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Florida State Seminoles monday february 28 - March 2, 2011

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North Carolina Tar heels Volume XX ISSUE xVII complete issue inside

The stage is set

FSU, UNC clash in pivotal ACC showdown

Go to fsunews.com to follow a live blog of Wednesday night’s game featuring FSView Sports Editor Brett Jula and the Tallahassee Democrat sports team. Photo by Melina Vastola/FSView • Design by Emealia Hollis


’Noles go toe-to-toe with Tar Heels Florida State seeks revenge against North Carolina Wednesday NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor

Melina Vastola/FSView

With first place in the ACC out of reach for Florida State, they still have a chance to play the role of spoiler to North Carolina, who is still mathematically alive to win the ACC. Any time you can be the thorn in the paw of one of the conference’s lions, that usually brings an extra boost to your squad. The Seminoles (20-8, 10-4 ACC) fell to the Tar Heels on Feb. 6 at the Dean Smith Center, but there are three keys that will make a difference between that game and the one on Wednesday: shooting, personnel and circumstance. When Florida State and North Carolina faced off in early February, the Tar Heels enjoyed one of their best shooting nights of their season, hitting over half of their shots from the floor, including a solid 40 percent from long range. With Florida State leading the country in field goal percentage defense at 36.3 percent, you’ve got to figure North Carolina won’t be that lucky again. The ’Noles also had a pretty cold night from beyond

the arc. The Seminoles are such a physical presence in the paint that teams generally try and clog the lane to neutralize FSU’s size, and this in turn leaves a lot of open looks for the ’Noles from outside. In the first game of the series, Florida State shot an abysmal 19 percent from 3-point range. With the absence of Chris Singleton in subsequent games, it nearly forced the Seminoles to find their shooters’ touch from deep. In the three games without Singleton, their 3-point shooting percentage has been steadily climbing. Against Wake Forest, the Seminoles shot 22 percent and improved 39 percent against Maryland on the road, and most recently an outstanding 58 percent against Miami in Saturday’s win. Guard Deividas Dulkys alone went 4-for7 and Okaro White, who normally doesn’t shoot from outside (he has 29 attempts all season), was 1-for-2. Florida State must hit the easy outside shots to contend with UNC. Wednesday’s matchup will be sure to be another battle of the boards.

The ’Noles are 12th in the nation in rebounding and UNC is first, so someone’s strength will have to give in this big ACC showdown. Here is where it is most likely Singleton will be missed. Florida State is going to have to contend with John Henson and Tyler Zeller, both of whom are averaging a combined 16.7 rebounds per game. FSU only has one player averaging more than seven, and that’s Singleton. Florida State does have one advantage here, though, and that is found in guys like Derwin Kitchen and Michael Snaer, whose best asset is their anticipation when it comes to rebounding. They don’t necessarily have to outmuscle UNC, but they’re swift enough and smart enough to outhustle them. But, most of all, Florida State must ride the advantage of their home court this time around. All four of FSU’s conference losses have come on the road. If they can shoot better than their last bout against the Tar Heels and overcome UNC’s power on the boards, look for the ’Noles to keep that conference home record perfect.

FSU: 3 players to watch Xavier Gibson, C/F Big things were expected of the 6-foot-10 center heading into this season, and while Gibson may have had his struggles living up to those expectations, Wednesday’s game against North Carolina will give him a great opportunity to redeem himself. Gibson went down with a knee and wrist injury against Butler back on Dec. 23 and missed the ensuing nine games before coming back against, coincidentally, North Carolina on Feb. 6. Head coach Leonard Hamilton has been cautious with his use of Gibson, playing him just 49 total minutes in the six games since Gibson returned from injury. But, with an injury to forward Chris Singleton

and the great size the Tar Heels have in the frontcourt with skilled big men Tyler Zeller (7’0’’) and John Henson (6’10’’), Gibson’s role should increase dramatically in the Seminoles’ second go-around with UNC. Jon Kreft, C/F Much like the aforementioned Gibson, Kreft will play an important role Wednesday night in Florida State’s hopes of controlling the paint. Kreft is only averaging 9.8 minutes per game on the season, but UNC’s size and Kreft’s physicality in the paint should result in the junior college transfer seeing more minutes in the final home game of the season. Kreft’s role Wednesday won’t change from what it’s been all season, which

has been to add depth to the Seminoles and play strong defense on the interior. Kreft isn’t much of a scorer, averaging just 3.1 points per game, so any offense he can potentially bring to the table Wednesday would be an added bonus for FSU and greatly increase their chances of defeating the Tar Heels and staying in the hunt for the No. 2 seed in the fastapproaching ACC tournament. Okaro White, F White came into the season as a raw, freshman talent, but his performance lately is a reflection of just how quickly Clearwater, Fla., native has grown up in his rookie season. Since Singleton’s injury, White has been forced to step up his game on both ends of the floor, and he

has responded admirably. The freshman is averaging 11.3 points and 3.3 rebounds in the three games Singleton has missed. White was inserted into the starting lineup Saturday against Miami and had a breakout game, recording his second-highest point total of the season (17) and making a critical shot with less than a minute to play to help lift FSU to victory. As the season has progressed, it’s become clearer that White is far more productive the more minutes he plays. In games where White has played 20 minutes or more, he is averaging 12 points per game, compared to the 4.1 points per game average when he plays less than 20 minutes.

Gibson

Kreft

— Brett Jula

White

UNC: 3 players to watch Barnes

Henson

Zeller

John Henson, F The 6-foot-10 sophomore forward is nearly averaging a double-double and is tied for third in the conference in rebounding at 9.3 per game. In the last contest against FSU, Henson nabbed that double-double, netting 16 points and grabbing 10 rebounds. Since that game in February, Henson has recorded no less than 12 rebounds in every game he’s seen action. His size and athleticism could really cause problems for the Seminoles down low, especially in the absence of Chris Singleton. Forwards Bernard James, Okaro White and Ter-

rance Shannon are going to have to hustle to keep up with Henson on the boards. Tyler Zeller, C Zeller is the heavier hand to UNC’s one-two punch. More experienced and a couple of inches taller than Henson (Zeller measures 7 feet), Zeller leads the charge for the Tar Heels in scoring, averaging 14.4 points per game. Over the past five games, Zeller is averaging 15.8 points a game, including a 24-point performance in a loss to Duke and 18 against conference punching bag Wake Forest. Zeller makes his liv-

ing in the paint and rises to the occasion in bigger games. In a two-point win over Kentucky earlier in the season, Zeller had 27 points and 11 rebounds and in the loss to Duke Zeller had a cool 24 and 13. With regular season conference title hopes on the line, Zeller will be a handful. Harrison Barnes, G Although he is still only a freshman, Barnes is perhaps North Carolina’s best all-around player. The 6-foot-8 shooting guard doesn’t lead the marquee statistical categories for the Tar Heels—among the starters, he is in the

top three in scoring, rebounds, and three-point field goal percentage— but he does lead the team in minutes. He hustles, he shoots, he rebounds, he scores. He’s an all-purpose player that coaches gameplan around, players stir in their sleep over and pro scouts salivate over. When the team needs a lift, Barnes provides it, and one of his two doubledoubles this season came against Florida State in early February. If the Tar Heels want to come to Tallahassee and secure a win, Barnes will be key to their success. — Nick Sellers

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MONDAY FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 2, 2011

VOLUME XX ISSUE XVII

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Remembering one of our own

WARMER WEATHER FSU climatologists predict that La Nina weather phenomenon will bring warmer weather to town

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE FSU students encourage other students to get involved with national sustainability movement. To read these stories, visit fsunews.com.

fsunews.com web poll results Previous question: What film are you hoping will win Best Picture at Sunday’s Academy Awards?

Memorial service celebrates FSU student Ashley Cowie ANA REBECCA RODRIGUEZ Assistant News Editor On Sunday, Feb. 27, family and friends gathered at the Oglesby Union Ballrooms for a memorial service organized to honor and celebrate the life of Florida State University student Ashley Cowie. FSU administrators from

the Dean of Students office assisted the family in planning the 11 a.m. event. When the family announced the memorial service, they requested that those in attendance wear purple or yellow, which were reportedly her favorite colors. Cowie’s twin sister Amy reflected on Ashley’s life, referring to her as her

best friend while sharing personal stories through laughter and tears. “[Ashley was] my wombmate and my roommate,” she said during her speech at the memorial. Amy went on to reflect on the loss of her sister. “I lost myself when I lost [Ashley],”Amy said. Cowie, a sophomore from Orange Park who

was studying interior design, lost her life on Jan. 9, after another FSU student, Evan Wilhelm, accidentally shot Cowie. Earlier this month, members of Cowie’s sorority, Chi Omega, collected notecards with drawings or quotes in commemoration of Cowie. The sorority also collected $1 donations in order to

make a book out of the notecards for the family. The memorial service was open to the public, allowing about 400 students and community members to pay their respects and gather in honor of Cowie. Also in attendance at the memorial were Dean of Students Jeanine WardRoof and Associate Dean of Students Robin Leach.

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Black Swan The King’s Speech Other

Not-so-plain Jane Jane Pollock J. MICHAEL OSBORNE Managing Editor

This issue’s question:

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Photos of Ashley Cowie are displayed at her memorial held at FSU on Feb. 27, next to yellow and purple flowers, the colors of the service. Yellow was chosen to represent sunflowers, which are ‘bright, colorful, and full of life [just like my sister],’ explained Amy Cowie (right), Ashley’s twin sister. The purple was said to be simply ‘Ashley’s color.’ Ashley Cowie lost her life on Jan. 9 after she was accidentally killed by a gunshot wound.

