorials that appear within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the editorial writer. Any other column that appears in the newspaper is the expressed opinion of the columnist and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers. All correspondence to Editorial can be considered for publication, unless indicated otherwise by letter writer. In accordance with The Associated Press guidelines obscenities, vulgarities and profanities will not be published. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters may be edited for clarity and content, or for space purposes.


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Students celebrate the arrival of spring by throwing colorful dyes in the air during the Holi event, hosted by the Indian Students’ Association.

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The contest begins March 14th, 2011. The rules are: 1. Take a creative, original photo while visiting any Moe’s Southwest Grill of Tallahassee, FL. 2. Post the picture on the Moe’s Tallahassee Facebook page to enter it in the contest. 3. Deadline for entry is April 1st. After April 1st, the top 5 finalists will be chosen based on originality, creativity, fitting with the Moe’s brand. The top 5 photos have 1 more week to generate the most comments and likes on their picture. 1 comment per day per person. 4. At the end of the contest, the photo with the most comments and likes is the grand prize winner. THE PRIZES

JOSEPH LA BELLE Assistant Photo Editor Florida State had its own Holi celebration this past Friday, March 25, to celebrate the coming of spring. Holi is an Indian festival that welcomes in spring and celebrates the end of winter. Students gathered together on Landis Green to throw colorful dyes and colored water at one another, much like the tradition calls for during the festival in India. This year’s Holi celebration was planned on cam-

ebrations. “I have done it every year since I was a little girl, so to have it be part of my college process is pretty awesome,� said Patel The Indian Students’ Association plans to continue to host a Holi celebration every year, hoping it gets bigger each time. To find out more about upcoming Indian Students’ Association events, visit their Facebook page, “Indian Students’ Association @ Florida State University.�

pus by a new organization known as the Indian Students’ Association. Last year’s Holi was hosted by the Asian American Student Union. The Indian Students’ Association provided several different dyes for students to use and asked everyone in attendance to dress in white or something that could be easily stained. Indian communities around Tallahassee also hold their own Holi celebrations. Kinjal Patel has been part of these cel-

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BAZAAR from 1 learn about the different cultures represented within the Tallahassee and FSU community. “It’s definitely important because it promotes not only awareness, but community in general, especially having not only students, but the greater Tallahassee community come together and have something fun happen, get to know each other, just being able to be have a shared experience and having people come together in a good, fun way,� Seeber said. Rieg said the event helped to promote global awareness and global engagement amongst international students and FSU students. “It’s just to showcase all the diversity that we have here in Tallahassee,� Rieg said. Rieg said the planning for the event took several months and is very involved, with several staff members and student interns coordinating the bazaar. “It’s quite a team that comes together and makes it happen,� Rieg said. Darrah Thomas tabled for the Arab Cultural Association. “I think it’s good, because I’ve seen a lot of people here who aren’t necessarily FSU students, just coming out from the community,� said Thomas, a senior studio art major. “Looking out and seeing all the different cultures and all the different cultural events that go on at FSU and how diverse FSU is, they have these different communities that are being completely representative.� Archana Mahajan moved to the U.S. from India five years ago, and attended the International Bazaar for the first time on Saturday. “I think it’s very important because a lot of people don’t know much about dif-

The purpose is to allow the community to explore, interact with and be exposed to different cultures. Steven Rieg, Assistant Director of Intercultural Programs at the Center for Global Engagement

Bryan Vallejo/FSView

Left: The African Student Association invites males from the audience to participate in their dance routine during the International Bazaar hosted at Oglesby Union Ballrooms on Saturday, March 26. Above right: Courtney Mickens of Acabelles performs during the event. Below Right: Caitlin Greene of Acabelles sings during the bazaar. ferent cultures, and there could be so many similarities, but there could still be, you know, the cultural depths, so I think it’s just a nice exposure, especially to the young crowd,� said Mahajan. Mahajan said she enjoyed the different performances, especially the Indian dance and music. “My daughter, who is not even two years old yet, she was dancing,� Mahajan said. “So I enjoyed watching her. She enjoyed it.� Sarah Hammond represented the FSU Friends of Internationals, a service organization that reaches out to international students in the FSU community. She said the event high-

lighted a lot different cultures that community members might not be as familiar with, as well as generated interest for the numerous cultural organizations at FSU. “It’s a good way to get out there to international students and also Americans who want to get involved,� said Hammond, a freshman accounting major at FSU. Among the various student and community cultural organizations that tabled at the event were the Iranian Student Association, the Dominican Student Association, the Peruvian Student Association, Chinese Language and Cultures Association, Turkish Culture at Florida

State, the African Student Association, the Venezuelan Student Association, the Japanese community and Belly Dancers at FSU. Additionally, the Cuong Nhu Martial Arts Sports Club, the African Student Association, Lebanese Social Organization, the Muslim Student Association, Empowering Women Globally, Amnesty International, Global Peace Exchange, International Programs, the Thai community of Tallahassee, the Buddhist Student Association, the Indian Student Association, the FSU German Club, the India Association of Tallahassee and the Tolerance and Dialogue Group participated in the event.

Bryan Vallejo/FSView

During FSU International Bazaar, children of India Association of Tallahassee members present a native dance to the FSU audience at the Oglesby Union Ballrooms on Saturday, March 26. They were one of the many groups to showcase their culture.

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Sales team places fourth nationally FSView Staff Reports The sales team of Florida State University’s College of Business placed fourth at the National Collegiate Sales Competition. The sales team is a competitive group in the College of Business. There are multiple parts and goals of the team, according to Pat

Pallentino, the director for the FSU Professional Sales Program. “One of the parts is a competition group,” said Pallentino. “These students first compete among themselves in mock selling situations to be selected as one of the two that go to the national competition.” The students involved in

the sales team are highly sought-after students in the business world. During the interview, Pallentino said that the two actual competitors from the competition were not there because they “are in such demand that they’re flying around the country,” meeting with potential employers.

“There are multiple purposes [of the team],” Pallentino said. “One is for the students; it’s a great experience in practicing and enhancing their skills. From the point of view of the college, doing well at these competitions brings sponsors to the college because they want to recruit these top students.”

Meghan O’Brien, a student who is not yet on the team, said she cannot wait to become a part of the team. “Being around people who are on the sales team, I’m able to see all the benefits they’re getting and all the job offers they’re raking in,” said O’Brien. Amber Schrader, a mem-

ber of what she described as the sales team “family,” said that the competition was more than just a competition. “The 10 of us [on the team] have almost become a family,” Schrader said. “[The competition] was fun, too. It was a lot of work, but it was fun at the end of the day.”

FSU student receives music scholarship Christal Ferreira one of four student recipients KENDAL KALISH Staff Writer Christal Ferreira, a Florida State University theatre and English major, was recently awarded $2,500 after being named a 2010 Heineken USA and Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) music scholar. In an effort to support arts, music and education among the Hispanic community, CHCI chose Ferreira and three other college students from

a pool of 2,000 applicants from across the nation. “I didn’t think I was going to receive this scholarship because I had applied to a few other programs and didn’t have any luck with those,” said Ferreira. “When I did find out about the music scholarship, I was definitely excited, but I was also grateful too.” Ferreira plans to study abroad this fall with the FSU theatre program in London. Instead of taking out loans, Ferreira will use this money for her trip.

“I encourage everyone who may need a scholarship to apply for one,” said Ferreira. “People assume that, since so many other people are applying, then there is no chance for them. I felt the same way before, but then I ended up winning. My advice for other students would be to just go for it.” Recipients were determined based on their history of performing public service-oriented activities in their communities and demonstration of their de-

sire to continue civic engagement in the future. As a member of the FSU Chapter of MEISA (Music and Entertainment Industry Student Association), Ferreira helps promote community music workshops and raises money for Habitat for Humanity. She is also a member of the Dean’s List, the National Society of Collegiate Scholars and is currently volunteering in the Tallahassee community through CHICS (Caring and Helping in Community Service) at FSU. As of now,

Ferreira’s focus is on playwriting and directing films. “It didn’t surprise me at all that Christal won this scholarship,” said Roselyn Almonte, friend of Ferreira and junior at the University of South Florida. “I’ve known Christal for over 15 years now and she is one of the most incredible, intelligent and kind people I’ve ever met. She is a truly hardworking individual and she gives everything she does 110 percent. She really deserved an opportunity like this.” The CHCI-Heineken scholar program is part of CHCI, the premier His-

panic not-for-profit and nonpartisan leadership development organization in the country. Its mission is to provide critical financial assistance to increase graduation rates among Latino students in post-secondary education. Heineken USA, Inc., the nation’s premier beer importer, is a subsidiary of Heineken International BV, which is the world’s most international brewer. Some of their imported and exported brands include Heineken Lager, Amstel, Newcastle Brown Ale, Dos Equis and the Bohemia brands from Mexico.

Sexual assault story inspires walk across Florida COURTNEY ROLLE Staff Writer On Saturday, March 19, Lauren Book began her 1,000 mile walk in Key West, a journey that will take her through the state of Florida in order to garner attention for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. The walk will take approximately 39 days, with a final stop in Tallahassee. Upon arrival, Book plans to promote The Walk in Their

Shoes Act, which outlines the protection for sexual abuse victims. Book said she hopes that, by leading the second annual Walk in My Shoes, the 1,000 mile walk from Key West to Florida’s capital will help increase awareness. Along the way, Book will be visiting several rape crisis centers and sexual assault program centers located throughout Florida. As a child, Book was sexually abused by her nanny for a period of six years.

She said that she hopes the walk will help inspire other sexual abuse victims. “I want victims and their families to know that they are not alone and that healing is a continual journey,” Book said. “Our Walk is a manifestation of that journey, teaching others that it is OK to tell and share their stories.” To tell her own story, Book wrote a memoire of her experiences entitled It’s OK to Tell, in which she talks about the years

of abuse she suffered. She also talks about how she turned the pain she once endured into drive and ambition. According to national statistics, one in three girls under the age of 18 is sexually abused, and one in five boys is sexually abused. Book hopes this walk will help bring these statistics to light. The Walk in Their Shoes Act includes several different provisions that aim to benefit victims.

The act aims to enhance the Rape Crisis Program Trust Fund, provide assistance with relocation for victims of sexual crimes, offer Internet safety/ health education, and provide quick HIV tests for offenders. Florida State University sophomore Ashlynn Banks said that Book’s plans are a step in the right direction. “Sexual abuse is a real problem in today’s society; to shed light and bring awareness to this issue is

just what society needs,” Banks said. “Anything to help stop this problem.” Floridians are invited to participate in this statewide walk. Survivors, their families and friends are also urged to join Book as she walks to raise awareness of sexual abuse issues across the state. For more information on Book, check out her Facebook profile, her YouTube page at “Lauren’s Kids,” or follow her on Twitter at “LaurensKids.”

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SOFTBALL STIFLED S e m i no l e s hi t wa l l ove r t he w e e ke nd o n t he r o a d a ga i nst N o r t h C a r o l i na PAGE 7 FSView & Florida Flambeau

MARCH 28, 2011

Signs of the times Trends in the tournament and FSU

NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor While looking for inspiration to write this commentary, I found myself staring at the box score of Friday’s game, wondering, “How the %?#! did we lose to Virginia Commonwealth?” Going into Friday’s matchup, I felt that we were better athletically, certainly better defensively, and as long as we didn’t have our worst shooting night of the season, the Seminoles would cruise to victory and a berth in the Elite Eight. But such is the parody now inherent in the NCAA Tournament. The facts are that FSU didn’t shoot all that well, but it wasn’t our worst performance, and although the box score may indicate otherwise, we played great defense down the stretch, and, save for the last play, into overtime. If you want to blame the loss on anything, blame it on a VCU team that just got exceptionally hot at precisely the right time. Rams guard Bradford Burgess played absolutely out of his mind, hitting six of seven shots from beyond the arc and getting the game-winning layup with seven seconds remaining. No other VCU player hit more than three shots from 3-point range, and if you take away Burgess’ attempts and makes, VCU would have shot just 31 percent from deep. But Florida State certainly isn’t alone in their suffering, and their matchup against VCU, which was the first-ever matchup between a 10-seed and an 11-seed since the tournament field expanded to 64, is a clear sign of the times. Take a good, hard look at this year’s bracket (and, at all costs, avoid looking at the wreck that is your own). How does a Morehead State upset a Louisville? Or a Richmond take down a Vanderbilt? What about Arizona absolutely embarrassing the defending champion Duke Blue Devils in the Sweet 16? There are a variety of reasons for this increase in upsets, but the most glaring one that we can point to is the difference in talent and leadership between the teams. Smaller schools hold on to their talent for longer, and schools from the bigger conferences, although they land the bigger-name talent, field a more athletic, albeit less-experienced roster. The Butler Bulldogs are in their second straight Final Four, and they are the only No. 3 seed or lower to ever make consecutive Final Fours (they were a five-seed last year and a No. 8 this year). Apart from an outstanding coaching job by Brad Stevens, the Bulldogs have SEE SIGNS 7

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 6

Sweet 16 brings bitter ending ’Noles ousted by VCU in closing seconds of OT thriller BRETT JULA Sports Editor By the time their game began, Florida State and Virginia Commonwealth were the lone double-digit seeds remaining in the NCAA tournament, and only one of them could continue their remarkable run toward a potential Final Four berth. Unfortunately for No. 10 seed Florida State, they were the ones sent home in gut-wrenching fashion. Bradford Burgess scored a game-high 26 points, but none were bigger than his gamewinning layup off an inbounds pass with 7.1 seconds remaining in overtime, as 11th-seeded VCU continued to prove their many doubters wrong with a heart-stopping 72-71 victory Friday night in San Antonio to advance to the program’s first-ever regional final. For the Seminoles (23-11), the loss capped a season that saw the program advance the furthest in the tournament in 18 years, primarily on the heels of its stingy defense. FSU swallowed up Texas A&M and Notre Dame in their first two tournament games, limiting the two teams to a combined 31 percent shooting, but the Rams proved to be prepared for the vaunted Seminole defense. VCU shot 45 percent from the floor and an astounding 12-of-26 from

the 3-point line—six of which were by Burgess on only seven attempts. The 12 made 3-pointers tied the most allowed by Florida State in a game this season. “They hit some really tough shots—some shots [that] were thoroughly contested,” FSU head coach Leonard Hamilton said. “A percentage of those shots I didn’t think we did a very good job of getting hands in their faces. A couple of shots they hit were almost from the parking lot. They were way beyond NBA range—maybe three or four of them were almost out of bounds.” The Seminoles were able to keep pace with the hot-shooting Rams due in large to their rebounding. Florida State exposed VCU’s vulnerability on the boards by outrebounding the Rams 47-32 with 21 of those rebounds coming on the offensive end. The rebounding disparity led to 18 more shot attempts for the ’Noles, but it turned out to not be enough. VCU (27-11) led 36-31 at the half and looked poised to blow out the Seminoles like they had their previous three tournament opponents, as they surged to a ninepoint lead following a Rob Brandenberg free throw with 7:37 to play in regulation. But like the Seminoles had done so often SEE SWEET 9

AP Photo

Derwin Kitchen goes up for two of his 23 points in Friday’s Sweet 16 matchup with VCU.