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at the FSView & Florida Flambeau have hardly done much to hide our crush on Jane Jane Pollock, the fourturned-five-piece we invited to co-headline our first-ever local music and art showcase at The Engine Room last October. The group—which includes vocalist and multi-instrumentalist Michael Arcos switching between guitar, keys, trumpet and any amount of percussion, Courtney Asztalos on vocals, organ and keys, Danny Clifton on guitar, Ryan O’Malley on drums and Heather Lee Smith on vocals and bass—has been awfully busy since then, and, with a growing live presence in nearly every venue in Tallahassee, they’re rapidly becoming a local favorite. Besides finding a drummer in O’Malley toward the beginning of this year, they’re currently booking a tour to stretch throughout March (with plans to hit Gainesville, Orlando, Seaside, New Orleans and Athens, Ga.) with the Gainesville band Lighthouse Music, who Jane Jane described as having “taken [them] under their wing,” all while prepping their new, self-titled album for release at their show this Thursday, March 3, opening for Thee Oh Sees, at which time they’ll also kick off their tour. local band has a bit of a poorly kept secret, though: They’re not actually local, per se—they commute. For the past four years, founder and frontman Arcos has lived in a wooden trailer in the rural Thomasville, Ga., nearly an hour’s drive from Tallahassee. An artist and filmmaker as well as musician, Arcos moved to northern Florida from Miami and, after spending two years in Tallahassee, decided to move to

Popular local band talks to the ‘FSView’ in their Thomasville, Ga., playhouse

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Local band Jane Jane Pollock are (L-R) Ryan O’Malley, Danny Clifton, Courtney Asztalos, Michael Arcos and Heather Lee Smith. The group will play The Engine Room on March 3, where they will be giving free copies of their new, self-titled album to all who attend. Thomasville to have more freedom to do his work, whatever that ended up being. That freedom would eventually give way to Jane Jane Pollock. “I moved here definitely to just kind of have the peace-of-mind to just create, at all hours of the night,” said Arcos. “And I think, little by little, it just grew and we SEE JANE 2

Inside: Check Arts & Life for the lowdown on Thee Oh Sees and locals Black Cloud, who will take the stage at The Engine Room along with Jane Jane Pollock on March 3. See page 6.

Visit fsunews.com/janejanepollock for photo galleries of Jane Jane Pollock, as well as see our video on the band and listen to a song from their upcoming album—exclusive to FSView.

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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 28, 2011

JANE from 1

850-561-6653 Editorial Fax: 850-574-2485 Advertising Fax: 850-574-6578 General Manager Eliza LePorin 850-561-1600 eleporin@fsview.com EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Adam Clement 850-561-1612 editor@fsview.com Managing Editor J. Michael Osborne 850-561-1613 managing_editor@fsview.com News Editor Jesse Damiani 850-561-1614 news@fsview.com Assistant News Editors Bailey Shertzinger Ana Rebecca Rodriguez Arts & Life Editor Agata Wlodarczyk 850-561-1615 artsandlife@fsview.com Assistant A & L Editors Ana Renee Rodriguez Nicki Karimipour Sports Editor Brett Jula 850-561-1616 sports@fsview.com Assistant Sports Editor Nick Sellers Photo Editor Melina Vastola 850-561-1617 photo@fsview.com Assistant Photo Editors Reid Compton Joseph La Belle Digital and Multimedia Editor Reid Compton 850-561-1617 webeditor@fsview.com Assistant Multimedia Editor Matt Clegg multimedia@fsview.com Assistant Web Editor Duncan Graham ADVERTISING STAFF Jennifer Eggers 850-561-1603 jeggers@fsview.com Kristina Greenlee 850-561-1609 kgreenlee@fsview.com Patrick Toban 850-561-1611 ptoban@fsview.com Sales Assistant Corey Calhoon

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salesassistant@fsview.com DISTRIBUTION Distribution Coordinator Karl Etters 850-561-1608 distribution@fsview.com PRODUCTION STAFF 850-561-1606 Production Manager Justin Christopher Dyke productionmanager@fsview.com Assistant Production Manager Danielle Delph ddelph@fsview.com Production Designers Glenishia Gilzean ggilzean@fsview.com Emealia Hollis ehollis@fsview.com Yves Solorzano ysolorzano@fsview.com The FSView & Florida Flambeau is a Gannett newspaper published by FSView & Florida Flambeau, Inc. Member, Florida Press Association Associated Collegiate Press College Media Advisers Office Location: 954 W. Brevard St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Mailing Address: P. O. Box 20208 Tallahassee, FL 32316 Single copies are free; additional copies are available for $1 per copy. The editorials that appear within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the editorial writer. Any other column that appears in the newspaper is the expressed opinion of the columnist and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers. All correspondence to Editorial can be considered for publication, unless indicated otherwise by letter writer. In accordance with The Associated Press guidelines obscenities, vulgarities and profanities will not be published. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters may be edited for clarity and content, or for space purposes.

needed more people.” Arcos first joined up with Smith, an actress and fellow musician recording her own songs on 4-track tapes. The duo soon added Arcos’ girlfriend Asztalos, now a recent graduate from the FSU BFA studio art program in photography, along with then-drummer Ian Weir (who mastered the new record). As Weir took his exit, they brought in guitarist Clifton (also the founder and designer for local screen-printing company American Waste Apparel), having met Arcos and Asztalos outside the FSU Circus when the pair were putting on a freak show and giving out “experimental popcorn” (whatever that is), bringing Jane Jane to an even four-piece. “I definitely felt like we had kindred spirits,” said Clifton of the first time they played as a quartet. “We just got together and there was a really good energy, and we really had a lot of fun doing that.” That four-piece produced four releases together in various forms, primarily using a drum machine, which they still maintain a fondness for, before inviting O’Malley to their Thomasville trailer to practice with them—an experience they compared to a strange sort of group dating session. “When I came into this band, I kind of knew immediately—I have the least amount of background in, if you want to broadly say, creativity or art,” O’Malley said. “And so I knew that I couldn’t just come into this band and be, like, a drummer, like a rock ’n’ roll drummer. I had to look at my instrument as not a drum set, and something where I’m just kind of creating, kind of using it not in the way it’s supposed to be used, or how people normally see it.” Saturday, Feb. 14, before playing a show at The Farside that night, Jane Jane Pollock agreed to let me drive up with a photographer to spend the afternoon with them and explore their secluded Xanadu-meetsPee-wee’s Playhouse for myself. (Not coincidentally, the soon-to-be-released album opens, on “Mousehole,” with a sample from Pee-wee’s Playhouse.) The tour of the trailer itself was predictably short, since it primarily consisted of two vaguely claustrophobia-inducing rooms. But that hasn’t stopped Arcos and Asztalos from packing the place to the brim with their combined collection of musical and recording equipment, found photographs and odds-and-ends they’ve amassed, alphabetized vinyl, costume accessories and masks hung on the wall, almost like a really, really interesting episode of Hoarders. After Arcos made us what everyone referred to as “experiment pizza,” a craft he’s been perfecting along with his music for the past four years, we started our interview, which we agreed to do in segments, giving us a chance to take in as much of the grounds as we could. As it turned out, the walks in between our interview segments wound up being more interesting than anything else we discussed. Here they would tell me stories about people who may or may not have been murdered and buried somewhere on the grounds long ago, and of how the Photos By Joseph La Belle/FSView gender-scale-tipping addition of O’Malley (Clockwise from top left) Drummer Ryan O’Malley; multi-instrumentalist and founder Michael Arcos; guitarist has opened up Arcos and Clifton to their Danny Clifton; Courtney Asztalos and Heather Lee Smith sit on an abandoned tractor in Thomasvill, Ga., with our “bro-ness,” while Arcos did cartwheels past abandoned trucks puzzlingly strewn own J. Michael Osborne; vocalist and keyboardist Courtney Asztalos; and vocalist and bassist Heather Lee Smith. across the field and Asztalos talked shop lock. As they played that night, switching they will accept donations, obviously—as with my photographer Joe. instruments between them for half the well as a download code for their fourth “Hopefully [our music] always comes night’s setlist while looking like a ’60s all- release, Yard Sale, with a merch purchase. from the most genuine place,” said Aszgirl beach-party band (a friend of mine The show will also feature the premiere talos. “We’re really lucky to have this described them after the show as “Monster of the band’s video for “Mousehole” and kind of like breeding ground for what we Mash surf-rock”), it started to be obvious an installation art piece by Asztalos: a felt do. And I think it is a goal to take it, and how this particular group of people—from confessional booth with a typewriter for remember where we came from, and also many different areas of the arts—came written, anonymous confessions. For more ways kind of make it from this place.” together. Jane Jane isn’t so much a five- information, visit janejanepollock.wordHaving listened to an unmastered CD piece rock band as they are a tight group press.com or janejanepollock.bandof Jane Jane’s new album, which was enof creators having fun together, creating for camp.com. tirely self-recorded and mixed and proCheck fsunews.com for a photo gallery the sake of the creation and doing for the duced by Arcos, the band’s eclectic trailand video from our Saturday in Thomassake of doing. er has a recognizable presence in the “We’re all sort of—even if we’re ap- ville, and an exclusive stream of one of recordings. Or, rather, the album sounds like an old horror-movie, carnival-ride, for the large bins of assorted pots and proaching things from different angles— their album highlights, “Stuck on a Highcartoon version of Arcos and Asztalos’ pans they have to make multiple trips to all of us are interested in each other’s way Island.” Thomasville home—odd, charming, carry in for their live shows. Their new work, regardless of whether we’re not all disparate at times and interested in do- record finds them continuing to explore musicians, or visual artists, or photogweird sounds, including an extended raphers or whatever,” said Smith. “I feel ing seemingly just about everything. Program of “This our fifth release under the name pots-and-pans breakdown in “Gloomy,” like we kind of influence each other, in a Advanced Studies on Jane Jane Pollock,” Arcos said. “And I vibraphones, toy pianos, film samples way. And, if anything, for me, coming from Human Rights think we’ve come to terms with just call- and recurring appearances from their a place of motivation: knowing that your & Humanitarian Law ing it ‘Jane Jane Pollock.’ I feel like it’s cats, who roamed the grounds while we friends and the people who are in your May 30 - June 17 finally come to a place where it sounds did our interview. (“We like cats,” said community, that you’re constantly all workWashington, D.C. like it should. I’m really happy with the Smith.) As we toured the area around ing on projects and—what’s the next thing, recording, and I feel like it’s a really good his home, Arcos would periodically and the next deadline? It sort of collectively representation of what we do live [….] point out guest sounds on the album, pushes all of us to be making art all the To be honest, our second-to-last release, like a ghostly, out-of-tune piano sitting time, you know?” There’s a good reason for why the ecPotluck, was just a learning experience in a barn, or a toy wooden carving of a for us, because we kind of put the re- face that produces a strangely unsettling centric quintet has started to turn heads around Tallahassee the way they have. cording into somebody else’s hands, and laugh. “All of the recording, we did here in Whether they’re at Club Downunder or an it just came a little more crisp and cleaner than we actually sound and what we the trailer for this album,” Smith said. hour outside of town, in Arcos and Asztakind of like. So I think this is—it’s got “So the trailer is almost like its own los’ Thomasville trailer—even if one of dirty, scratchy elements, and—ghoulish band member, you know? The spirit of their songs should have reached the tipMAXIMIZE ping point of weirdness for many folks, the trailer is definitely in the album.” sounds.” YOUR SUMMER or they’ve broken blood capsules in their Smith elaborated on the album’s left as the sun was setting, mouths onstage—there’s a sense of earghoulish mood. study and intern in D.C. Open to law students, activists after Jane Jane played us a nestness to their music and performances “There’s a lot of maniacal laughter and lawyers in the US and abroad, song (the album standout that can instantly bring you back in. Jane throughout the album,” said Smith, this unique program brings laughing. “There’s a lot of samples of “Mystic Lurch”) and began to get their Jane Pollock may be unmistakably individtogether 36 experts to teach little ghouls laughing and stuff, so there’s equipment together for the night’s show. I ualistic, but they’re always inviting the rest participants from 35+ countries. that sort of creepy element. I think it met them again at The Farside a few hours of us to do the same. Contact Us: Arcos, Asztalos, Clifton, O’Malley and was at our Athens show last summer, later, where they were to be the sixth(!) and wcl.american.edu/hracademy hrcademy@wcl.american.edu the sound guy afterward, he was like, final band of the night. For some inexpli- Smith will be performing at The Engine 202. 274. 4070 ‘Yeah, we don’t really get very many goth cable reason, the band had decided to all Room Thursday, March 3, with Black adopt blonde wigs for the occasion, except Cloud and Thee Oh Sees (the latter of bands.’ [Laughs.]” whom Jane Jane cited as “heroes”). Jane Jane Jane has built much of their lo- O’Malley, who made a lovely brunette. It was a small and silly gesture, but it Jane will be giving free copies of their new cal reputation around their affection for strange instrumentation, particularly seems to sum up so much of Jane Jane Pol- album to everyone who attends—though EO/AA University and Employer