Baseball takes twoof-three from Wake FSU responds to blowout loss with convincing win of their own Sunday ERIC ZERKEL Staff Writer

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Devon Travis and the Seminoles bounced back on Sunday after an 8-0 drubbing by Wake Forest on Saturday.

After losing four of their last five games, all in extra innings, Florida State responded by winning two of their three games against Atlantic Coast Conference bottom-feeder Wake Forest. On Friday, the Seminoles (18-6, 6-3 ACC) opened the series with a 12-4 victory, avoiding extra innings for the first time in six games

with a strong first inning. After a walk, a Mike McGee double, and two Wake Forest errors, Jayce Boyd stepped up to the plate and belted his first career grand slam off the scoreboard in left field, giving the Seminoles a 5-0 lead out of the gates. “You just get in there looking for a good pitch to hit and hopefully you can get something done with it,” Boyd said. “It was a change-up away. Obvious-

ly, you’re not supposed to pull that pitch, but I was sitting on off-speed, because that’s pretty much what a lefty wants to do to a right-handed batter in a situation like that. I definitely got a good swing on it.” The five-run inning was more than enough for the Seminoles with junior lefty Sean Gilmartin on the mound. Gilmartin (5SEE BASEBALL 9

Seminoles stagger yet again Men’s tennis team’s skid hits four with losses to VT, UVa HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer Everything on Friday was all-too-familiar for the FSU men’s tennis team. When the fifth match closed, the Seminoles were tied at 3-3 with one underclassman vying for the deciding point. When all was said and done, the courts were cleared and the Seminoles walked off, yet again, with their heads hung in defeat. It is not déjà vu. This has happened before— three other times, in fact. The No. 35 Virginia

Tech Hokies (11-5, 3-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) were the fourth team to come to Tallahassee and walk away with a 4-3 win over the No. 45 Seminoles (6-10, 1-4). Friday’s match ran over five hours long, accounting for one of the longest matches in FSU tennis history. Freshman Blake Davis was the last player on the court—already disadvantaged from a recent injury—against Hokie senior Pedro Graber. Davis went down 0-3 in the third set, then won three games in a row to tie the score and instill hope in

the Seminoles. Graber proved superior, however, winning four of the next six games to seal the third set—and the match—with a score of 6-7 (3), 6-4, 7-5. “Blake battled hard, he competed well,” head coach Dwayne Hultquist. “A match like this is practically a marathon, so physical conditioning factors heavily to the match’s outcome.” The “marathon” began with two of the three doubles matches going into tie-breaking sets. Sophomores Andres Bucaro and Anderson Reed won a hard-fought match lit-

tered with aces from both sides and volleys in which the ball would rarely hit the court. They clinched the point over No. 52 Luka Somen and Corrado Degl’Incerti Tocci with a 9-8 (10) victory, marking their second straight win over a ranked doubles team. The No. 15 duo of Vahid Mirzadeh and Connor Smith snapped a threematch skid, beating No. 45 Will Beck and Pedro Graber 8-6 on court one. It was the fourth time that FSU has swept doubles this season. Points were then trad-

ed in singles play, with Beck’s win over Andres Bucaro tying the score at two points apiece. No. 26 Mirzadeh, who is seemingly the captain of composure on this struggling Seminole tennis team, won his match in straight sets over No. 45 Somen to put the Seminoles ahead at 3-2. The rest of the day was not much to brag about for the other FSU players. “We didn’t get any of the other three singles matches into third sets,” Hultquist said. “It would SEE TENNIS 9


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Softball smothered by Tar Heels FSU bats go quiet in UNC’s three-game sweep of ’Noles ERIC TODOROFF Contributing Writer After winning four of their last five games, the Florida State softball team was looking to carry their

momentum to Chapel Hill, N.C., this past weekend against the North Carolina Tar Heels. The Seminoles’ pitching staff had their way with the Tar Heels in both

games of Saturday’s double-header, limiting UNC to four total runs, but the FSU offense struggled to support their strong pitching performance. In game one of the dou-

ble-header, Sarah Hamilton stifled the UNC bats by pounding the strike zone and made it difficult for any hitter to get solid contact on the ball. The only earned run Hamilton

gave up came off a controversial call in the bottom of the fourth inning. With the bases loaded, Hamilton tossed a pitch inside to Brittany McNally, and it seemed to

hit the bottom of her bat. Home plate umpire Rodney Graves initially ruled it a foul ball, but after a conference with the other

they’ve been able to retain their talent for longer, and are perhaps a better team than most—myself included—would care to admit. So there’s your silver lining, Seminole fans. Friday night is going to hurt for a while, but as a program, Florida State will benefit

from this year’s tournament. Although Florida State will lose Derwin Kitchen due to graduation, and, although I’m hoping against it, Chris Singleton to the NBA Draft, the guys that do stay will be the better for it.

Keep an eye on freshman Ian Miller and definitely junior Bernard James. This duo only stands to improve their games in the offseason, and if the debuts of these two were any indication, they’ll be ready to dance again next year.

SEE SOFTBALL 8

SIGNS from 6 something else on their side: experience. The contest in last year’s national championship against Duke provided the Bulldogs with invaluable crunchtime experience, and although the game resulted in a loss, Butler certainly benefited as a program from that game. Of the key players from that 2009-10 team, only then-sophomore Gordon Hayword made an early jump to the NBA. Matt Howard, the leading scorer and heart and soul of this year’s team, stuck around for another run at cutting down the nets. Had Howard been more hyped and gone to a larger school (for example, a Kyrie Irving of Duke, who, as a freshman that missed half the season due to injury, still might be the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft), he would’ve done what so many inexperienced but physically gifted players have done before him: jumped ship and made an early exit for the draft. Now Howard is in his second Final Four in two seasons and leading the Bulldogs. Hayward rides the pine for the Jazz in the NBA and averages 4.1 points per game. The point is this: The lure of the NBA makes for a dilution of talent in the college ranks, and this lack of experience makes room for more upsets in the NCAA’s

“Big Dance.” Let’s go back to VCU. They’re a Final Four team and they’ve made an indelible mark on this year’s tournament. How? They’ve got a core group of players that have a ton of experience. Between Joey Rodri-

guez, Brandon Rozzell, Jamie Skeen and the aforementioned Burgess, three of those guys are seniors, and there’s a total of 12 seasons of college basketball experience. VCU might not be the most gifted team, but due to their lot as a mid-major,

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Women’s tennis splits Virginia road trip Seminoles take down Hokies Saturday, fall to Cavaliers Sunday SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer The Florida State women’s tennis team took a road trip to the state of Virginia this weekend to face off with Atlantic Coast Conference foes Virginia and Virginia Tech. The No. 35 Seminoles (7-5, 2-2 ACC) took down the Hokies of Virginia Tech (9-8, 1-3) on Saturday at the BurrowsBurleson Tennis Center in Blacksburg, Va., furiously rallying from a 2-0 deficit to win by a final score of 5-2. Virginia Tech got off to a solid start, controlling the doubles portion of the match with three convincing wins, which earned them the doubles point and all of the momentum heading into singles play. The ’Noles were able to turn things around in the singles matches, and went on to dominate the rest of the afternoon. After Tech’s Yazmin Hamza defeated FSU’s

Francesca Segarelli in the first singles match, the Seminoles took over and never looked back. FSU went on to win five of the six courts in the singles portion of the match. Florida State freshman Ruth Seaborne defeated Holly Johnson (6-2, 6-2) on court four, followed by a win from sophomore Noemie Scharle over Tea Ivanovic (6-3, 6-3). Senior Katie Rybakova defeated Martha Blakely (0-6, 7-6, 6-1) on court two to give the ’Noles the lead at 3-2, which they never relinquished. Sophomore Amy Sargeant won on court six over Isel MartinezMarcos (6-2, 2-6, 7-5), while senior Federica Suess defeated Shannon Betts (5-7, 7-5, 6-3) to win court five and close out the victory for the resurgent Seminoles. Suess’ victory was a memorable one, not only because she came back from a set down to earn the win, but also because it marked the 100th ca-

reer victory for the senior standout. “Fede got her 100th win today in typical Fede fashion,” head coach Jennifer Hyde said of Seuss. “Since her freshman year, she has always been someone who never dies out there on court. […] She is a fighter and has the heart of champ.” Overall, the coach was pleased with her team’s performance in the first leg of their weekend double-header. “The team needed a day just like today turned out to be,” Hyde said. “We were down the doubles point and then quickly down three first sets in singles. “At one point during the match, things looked very grim for us. But just then, the girls created a tremendous momentum swing for themselves on three or four different courts, and from that point on, I felt like we were in control.” Sunday was a very different story for the ’Noles.

The Virginia Cavaliers defeated FSU handily in Charlottesville by a score of 5-2. FSU dropped all three doubles matches (8-4, 8-4, 8-2) and lost four of the six singles matches. UVa’s Lindsey Hardenbergh defeated Segarelli on court one (6-0, 6-2), Emily Fraser defeated Scharle on court two (63, 6-4), Caryssa Peretz defeated Suess (6-1, 6-3) on court five and Maria Fucillo rounded out the strong play of the Cavaliers by defeating Sargeant on court six (62, 3-0). The bright spots for Florida State came on courts three and four, where Rybakova and Seaborne were both able to notch victories for the ’Noles. Rybakova took down Hana Tomljanovic (6-4, 6-7, 10-5), while Seaborne defeated Erin Vierra (6-3, 7-6). The Seminoles return to action at home on Friday when they take on N.C. State at 4 p.m.

Zachary Goldstein/FSView

Noemie Scharle and FSU split their weekend matchups.

Butler tops Florida in overtime, reaches Final Four NEW ORLEANS (AP)—Of course Butler erased a late deficit. Of course the Bulldogs hit a clutch 3-pointer late in overtime. Of course they’re going back to the Final Four. This is the Butler Way. Shelvin Mack scored 27 points, including five in overtime, and Butler reached the Final Four for the second year in a row with a 74-71 victory over Florida on Saturday. Butler, the Horizon League champ, has vanquished three higher seeds from major conferences—top-seeded Pittsburgh, fourth-seeded Wisconsin and now second-seeded Florida—in succession. Those big wins came after Howard tipped in a winner in the final seconds against Old Dominion. Matt Howard scored 14 and David J. Phillip/ AP Photo Khyle Marshall added 10 for the Horizon League member Butler Bulldogs (27-9), who showed will be making its second straight again they simply won’t give in, climbing out of an 11-point hole Final Four appearance. in the last 9:25 of the second head, only that it was bleeding half. Mack was playing through when he came to the sideline. That didn’t stop him from pain after rolling his left ankle in the first half and needed a draining a crucial 3-pointer with small bandage on his forehead 1:21 left in overtime to give Butin the second half. He could ler the lead for good at 72-70. He not recall what happened to his also had enough vigor left dur-

ing the net-cutting ritual to do a mocking Gator chomp with his arms from atop a ladder. Kenny Boynton missed a long 3 that could have given Florida (29-8) the lead with a little under 20 seconds left. Alex Tyus appeared to have the offensive rebound, but Howard tied him up and the possession arrow favored Butler. Florida had to foul Mack with 10.6 seconds to go, and he hit both shots for the final margin before Erving Walker missed a 3 to tie in the final seconds. In the locker room after the game, players said they hoped they made the Butler community proud. Judging by video of celebrating fans back in Indianapolis being passed around the locker room on a cell phone, they had. Last year, Butler was able to play in front of those fans at the Final Four in Indianapolis, where about 30,000 fans attended their open practice. Now it seems as though the Bulldogs win the crowd wherever they play, although Stevens suspects the support they had at last season’s Final Four in their hometown will be hard to top. Vernon Macklin scored a ca-

reer-high 25 points for Florida, while Boynton finished with 17 points and Tyus had his secondstraight double-double with 14 points and 10 rebounds. Butler had to overcome Florida’s size advantage and a number of its own mistakes. In regulation, the Bulldogs made 10 of 20 free throws and shot 39.6 percent (21 of 53), including 8 of 30 from 3-point range. Yet they somehow found a way to survive to overtime, when they hit all seven foul shots and three of their eight field goals. Remarkably, Butler also outrebounded the Gators, 41-34. Now the Bulldogs are one win away from a second straight appearance in the national championship game. Florida appeared to be taking control when Tyus, the leading scorer and rebounder in Florida’s overtime win over BYU, got loose for a pair of soaring dunks, then added two free throws and a driving floater during a 12-1 run that gave the Gators a 51-40 lead with 9:26 left. Howard’s basket inside as he was fouled snapped the run, then seldom-used reserve Chrishawn Hopkins, who’d just

set up Howard’s score, added a 3 as Butler slowly clawed its way back again, finally tying it at 57 with 3:03 to go on the second of consecutive driving layups by Mack. Macklin, who’d been limited by foul trouble in the second half—he committed his fourth with 9:02 left—returned to hit a free throw and a layup on a strong move inside to make it 60-57. Mack’s free throws cut it to one point and Howard had a chance to give Butler the lead after drawing a foul with 30.7 seconds left. He missed his second free throw, then Walker missed a long pull-up jumper—his eighth straight miss to that point— forcing overtime. Butler initially took a 67-64 lead in the overtime on Ronald Nored’s free throws, but Florida came back with a couple of clutch 3s. Boynton’s tied it 67, then Walker finally hit his first field goal from 3 to put the Gators up 70-69. That’s when Mack responded with his big 3 that propelled Butler to its latest upset. It helped make up nicely for the Pittsburgh game, when his late foul nearly cost Butler a chance to move on.

SOFTBALL from 7 umpires, it was declared McNally was actually hit by the pitch. The questionable call pushed the only run of the game across the plate and effectively won the game for the Tar Heels. Florida State hitters were under the control of UNC pitcher Lori Spignola the entire game, as she dominated FSU by throwing a complete-game shutout. The ’Noles could only muster three hits the entire afternoon—two of which came from Tiffani Brown. Spignola found herself in a couple of bases-loaded situations, but Florida State was unable to capitalize. In the first inning, the Seminoles left the bases loaded and were unable to score in the sixth thanks in part to a great leaping catch by Carolina centerfielder Dani Manko. Game two of the double-header featured much of the same from the Seminoles: great pitching and a severe lack of offense. Starting pitcher Jessica Nori had her way with the UNC hitters for the first five innings, giving up only a pair of earned runs. The ’Noles’ only offensive production came from an Ashley Stager two-run homerun in the top of the sixth to put the Seminoles in the lead at 2-1. In the bottom of the

sixth, Hamilton came into the game in hopes of closing out the victory for Nori, but the Tar Heels had other plans. With the bases loaded, Hamilton walked Elisha Elliott, and Kelsey Green followed up with the game-winning sacrifice fly. The Seminoles ended

a disappointing Saturday scoring a combined three runs on 11 hits while leaving 13 runners on base. On Sunday, Florida State looked to salvage a game and avoid traveling back to Tallahassee the victim of a sweep. Morgan Bullock started the game but was pulled after just

one-third of an inning after giving up one run on two hits. Hamilton again came on in relief and kept the Tar Heels in check until the fifth inning when Haleigh Dickey hit a long single off the center-field wall, bringing in one run. UNC struck again in the bottom of the sixth inning

when Ally Blake hit a tworun homer over the left field fence. The Seminoles could only manage three hits off Spignola, as she tossed another complete game to lead the Tar Heels to a 4-0 victory. The Sunday victory was of special significance to

long-time Tar Heel head coach Donna Papa, as it marked her 1,000th career win After getting swept, the ‘Noles’ have fallen back below .500. FSU has an opportunity to turn things around this Wednesday in a two-game home series against Mercer.

Joseph LaBelle/FSView

Briana Hamilton and Florida State had a tough time offensively against the North Carolina Tar Heels, getting swept by UNC over the weekend.


MARCH 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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BASEBALL from 6 0) allowed just four hits and an unearned run in six innings of work. Still, Gilmartin would get more support when the Seminoles pulled away with a huge six-run fourth inning. McGee and Sherman Johnson both had RBI-doubles, while Justin Gonzalez also picked up an RBI with a single, pushing the Florida State lead to 11-0. Wake Forest (8-15, 3-6) would earn a measure of revenge in the second game of the series. Behind pitching ace Tim Cooney

(3-1), Wake shut down the Seminole bats en route to an 8-0 victory. Cooney had 11 strikeouts, allowing just five hits in 7.2 innings of work. “The guy did a great job, he really did,” Florida State head coach Mike Martin said of Cooney. “He showed why he’s one of the best pitchers in our league. It was a beautifully pitched ballgame. He carved us up.” With Cooney on the mound, Wake used its five runs in the first two innings to put away the

Seminoles. Steven Brooks opened the first inning with a single after McGee slipped and fell, then Pat Blair placed a bunt down the third base line to take first base and send Brooks to second. With two runners on, Mac Williamson stepped to the plate and belted a home run to left field to give Wake a 3-0 lead. Florida State pitcher Scott Stitz (2-1) was the victim of those first two innings, and after allowing the five runs was pulled in favor Brian Busch.

Busch faired much better than his counterpart, pitching 3.1 innings of shutout relief to go along with five strikeouts. With the prospect of falling further down the rung of the ACC standings, Florida State responded with a strong 11-2 victory to close out the series. Seminole pitcher Gary Merians would ensure the Seminoles would come out on top, pitching six innings while allowing five hits and just one earned run on Sunday. Despite striking out only two bat-

ters, Merians coaxed Demon Deacon hitters into a series of groundouts to avoid any serious trouble. Again, the ’Noles’ batters would support their pitching staff with a strong start. In the first inning, both Mike McGee and James Ramsey hit home runs off Wake Pitcher Zach White as part of a three-run first inning. Balls continued to leave the park in the second inning. Gonzalez played his part in the Florida State home run derby, hitting a solo homer, his fourth

of the season. Alongside Gonzalez, Ramsey followed up his first inning homer with a two-RBI double. The ’Noles scored five runs in the second inning on three hits. The fifth-ranked Seminoles will travel to Jacksonville next to take on No. 1 Florida for the third time this season on Tuesday, March 29, at 7 p.m. The teams have split the first two meetings of the season, with FSU winning the first in Tampa and Florida taking the second in Gainesville.

Riley Shaaber/FSView

Sean Gilmartin was lights-out against Wake Forest on Friday evening, going six innings, striking out four batters and earning his fifth win of the season. After being shutout Saturday, Florida State came back to defeat the Demon Deacons 11-2 on Sunday. The Seminoles outscored Wake Forest 23-14 over the weekend.

TENNIS from 6 have been far different if we had two matches playing to win one, as opposed to that single match.” The Seminoles did not have much of a chance on Sunday, though. The topranked Virginia Cavaliers (20-0, 5-0) picked up four points before play was suspended due to severe

weather warnings, then notched another three to earn the 7-0 victory. The doubles portion showed a glimmer of hope for the Seminoles. Two of the three matches went into tiebreaking sets, but all three were eventually won by the Cavaliers. The 15th-ranked duo of Mirza-

deh and Smith came the closest to victory, losing 9-8 (7-5) to the thirdranked tandem of Michael Shabaz and Drew Courtney. The Cavaliers’ dominance was carried into singles play, where their two through four players—who are all ranked

in the top 40—won in straight sets. Seminole sophomore Jordan Kelly-Houston lost in the third set to No. 109 Julen Uriguen to end the match. FSU has a bit of time to rest and prepare for their next match, which will be Friday at N.C. State.

SWEET from 6 throughout the season, they clawed back. Florida State went on an 8-1 run over the next four minutes, where Michael Snaer and Derwin Kitchen accounted for all eight points. Snaer connected on a 3-pointer to bring the ’Noles within six at 62-56 and added a free throw, while Kitchen scored all four of his points during the run from the free throw line. Kitchen, FSU’s senior point guard, played valiantly in his final game as a Seminole, recording a double-double with 23 points and 12 rebounds. “For me, this was my last game, so I’m kind of devastated,” Kitchen said. “I wanted to keep it going as long as possible.” As well as the Rams were shooting the ball all night, Florida State’s defense rose to the occasion by limiting VCU to just three points over the last seven minutes of the second half to keep themselves in striking distance, but it was a key offensive play that forced overtime. Following a defensive stop, Chris Singleton, who finally appeared to be 100 percent after recovering from a foot injury suffered on Feb. 12, stepped up and knocked down arguably the biggest shot of his career— a 3-pointer that tied the game at 65 with 46 seconds left. A Bernard James block with 16 seconds remaining gave the Seminoles a chance to

win the game in regulation, but Kitchen’s 3-point attempt at the buzzer didn’t find the mark. “We knew the only way to get back in the game with seven minutes to go was with defense,” Singleton said. “We knew we had to rely on our defense to get stops [and] to try to execute on the offensive end.” Snaer started the overtime scoring with a driving layup to give FSU a 67-65 lead, but Burgess nailed a 3-pointer on the Rams’ ensuing possession

that handed the lead right back to VCU. Singleton would again come up big in the final minute, this time converting on a dunk with 30 seconds left to give the Seminoles their last lead of the game at 71-70. FSU would hold strong on defense over the next 22.9 seconds, but following a Florida State timeout, Rams guard Joey Rodriguez got his game-high 10th assist when he found a cutting Burgess on an inbounds play that proved to be the game-winner.

Singleton would have one more shot to be a hero, but his last-second runner in the lane was blocked by Jamie Skeen, and VCU players and coaches stormed the court in jubilation. “It was a mistake on me,” Kitchen said about VCU’s successful inbounds play. “I was guarding Burgess and I turned my head the wrong way. I thought we had somebody under [the basket]. But I turned my head the wrong way and he slipped and he got a clean look at the basket.”

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It’s that time of the year again, folks. The ballots have been cast, collected and counted. For the past few months, the Tallahassee Visit fsunews.com for more photos from Best of Tallahassee. community made its voice heard through paper and online submissions, and the FSView & Florida Flambeau is proud to present this year’s winners of our annual Best of Tallahassee awards as voted by the readers.

THE WINNERS ARE: NIGHTLIFE Bar: Bullwinkles Beer Selection: Proof/Liquor Loft Club: 20/20 Country Bar: Stetson’s Drink Special: Bullwinkles Happy Hour: Bullwinkles Live Music Hot Spot: Bullwinkles Movie Theatre: AMC 20 Place to See a Play: FSU School of Theatre Pool Hall: Pocket’s Sports Bar: A.J.’s Sports Bar and Grill

FOOD AND DRINK Overall Restaurant: Monk’s Newcomer: Chipotle Appetizers: Monk’s Bakery: Lucy and Leo’s Cupcakery Bang-For-Your-Buck: Moe’s Barbecue: Sonny’s Breakfast: Jenny’s Lunchbox Burger: Monk’s Cafe/Coffe Shop: Starbuck’s Date Restaurant: Bella Bella Deli: Publix Chinese: Publix Fast Food: Chick-fil-a Healthy Fast Food: Crepevine Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt: Rita’s Italian Ice Italian: Bella Bella Late Night Munchies: Taco Bell

Mexican: El Jalisco Pizza: Momo’s Seafood: Barnacle Bill’s Smoothies: Tropical Smoothie Steaks: Outback Subs: Jimmy John’s Sunday Brunch: Andrew’s Capital Grill and Bar Sushi: Jasmines Wings: Buffalo Wild Wings

GOODS AND SERVICES Apartment Complex: West 10 Bank: Bank of America Barbershop: Renegade Barbershop Bike Store: Higher Ground Bookstore: Bill’s Bookstore Car Repair: Kia Autosport Car Wash: Super Suds Computer Store: Best Buy Golf Course: Seminole Golf Course Gym: Leach Men’s Clothing Store: Express Music Store: FYE Nail/Spa: Nail Bar Novelty/Adult Store: X-Mart Salon: Aveda Sports Apparel/Equipment: Sports Authority Tanning Salon: Sun Dial Wireless Provider:Verizon Women’s Accesories/Shoes: Aldo’s Women’s Clothing Store: Forever 21 Vintage Store: Sick Boy Vintage


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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

Bella Bella BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor Amidst the college romance scene of shacking, hooking-up and drunk texting, some couples manage to engage in the traditional dating ritual of dinner and a movie. While the movie theater choices may be limited, the restaurant decision can be difficult. With

so many different options in Tallahassee, the go-to date restaurant of choice is Bella Bella. This quaint Italian restaurant offers an intimate atmosphere without the cliché details (dark corners, enclosed spaces). Often, unobtrusive live music will be played during dinner. “I like that the atmosphere is not forced,” said

Bill’s Bookstore

FSU student Kevin Greunke. “It isn’t stuffy, and the food is also good.” The moderately priced menu offers a range of Italian dishes. Couples of all ages can enjoy the homemade cuisine, or peruse a list of craft beers. Locally owned for 10 years, Bella Bella has become a staple in Tallahassee’s dating scene.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Bella Bella, on Monroe Street, is the top spot to take one’s honey(s).