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FEBRUARY 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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NEDA events promote healthy body image FSU organizations host ‘National Eating Disorder Awareness Week’ ANA REBECCA RODRIGUEZ Assistant News Editor As part of NEDAwareness Week 2011, several Florida State University organizations partnered together to help raise awareness about the negative consequences of having an unhealthy body image. The Student Government Association, several RSOs, Seminole Dining, members of the Panhellenic Association, the Women’s Center, Thagard Student Health Center and the University Counseling Center all worked together during the week of Feb. 23 through Feb. 26 in support of the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), the leading U.S. not-for-profit organization supporting individuals and families affected by eating disorders. According to NEDA, in the U.S. alone, as many as 10 million females and 1 million males have an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia. Millions more are struggling with binge eating disorder. To help combat those statistics, several planned events focused on providing awareness, education and prevention resources

Simon Lopez/FSView

Sophomore Andrew Gonzalez enjoys a free sample of Pomegranate Salad as part of the National Eating Disorder Awareness Week on the Union Green this past Wednesday, Feb. 23. for eating disorders. Each event was tailored around the idea that having a negative body image, which can be severely affected by environmental messages, is a strong risk factor in the development of eating disorders. On Wednesday, Feb. 23,

between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. the event, “Embracing Natural Beauty,” focused on promoting healthy skin via an assortment of nutritional recipes and professional skin care advice. Attendees received giveaways as well as information and advice related to

achieving a healthy body image. Later that same day, between 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Kathleen MacDonald, of For Recovery and Elimination of Eating Disorders Foundation (F.R.E.E.D), was slated to share her personal, 20year struggle with eating

disorders and her path to recovery. Due to a medical emergency, MacDonald was unable to attend. Instead, FSU senior, Kelly Donovan, shared the story of her own struggle with an eating disorder. Donovan, a social work major, said she first began strug-

gling with her body image when she was around 10 years old. At the beginning of her speech, Donovan introduced herself to the audience. “I am an FSU senior and a four-year member of the Panhellenic community, as well as a recovering anorexic,” Donovan said. “Typically, when I describe myself to others, I use a little bit more detail than these two facts. Today, I would add to this information that I am a strong, confident, sensitive, caring, passionate, perceptive and determined woman.” Before she got to her present state, however, Donovan said that she went through what she described as a dark path. It all began in her youth, as she experienced changes with her body. “My problems with my body image began around 10,” Donovan said. “Like many adolescent girls, this was the time in my growth process when I was experiencing those awkward years. Because I was in dance, I was constantly around mirrors, making me aware of every single difference in the shape of my body compared to those [around me].” SEE EVENTS 4

Composite materials community comes to FSU

Riley Shaaber/FSView

Chief Technologist Dr. Richard Liang leads a tour of HPMI. FSU’s High-Performance Materials Institute is the most widely known for their success with ‘buckypaper’ material.

HPMI research center hosts Multifunctional Composites Workshop on campus Catherine O’Connor/FSView

Alaa and friends hold signs in front of the Capitol on Friday, Feb. 25, in support of the Libyan Revolution.

Revolution prompts rally at Capitol

EMILY OSTERMEYER Contributing Writer Leading researchers, government and industry representatives of the composite material community gathered at the Turnbull Conference Center at Florida State University on Feb. 23 and Feb. 24 for a Multifunc-

tional Composites Workshop, organized by the High-Performance Materials Institute (HPMI), a research center at FSU. The High-Performance Materials Institute is one of the leading research centers in composite materials in the nation. Composite materials are combination materi-

als made up of different fibers, some synthetic and others biological, such as carbon and glass, or polymers. Because they are lighter, stronger, safer and more energy efficient than non-composite materials such as aluminum, composite materials are SEE COMPOSITE 4

FSU Muslim Student Association hosts event in order to show support of Libyan voice CATHERINE O’CONNOR Photographer As the protest-turnedrevolution continues to transpire in Libya, students here at Florida State University came together to advocate the rebels’ struggle for democracy against the 42-year-long dictatorship of Mu’ammar Qaddafi. “He has a horrible track record,” said FSU student Alaa, sporting a painted Libyan flag on her cheek. “He has held hangings of students at universities who oppose his ideology and has imprisoned or assassinated his political opponents. Now he is bombing cities and hiring mercenaries to kill and rape his own people.” Alaa and her family spearheaded the rally

that took place this past Friday, Feb. 25, hoping to spread knowledge of the atrocities being committed against the Libyan people by their government. Ultimately, supporters of the revolution would like to see the international community get involved and push toward enacting a “no fly zone” over Libya to restrict Qaddafi’s access to resources. This event in particular was aimed at reaching people here in America and, specifically, here in Tallahassee. Protestors chanted, “Obama don’t you dare leave these bodies everywhere,” and held signs that asked cars to “honk 4 peace in Libya.” They started at 11 a.m. and continued, despite wind and rain, until 1 p.m.

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Best jugs earn big bucks at fundraiser

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 28, 2011

College Republicans debate FAMU

Pi Kappa Alpha collects donations for breast cancer research CHAD SQUITIERI Contributing Writer Students walking around campus last week may have been surprised when they saw Pi Kappa Alpha’s “Best Jugs on Campus Contest.” The contest, which raised money for breast cancer prevention and research, involved different organizations taking five gallon water jugs and putting replica breasts on them. Passersby were encouraged to donate to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Breast Cancer Research Foundation by dropping donations into the jug that they thought was the best. The jugs varied in how each were made. Some had various sayings on them such as “big or small, save them all,” while some had large bras over the front of them filled with half-spheres of styrofoam. “No fraternity has really raised money for breast cancer awareness and we wanted to kind

of be the first to do that,” said Ryan Otero, public relations chair for Pi Kappa Alpha. “We were throwing ideas out how to raise the money and this idea came about and it seemed like just a neat idea, and the name was kind of controversial and catchy.” With recent heated arguments on campus over abortion, the controversial nature of the name of the fundraiser could have been a problem, but throughout the week, that did not seem to be the case. “At first, some people were shocked; they would look at us like, ‘What are you doing?’” said Otero. “But, to be honest, the catchiness of the name helped out a lot. People would be like, ‘OK this is kind of funny, I’ll throw some change or a dollar in to help out.’” Others involved said they agreed that the controversial nature helped with the overall support. “I think, because it is a little controversial, it

is a little eye-grabbing, it’s definitely helped the cause—we’ve been able to raise more money that way,” said Jon Fistel, who is in charge of the philanthropy, in an earlier interview. A total of 16 sororities at FSU participated alongside Pi Kappa Alpha in the contest, and while the official numbers are not out yet, according to Otero, the contest raised over $1,000. “We couldn’t believe it,” said Otero. “We were looking to raise about $500 and we surpassed that.” Despite the tonguein-cheek name of the contest, the money was raised for a serious cause. “I’m glad we were a part of this,” said Otero. “Everyone has a family member, whether it’s a mother or a grandmother, or a family friend who has been affected by breast cancer, and it’s just an awesome thing to do and I am really glad we were a part of it.”

Photos by Reid Compton/FSView

Audience members watch the repartee inside an at-capacity HCB 102 during the debate between the FAMU mock trial debate and the FSU College Republicans on Thursday, Feb. 24. Although both teams disagreed on almost every issue presented, the debate remained well-moderated and respectful. Both teams agreed to meet again, possibly at FAMU.

Above: Richard Keeth speaks during the debate. Above right: Jamaal Rose argues a point during the debate. Below right: Reamon Soto speaks during the debate.