BRETT JULA Sports Editor Looking for a place to watch the next big fight on Pay-Per-View? How about a place to shoot some pool with your friends? And what about somewhere with those always-coveted drink specials? Luckily, you can find all of these amenities at AJ’s Sports Bar & Grill, located on West Tennessee Street just east of High Road.

BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor Between going to the strip, eating diner food at midnight and laying out on Landis Green, Florida State University students have to do the unthinkable— attend class. And along with that unfortunate task comes the bothersome chore of buying textbooks. Although buying books is one the most expensive and annoying parts of being in college, it is also a necessity. Therefore, it is

Kristen Alberico/FSView

Bill’s Bookstore was voted Best Bookstore for Best of Tallahassee 2011. imperative that students at FSU have a bookstore that is cheap and easy to negotiate. Bill’s Bookstore has a reputation for having an easy-to-use rental policy and the cheapest prices on used textbooks. In addition to being student-friendly, Bill’s is also located in three

convenient locations. Bill’s also offers a wide variety of FSU gear for students, carrying a myriad of brands from Nike to Lily Pulitzer. Even though school can get in the way of a student’s college experience, it is nice to have a bookstore to lessen the stress.

Jimmy John’s

AJ’s Sports Bar & Grill AJ’s has everything you could ask a sports bar to have: inside dining, pool tables, a number of flatscreen televisions, dartboards, a large amount of open space, and a whole lot more. “I like AJ’s on any given day or night because there’s so much to do,” FSU junior Will Schonenberg said. “You could go there to watch football on the weekend, or even on a Tuesday night with their ‘Flippin’ Tuesday’ event. It really is a good time.” “Flippin’ Tuesday” involves actively using the customer’s luck in coinflipping. It’s simple: Get the coin-flip right, the drink is free; get it wrong, you pay for it.

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor

Kristen Alberico/FSView

A Jimmy John’s employee makes subs during the lunch rush. Jimmy John’s was voted Best Subs for Best of Tallahassee 2011.

Crack. Heroin. Ecstasy. These illegal substances have nothing in common with Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches, except that they are all highly addictive. Some Florida State University students even joke that Jimmy John’s bakes drugs into their bread, because they can never get enough. Whatever Jimmy John’s does, it is working. One of the most popular places to eat for FSU students, Jimmy John’s consistently wins the Best of Tallahassee award for subs. Even after com-

peting with nationwide chains and new contenders, Jimmy John’s still comes out on top. One of the reasons for Jimmy John’s popularity is their speedy service. “Freaky fast” is their motto, and they consistently live up to their mantra. After calling for delivery, it will take a maximum of 15 minutes for Jimmy John’s to deliver on-campus. The system Jimmy John’s developed for making sandwiches is extremely efficient. Another reason for the popularity of Jimmy John’s is the length of their subs, as they mostly come in one size: large. Whatever the reason for Jimmy John’s addictive subs, it can be sure that Jimmy John’s will always have a special place in the hearts and stomaches of FSU students.

Bullwinkle’s Saloon ADAM CLEMENT Editor-in-Chief Where else can you go to find the best drink specials, the best bar atmosphere during the happiest of happy hours, and that guy who occasionally shows up in pajama pants? Cleaning up as the winner of four awards this year, Bullwinkle’s proves once again why it has become a legendary staple

of the Tennessee Strip. Originally conceived as a pool hall in 1979, the saloon has since grown to meet the thirsty demands of college students, boasting a double-deck outside complete with beer garden and music stage, dance floor setup inside, multiple screens to watch whatever game’s on (including a 25-foot big screen outside), as well as its signature Thirsty Moose Club membership, which waives members of

cover charges and grants exclusive privileges on select nights. “I love that it’s 21-andup only, [so] you don’t have the underage students who can’t hold their liquor running around all over the place,” said graduate student and Bullwinkle’s regular Nicole Jones. “Bull’s is a great place to have a drink or two after class to unwind. Grad school is incredibly stressful, and thanks to my Bull’s card, I can swing

by after class and grab a drink with friends whenever the need strikes.” For those of us with a little more leeway in our academic schedules, the saloon’s drink specials have also consistently been voted to offer the most booze for your buck. “Nothing is better than Bull’s on a Friday night,” said Jones. “What more can you ask for than $10 all-you-can-drink top shelf from 5 p.m.-1 a.m.?”

• VOTED TALLAHASSEE’S BEST BAR 20 YEARS IN A ROW! W! • • ONE OF PLAYBOY’S TOP 100 COLLEGE BARS •

Come on down and see for yourself why Bullwinkle’s is the hottest spot pot in ve it! Tallahassee for so many years running now that even we can’t believe Bullwinkle’s is all about good friends, good times, and just being yourself. f. You students make Bullwinkle’s what it is, the best. And we take this opportunity to thank you for once again voting us the Best of Tallahassee! Winner in four categories: BEST BAR • BEST DRINK SPECIALS • BEST LIVE MUSIC HOT SPOT • BEST HAPPY HOUR

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Check us out on facebook! www.facebook.com/ThirstyMoose www.myspace.com/bullwinklestallahassee *Bands & Specials subject to change

Always party responsibly, never drink and drive.


MARCH 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

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Jasmine AGATA WLODARCZYK Arts & Life Editor This year’s Best of Tal-

lahassee winner for Best Sushi is Jasmine Café. Located in Downtown Tallahassee, Jasmine is close to campus, making it easy for hungry students to drop by for a bite. Location, however, will only get you so far with fickle students, and Jasmine has all the right flavors to keep patrons

coming back for more. For those on a budget, Jasmine is a great lunch spot with the special including two rolls, miso soup and a salad—all for less than $10. This Downtown hotspot includes a variety of choices for sushi lovers, including rolls with catchy names like the

Firecracker, the Caterpillar, the Black Widow and the Hurricane. Jasmine offers vegetarian options as well and, for those who aren’t huge fans of sushi, Jasmine has a variety of salads, sandwiches and chop bowls to keep anyone happy. Jasmine is located at 109 East College Avenue.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Aveda Salon is both an institute and hair salon.

Aveda

Buffalo Wild Wings RYAN RABAC Staff Writer FSView readers voted Buffalo Wild Wings as the best place for wings in Tallahassee, with the national chain’s location

on West Tennessee Street beating out numerous other local competitors. Part of the reason for this win is Buffalo Wild Wings’ incredible selection of unique sauces, including (in order of hotness): Sweet BBQ, Teriyaki, Mild, Parmesan Garlic sauce, Medium, Honey BBQ, Spicy Garlic, Asian Zing, Caribbean Jerk, Hot BBQ, Hot, Mango Habanero, Wild and Blazin’. For a limited time, Thai Curry

and Jammin’ Jalepeño are available for those willing to try something a little less conventional. The restaurant was founded in 1981 as Buffalo Wild Wings & Weck. The popular BW3 acronym used by fans stuck around long after the “Weck” was removed. The chain now has locations in 42 states. The franchise has gained more attention from its popular commer-

cials, in which restaurant employees manipulate sports games in favor of guests. Buffalo Wild Wings doesn’t only have wings. The restaurant serves a wide selection of appetizers, salads, flatbreads, wraps, sandwiches, burgers, desserts and more. And, for sports fans, BW3 has enough televisions inside to make any seat a great seat to watch a game.

NICKI KARIMIPOUR Assistant Arts & Life Editor Located on W. Pensacola Street, Aveda Salon contains a Master’s Studio and one for Licensed Professionals side by side. In addition to being a salon, Aveda is also a school where future hairstylists and aestheticians receive the training they need to jump-start their careers.

Providing affordable and fashionable haircuts, Aveda also uses many plant-based products for hair and skincare, as well as cosmetics. Haircut prices start at $12 and increase depending on length and hair type. The salon also offers services beyond haircuts—like massages, pedicures and manicures, waxing, hair and scalp treatments, facials and much more. They also do hair styling—such as before a special event like a formal, graduation or wedding. To book an appointment or inquire about pricing, call 350-3810.

Proof/Liquor Loft JESSE DAMIANI News Editor With 28 different beers on tap and over 100 bottled beers, as well as an ample liquor selection, Proof offers bargoers a pub experience for those looking to move past typical bar staples and the noisier club scene. Centrally located next to Starbucks on Tennessee Street, it is a great meeting spot

from any part of the city, and even on busy weekend nights and “Kill the Kegs” Wednesdays, it never waxes claustrophobic. Bartenders are knowledgeable about drink selections, and are always happy to help with suggestions. And, for those who discover a new favorite among the various options, Liquor Loft, Proof’s closed-container counterpart, is open during the day (as well as during bar hours), chock full of anything from big names to microbrews, so whether you’re looking to try something new or relish in classics, Proof/Liquor Loft have something for any taste.

Thanks for voting us 3 years in a row! We have the largest beer selection in North FL, OVER 700+ & still growing!!

You can find special events & daily specials on our Facebook pages:

Liquor Loft & PROOF A MODERN AMERICAN PUB and receive all info for LL/PROOF by signing up for our news letter @ WWW.LL100PROOF.com. WWW.LL100PROOF.com Remember we are open 7 days ays a week and you will never payy a cover @ the door.

THANKS AGAIN!! FSView File Photo

Liquor Loft is attached to Proof, a full liquor and beer bar, located on W. Tennessee Street.

You will never pay a cover @ the door 1717 W. Tennessee St. Next to Starbucks - (850)894-LOFT 5638

Thank you FSU students for voting

(2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 2008 8, 2009, 2010, & 2011)

Bank of America The Best Bank in Tallahassee! We sincerely appreciate your business! Everything we do starts and ends with our customers. To be certain, we are in the banking business, investment business, asset management business, trust business, planning business among others. But, first and foremost we are in the customer service business. Thank for choosing us!

Visit us at www.bankofamerica.com

©2011 Bank of America Corporation


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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

Rita’s Italian Ice REBEKAH SUWAK Staff Writer Rita’s Italian Ice, known to many simply as Rita’s, brings a Pennsylvania-chilled recipe to fight off Florida’s heat. Located on Pensacola Street a short walk from campus, next to Gold’s Gym and Bill’s Bookstore, the shop is convenient for anyone looking for a cool down. Rita’s

menu has something to offer everyone, from the gelati (Italian ice and custard) and unique flavor base to the Slenderita (fat-free). “The prices are great and you got to love that their shirts say ‘Have a Happy Day,’ ” said FSU student and customer Jessica Woolbright. “They have unique flavors like Swedish Fish, which reminds me of childhood.” In 1984, by way of Bensalem, Penn., Rita’s opened its first store that has now spread to over 500 locations in 20 states. This past year, Rita’s widened their flavor base to

outshine most traditional ice cream shops, by introducing PEEPS-flavored Italian ice to their menu for all those marshmallow lovers. Rita’s made fresh daily Italian ice (with real fruit) and diverse menu are designed for students looking for something different than the conventional cone. A community program in place and catering menu are some of the reasons for Rita’s Best of Tallahassee award for best ice-cream/ yogurt spot this year. FSU students agree: Prices and flavor variety make Rita’s the place to eat for a cold treat.

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

Renegade Barbershop

BRETT JULA Sports Editor The nine locations in the local Tallahassee area could be one reason why

Renegade Barbershop was voted as the best in its respective category for 2011, but maybe it has to do with another reason: sports. Anyone who comes in and does their “sports pick ’em” contests and wins by picking more winners than anyone else gets $25 and a free hair cut. Haircuts that start as

low as $11 show why they are considered (and now proven) to be the best that Tallahassee has to offer in regard to price. With highly trained professionals waiting on your service, if you don’t see the style that you want, let them know and they’ll fix you up the way you like it. They can do it all at Renegade Barbershop.

Crepevine

BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor When Florida State University students need to grab a meal quick, there is a good possibility that the

food will help progress the inevitable “freshman 15.” Luckily, there is an antidote to greasy, high-calorie fast food: The Crepevine. Traditionally a European dish, Crepevine has introduced the crepe to Tallahassee. A crepe is a sort of flattened pancake. Crepevine offers breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert fillings for their crepes. In addition to having

healthy options, Crepevine also offers an alternative to the usual drive-thru chains, which can be refreshing for college students who are always dining out. Also, there is no need to break the bank to try something new. All of the crepes on the menu are under $10. Crepevine has two locations in Tallahassee. For more information, visit thecrepevine.com.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery has quickly become a local favorite.

Lucy & Leo’s NICKI KARIMIPOUR Assistant Arts & Life Editor

Riley Shaaber/FSView

Best of Tallahassee for Healthy Fast Food: Crepevine

(&&/

Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery began from an idea its two co-owners Jean Bates and Paula Lucas had while on vacation in Nottingham, England. Since its creation, Lucy & Leo’s has been serving up specialty cupcakes in Tallahassee. Although

their flavor offerings change daily, their most popular flavor on the menu is red velvet. Other flavors include the standard chocolate and vanilla, chocolate/peanut butter, Oreo, strawberry, coconut, carrot, Cookies ’N’ Cream, Lemon Blue Sky, snicker doodle and even some gluten-free and vegan options for those with dietary restrictions. Lucy & Leo’s strives to use fresh ingredients such as real butter, sugar, flower and more. They do not use preservatives and cupcakes are made in small

batches from scratch daily. Additionally, Lucy & Leo’s serves coffee and assorted sodas. The shop has also been featured on the Food Network on the show Cupcake Wars. Named after the owner’s two dogs, Lucy & Leo’s is a fun place to fill up on a sweet treat and even to get some studying done in between classes, as they have free Wi-Fi for patrons. The shop is located at 1123 Thomasville Road and is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m.