EVENTS from 3 Donovan said that she felt like everyone around her was thin, except for herself, which made her feel like she did not belong. “This longing to be thin grew stronger as the years went on, until my eighth grade year, when I developed a solution to eating healthier and smaller portions of food to help me achieve my ultimate appearance,” Donovan said. “Being the perfectionist I am, I put all of my efforts toward this goal and achieved success. I was thinner and happier, or at least that’s what I thought.” She realized that she was not, in fact, healthy or happy when her doctor informed her that she had lost so much weight she could technically be considered anorexic. That reality shocked and scared her and so, over the summer, she gained a healthy amount of weight back. “I went into my four years of high school without another serious encounter with an eating disorder,” Donovan said. “It was almost like my eating disorder went dormant for a couple of years, showing

up here and there in small doses.” Unfortunately, her struggles with food did not stay away for long. “My eating disorder took off right where it left off at the end of my senior year, leading me down a darker path than I could have ever imagined,” Donovan said. According to Donovan, she is a creature of habit who does not like the idea of change. When she moved to FSU all the way from Chicago without knowing anyone except her older brother, she was both terrified and excited. Eventually, she joined Chi Omega, which helped her meet friends and experience college life. As school and social pressures closed in, however, Donovan said she was once again struck with difficulty. “Being both the perfectionist and people-pleaser I am, I automatically wanted to get super involved so I felt like I was making the most out of my sorority and college experience,” Donovan said. “Never once did I think if I wanted to do something, I just did it because I felt like I should. All in all,

from the beginning until the end of my first year here at FSU, things felt out of control and I was extremely overwhelmed trying to balance this new life of mine. The only thing that unconsciously kept me going was some sort of rigid routine in my life, which happened to center around food.” Everything seemed manageable for a while, until she went home for winter break and her family commented on how much weight she had lost. “Over Christmas break, after being shocked and concerned over how much I weighed, I realized I had hit rock bottom,” Donovan said. “I shared this information with my parents, but it was not until I had come back to school during the first week of my second semester that they told me that based on my weight, I was anorexic and that I was in a state of health where I could lose my life.” That is when she made a decision that would change her life. “This is the point where I made the hardest, but best decision of my life,” Donovan said. “I decided

to take a medical leave of absence from school and go back to Chicago for the semester for a partial-hospitalization treatment program for eating disorders. I knew that, if I wanted to get healthy both physically and mentally, I needed to finally take time for myself and fight off this eating disorder voice that had been with me for so long.” Donovan underwent treatment for a period of five months, in which she was put on a meal plan by a dietician, and participated in both group and individual therapy. She said that what she learned in treatment eventually led her to the place she is today. “Of the many truths that I learned about eating disorders in my treatment, I found one to be the most helpful in my recovery,” Donovan said. “This truth is that, despite the fact in its name, an eating disorder is not really about food or a person’s body. The root [of an eating disorder] often lies within a variety of different factors including the need for control, the need to please others, the need to manage anxiety, the need to

suppress unpleasant feelings or experiences and the need to be loved and accepted by others.” According to Donovan, learning that information allowed her to see the bigger picture in terms of her eating disorder. In the past, she did not want to believe she had an eating disorder because she did not fit into the definition of an anorexic. That, said Donovan, is what keeps so many individuals unable to cope with their disorders. “Many people, including many college women and men, are unaware that they have an eating disorder because their relationship with food does not fit the typical description of someone with anorexia or bulimia,” Donovan said. When she realized all the aspects surrounding her eating disorder, Donovan embarked on a path to recovery. “I centered my recovery on overcoming my perfectionist nature with the power of love,” Donovan said. “This [allowed] me to open up my life to all kinds of love, including the love of others, which gave me support in my hardest times and joy is my suc-

cessful times; my love for dance, which served as an outlet to use my body in a positive way; and, most importantly, the love of myself, without which the amazing life I have today would not be possible.” According to Donovan, one of the most important factors in her recovery was her decision to accept that she cannot control everything. “I have learned to accept and embrace any sort of imperfection in my life whether it is in relationships, my grades or my physical appearance,” Donovan said. “I finally feel like I am living a life again, one that is based on complete love for myself and others, and that is the best feeling in the world.” Today, she said, her current struggles involve dealing with her anxiety, her perfectionist nature and fighting to stay strong in her recovery. She added, however, that she will not give up and is determined to continue fighting and loving at the same time. “I remain determined to fight against anything that could compromise the love I have for myself.”

two, is we will start a continual dialogue to develop a technology road map so that the people in industry, government and academia can work together to make it happen,” Wang said. Allen said this workshop was a year in the making and began when the National Science Foundation (NSF) reviewed, approved and provided funding for the HPMI’s proposal for the workshop. Amongst the governmental, industry and academia representatives present were NASA, the transportation department, the Air Force Research Lab, The Boeing Company, Georgia Tech University and Texas A&M University. Tom Carstensen represented Sirkorsky Aircraft at the workshop—a company that he said has an ongoing interest in the use and application of multifunctional composite structures that the workshop focused on. “It’s a good combination of industry and academia, formulating ideas on how to use the multi-functional

composites for emerging applications,” Carstensen said. During his visit to FSU, Carstensen had the chance to meet with Wang and his team at HPMI and to tour the HPMI facility. “It’s a very good facility,” Carstensen said. “Particularly, the HPMI has state-of-the-art equipment and I had a opportunity to interact with some of the students and there appears to be a really good student base that’s very enthusiastic about these composites.” Dr. Franklin Chang-Diaz, Chairman and CEO of Ad Astra Rocket Co. and former NASA astronaut, was one of the keynote speakers at the workshop. He said his company has been contemplating a presence in Tallahassee, and his visit to the FSU research facilities such as the Mag Lab demonstrated the excellent variety of research being conducted at FSU. “I think that it’s good to see an institution in a city moving to the future and planning for the future,”

Chang-Diaz said. Chang-Diaz’s company is researching how to make a more efficient rocket engine, and at the workshop, spoke about the future of space transportation. Rob Maskell represented Cytec Engineered Materials, an industry supplier of composite materials. He said there is a big gap between academia and the industry producers of technology. “My role here as I see it is to actually take what’s being done in academia and bridge the gap between that and what the OEMs [original equipment manufacturers] want to do with it,” Maskell said. Maskell said the workshop’s content and format were very good. “I think the intent of the workshop was to work out how to get multi-functionality out of the laboratory and into the hands of the industry, if you will, and we’ve recognized that that’s not trivial, that we have the desire to try and do that, and we have the right people in this room,” Maskell said. “I think that

can actually take the message out as to what needs to be done to make this an eventuality.” Wang said he was pleased with the workshop’s success, with over 100 attendants. “If you looked at the participants, we covered the entire supply chain for advanced composites from the raw material suppliers all the way to the user, including the government, including the academic people,” Wang said. The workshop had a full agenda; in addition to Chang-Diaz, featuring keynote speakers Mike Dudzik, vice president for Science & Technology for the Lockheed Martin Corporation, and Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Laureate and Francis Eppes professor in the FSU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The workshop also included industrial panel discussions, breakout sessions and tours of the High Performance Materials Institute, the Center for Advanced Power Systems and the National

High Magnetic Field Laboratory. “It really helps for the people in the entire community, the advanced composite community, to come here and have an opportunity to look at FSU, interact with the FSU faculty and students, and look at the facilities,” Wang said. Wang said that, as opposed to a conference, this workshop stressed interaction within the advanced composite materials community. “The big difference is, when you go to a conference, you move from room to a next room, and usually you take notes but you don’t really have time to talk with other people to express your views and ask questions, but a workshop is totally interactive,” Wang said. Additionally, Wang said the workshop helped bring a lot of visibility to FSU. “Now they have a better understanding of FSU as a major player in advanced composite materials, powers systems, and also magnets,” Wang said.

COMPOSITE from 3 often utilized in a variety of industries, such as the production of cars, commercial and fighter air crafts, spacecrafts and prosthetics. Frank Allen, Operations Director for HPMI who worked with HPMI colleague Judy Gardner to help organize the event, said the workshop aimed to gather some of the leading minds in primarily composite materials technology to set about what the advanced composite material industry needs. “We really want to harness and focus our research on what the needs of the industry are and take advantage of leveraging resources and coming up with best partners and, again, see what the needs are so we can address them,” Allen said. Dr. Ben Wang, director of the HPMI, said the workshop served two main functions. “The purpose of the workshop was number one, to have a better understanding of the different nature of the challenges that we face and, number


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Letter to the Editor To invite or not to invite, that is the question As the organizer of the recent pro-life event called the Genocide Awareness Project (GAP) at FSU on Feb. 16-17, let me clear up the apparent confusion regarding the whether the College Republicans “invited” GAP. Several months ago, the Center for Bio-Ethical Reform (CBR) began planning to display GAP at FSU without any student group involvement whatsoever. CBR had begun a conversation with the FSU administration to utilize the free speech area available to outside organizations on Landis Green. For the record, non-student organizations can exercise their free speech rights on publicly funded universities like FSU without official student group involvement. During the course of the negotiations with the FSU administration, CBR was contacted by Alex Holzbach, a member of the College Republicans (CR), on an unrelated issue. Because Union Green is not made available to outside groups, CBR asked if the CRs would be willing to reserve the Union Green for GAP because it provided a more prominent than Landis Green. At that time, the CRs agreed to reserve the space on Union Green because it gave us a better opportunity to engage more of the FSU student body on abortion than Landis Green. The bottom line is the CRs believed that CBR should be given the best location to express our First Amendment rights. Those who want to make an issue out of whether what the CRs did should be considered an “invitation” or not are simply using the oldest trick in the book: changing the subject away from the gruesome reality of abortion. It should be no surprise to anyone that the CRs are pro-life, and their willingness to be involved with GAP is consistent with the Republican Party platform’s pro-life plank. The CRs did not contribute funds or manpower for the display but simply provided a better opportunity for CBR to get its message out by reserving Union Green for the Genocide Awareness Project. —Mark Harrington, Executive Director, Center for Bio-Ethical Reform, Mark@endabortion.org

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How has this not been dealt with yet? Retracing Our Steps ERIK EMBREY Staff Writer It seems as if the big, gay monster has been slowly rearing its head again across the nation: There have been a few remarkable developments in the past week or so in the interest of legalizing gay marriage. It’s getting ridiculous that this is still an issue in 2011. Removing religious aspects and beliefs, I can’t understand how even civil unions are still considered points of contention in our society. And, considering America’s separate-butequal track record, even establishing a separate term that would give supposedly equal benefits to marriage feels as though it’s already on shaky ground.