(&'&

1304 N. Monroe Street Lake Ella/Midtown 329-6754

2020 W. Pensacola Street Gold’s Gym Shopping Plaza 562-7373

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Thank you for voting us as Best of Tallahassee’s Bakery for 2011! 850-765-0374

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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

MARCH 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Pocket’s Joseph La Belle/FSView

Sick Boy Vintage recently had its five-year birthday.

Sick Boy Vintage RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor For the past five years, Sick Boy Vintage has been a staple in the Tallahassee fashion community for its unique collection of vintage garments. Inspired by her grandmother’s penchant for fashion, owner and vintage aficionada Devon Pyles dreamed of

owning a store one day that would reflect her taste in clothing. After graduating from Florida State University with dual degrees in political science and creative writing, Pyles put her law school plans aside and opened Sick Boy Vintage instead. Since opening, Sick Boy has become a local favorite and has gained a loyal following.

For those who may still be wary of exploring the vintage world, however, Pyles promises they’ll have a unique shopping experience. “Everything that we sell is one of a kind,” said Pyles in a previous interview. “You’re not going to find another piece like that because we customize our vintage before it hits the

BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor rack, as well. For those who are starting out wearing vintage for the first time, embrace it. It’s exciting, you never know what you’re going to find. It’s always going to be unique; it’s always going to be wellmade. With vintage clothing, aside from profound historical merit, you have a stylishly well-made piece that is all your own.”

RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor By this time last year, students at Florida State University had already come to terms with the fact that Chipotle was probably never going to make its way to Tallahassee. Luckily, thanks to juniors Taylor Banks and Sophia Crowley, that

ters and were notified that Tallahassee would finally be home to two restaurants. Since opening on Tennessee Street and Apalachee Parkway, both restaurants have continually had a slew of hungry patrons eager for a bite. With over 65,000 possible combinations of fresh ingredients, a fast and easy assembly line production and, of course, an incomparable guac recipe, it comes as no surprise, then, that Chipotle has become the recipient of Best Newcomer in Tallahassee.

JESSE DAMIANI News Editor Apparently size matters in Tallahassee. Offering slices the size of Charlie Sheen’s ego, and situated close to campus, Momo’s provides a great meeting place for students, regardless of whether they live on or off campus. In addition to “slices as big as your head,” Momo’s of-

fers a slew of salads and calzones, as well as music loud enough to fill the silence in even the most awkward of dates. “I enjoy Momo’s for the rich cultural environment they provide, not to mention the pizza slices are as big as my head—and that’s saying something because I have an abnormally large head,” said FSU student Daniel Padolina-Honeycutt. In a town where pizza is an integral component of the average diet, Momo’s rises above the rest, leaving its chain counterparts in its wake.

Barnacle Bill’s It is clear when students first venture to Florida State University as freshmen that Tallahassee will be different from their hometown. Often, one of these differences include proximity to the ocean. Since Tallahassee is not know for its waterfront views

BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor

or white sandy beaches, one can infer that the seafood scene is Tallahassee is sub-par. Fortunately, Barnacle Bill’s Seafood Restaurant is the saving grace for students who feel homesick and need their seafood fix. Located on North Monroe Street, Barnacle

Jenny’s Lunchbox

Momo’s

Chipotle Mexican Grill all changed in December 2010 with the addition of not one, but two Chipotle restaurants. Chipotle devotees, Banks and Crowley developed a Facebook page dedicated to increasing the demand for the one-ofa-kind Mexican chain. Thought it was a seemingly far-fetched approach to get Chipotle’s attention, the page quickly grew in popularity and began getting noticed. After garnering about 2,000 fans on their page, Banks and Crowley were then contacted by Chipotle headquar-

Pocket’s Pool and Pub— many students have seen it; few have experienced. This lack of mainstream Florida State University students may be intentional. The pool hall is a selfproclaimed “alternative to the college bars.” Located on Sharer Road, it is hard to miss the pool hall. With 22 pool tables, six bowling lanes, seven dart

boards and 50 high-definition TVs, Pocket’s has a lot to offer patrons. The pub also hosts karaoke, trivia and poker nights. And, of course, there is a daily happy hour. Pocket’s has its own pool league where seasoned pool veterans can compete. Pocket’s also offers food to their patrons. The spot can be rented for private parties, as well. For more information about the establishment, visit pocketspoolandpub.com.

Bill’s boasts the “Best Raw Oysters in Tallahassee.” The family-friendly seafood restaurant has dinner specials daily and a happy hour every day from 4-7 p.m. and 9-11 p.m. Also, Barnacle Bill’s accommodates college students’ hectic schedules by offering all

of their menu items for take-out. “Down Below,” the restaurant’s adjoining bar and local watering hole, can be rented by organizations to hold events. For more information on dinner specials, happy hour or rental space, visit barnaclebills.com.

AGATA WLODARCZYK Arts & Life Editor This year’s Best of Tallahassee winner for the Best Breakfast is Jenny’s Lunchbox. A longtime Tallahassee favorite for breakfast, Jenny’s has two locations (N. Magnolia Street and W. Tennessee Street) to serve hungry patrons on two sides of town. The Lunchbox offers an assortment of breakfast favorites including pancakes, turkey sausage and, of course, eggs and bacon, as well as lunch staples such as burgers and sandwiches. Jenny’s opens at 6:30 a.m. and serves breakfast and brunch until 2:30 p.m. daily.

Chick-fil-A BAILEY SHERTZINGER Assistant News Editor

Kristen Alberico/FSView

A customer purchases a meal from Chick-fil-A from Chick-fil-A on Monroe Street. Chickfil-A was voted Best Fast Food for Best of Tallahassee 2011.

For many students at Florida State University, two words describe their Monday and Thursday nights: College. Night. Arguably one of the best specials in Tallahassee, Chick-fil-A’s college night has become a staple for FSU students. For those who have never ventured to one of the five Chickfil-A locations in Tallahassee, students receive a free chicken sandwich or box of chicken nuggets with the purchase of a meal. This promotion happens every Monday and Thursday from 4-10 p.m. In addition to the infamous college night, Chick-

fil-A beat out the competitors by staying true to their name and values. One will not find a quadruple-staked bacon burger on their menu. Instead, Chick-fil-A offers a variety of chicken-based meals, and the waffle fries instead of french fries. Also, Chick-fil-A managed to win Best Fast Food restaurant despite being closed every Sunday. Some even say this dedication to family values is endearing and makes Chick-fil-A the best of Tallahassee.

THANKS TALLY FOR VOTING US BEST BREAKFAST JOINT!

BANKRUPTCY AUCTION

20/20 NightClub ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer Since the beginning of the fall semester, 20/20 has hosted turnouts from every celebrity such as multi-platinum hip-hop artist Ludacris to infamous house DJ Steve Aoki and, most recently, genre-bending producer and DJ Diplo. The club

has consistently drawn enormous crowds and the venue’s weekly “Finally Fridays” have become a hotbed of student activity. “If it’s a Friday night, I know that I’m going to see all of my friends there,” said FSU sophomore Taylor Schwebach. “I go to 20/20 more often than most clubs in Tallahassee because it’s bigger and it always gets great performers to go there. I met Ludacris in VIP there after his homecoming performance. He shook my hand and smiled at me. I’m pretty sure I

died, went to heaven and came back. The experience was so surreal.” Other students must feel the same way as Schwebach, because 20/20 was voted “Best Club” in this year’s Best of Tallahassee awards. “Personally, I like Baja’s more, but if 20/20 had more votes, then I guess I’m in a minority,” expressed freshman Monika Kluziak. “Either way, a club is a club— except for Mint. Mint is too classy.” Freshman Alex Resnick chimed into the argument with a male’s

perspective. “The best club to me is the club with the cutest girls,” he said. “The rankings change on a day-to-day basis but 20/20 usually has a pretty good-looking crowd. Most people go there on Fridays and, since it’s the weekend, they usually party harder than they would on other days, so that probably helped 20/20 get some votes, as well.” Join the rest of the party at this week’s “Finally Fridays.” In the words of Rebecca Black, “It’s Friday. We so excited.”

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BEST OF TALLAHASSEE

GRACE NORBERG Senior Staff Writer Wells Brothers Bar and Grill, more commonly known as Monk’s, has long been a Tallahassee staple

Monk’s because of its unique burger and beer options. Monk’s is an all-American type of restaurant, with a casual atmosphere and traditional fare such as wings, cheese fries, burg-

ers and pizza. What sets this place apart from the crowd, however, is that Monk’s puts a gourmet twist on all the food they serve—for example, even their cheese fries come

with homemade ranch. “My favorite thing about Monk’s is that you can make your own burger with any toppings you could imagine,” said FSU junior Noelle Mandolfo. “Their vegan burger is phenomenal; you’re not missing anything. You just feel good when you eat there— you can see and taste every ingredient that they use.” Some of the toppings may seem bizarre, but they’re on the menu for a

Moe’s Southwest Grill J. MICHAEL OSBORNE Managing Editor Sure, Tallahassee may have found a shiny new girlfriend named Chipo-

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

tle, twice, but when it comes to getting Tex-Mex bang for your buck, Moe’s just can’t be beat. If you go the burrito route (or, “Joey Bag of Donuts,” as Moe’s fully loaded burrito is known), that means something resembling a truckload of rice, beans, meat, salsa and the choice of guacamole and sour cream, next to a helping of complimentary chips

and, if you order it (and, duh, you should), their signature queso, all on a college student budget. “The combination of Moe’s queso and classic rock,” says FSU senior and Moe’s regular Beau Schwarz, “is enough to make any fully grown man weep with joy.” With a newly revamped menu and look, Moe’s is like a quirky, one-of-a-

kind college-town treasure that just happens to be everywhere. Whether it’s for study-fuel, a Sunday dinner or hungover Saturday afternoon lunch, this is a restaurant that should stay toward the top of every student’s list when they’re looking for a place to get sick from overeating, without overdrawing their dangerously low checking account.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Monk’s famous burger has to be eaten to be believed. reason—patrons think they’re delicious. A popular option is the Lip Smacker, which is a burger with smoked bacon, cheddar cheese and creamy peanut butter on top. There is something for everyone at Monk’s, from a gyro to a Reuben sandwich. It

X-Mart Adult Supercenter

JESSE DAMIANI

Higher Ground Bike Shop NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor For many college students, buying a bike is

a rite of passage, a testament to a newfound vigor for the outdoors and a heightened environmental sensibility. In Tallahassee, there’s no place better to buy or service your twowheeled, self-propelled mode of transportation than Higher Ground. Founded by managers Roger Hawkes and Todd May over 10 years ago,

more natives of Tallahassee turn to Higher Ground than any other bike shop in town. Higher Ground has two locations in Tallahassee: a Mountain Bike Shop on Tennessee just past Magnolia and another location on Capital Circle NE geared more toward road bike aficionados. Both locations boast a wide se-

lection of both mountain and road bikes and an experienced staff to service either style of bike. So whether you’re hitting the trail or looking for a speedier, parkingfrustration-free way to get to class, when it comes to bicycles, Higher Ground Bike Shop is the class of Tallahassee.

is a seat-yourself restaurant with both outdoor, indoor and bar dining options. Monk’s located on Tharpe Street across from Bruster’s and is open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday, and until 11 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.

News Editor Well, X-Mart has finally thrust itself to the forefront, penetrating the ranks in pursuit of the crown of Tallahassee’s go-to stop for all things sexy. Visiting X-Mart is nothing short of a rite of passage as a Seminole, and coming inside is always further confirma-

tion in the validity of Rule 34 (“if it exists, there is a fetish for it”). Whether seeking oils, costumes, cuffs or edible goods, it has a great spread, with more than a few options for any craving. Located on West Tennessee Street near Wal-Mart, X-Mart is a quick jaunt from campus, making it easy for students to slip in and out if they’re in a hurry, though many prefer to take their time and enjoy the sensory stimulation. Against stiff competition, X-Mart has set an even stiffer bar, casting a long hard shadow on other adult stores.

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Kristen Alberico/FSView

TCC students James Jones and Kelly Halcomb enjoy Taco Bell burritos. Taco Bell was voted Best Late Night Munchies for Best of Tallahassee 2011.

Taco Bell While it’s a far cry from representing Tallahassee’s local flavor as a chain establishment, Jacobson added that it’s just as in-

ADAM CLEMENT Editor-in-Chief Maybe it’s the unavoidable location on Tennessee Street. Maybe it’s because, aside from Guthrie’s, Waffle House, Hip Hop Fish and Chicken, McDonald’s, Whataburger, Sumo Sabi, and the like, it’s one of the only places around that offers your favorite (and affordable) tacos, burritos and quesadillas at the hour you want them. Whether you’re driving on through or stammering on in for a food fix after a night of partying, it would seem the only thing the last call bell would signal is a trip to Taco Bell, as voted on by the Tallahassee community as best late night munchies spot in town. “When the bars close, this is the place to be,” said FSU alumna Ivy Jacobson. “I’ve seen (and been part of) the drivethru line clear down Tennessee at 3 a.m. with fellow bar-hoppers waiting close to 30 minutes for a crunchwrap, gordita or volcano taco.”

tegral an experience as Florida State’s other traditions. “Besides going to FSU football games and jump-

ing in the Westcott fountain, you aren’t a true [Seminole] till you’ve been to Taco Bell after midnight.”