The Defense of Marriage Act needs to be repealed and gay marriage, or at minimum civil unions, need to be nationally recognized across the U.S. There are a few reasons against that seem to come up time and time again, one of which is that sanctioning gay marriage will destroy family values. Yet, aside from being unable to procreate on their own, how can one set of randomly selected individuals be quantifiably better parents than another set who happen to share the same sexuality? Past the actual creation of offspring, any two people on average should be as successful parents as any other two. Heck, maybe legalization could cause the adoption rates to go up and those children without homes could find themselves in a much more stable situation.

Considering that single parents raise children all the time, I fail to see how adding another same-sex parent to the equation to be a bad thing. Another common argument against is that they’ll open up the gates to even more provocative matters such as bestiality or polygamy if gay marriage is allowed. People will start wanting to marry inanimate objects! It’s demoralizing; some of the hyperbole that has been thrown around masked in complete seriousness by opponents to block action being taken is completely disingenuous. The base cause for recognition is that two people should be able to share their lives and receive the benefits that a heterosexual couple would receive otherwise—that is, two humans having rights that have been granted to others for years. No-

where does that lead to a human marrying an animal or a sofa, or even multiple partners. Those are separate issues that should be handled on their own merit and not piggybacked on gay marriage because it’s convenient; they’re not equivalent to each other. There has been good news in the last few days with Hawaii passing civil union legislation that goes into effect on Jan. 1. Maryland’s Senate chamber has passed a bill that is now on the way to the house to legalize within that state as well. The main problem is that, while recognized at the state level, marriages or unions performed in states that allow it are not recognized at the federal level, or in other states that have provisions against it. Perhaps the biggest development came when the current administration announced recently

that it was backing off from supporting the DOMA in two key court cases that are currently pending in New York. This does echo a bit of dangerous precedent against the checks and balances of the federal system, but if the law is truly unconstitutional, then there is no reason to back it and the administration is still technically enforcing the law even with this announcement. The reasoning for President Obama backing it up to this point does have merit, despite the law being highly questionable at best: The courts are there for a reason, and that is to determine the ultimate constitutionality of the law. Hopefully the courts will find the DOMA unconstitutional, but if not, at least there are other legislative avenues to fix the problem so that the country can move on from this issue.

Steve Jobs, my favorite liberal Against the Grain SAMUEL BERKOWITZ Staff Writer It’s not often that someone who is generally conservative finds good cause to speak highly of a public figure who demonstrates distinctly left-leaning proclivities. On the contrary, celebrities—particularly actors—are generally on our “F-list” when it comes to their loudly expressed political views. However, there is one man whose innovative genius and business savvy have put him at the forefront of the technological world and whose political leanings become quite irrelevant when examined next to the mammoth contribu-

tions that his company have made to personal and business computing, and to the world. I refer, of course, to Apple CEO Steve Jobs: co-founder and later savior of what can easily be described as the premier technological firm on Earth. Pretty much all of us have heard debates among students and faculty about whether Windows or Mac OSX is the better operating system. Diehard Windows users cringe at what they perceive to be an inaccessible and foreign user interface, while those of us in the Mac camp realize that people who make these allegations have likely never used anything but Windows, and tout the virtual absence of Mac viruses to boot. Window’s present incarnation is available in three versions,

starting at about $119. A Mac OSX Snow Leopard upgrade runs about $29. Windows users balk at the relatively higher cost of Apple’s machines. Mac users chuckle, “You get what you pay for,” when our Microsoft friends’ laptops start having viruses, hard drive crashes, and other issues in less than a year after purchase. When I bought my wife’s Acer in Fall 2008, I warned her that we would be better off spending the extra $300 for an entry-level Macbook, and although she only uses it for e-mail, pictures and light Web surfing, it now takes a good three minutes from the press of the power button to readiness for commands. It also loads Firefox and Chrome like molasses. The white Macbook I

bought in 2007, on the other hand, still runs relatively fast by today’s standards (for having only 2 GB of memory) and has yet to incur any major problems. There isn’t space enough here to go on about why iOS will consistently clobber Android and Palm OS for years to come. For years, Apple has consistently pumped out superior products and the company has shown consistent growth. Yet Ed Sutherland reported last week, “People have gone through Apple’s SEC Form 8-K and discovered almost 4.8 million votes against keeping Steve Jobs on the Cupertino, Calif., company’s board of directors.” This seems rather difficult to account for, considering that Jobs has presided over re-

cord-setting growth for the company, and the passing of Exxon as the most valuable traded company in the world, according to ZDNet’s David Gerwitz, who writes, “Apple’s market valuation will zoom past that of Exxon Mobile over the next 12 months.” Not bad for a company that has been declared “dead” 19 times since 1996. Many readers will be aware of the health problems that have afflicted Steve Jobs in recent years, and we all certainly wish him nothing but the best in that regard. If he is as resilient as the organization that he in part created, then we may be assured of a well-deserved prosperous and productive future for Cupertino’s bitten fruit.


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FEBRUARY 28, 2011

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Tallahassee welcomes Thee Oh Sees Bay Area punks to perform at The Engine Room on March 3

J. MICHAEL OSBORNE Managing Editor Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1—Feb. 28-March 2 at 7 and 10:30 p.m. If you’re an undergrad at FSU, you’ve probably— quite literally—grown up with Harry Potter, and have also watched his cinematic stand-in Daniel Radcliffe blossom from a teeny tiny bad actor into an awkward teenage bad actor. For the seventh and final installment of the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, they’ve broken the film up into two parts for double the Harry, double the fun and, more pertinently, quadruple the cash. So that means essentially nothing happens in Part 1 except a lot of tense music but, hey, the end has to begin somewhere. (Sorry for the snark. I suppose I can’t really forgive this film for inspiring the Twilight franchise to pull the same two-movie stunt for Breaking Dawn.) Film School F-3 Screening—March 3 at 7 p.m. Support the work of your fellow students, with films from our own FSU College of Motion Picture Arts.

Image Courtesy of Jerrod London Porteroto

RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor Once known as The Ohsees, OCS, Orange Country Sound and Orinoka Crash Suite, Thee Oh Sees originally began as an experimental solo project for musician John Dwyer. In time—and after a few records—his project evolved into a full band, which currently consists

RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor Secret Cities with American Honey, Coffee Eyes, Dr. Glass— Monday, Feb. 28, show 8 p.m. at The Farside. Admission: $5 Hailing from Fargo, N.D., Secret Cities consists of MJ Parker, Charlie Gokey and Alex Abnos. Inspired by their love for psychedelic pop, then15 year olds Parker and Gokey established a new band as pen pals, agreeing to trade 4-track tapes through the mail. The duo then became a trio following the addition of Abnos, calling themselves White Foliage before changing to Secret Cities. Following a few small releases early in their career via Baltimore’s Fall Records, the band went on to release Pink Graffiti in 2010 on Western Vinyl and, most recently, Strange Hearts in 2011, also on Western Vinyl. The three-piece is currently receiving all kinds of love from various music publications for their latest album, including Nylon, Pitchfork, Fader, Stereogum and Prefix, which reported, “...big, smiling melodies are given just the right amount SEE LOCAL 8

of Dywer (vocals, guitar), Brigid Dawson (vocals, keyboards), Petey Dammit (guitar) and Mike Shoun (drums). Though they’re known as a garage/punk band, Thee Oh Sees also draw influence from ’60s surf-rock, psychedelia and rockabilly tunes. Often hailed as one of the best underground bands of the San Francisco Bay Area, Thee Oh

Sees are continuing their success following the release of their latest album, Warm Slime. The album, which opens with an epic 14-minute title track, has received rave reviews. “Through Dwyer’s reverb-drenched hoops and hollers and Dawson’s saturated, sexy mysticism, Thee Oh Sees climb back in the driver’s seat with the gas pedal to the floor

where it belongs,” according to Owl Mag. Sticking true to their garage sound and feel, the band reportedly completed the entire album live on San Francisco’s 60 6th Street in one day on a Tascam 388 8-track recorder. Aside from their latest album, Thee Oh Sees have also released a slew of recordings, including six full-lengths and nu-

merous EPs in the past three years alone, not to mention previous recordings completed by Dwyer on his own. Described as both gritty and infectious, their live shows are not to be missed. Fans can watch the band in action on Thursday, March 3, at The Engine Room along with local bands Jane Jane Pollock and Black Cloud.

Brighter days ahead for Black Cloud With recent bookings, local band’s future looks promising RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor On my way to visit members of local band Black Cloud, my normally punctual self was met with a downpour that slowed down traffic and affected visibility on the road. While stuck at a seemingly never-ending

red light, I chuckled at the coincidence of interviewing a band called Black Cloud on such a rainy afternoon. Though brief, the thought stayed me with me long after the light turned green. After arriving 20 minutes or so late, I felt embarrassed to be tracking in dirt from the

rain-soaked front yard, but the boys didn’t seem to mind. Drummer Nick Alexandrou met me at the door, extending a friendly hand and welcoming me into the home he shares with lead vocalist/guitarist Miles Constable, who sat comfortably on one of the couches, while bassist Max Fields sat alone on

the other side of the living room. Though guitarist Andrew Motis couldn’t be there, the boys began filling me in on all things Black Cloud. As childhood friends who grew up playing music together, Alexandrou and Constable decided to try their hands at forming a band while studying at

Florida State University. At the time, they also happened to be looking for another housemate. As luck would have it, one of their friends gave them Fields’ number, also a musician. “I already had a lease signed but my living situaSEE BLACK 8

TOMS at FSU to host interest meeting The campus organization is seeking out fellow TOMS owners to join RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor

Photo courtesy of Lisa Denmark

TOMS campus representatives from left to right: Emily Blacketer. Lisa Denmark, AnnaMaria Chemoch and Brian Varela.

As part of their efforts to raise awareness for TOMS Shoes and the One for One movement across Florida State University, TOMS at FSU will be hosting their first interest meeting of the semester on Monday, Feb. 28, at the Student Services building from 7:30-9:30 p.m. The on-campus organization was inspired by the cause of TOMS Shoes, a company led by American

Blake Mycoskie. After traveling to Argentina in 2006, Mycoskie encountered some children who didn’t own a single pair of shoes to protect their feet. Without shoes, children in different areas around the world are at risk for soil-transmitted diseases, a leading cause of illness in developing countries, and many are denied the right to attend school as shoes are required as part of their uniform. SEE TOMS 9


FEBRUARY 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Immerse yourself in Russian nesting dolls with ‘Stacking’ COLLIN MIRANDA Staff Writer Back in 1984, the world was introduced to Tetris, a smash-hit that continues to be culturally relevant to this day. With this in mind, it’s baffling how this obvious recipe for success, a Russian game about stacking objects, has never been attempted again. That is, until now. The world of Stacking is populated by Russian matryoshka dolls, those painted wooden figures that can open up and fit into one another according to size. You play as Charlie Blackmore, the youngest in a family of impoverished chimney sweeps, as well as the tiniest matryoshka doll in the land. The story, told in the style of silent films, tells of Charlie’s father being mysteriously kidnapped, followed by his numerous siblings being taken away by the nefarious Baron so that they, and all other children, can work for him. What follows is an undeniably charming tale of a boy, along with his hobo friend, Levi, out to save his family, replete with themes of perseverance, the inherent flaws of child labor and the strength of family bonds. Being the smallest matryoshka doll, Charlie has the ability to enter and control a doll a size up from himself, who in turn can enter the next largest doll, and so on and so on until you’ve got a large collection of dolls in your possession. Each type of doll in the game has its own unique ability, and there are an impressive variety of dolls populating the game, possible over 100. Finding different dolls and exploring what

help you figure out how to cause a ruckus using a specific doll. Completing the Hi-jink will award that doll, and all of its counterparts, some sort of special, usually gold, article of clothing. The world of Stacking is absolutely charming and beautiful. The environments are finely detailed, and feature a sort of old-world aesthetic reinforced by a tinge of sepia. Levels include a zeppelin, steamboat and a train station hub world. Cinematics, as mentioned before, are shown in a silent film style, where the characters are on a simple stage with a cloth backdrop representing their location. The dolls them-

selves feature the most intricate, well-done details in the game, which is impressive considering the sheer number of them. Stacking is one of those rare cases where an extremely ambitious premise is actually successful in practice. Of course, if anybody can pull this off, it’s developer Double Fine (Psychonauts, Brßtal Legend). Rest assured, if you purchase this game (unless you’re a Playstation Plus subscriber, in which case it’s free), it will certainly be one of the most eccentric games in your collection. Oh, and yes; that farting doll (pictured) does look like Carl from Aqua Teen Hunger Force.

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‘Stacking’ offers over 100 different nesting dolls to play as.

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they do is where most of the game’s fun comes in. Actions can range from useful abilities, such as unlocking doors or commandeering a velocipede, to more entertaining abilities, such as pantomiming or suffering from a sugar rush. Some dolls’ actions can also be combined with others, like combining a flatulent doll with one that will allow it to light the fart on fire. Furthermore, the dolls populating the game will react differently depending on which doll you’re controlling, which makes the game’s variety seem almost endless. Of course, there is a purpose to this game, and to the ocean of dolls at your disposal. Gameplay consists of solving puzzles in order to proceed, which will have you using the dolls’ abilities in clever ways. Creativity is encouraged, and each puzzle has at least three, usually more, possible solutions. For example, one puzzle asks you to cause a commotion in order to shut down a safari show. To solve this, I could inhabit a doll with the ability to deliver a “proper uppercut� and unleash myself upon the crowd. I could also possess a doll that controls a cannon and shoot it around recklessly. The closest thing I can compare this puzzle variety to is Scribblenauts for the Nintendo DS. Discovering each solution will grant you access to bonuses and unique dolls. While the main storyline can be completed relatively quickly, this variety, along with tons of side quests and doll collecting, make up enough content and gameplay time to merit the $15 price tag. There are also optional tasks called “Hi-jinks,� which are vague titles meant to

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Director Kerlikowske was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate as the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. In his position, Mr. Kerlikowske coordinates all aspects of Federal drug control programs and implementation of the President’s National Drug Control Strategy. Mr. Kerlikowske brings 37 years of law enforcement and drug policy experience to the position. The majority of his law enforcement career was in Florida where he served in the St. Petersburg Police Department and later as Chief of Police in Port St. Lucie and Fort Pierce. He holds a B.A. and M.A. in criminal justice from the University of South Florida in Tampa, and is a graduate of the F.B.I. National Executive Institute in Quantico, Virginia.

E-mail: fsv-cr@fsview.com

R. Gil Kerlikowske Director, White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP)

When: Thursday, March 3rd at 12:30pm (to 1:30pm)

Where: FSU College of Law Rotunda This event is free and open to the public.

The lecture will be webcast live at http://law.fsu.edu/ondcp


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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 28, 2011

BLACK from 6 tion fell through that summer,� recalled Fields. “They gave me their information and we just started jamming and never stopped.� Then a three-piece, the guys met Motis about a year later. “We were playing in a warehouse at a party or something and [Andrew] was just really, really drunk, playing on some open guitar and amplifier—� said Alexandrou before Fields chimed in. “I was outside and I started hearing [Nick] play with Andrew, but I didn’t know it was Andrew at the time,� said Fields. “I thought it was just Miles and it just fit so well. It sounded like he was already in the band.� After inviting him to come over the next day to play music, the guys knew they had found their missing piece. “We played with him twice and were like ‘OK, you’re in the band’ [laughs],� said Fields. This kind of spontaneity was nothing new for Fields, who taught himself how to play bass in one weekend during high school. “I lied and told the band director that I already knew how to play just because I thought it looked cool so over a three-day weekend, I had to teach myself to play,� he said. That same method of self-teaching is evident in the rest of the band as well. After releasing The Sneeze during their early days as a band, Black Cloud’s sound has since become more refined. Upon mentioning the album, I was met with groans and laughs before Constable explained their collective reactions. “Before we even played shows, we threw some music together that we’d been working on for a while, just to find our sound,� he said. “We don’t sound like that at all anymore. We don’t even play those songs anymore.�

“[Laughs] I think we might have even forgotten our password to get on that [bandcamp] site,� added Alexandrou. Since then, the band, who collectively writes all of their music together, has worked to develop a better sound, but aren’t concerned with pigeonholing their music into one specific genre.

cuss the current state of local music. “It’s doing alright,� said Constable. “There are plenty of bands around here. There are people out there doing it.� Despite any shortcomings the scene may or may not have, Fields argued that it’s still better than other towns in Florida while Alexandrou expressed a

gives you a full-body feeling of emotion,� he said. “If I can do one of those two things with my music, that’s f***king cool.� The band, who shares Alexandrou’s passion, is currently in the process of completing a new album, much of which was recorded in that very living room. Constable suggested that I get an exclusive peek of

“There’s, like, 250 to 2,000 f***king different genres out there and subsub genres and s**t— make your own genre,� Alexandrou said. “Really try to figure out what you think you sound like.� But if you need any hint as to how they sound, the band credits musicians such as Link Wray, Dick Dale, The Sonics, The Gories and MC5, in addition to early ’80s punk and jazz as inspirations. As members of the local music scene, it was almost inevitable for them to dis-

desire to see more involvement from the public. “I feel like people are like, ‘Oh, you’re a local band?’ or think, ‘That one band is playing tonight. I’m going to walk in with low expectations because they’re a local band,’� he said. Alexandrou aims to alleviate that kind of doubt through his passion for music. “Music basically does two things: It either makes you want to stand up and dance around a little bit or hits you in your chest and

one of their new recorded songs, titled “The Willow Tree Blues.� Sitting there and listening to the song fill the room, I couldn’t help but look around to absorb their living space. After glancing at the assortment of books on the overflowing bookshelf, I noticed an old Nintendo 64 connected to their TV set, a stack of movies, a decentsized collection of LPs and other knickknacks around the house—a mix of both interesting and typical college-aged items. As the song progressed, however,

discovering pop musicians such as The Sundays and The Smiths. “I felt like that solidified where my heart is when it comes to writing songs,� Beard recalled. “It wasn’t until later in life that I got a real love for electronic music and electronic pop.� Fellow local solo project Transmuteo will join Plastic Flowers as well as Gainesville acts jamesDUNK and The Viirus.

Black Cloud and Vein Cranes, the turnout is expected to be even bigger. In honor of their two-year anniversary, punk/garage seven-piece Davila 666 is making a return to Tallahassee since first playing in an early Back to the Garage show back in 2009. Hailing from San Juan, Puerto Rico, the band consists of Sir Charles (vocals, tambourine), AJ (multi-instrumentalist), Miss Davila and Johnny Otis (guitarists, vocalists), San Pablo (drums, guitar, vocals), Panda (percussion, vocals) and Gigi (guitar, drums, vocals) and is known for putting on a theatrical performance— themes, props, costumes and dancers included. In addition to signing to Vice Records, the band is releasing a new album, Tan Bajo, on March 1. Slippery Slopes is a punk band from Florida, and is notorious for receiving a lifetime ban from St. Michael’s Pub two years ago. That incident, however, hasn’t stopped the band from performing elsewhere in Tallahassee and will be joining Davila, 666 along with rising local favorites Black Cloud and Orlando natives Vein Cranes.

was listening to belonged to the men around me—young college students who happen to be musically gifted. When the song ended, I was even more impressed after they told me their new album was being recorded entirely on a 4-track analog recorder. “Digital music sounds too cold a lot of times,� said Fields. “There’s warmth in analog.� After listening to one of their songs on tape, I couldn’t have agreed more. During the remainder of my time with Black Cloud, we talked about everything from tattoos, music festivals and plans for the weekend to our hometowns, majors and future goals. As for their future plans as Black Cloud, they stressed a desire to book more shows, tour more often and move to a bigger city following graduation to continue sharing their music with others. When the time came to leave, I stepped out of their home and immediately noticed the once-gray sky had now cleared and the sun was beginning to shine through. Remembering my thought at the red light earlier, I asked myself, ‘Is this a sign of promise for the future of Black Cloud?’ Photo by Teddy Cox Definitely. Black Cloud members (from left to right) include Nick Alexandrou, Max Fields, Andrew Motis and Miles Constable.