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ADAM CLEMENT Editor-in-Chief Waking Sleeping Beauty—March 28 at 7:45 p.m. Animation week at the SLC continues with this documentary on Disney’s historic golden years, as produced by Disney (so you know all the shady deaths are still being covered up). Waking Sleeping Beauty chronicles the studio’s rise, fall and corporate shuffle of its animated division from 1980’s The Fox and the Hound to 1994’s The Lion King and everything in between, making this a must-see for fans of Disney lore. Finding Nemo— March 28 at 10:15 p.m. I’m not sure I know anyone who’s not seen Pixar’s Finding Nemo. Add to that, I’m not sure I’ve met anyone who’s not found it either “adorable,” “amazing,” or “pretty much the best movie ever.” So, by this line of logic, to see it is to love it, I suppose. For those out there who have yet to find Finding Nemo, then, I concede I can’t quite sell a movie any better than the aforementioned, anonymous testimonies I just pulled out of my memory. If you must know, it’s a father-

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F l a m b e a u

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 7

You know what it is: Wiz Khalifa chats with ‘FSView’ Famed rapper dishes on his new album, label switch and upcoming movie

ERIC JAFFE Staff writer FSView & Florida Flambeau: Rolling Papers is your first album being released on Atlantic records. You started up on Warner Bros., but decided to go independent after a few months on the label. [As an independent artist,] you built up a huge, huge fanbase before coming back to Atlantic with a lot more leverage. How do you think having a huge fanbase before signing to a major label impacted the development of your Atlantic debut? Wiz Khalifa: It didn’t really affect the album at all. It just affected the push for the album. I came to the label with

a bunch of people who actually wanted to hear the album, not just a single or a song. I had actually released albums before [signing to Atlantic] that had sold and I’d made money touring, as well. At the end of the day, it just gave me that confidence to know that the next move I made was going to big one, whether it was on a major label or not. FFF: You’re probably one of the most versatile hip-hop artists in the game right now; you have your club bangers, your street singles, your stoner anthems. What kind of sound overall would you say fans could expect from the new album? WK: The same thing. It’s really going to be consistent with what I’ve been doing. I put all of those types of songs out there so people can know me and, when I put them all on the album, it can be expected. I’ve got radio hits, I’ve SEE KHALIFA 19

Wizkhalifa.com

Wiz Khalifa opens up in a candid interview with the ‘FSView.’

Wiz Khalifa lights up ‘Rolling Papers’

SEE LIFE 18

Generic hip-hop and potential classics in one package ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer

RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor Menace Beach: April Fools Edition with Klever, Team Jaguar, CJ Milli, Ben Danner and Truewill—Friday, April 1, doors 9 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $10 (21+), $12 (under 21), ladies FREE until 11 p.m. The son of famous blues musician Juke Joint Johnny, DJ Klever, aka Josh Winkler, was surrounded by music while growing up. At the age of four, he received his first drum set and by 16, he found a passion for the turntable and began studying DJs such as Premier, Cash Money, Jazzy Jeff and Afrika Bambaataa. In an effort to get his name out there, Klever constantly competed in DJ competitions and by 2000, was inducted into the famous Allies crew (Craze and A-Trak) after winning the national DMC competition. Since then, the Atlanta native has remained among the ranks of recognized DJs, having established his name long ago and developing a signature style that includes blending everything from SEE LOWDOWN 18

Wizkhalifa.com

There are few things in this world more disappointing than seeing one of your favorite artists sell out. One day, he’s your personal gem. You promote his music to anyone who will listen. The next day, he’s all over the radio singing cookie-cutter pop music that everyone else is listening to but you. Rolling Papers was supposed to be the album that brought Wiz Khalifa

WIZ KHALIFA Rolling Papers

HHHHH one step further from his core fanbase and 10 steps closer to Katy Perry fanatics. I am happy to say that the keywords in that last sentence were “supposed to be.” As it turns SEE PAPERS 19

Matt Stone and Trey Parker hit Broadway ‘South Park’ creators talk about new play ‘The Book of Mormon’ ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer You may know Matt Stone and Trey Parker as the creators of the massively popular Comedy Central television series South Park. Friends since college, the filmmaking duo has spent more than a decade satirizing the world around them, but on March 24, the duo brought their seasoned talents to a fresh medium: musical theater. “[Making a musical] is something that I’ve always wanted to do since I was a kid,” said Parker when speaking of his latest creation, The Book of Mormon. “A big Broadway musical was some-

thing that I wanted to do probably even before movies and television. Once Matt and I got together, we started doing musicals—we made a lot of our movies musicals. [Heading to Broadway] never really seemed like a crazy idea, but more the thing that we were heading toward.” Set in the present day, The Book of Mormon tells the story of two young Mormon missionaries sent to spread the word of their church in a dangerous part of Uganda. Like Parker and Stone’s past creations, the play portrays serious topics in a not-so-serious manner. According to SEE MORMON 19

Renee Rodriguez/FSView

Diplo, aka Wesley Pentz, delivers a stellar set on Monday, March 21, at 20/20.

Diplo delivers at 20/20 The ‘FSView’ gets exclusive with famed DJ RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor Last November, when I found out that the everpopular genre-bending DJ and producer Diplo was going to perform in Grand Central Miami in

December, I didn’t hesitate for a minute to purchase a ticket. On the day of the actual show, however, there was a family emergency, which caused me to miss the show. When word began spreading that he’d be

performing at 20/20 Nightclub this semester, I knew nothing would stop me from seeing him live again (even if it was on a Monday night) and I knew I wanted a minute SEE DIPLO 19


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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

CDU hosts Queer Music Showcase Pride Student Union and Black Student Union host Shunda K and others

JESSICA MILITARE Staff Writer On Tuesday, March 29, Club Downunder will host the Queer Music Showcase sponsored by the Pride Student Union in association with the Black Student Union. The event will feature Shunda K of Yo! Majesty with opening acts Gio Black Peter and local band From a City in Trees. As the leader of hip-hop group Yo! Majesty, Shunda K has commanded the stage with sonorous rhymes and sexually charged jams worthy of the dance floor. As a lyrical orator, she has embraced her lesbianism, along with her faith, integrating pride through outspoken and titillating songs. Since parting from Yo! Majesty, Shunda has been on the grind: collaborating with Peaches on her

last album, I Feel Cream, appearing on the track “Billionaire,” and touring with the electro-vixen. Additionally, she has circulated a number of EPs with French producer Flore and Damp Heat, has participated in an array of music festivals and released her own compilation, The Most Wanted, in January on Fanatic Records. The album’s single “Here I Am To Save The World” was listed by NME as one of “10 Tracks You Need To Hear,” adding Shunda K to its “Cool List.” With all this under her belt, she continues forward with seething confidence. “I’m just personally trying to be the best I can be and be all I can be,” said Shunda K. “It’s about maintaining your character and integrity—all of that plays into being successful.” On her new album, she has taken on themes such as love, sex, politics, saving the earth and identity. Shunda sees the hand-clapping track, “Chasing Dat Sound,” as her mantra. “I want you to listen to what I have to say, but at

the same time, be finding yourself,” said Shunda. “Listen to my testimony and the steps that I took and be encouraged.” Coming from a religious and sheltered household, Shunda was taught to act and dress a certain way— which, upon entering out into world, gave her a new reality and perspective. “Coming up as a kid, I was really sheltered, so once I got out in the real world, no one really told me about it,” said Shunda. “Seeing things on my own, I had to defend myself, so from that I got a little bit harder and now I don’t tolerate a lot.” The split of Yo! Majesty was trying for the femcee, but she’s proud to say that her talent has matured because of the group. “It was through Yo! Majesty that I have come to the place where I can be a universal artist and be able to appeal and get down on any genre of music, ya feel me?” said Shunda. “I am music.” The Yo! Majesty-reuniting “I’m Da’ Best” could mean a truce for the group.

The track discusses gender inequality in the Bible with words from Shon B, who was originally part of Yo! Majesty. Despite her struggles, Shunda K has risen above, equipped with an ardent faith in God. “I want people to embrace who they are, and not fake it to make it,” said Shunda. “We can be who we are and be successful and be loved by God. I mean after all, he created each and every one of us.” Faced with the reality that discrimination and criticism may come her way, she views fear as a call to action. She recognizes a dream is cultivated in the mind and to make it happen requires hard work and tools to mend failure. A levelheaded artist, Shunda revealed that she only fights back when necessary. “I listen to my album a lot, just to make sure it makes sense, because you know I see good reviews, and then I see bad reviews,” said Shunda. “Once I pop it in I’m like, ‘Them motherf*****s crazy; this album da bomb.”

IF YOU GO WHEN

Tuesday, March 29, doors at 8:30 p.m., show at 9:30 p.m. WHERE

Club Downunder LINEUP

Shunda K, From A City In Trees ADMISSION

Free for everyone A lover of people, Shunda believes that it doesn’t matter who a person is, she’s here to spread her love. More importantly, she believes in the preservation of the earth. “If we begin to appreciate earth more, I think we’ll be a lot healthier,” said Shunda. “When it comes to the earth, a bunch of trees are getting cut down. Don’t they know that’s how we breathin’?” Opening act Gio Black

Peter, performance artist extraordinaire, will grace the stage as well. Known for his psychosexual and socially analytical aesthetic, his presence will add a contrasting blend to the show’s artistry. From A City In Trees will also perform, representing a local flavor of blues and indie rock. “A showcase like this brings people together,” said Megan McKenzie, lead vocalist of From A City In Trees. “We’re really stoked to be opening for Shunda K, and are really honored to have been chosen to play this show.” When asked what she will bring to Tallahassee on Tuesday, Shunda K had plenty to say. “I’m gon’ bring the party,” said Shunda. “I’m gonna get the chance to minister and y’all just sit back and listen for a minute, and then we gon’ bring out some partying time so you can dance the night away, and then I’m gonna show you about real love, and how to maintain that, and have the whole package.”

‘Sucker Punch’ fails to land a hit New film from ambitious blockbuster director Zack Snyder falls flat

ERIC SARRANTONIO Staff Writer Zack Snyder, the director and co-screenwriter of Sucker Punch, has had a fairly safe and easy career in the film industry remaking and adapting other narrative works to the screen. Snyder is most well known for his adaptations of the famous graphic novels 300 and Watchmen, two extremely popular titles. All of Snyder’s films have been commercial successes, but they have not all been well recieved by

film critics. With his first attempt at writing an original screenplay, Snyder is likely to disappoint the fans just as much as the critics. Co-written with Steve Shibuya, another first timer at writing an original screenplay, Sucker Punch started its development in early 2007 only to be halted by Watchmen. With Watchmen out of the way, production on Sucker Punch started again in 2009. In the many years the film has been in production, it seems like more attention was focused at the stylization of the film rather than the strength of the story. It’s hard to say that the story has a large amount of plot holes because Snyder uses a number of cheap

narrative techniques, allotted to him by the fantasy genre, to cover up any weaknesses in the story. Those cover-ups, however, act as a sort of botched plastic surgery job and toy—rather obviously— with the audience’s suspension of disbelief. There seems to be an on and off switch for conflict in the movie. At times when one might expect more of a struggle from the film’s female leads, all issues are resolved by invisible fate. And, at other occasions when their battles seem to be won, a new difficulty appears out of nowhere to lead the story hastily in its intended direction. Sucker Punch does redeem itself slightly through its special effects. There are some truly in-

credible sequences in the film that distract from the many flaws of story. This, however, should be of no surprise, because more often than ever, studios think they can get away with eye-catching effects in lieu of narrative artistry. Snyder’s effects-overstory approach is particularly obvious in the many scenes where there is practically no dialogue. The film’s lead actress Emily Browning has fewer lines than most of the other cast, probably with the intention of drawing in a large audience with an attractive female lead. It’s a good thing she has so few lines, however, because she is easily the film’s worst actress, with less emotional range than

a comic book villain. Compared to probably the greatest director still making big-budget studio films, Christopher Nolan, Snyder’s films look like a cheap knock-off version of what blockbusters should be. Warner Bros. must have been ignorant to the huge mismatch of the two directors when they hired Nolan last year to mentor the development of Snyder’s Superman reboot. Many fans are hoping that a great deal of Nolan’s touch comes through in the final product. When the Superman reboot comes out next year—with the safety of adapted material and the help of Nolan—Snyder may impress his biggest critics yet, but certainly

original storytelling, genius Danny Elfman score, and pitch-perfect mix of grim and cheer in Jack Skellington’s misguided journey to do Christmas his way. Whether you first saw it in ’93 or in 3D, you know you’re a fan if you can properly identify the Burton-regular voice actors, or simply love to troll novice film types who believe Tim Burton directed this one. (Hint: He didn’t.)

nal, unique vision sure to shatter whatever conceptions one may have about animation. Needless to say, these aren’t your childhood’s Saturday morning cartoons.

for an uncomfortable first date, Sylvain Chomet’s Les Triplettes de Belleville is nothing if not wonderfully eccentric, as it follows an old woman in her quest to save her Tour de France cyclist grandson from the mafia. Take it from me: It’s worth it. Just do those around you a solid and remember to eat before you go.

and the former being flatout abused by boxers in the ring—a powerful supporting cast lifts what could have passed as the umpteenth Rocky sequel to that of true contender, as Micky may or may not inevitably find it within himself to roll with the punches and tell his naysayers to “Say hi to your mother for me” (but, you know, with his fists).

The Fighter—March 31-April 2 at 7:30 and 10:15 p.m.