LOCAL from 6 of haunting melancholy with the vocal harmonies, ending up with something both bright and dark, both uplifting and downtrodden.� Joining Secret Cities are locals American Honey (blues, folk), Coffee Eyes (math/indie rock) and Dr. Glass (solo, experimental). Plastic Flowers with jamesDUNK, Transmuteo and The Viirus— Thursday, Feb. 3, show 8 p.m. at The Farside. Admission: $5 Tallahassee’s Sean Earl Beard makes up synthpop act Plastic Flowers. In an interview with AZLTRON, Beard revealed his moniker comes from a song by The Wake but chose it more because it fit with his desired sound. “I wanted something that didn’t stick out too much, wasn’t trying to grab your attention— which is something I see a lot with new artists these days,� he said. “I wanted a band name that almost sounded like it was already around for years.� Beard cites post-punk and early goth bands such as Bauhaus, The Cure and Joy Division among his early influences before

Back to the Garage Two-Year Anniversary Party with DAVILA 666, Slippery Slopes, Black Cloud and Vein Cranes—Friday, March 4, doors 9:30 p.m. at Mockingbird CafÊ. Admission $6, free beer & cake Engineered by Tallahassee natives Sharod Bines and Merle Causey, Back to the Garage is a concert series that’s played host to hundreds of local and touring bands over the past two years. Since it first developed, Back to the Garage has evolved from a small event to one that continually brings in dozens of attendees each time. With performances by Davila 666, Slippery Slopes,

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I took a better look at the band members. I caught Constable rest his head on the back of the couch as his foot tapped along to the beat, while Fields slowly exhaled smoke from his cigarette and Alexandrou’s body subtly moved in tune with the music. Looking around the house again and then back at them, I was reminded that the raw talent I

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FEBRUARY 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Discovering college companions Meet My Campus helps students find friends, dates and network GRACE NORBERG Senior Staff Writer Almost 40,000 students attend Florida State University, making the university’s population similar to that of a small city. The sheer size of FSU makes it impossible for one to meet every potential friend on campus they could potentially be friends with, much less date. Meet My Campus is here to help with that. The website launched just recently with the goal of helping college students and alumni between the ages of 18 and 32 find dates, make friends and to network. “The point of my site is

to meet people who you would otherwise never meet,” said Founder and CEO Jonathan Rosen. “A university can be a big place. Let’s say you’re a grad student or law student; you may never come in contact with kids outside your [particular] school.” Rosen is a Ph.D. student at the University of Miami, and knows how difficult it can be to branch out on a campus that is overwhelmingly large. Rosen’s inspiration for the site came from his preference for Facebook when it was only open to people with .edu e-mail addresses. Everyone who joins MeetMyCampus.com must

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more from La Cosa Nostra’s production ‘[title of show].’

ing to including networking and friendship makes the site more accessible and puts less pressure on users. Like many dating sites, Meet My Campus uses an algorithm to match people according to similar interests. There are about 20 interests listed, such as sports, reading & writing, arts, politics, cooking, traveling and more. Other criteria are gender, age, ethnicity, smoking and drinking preferences and body type. One can create a profile with a picture and an “about me” and post it on the site for others to browse. The difference between

have an .edu address, which means that everyone initially has at least one thing in common. Meet My Campus originally started out as a dating site called U Date Finder, which was launched a month ago. “The problem with just a dating site, which is why I’m changing it, is that a pure dating site has too much of a stigma,” said Rosen. “College kids are like, ‘I’m too cool; I don’t need to find someone online,’ even though the online-dating industry is a billion-dollar industry and one in five relationships start online.” The shift from just dat-

Meet My Campus and Facebook is that this site is geared toward meeting people you don’t know, whereas Facebook is more or less known for keeping in touch with friends and acquaintances. “If I messaged you randomly on Facebook and was like, ‘Hey, I saw your profile; I’m interested in networking,’ you would think that was the creepiest thing ever, right?” said Rosen. “I never friend anyone I don’t know on Facebook. So this is all about connecting with people that you don’t already know on your campus.” MeetMyCampus.com is completely free and avail-

able to over 100 American universities. Users can even use the site as a sort of MeetUp. com, for example, if they are visiting another city and want to find other college students to hang out with while there. Rosen will continue to add schools as requests are made, and make improvements and changes based upon suggestions. “I think, at the end of the day, a university or the world in general can be a very impersonal place,” said Rosen. “I think it’s easy to go to a big school to a big city and just kind of get lost. With this site, we scientifically match you.”

Joseph La Belle/FSView

(Left) Carlie Craig sings to Matt Jarvis during ‘[title of show],’ a production hosted by La Cosa Nostra. (Right) In ‘[title of show],’ a four-person cast presents the struggle and creative process of two guys trying to write an original musical in just three weeks. This production, directed by Thomas Randolph and Gerry Nielsen, is only the 17th production of the show since the original that premiered on Broadway in 2008.

TOMS from 6 Feeling uneasy about these consequences, Mycoskie felt inspired to help and created TOMS Shoes with the goal of matching each pair of purchased shoes with a new pair for a child in need, now known as the ongoing One for One movement. The same year he launched TOMS with family, friends and staff, Mycoskie returned to Argentina with 10,000 pairs of shoes for those in need. Since launching nearly five years ago, TOMS has donated over one million pairs of shoes to children in need across the globe and has inspired TOMS clubs on college campuses across the nation. “We’re really trying to

have FSU students be more aware,” said TOMS campus representative Lisa Denmark. “There are students who buy shoes and there are people who know about it but we really want to get more students involved, spread the word, get more people to know about it and love the movement as much as we do.” As the movement gets bigger, more students across campus can be easily spotted sporting TOMS. After first learning about TOMS through a friend, FSU junior Eliot Crandall was instantly moved by their message. “I researched them and found out their One for One policy and I was hooked,” he recalled. “I

think it’s a great idea because so many people around the world go without shoes every day [.…] With TOMS, I have an opportunity to help others while getting a product.” Depending on the style of shoes, ranging from the classic slip-on to ankle boots, the prices range from $40 to $100. “Some people say that they are pretty expensive, but I always explain to people that they are paying for two pairs and regular shipping and international shipping to a child in need,” Crandall said. Crandall, who already has two pairs and is saving up for a third, enjoys spreading the TOMS message. “People stop to ask me

about my TOMS every now and then and I love telling them about their cause,” he said. “I see other people around wearing a pair and I feel like we already have something in common. They have been a great way to talk to new people, either about their TOMS or about my TOMS and me telling them about their cause.” The upcoming meeting will be the first interest meeting of the spring semester and will involve more information on how to get involved with the organization and TOMS events, meeting other campus representatives and watching a documentary about TOMS, in order to boost enthusiasm for their next big event, One Day Without Shoes,

on Tuesday, April 5. “It’s a day where anyone can go without wearing shoes walking to class or going to work, if they can,” said Denmark, about the popular event. “[It’s about] having the choice to not wear shoes for people who don’t have a choice. They have to walk barefoot everyday but we have the choice of doing it one day to raise the awareness.” Though she participates now, Denmark wasn’t always sure about exposing her bare feet to a campus that’s home to over 40,000 students. “At first, I was really skeptical because I didn’t want to walk around campus barefoot because it’s dirty [laughs], but I decided to give it a chance,” she recalled. “It was a one-mile

walk during my freshman year and I fell in love with it. It really changed me and inspired me to learn more and get more information about it.” Denmark first learned about TOMS during high school before becoming involved during her freshman year at FSU and becoming a campus representative. “I heard about them through a commercial a couple years ago back in high school and I really loved the commercial,” she said. “I thought it was inspiring, so I researched it, loved it, bought my first pair of shoes and just kind of fell in love with it and went from there.” To learn more about how to get involved, e-mail fsutoms@yahoo.com.

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WILD, WILD WEST S e m i no l e so f t ba l l t e a m re t ur ns f r o m w e st e r n r o a dt r i p w i t h m o re l o sse s t ha n w i ns PAGE 11 FSView & Florida Flambeau

FEBRUARY 28, 2011

Tennis earns win in Atlanta Sargeant debuts strongly in win over Georgia Tech HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer Florida State exemplified a “go-get-’em” attitude on Saturday, as the No. 20 Seminoles (4-2, 1-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) notched their first ACC win of the season with a momentous 5-2 victory over No. 15 Georgia Tech in Atlanta, Ga. With the return of sophomore Amy Sargeant, who had been sidelined at the start of the season with a hip injury, the new-look Seminoles reworked their lineup as they headed into the doubles portion against a Georgia Tech team that is 5-0 when winning the doubles point. The beginning of the match looked bleak for the Seminoles, as the 47th-ranked doubles team of Francesca Segarelli and Ruth Seaborne were upset 8-2 by the 68th-ranked duo of Jillian O’Neill and Viet Ha Ngo. Sargeant made her debut a triumphant one, though, as she and senior Katie Rybakova won 8-4 on court three to even the doubles score. Senior Federica Suess and sophomore Noemie Scharle, playing together for the first time this season, had trouble meshing early on and found themselves down 5-0 to 70th-ranked Sasha Kuprina and Elizabeth Kilborn. The Seminole duo clawed back, though, winning eight of the next nine games to take the doubles point with an 8-6 victory. “Fede and Noemie showed a ton of guts to clinch that doubles point for us,” FSU head coach Jennifer Hyde said. “[Associate head coach] Oliver [Foreman] did a great job of coaching them through that match, and the girls responded and executed unbelievably well.” The Yellow Jackets (54, 1-1 ACC) tied the score at 1-1 when their highestranked singles player— No. 61 Jillian O’Neill— defeated No. 32 Scharle 6-4, 6-1. Ten days was enough time for Rybakova to forget her 6-0, 6-0 loss against Miami. The No. 64-ranked senior played like the veteran she is, posting a 6-3, 7-5 victory on court one over No. 105 Ngo to give the Seminoles the 2-1 lead. Seaborne extended the lead to 3-1 with her 6-4, 6-4 victory on court five. On court four, however, Suess was blanked in the third set, dropping her match 1-6, 7-5, 0-6 to tighten the score at 3-2. Segarelli continued her tear, as she clinched the Seminole victory with a 6-2, 0-6, 6-2 win, extending her singles match winning streak to five and upping her record to 6-2 on the year. The most promising part of the match came after the clinch, surprisingly. FSU was notorious for its lack of success in the sixth spot this season, as freshman Manon Veldman was 0-7 in singles this spring. Sargeant filled the void with a 6-2, 6-7 (3-7), 6-2 win on court six, making her debut a complete SEE ATLANTA 11