Johnny Mnemonic— April 1 at midnight

SUCKER PUNCH DIRECTOR

Zack Snyder STARRING

Emily Browning, Abbie Cornish, Jena Malone SCREENPLAY

Zack Snyder, Steve Shibuya MOVIE STUDIO

Legendary Pictures RATED PG-13

HHHHH needs to mature as a scribe before he returns to writing original works like Sucker Punch.

LIFE from 17 son, fish-out-of-water adventure about a father clownfish (Albert Brooks) searching for his son affectionately named Nemo. The rest, as per Pixar’s track record, is undercut by family-friendly comedy and moral lessons about life, especially Dory’s antisuicide anthem, “Keep on Swimming.” The Nightmare Before Christmas—March 29 at 8 and 10:15 p.m. What might be my favorite animated film of all time, this hauntingly beautiful stop-motion masterpiece mashup of Halloween and Christmas doesn’t need a holiday to make a stop at the SLC. While it may be plagued by Hot Topic’s shameless merchandising, there’s no denying the brilliance of

Nine Nation Animation—March 30 at 7 p.m. From The World According to Shorts comes this vignette-laced film featuring nine animated shorts from around the world. Utilizing a myriad of filmmaking techniques, each represents an origi-

The Triplets of Belleville—March 30 at 10 p.m. True story: I once took a girl out on a date to this film. It’s French, it’s eccentric and I was trying entirely too hard. This, of course, soon became one of the most awkward experiences of my life upon realizing that this was an almost dialogue-free film, notwithstanding some quirky sounds and music here and there. While incessant stomach growls and futile make-out attempts made

Director David O. Russell’s underdog parable stars Mark Wahlberg and (finally) Academy Awardwinner Christian Bale as boxing brothers Micky and Dicky. With each fighting their own share of battles—the latter facing drug abuse,

In the year 2021, we won’t have to worry about memorizing trivial information for tests, our significant other’s birthday, or the names of people we met while hopelessly intoxicated. According to the cult 1995 film based on the short story by William Gib-

son starring a manic, preMatrix Keanu Reeves, we can store up to 80 gigs in our craniums, making us (or in this case, him) walking flash drives containing precious information. Unfortunately for Reeves, he’s downloaded some super-sensitive stuff—too much to be safe for his brain’s capacity, at that—making him a sad Keanu whose brain may very well explode in this Far East-inspired, dystopian cyber-thriller. Featuring Ice-T, Henry Rollins and Dolph Lundgren, Johnny Mnemonic offers an ample quota of classic overacting and gaudy special effects to provide more than enough midnight movie madness. It should be noted, however, for those in the know: Room service is not included.

This week, they bring garage pop-punk band Bare Wires, hailing from Oakland, Calif. “[…] Bare Wires is a move away from Melton’s ‘Biker-Psych’ to something that they call ‘Smooth Punk’ […] Can you believe this s**t? This is world we live in now. Soft Punk. F**k. Embarrassingly, I even understand

exactly what they are talking about and it works. S**t. It’s good,” according to Z-Gun Fanzine. Joining this “soft punk” band is Surf City, a loud, upbeat, layered band all the way from Auckland, New Zealand. Opening acts include locals Boss Fight and D**kkicker along with Orlando natives Lazy Boyzzz.

LOWDOWN from 17 booty music to new wave. Joining him are Menace Beach resident DJs, Team Jaguar and Ben Danner along with Tampa’s femme DJ, CJ Milli, while Truewill spins on the patio. First Friday Benefit: Ha Ha Hospital with This Old Machine, Small Talk and Sad Kids—Friday, April 1, doors 7:30

p.m. at The Farside. Admission: $5 In conjunction with Railroad Square’s First Friday event, The Farside will host a benefit show. Among the performing acts are local lo-fi acoustic duo Ha Ha Hospital along with fellow local experimental nu-folkcore band This Old Machine, headed

by Stefan Lang (guitar, vocals) and Caitlin Dunn (guitar, vocals) and Mikey (banjo, vocals, percussion). In addition, Small Talk, Sad Kis and Parasol will be performing. Back to the Garage Presents: Bare Wires with Surf City, Boss Fight, D**kkicker and Lazy Boyzzz—Sunday,

April 3, doors 9 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $7 (all ages), Free beer (21+) Organized by locals Sharod Bines and Merle Causey, Back to the Garage is a concert series that continually plays hosts to various local and/ or touring in different venues across Tallahassee.

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MORMON from 17 Stone and Parker, however, the production feels like nothing they have done before. “[The Book of Mormon] is a completely different animal [from South Park],” said Parker. “We’re so used to being able to do whatever we want. Like, in any scene, we can say, ‘Let’s have a tank show up,’ and ‘Let’s have half of France show up,’ and we can do all of that. With [The Book of

Mormon] we spent years trying to work out the limitations of the whole thing [...] I think if anyone saw it and then learned that [Matt and I] wrote it, they wouldn’t be shocked, but it also doesn’t feel like a South Park episode at all.” Inspired by the Mormon population of their hometown in Colorado, Stone and Parker have been working on The Book of Mormon for seven years.

In that time period, the two have made as sincere an effort to learn as much about missionaries as they possibly could—talking to Mormons in Salt Lake City and conducting their own research online. “There was a lot of Wikipedia time,” said Parker. “[Our research] depended on where the musical was going. If we needed to talk about baptisms, then we might suddenly spend a whole day researching

that and seeing how [Mormons] do all of that [.…] The Church of Latter-Day Saints actually has its own Wikipedia-formatted thing, so they make it very easy on someone who wants to learn everything about their church.” In their brand of comedy, Stone and Parker may find some difficulty in separating their own thoughts and feelings from those of their characters. Still, unlike other bias-

driven satirists, the duo does try their best to make their messages as universal as possible. “The shows that Trey and I like best are those where the characters speak for themselves,” said Stone. “I think that, for some of the episodes of South Park, we’ve gone a little bit more the other way, but, again, our favorite stories are the ones that are true to themselves. The Book of Mor-

mon is more in that vein than anything else we’ve done.” Students can catch Stone and Parker’s acclaimed new play at the Eugene O’Neill Theater in New York. Shows will be running until September, leaving those interested plenty of time to head up north. Tickets are being sold at www.bookofmormonbroadway.com for upward of $69 apiece.

Comedycentral.com

‘South Park’ creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker make their Broadway debut with ‘The Book of Mormon.’

Bleedingcool.com

Accoding to Stone and Parker, ‘The Book of Mormon’ is completely different from their Comedy Central hit, ‘South Park.’

PAPERS from 17 out, Rolling Papers is one hell of an album. If you had asked me six months ago what I thought about Wiz Khalifa, I would have had nothing but praise for the young rapper. After a slew of outstanding mixtapes, Khalifa has solidified himself within the hip-hop community as a force to be reckoned with. Then came “Black & Yellow.” A chart-topping, starmaking, smash of a hit single, “Black & Yellow” was arguably the biggest

hip-hop track of 2010. The track’s production (courtesy of the alwaysreliable Norwegian production duo Stargate) mixed with Khalifa’s laidback rhymes proved to be exactly what the radio was looking for—and precisely what fans of the mixtape Khalifa had feared. Cliché and generic are two words that can be used to describe “Black & Yellow.” How many rappers can brag about their cars before the public gets sick

of hearing about it? If urban radio is any indication, the answer is “too many.” The album’s second single, “Roll Up,” and album track “No Sleep,” reek of the same tired formula. Thankfully, my negative criticism of the album ends here. Aside from the radioaimed lead singles, Rolling Papers is an album tailor-made for the fans. Tracks like “On My Level” and “The Race” easily rank amongst the best of the artist’s career.

The songs are catchy, but never generic; braggadocio, but never off-putting; heartfelt, but never melodramatic—classic Khalifa tracks worthy of immediate download. Similar praise can be applied to “Rooftops.” Featuring frequent mixtape collaborator Curren$y, “Rooftops” takes the generic “we in the building” theme that Lil Wayne has been pushing for years and makes it sound fresh and exciting. Wiz has never been hip-

hop’s best lyricist, but what he lacks in lyrical extravagance he makes up for in versatility. The array of sounds found on Rolling Papers alone makes it worth listening to. Listeners from all walks of life are bound to find at least one song that they can relate to and enjoy. In a genre often criticized for it’s lack of variety, this LP is a nice break away from the average hip-hop release. Overall, Rolling Papers

is an album that appeals to new and old fans alike. Generic singles come abound, but more often than not, Khalifa’s talent manages to shine through the plastic. Aside from the migraine-inducing “Top Floor,” the album lacks any true filler. Khalifa still has a lot of room for improvement (singing lessons would be a start), but for the time being, I am more than happy to light some—I mean listen to—Rolling Papers.

[process] actually makes things seem more spontaneous and fun. People back in the day used to be able to hold onto that stuff for a bit longer; we’re just throwing it out there now.

papers inside of the album, because, you know, people today kind of need an incentive to go out and purchase a physical copy, and I feel like that would be it. WK: [Laughs] I want to be able to sell [the album] at Wal-Mart too, though, so I’m going to have to cut myself off. Not everybody’s a smoker, so I want to make the album more for everybody.

vorite [remix]? WK: I like all of them. Everybody is doing the song over and it actually makes people pay more attention to the record in general. It’s just an honor to see people finding the beat and flipping it how they want to flip it.

gone pop? WK: Those people never really listened to all of my music, because anyone who has really listened to my music knows that I’ve been versatile since day one. Anyone who’s not willing to flow with the movement wasn’t a true fan anyway because, at the end of the day, I know, as an artist, that I haven’t changed anything or compromised anything and I’m the one who makes the music. It’s not up to [those fans] where the artist goes, because they can easily just become a fan of somebody else, which is completely fine. But, as far as my core fans and the real fans, they all understand where I’m going.

That was it.

KHALIFA from 17 got club bangers, I’ve got stoner hits, underground singles that I just felt were great songs—it’s really a mixture of everything. FFF: You’ve been releasing a lot of material online lately, whether it is your Cabin Fever mixtape, new singles, guest features or whatever else. How much, if any, of the material that’s been floating around the Internet is actually going be on Rolling Papers? WK: None of that is going to be on the album except for maybe a song or two off [the mixtape] Cabin Fever, but that’s really it. The rest of that stuff is just free music. I record all the time. What’s kind of cool about now is that everybody is moving so fast with their music so, if somebody sends me a beat and I jump on now, it’s usually out by next week. I think that

FFF: Is an official tracklist set for the album or is it still being reworked? WK: We’re set on our end. [The album] isn’t ready to be released yet, but we’re set. The album is turned in for mixing and mastering, and we’re getting the packaging ready. Everything is done. FFF: I have a question in regard to the packaging situation: Can the album artwork be rolled? WK: [Laughs] No, you won’t be able to roll it. I want you to keep that. The papers are sold separately.

FFF: Lets talk about the first single, “Black and Yellow.” I think the song was this year’s “A Milli” in the sense that every rapper on the face of the planet wanted to record freestyle to it or record a remix. You even had Tom Hanks’ son doing a remix. Did you hear that, by any chance? WK: Yeah. I heard it. That was pretty crazy.

FFF: Did you think that the track was going to be as big as it is when you were actually recording it? WK: No. I always knew it was a good song and I knew it would be a big record for me and for Pittsburgh, but I didn’t think it was going to do as well as it did.

FFF: Is there a way to actually put some rolling

FFF: Did you have a fa-

FFF: Since you achieved the level of popularity that you have, you’re always going to hear people claiming you “sold out” and went mainstream. How do you respond to people who claim you’ve

to loving his job, no matter how tiring it can get. “It started in Philadelphia about five years ago and then we moved to L.A.—that’s where we’re based now and we just do music there,” said Wentz about the growth of Mad Decent. “It was just, like, a singles label [at first] and then we moved to L.A. three years ago— actually, it was when I played at FSU [the last time], so four years ago. Now we’re based in making music but also based in a touring side. We also have block parties each year, which are a big deal.” Through his label, Pentz has released a number of records, but despite his growing popularity, not all have been met with acclaim. Pentz experi-

enced similar criticism as a student at Temple University. Enthralled by different cultures, Pentz studied anthropology and film, with the hopes of blending the two studies into one and also toyed with the idea of sifting through different cultures and picking out elements that he liked about each. According to some of his colleagues and professors, however, this seemed ethically wrong and they criticized him for doing so. When he transitioned into music, his love of culture followed, which is evident in both his original and collaborative material that expresses a sense of worldly influence—ranging from baile funk to indie rock. Though it has essential-

ly helped establish him as someone who isn’t afraid of stepping out of bounds, not all music critics feel as though his method of blending genres is a good thing. Pentz, however, says he doesn’t focus on the naysayers. “I don’t listen to the critics anymore,” he assured. “My thing is, I got into this because I’m fascinated by culture and critics— they don’t do what I do, they don’t make music so they’re not really valid to me. I love the artists I work with. I produce records all over the world and I collaborate with all sorts of people.” A constant worker, Pentz continually tours around the nation and across the world, performing, collaborating with a number of artists

FFF: Well, that’s what the fans really want to hear. Do you want to talk about the High School movie that you have coming out with Snoop Dogg? WK: Yeah. We don’t actually have an official date on it yet, but we’re still working on the movie. The soundtrack is almost done, which is really, really, exciting. Hopefully we’ll have it at least done by the summer time, but there’s not an official date.

FFF: Do you want to provide any insight as to what kind of collaborations made the final tracklisting? WK: Just Curren$y.

FFF: Did you and Snoop actually write the film or what’s the story behind that? WK: No. We had some other guys write the script for us, but we determined what we wanted [the story] to be around. We picked up some guys that each of us know and we just made it happen.

and coming up with new material—a seemingly exhausting task but one that Pentz loves at the end of the day. “It’s hard, but what I do is fun, so it’s not like it really matters,” he said. “It doesn’t feel like I’m working too hard. I get tired all the time. I’m tired as f**k. I had to wake up at nine in the morning and I won’t get to sleep until, like, four or five a.m. Everyday is like that, but I’m lucky to do this. I’m just trying to document as much as I can with what I do because that’s really the only thing I can do.” Following our conversation, I headed back inside the club and waited amongst a swarm of fans eager for him to get onstage. As the crowd went

crazy and delivered deafening screams for Pentz throughout the night, I took a moment to absorb the atmosphere around me, to really feel the music and to watch him in action. As I witnessed him take command of the stage, I realized how fortunate we all were to be in the presence of someone who is completely willing to put aside any criticism while hardly taking a break from work all for the sake of exploring and blending the beautiful diversity the world has to offer and delivering something in return to his adoring fans. I can only hope that it won’t be long before Pentz makes another visit to Tallahassee. In the meantime, we’ll be waiting with open arms.

DIPLO from 17 to talk to Diplo, aka Wesley Pentz, the man behind the music. On Monday, March 21, legions of fans gathered outside of 20/20 Nightclub to witness an electrifying set by Diplo and opening sets by local DJs Alex M, James Henderson, Crespo, Markstarr, ESP, Chris Manley and Ben Danner. With the help of Marcel Katz and Alex Gruenberg, co-founders of Evil Genius Records who also organized his appearance, I made my way backstage for an exclusive interview with Pentz before his set. Though our conversation was barely audible at times (as opening acts were already making the crowd go crazy inside), Pentz shed light on everything from his highly successful label Mad Decent


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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

Pat Metheny Trio plays Ruby Diamond Zachary Goldstein/FSView

Left: The Pat Metheny Trio performs in Ruby Diamond Auditorium as part of the Seven Days of Opening Nights Festival on March 23. Right: Pat Metheny plays a custom guitar-based instrument in Ruby Diamond Auditorium.

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more from Pat Manthey at Ruby Diamond.


‘That’s just, like, your opinion, man ...’ The editorials and cartoons within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the writer or illustrator. Any opinion that appears in the newspaper is exclusively that of the writer or illustrator and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers.

Have something to tell us? FSView & Florida Flambeau

MARCH 28, 2011

What was your favorite part of Spring Break? Survey says...

“I did go to Panama City Beach; I think just being around the beach was my favorite part.” —Xiomelie Crisostomo, sophomore

To subit a letter to the editor, shoot us a line via e-mail: managing_ editor@fsview.com. Please include full name, year in school, city and state.

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 2 1

In defense of teachers, and education HEATHER MCQUEEN Staff Writer In one of my previous articles, I discussed the current state of education within our nation, and specifically, the unfortunate situation teachers are facing. While there are many nuanced arguments about the quality of teachers, their deserving of “benefits” and the quality of education being provided in schools, it is also clear that there is an evident lack of interest or regard for the profession as a whole. That is, seemingly more and more college graduates are gravitating toward higher-paying careers—if they can find a paying career at all, given the economy. This presents a loss for the teaching profession,

and it is clear that, with lowered interest and draw for top-level graduates to the teaching profession, there inevitably come consequences. Gender plays a role within the profession, as well. When women were either expected to become secretaries or teachers (or other gender-specific roles), more highly qualified teachers were apparent within the profession. Yet now the opportunity to seek other careers, and more often than not, higher-paying ones, there is a coming absence of this quality of educator. One glaringly obvious factor is the fact that teachers are already underpaid to begin with. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, the average salary is $53,910, but the lowest in this range is $30,000, and the average starting salary is $39,000. This, combined with the current use of teachers as a political tool, and the politics within the profession, seem to dissuade

potentially highly qualified students from even considering teaching as a possible profession. According to the study performed by McKinsey & Co., a global management consulting firm, top performing nations recruit 100 percent of their teachers from the top third of college graduates, whereas the U.S. only recruits 23 percent, creating a massive talent gap within the teaching profession. Similarly, while the salary listed above may seem average or even well deserved, the study also found that many other countries’ teachers make the same level of salary, or greater, than engineers and attorneys. This likely comes as a shock to most of us, as it did when I first read the fact. But it makes sense, however, because the lack of regard and support for teachers is all too apparent within this country, especially when the media has tended to distort

their reputation to being “greedy” and “selfish” as of late. Additionally, the linking of student test scores with teachers’ salaries also undermines their ability and role within the educational system. In Florida, Gov. Rick Scott just passed legislation to ensure the implementation of this type of merit pay and salary calculation. Unfortunately, it is based on a hugely flawed system, the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). I’m not sure why, when the seeming majority of administrators, teachers and students all discount the validity and actual comprehensiveness of this test. Similarly, it excludes the presence other socioeconomic, environmental and psychological components that factor into student test performance. But there are things we can do as students to try to ameliorate this grave situation. For one, actually con-

sider the possibility of becoming a teacher—and, hopefully, sticking with it. The Teach for America program has been in full force on FSU’s campus attempting to recruit highly qualified candidates, but this is not the only route to teaching and making a difference. Similarly, take advantage of the fact that we attend school in the state’s capital city. Therefore, become politically involved. Finally, take time to thank your teachers and professors throughout the course of your career as a student. Though I’m sure we all think more fondly on some more than others, there are those select few who have shaped our educational paths and have affected where we are now. It is by necessity, not desire, that we work together, so that teachers gain a higher level of respect and esteem within our country, and inevitably become instrumental in improving the overall state of education.

“I went to California with my family. It was a nice break from school.” —Christopher Irwen, sophomore

“I was shooting a movie. It’s what I do so I liked it.” —Aamrdarita Podoiniteena, junior

Let’s get social “Getting a tan, because during the winter everyone is pale and ugly.” —Mandy Cora, freshman

Hope Will Never Be Silent

CAMERON GAUTHIER Staff Writer

“Going to Miami, seeing my friends and catching up with old ones.” —Tania Henao, freshman Photos and quotes compiled by Joseph La Belle/FSView

Starting almost on the day Barack Obama was elected president, the Tea Party “movement” (attempt to stop progress is a better way to say it) surfaced, claiming to be concerned with the nation’s budget deficit and wanting to get the country on the right track. Very quickly, the thoughtless group of followers who believe anything their savior Glenn Beck says quickly forgot that the economic crisis Obama was elected

into started when George Bush was president. A recent New York Times article titled “Iowa May Turn G.O.P.’s Focus to Social Issues” comments on the resurgence of a social conservative movement. While some consider this a potential threat to the Republican Party, which—because of the Tea Party movement— is already struggling to maintain the monotonous group-think style they’re accustomed to, I see it differently. I have felt all along that the Tea Party is a social movement. The feigned concern over the economy is merely a cover-up attempt by bigots afraid to publicly look like bigots. The Republican Party has proven itself incapable of dealing with economic issues; their best strategy has been to simply block proposals from the Democratic side

while simultaneously accusing them of getting nothing done. Now that a majority of people (and I dare not suggest that every person in this country shares the same views on everything by making references to the “American People,” as conservatives love to do) are getting fed up with both political parties, the Republicans have no other option but to cling onto their archaic social views and hope that they can convince enough of their fans of the evils of education and open-mindedness. Congresswoman Michelle Bachmann of Minnesota, who will be a potential G.O.P. presidential candidate in 2012, said, “We’ve been told that we need a truce on social issues. I highly disagree with that. Social conservatism is fiscal conservatism.” Accepting the fact that

“fiscal” is probably a bit of a big word for Bachmann, and considering that even if she looked it up in her pocket dictionary she probably still wouldn’t understand the difference between the two types of issues, it’s likely that that gem of a statement was simply to convince her constituents of its truth and, more likely than not, they’re already convinced. If the Republican campaign goes social, and distracts the easily distracted conservative constituents away from the ailing economy with issues like gay marriage, abortion, gun rights, the fallacy of science, et cetera, they will be fighting an uphill battle. It is the general trend that people become more open with regard to social issues over time. Conservatives fought fierce battles in the past to deny consti-

tutional rights to women and black Americans and to keep them from being able to vote. Since Roe v. Wade, conservatives have resorted to bombing abortion clinics and shooting doctors instead of accepting the changing of the social tides and dealing with the situation as per the Constitution. Now, gay rights seems to be the issue at hand and Republicans will fight the progress for simple lack of anything else to fight. One day, this movement will be in the past, too. Perhaps then conservatives will resort back to demonizing left-handed people or banning scientific texts. Until then, however, it is our responsibility to stay educated and aware. The future may be a game to them, but we are the ones who will ultimately have to live with whatever they leave behind them.


Study Break MARCH 28, 2011

PAG E 2 3

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is a 6 -- As T.S. Eliot said, “To make an end is to make a beginning.” Like a chimp, let go of one vine to swing on to the next. Don’t look down, but straight ahead.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

This week’s prize is a gift certificate from

Your energy and resourcefulness move projects ahead powerfully, despite your feeling decidedly antisocial. It’s fine to dig in to the work. Be open to changes for the better.

Name 2 of the 4 places where an FSU student can spend their first year abroad.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

You’re planning an adventure of discovery. Doors are opening. You may feel like hiding out before taking this leap toward fulfilling a purpose or dream. That’s okay.

(850) 561-1605 Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Find your spiritual side, and listen. You have the energy, resources and ability to generate something you’ve been wanting. Release self-doubt and pessimism.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Unless distracted by introspection and self-criticism, you can really move a group project forward. Imagine its intention fulfilled, despite any negative inner comments.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

There’s this constant dance going on to balance work and home life. Don’t be tempted by risky ventures, but rather aim to spend time peacefully managing obligations.

On March 28, 1979, America’s worst commercial nuclear accident occurred inside the Unit 2 reactor at the Three Mile Island plant near Middletown, Pa. On this date: In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to censure President Andrew Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States .In 1854, during the Crimean War, Britain and France declared war on Russia. In 1898, the Supreme Court, in United States v. Wong Kim Ark, ruled that a child born in the United States to Chinese immigrants was a U.S. citizen.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Projects are moving forward, propelled by animated, creative conversation. Don’t listen to inner cynicism. And get a second opinion before making financial choices.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

You’re grounded, energetic and resourceful. Projects are really rolling. Don’t go so fast that you run over someone. Be open to something new for an unexpected bonus.

Today’s Birthdays

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Get out and do something with a friend or sibling. Meet for coffee; go for a day trip or an afternoon hike. Let them talk you out of any lingering insecurities.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

You get a lot done today. Something you’ve been looking for may suddenly appear. Go ahead and get it, but consider the long-term implications of big purchases.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

You’re the king of the jungle. But remember that your species can’t survive because of you alone. We’re all in this together. Devote attention to others.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

There are too many unanswered questions. Some parts of life seem dark and gloomy, while others are bright and colorful. Focus on the latter.

Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara. In 1939, the Spanish Civil War effectively ended as Madrid fell to the forces of Francisco Franco. In 1941, novelist and critic Virginia Woolf, 59, drowned herself near her home in Lewes, East Sussex, England In 1942, during World War II, British naval forces raided the Nazi-occupied French port of St. Nazaire in Operation Chariot. In 1969, the 34th president of the United States, Dwight D. Eisenhower, died in Washington, D.C., at age 78.

Word Search: ULTRA Music Festival

Today’s Birthdays: Former White House national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski (ZBIG’-nyef breh-ZHIN’-skee) is 83. Country musician Charlie McCoy is 70. Movie director Mike Newell is 69. Actress Conchata Ferrell is 68. Actor Ken Howard is 67. Actress Dianne Wiest (weest) is 63. Country singer Reba McEntire is 56. Olympic gold medal gymnast

Bart Conner is 53. Rapper Salt (Salt-N-Pepa) is 45. Actress Tracey Needham is 44. Movie director Brett Ratner is 42. Country singer Rodney Atkins is 42. Actor Vince Vaughn is 41. Rapper Mr. Cheeks (Lost Boyz) is 40. Actor Ken L. is 38. Rock musician Dave Keuning is 35. Actress Annie Wersching is 34. Actress Julia Stiles is 30. Singer Lady Gaga is 25.

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“Those who say they give the public what it wants begin by underestimating public taste and end by debauching it.” — T.S. Eliot, American-Anglo poet and critic (1888-1965).

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Afrojack Armin Van Buuren Avicii Benny Benassi Carl Cox

David Guetta Deadmau5 Dirty Vegas Holy Ghost Kaskade

Klaxons Mstrkrft Robbie Rivera Royksopp Rusko

Skrillex Steve Aoki Super Mash Bros Tiesto

Thought for Today

Mondays: Live Trivia at 7PM Tuesdays: $5 Cheese Calzones Wednesday: Ladies Night Ladies Drink Free 7pm-9pm

$5 Pitchers $2 Wells All Day Every Day

Mellow Mushroom Pizza Bakers Since 1974

Thursday: $5 Small Cheese Pizza Sunday: $10 Large Cheese Pizza 1641 West Pensacola St.

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PAGE FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | MARCH 28, 2011

03.28.11  

E-Edition from our March 28, 2011 issue.

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