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’Noles hang on to top Hurricanes Miami’s late rally not enough as FSU sweeps season series from rival MATT RITTER Staff Writer Florida State played perhaps its best half of the season during the first 20 minutes on Saturday afternoon. The Seminoles then had to withstand a furious Miami rally late in the second half to escape with a 65-59 victory over their in-state rival at the Donald L. Tucker Center. The win gave Florida State (20-8, 10-4 Atlantic Coast Conference) a season sweep over the Hurricanes for the second consecutive season and for the third time in the last five years. Devidas Dulkys and Okaro White led the ’Noles with 17 points apiece. White was starting in place of the injured Chris Singleton, who is sidelined with a fractured foot. White came up big late, when he knocked down a running jumper in the lane to give the Seminoles a five-point lead with 31 seconds to play. The freshman connected on six of his 11 shot attempts and also grabbed seven rebounds. The win gave FSU its third consecutive 10win season in conference play. This marks the first time that the Seminoles have accomplished this feat since joining the ACC in 1992. “We can’t be satisfied at this particular point”, FSU head coach Leonard Hamilton said following the victory. “We still have two games to go.” The ’Noles came out on fire early in the game, due in large part to the hot shooting of Dulkys and sophomore guard Michael Snaer. Dulkys

Melina Vastola/FSView

Bernard James drives past Miami’s Reggie Johnson during Florida State’s 65-59 win over the Hurricanes Saturday. and Snaer each connected on a pair of 3-pointers to give Florida State a 16-2 lead six minutes into the first half. The rest of the half

didn’t get any better for Miami. The Hurricanes shot a dismal 14.3 percent in the first half, connecting on only four of their 28 field goal attempts.

Bring out the brooms Baseball rolls to easy sweep of Hofstra SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer It was a new week, but the results were the same for the Florida State baseball team, which cruised to a three-game sweep of Hofstra over the weekend with wins of 14-3, 16-3 and 7-0. The Seminoles’ offensive firepower was on full display in front of the home crowd at Dick Howser Stadium, as FSU (7-0) lit up the scoreboard to the tune of 37 runs in three outings. All-American candidate Mike McGee led the way for the ’Noles, with the senior enjoying a huge weekend at the plate. Mike McGee seemed to be on fire from the start, recording his first three-hit game of the season and driving in two runs in FSU’s 14-3 win Friday evening. As a team, FSU shredded Hofstra’s pitching staff for a total of 15 hits in game one, including three home runs and four doubles. FSU recorded seven runs in the game’s first two innings before Justin Gonzalez, Sean O’Brien

and James Ramsey all recorded home runs. O’Brien’s homer actually came with some help from one of his teammates, who lent him his bat after O’Brien’s broke earlier in the at bat. “It was a great feeling to get my first home run as a Seminole,” O’Brien said. “It wasn’t even my bat, so big thanks go out to Stephen McGee for letting me use his bat.” Friday was also another stout performance from the FSU bullpen. Sean Gilmartin (2-0) started the game and struck out five batters while allowing six hits over six innings. Hunter Scantling and Daniel Bennett came on in relief to close out the Pride in a six-hit effort. Mike McGee got even hotter on Saturday, turning in a monster performance. The senior hammered a grand slam on his way to a career-high six RBI in the 16-3 romp. Mike McGee was 3-for-4 from the plate for the game, including the aforementioned home run, his first of the season. “I squared it up,” Mike McGee said. “I thought it might have gone off

the screen because it was a line drive. I was kind of shocked when it went over. I was happy with it.” The Seminoles continued to hit well collectively on Saturday, tallying 14 more hits against the Pride. The scoring began early once again, as FSU scored two runs in the first innings behind RBI hits from Mike McGee and Jayce Boyd. The Pride matched that effort over the first inning, however, scoring three off Seminole starting pitcher Brian Busch. But Rafael Lopez opened up the second inning with a game-tying home run, and it was all FSU from there. Sherman Johnson chipped in three RBI for the ’Noles on their way to a season-best 16 runs. After his slow start, Busch settled in and struck out five en route to the victory. Sunday’s series finale did not produce as many offensive fireworks, but the Seminoles were impressive nonetheless. On this occasion, it was the pitching staff that came through. SEE BASEBALL 11

The Seminoles shot an impressive 58.3 percent in the first half and held a decisive 36-16 lead at halftime. The ’Noles’ defense was stifling in the

first half and forced the Hurricanes to take several tough 3-point attempts. Of those 3-point shots, SEE HURRICANES 11

’Noles fall to UM, top Clemson Women’s basketball earns split in final regular season games ERIC ZERKEL Staff Writer With just two games left in the regular season, No. 12 Florida State was primed for at least a share of the regular season Atlantic Coast Conference crown and a potential top seed in the coming ACC tournament. After an 84-68 loss to 14th-ranked Miami and a 67-50 win over Clemson, all the ’Noles can do now is look forward to that conference tournament. Against the Hurricanes (25-3, 11-2 ACC), the Seminoles looked to carry over the momentum from a 6659 victory against Miami earlier in the season. The Seminoles carried a perfect ACC road record into the game, while Miami was a perfect 23-0 at home. The teams were even early, with Miami taking a 30-28 lead into halftime. With 11:30 left in the second half, the ’Noles took their largest lead of the game at 52-44 due to the hot hand of Courtney Ward. Ward finished with 19 points to lead all Seminole scorers. It was the loss of Christian Hunnicutt, arguably

Florida State’s best defender, that gave way for a big second half for Miami’s trio of Shenise Johnson, Morgan Stroman and Riquna Williams. Johnson led all scorers with 25 points and added 15 rebounds, while Stroman and Williams polished off the scoring for Miami with 19 and 18 points, respectively. Miami would chip away at the FSU lead, going on a 15-6 run to take the lead at 59-58. Florida State would pull within two at 66-64 with four minutes left after a pair of Ward free throws, but Miami would close strong, going on an 18-0 run to end the game, putting Florida State out of their misery. “That was a battle just like any FSU-Miami game is in any sport,” FSU head coach Sue Semrau said. “Losing Christian put us out of rhythm a bit, but credit Miami for getting a big win.” Looking to rebound against Clemson (10-19, 3-11), the Seminoles were on the hunt for their third consecutive 10-win ACC SEE FALL 11


FEBRUARY 28, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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’Noles stumble against Hurricanes Men’s tennis drops its fourth straight match in heartbreaking fashion HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer If it takes three weeks to form a habit, then the Florida State men’s tennis team is heading for dire territory. For the third straight week, the match for No. 28 Seminoles came down to one final, deciding court and ended with a young player who could not come through in the clutch. This time around, it was the No. 38 Miami Hurricanes who celebrated on the Seminoles’ home court, looking almost identical to that of the Florida Gators and Texas Longhorns following their big wins in Tallahassee. This form of heartbreak is becoming too routine for the Seminoles (5-5, 0-1 Atlantic Coast Conference), who fell 4-3 for the third consecutive match and extended their losing streak to four matches. The 13th-ranked doubles team for the Seminoles of senior Vahid Mirzadeh and sophomore Connor Smith pushed their hot streak onward, as they won quickly and easily with an 8-2 victory on court one. The duo is now 10-1 in the spring season. The Hurricanes tied the doubles score soon thereafter, as Christian Blocker and Carl Sundberg won 8-5 over sophomores An-

derson Reed and Andres Bucaro. Playing for the clinching doubles point, senior Clint Bowles and sophomore Jordan Kelly-Houston went to the very last point before pulling out a 9-8 (75) victory to give the advantage to the Seminoles. The Hurricanes (5-3, 1-0) came out swinging in singles, as they picked up two singles points that went two sets apiece. Smith went down first at 6-7 (5-7), 0-6, followed by Bucaro on court five with a 4-6, 4-6 loss. No. 26 Mirzadeh, who jumped 16 spots in the rankings amidst his consistently strong play, fell behind early to Waylon Chin on court one. Down 5-3, the seasoned senior maintained his traditional style, whittling Chin down and forcing him to make mistakes. Chin’s frustration got the best of him, as Mirzadeh won four straight games and then won the second set 6-3. His winning streak is now at nine. “[Chin] came out swinging and hitting great shots,” Mirzadeh said. “Not much I could do except keep chasing down balls and, most importantly, staying tough mentally.” Miami took the 3-2 lead once Gabriel Flores knocked off Reed 7-5, 6-3. Bowles, meanwhile, coasted in his first set 6-2,

then dropped his second one 5-7. He looked to have the third set in the bag when he went up 5-1, but then lost three straight games and put the match back into contention. Bowles reawakened in the 10th game, however, as he tied the match score at 3-3 with his 6-4 win. And then, once again, all eyes were on a sophomore. Kelly-Houston, who was filling in the fourth spot as Blake Davis continues to recover from the flu, was tied 3-3 in the third set. Kelly-Houston missed two break points to lose that game, and then lost two more to finalize the win for Miami. “Well, the sophomores need to step up,” head coach Dwayne Hultquist said. “But three other guys lost the second set. Someone needs to take that second set, to put the pressure on them, so we can get two options instead of just one.” Mirzadeh also expressed a need for improvement. “It’s really tough to swallow another nail-biter,” he said. “We need to start doing extra work to get better individually, whether it be fitness on the court or hitting extra with a teammate. The main thing is, we are not getting it done.” Florida State’s next match is Friday, March 4, at Clemson.

Melina Vastola/FSView

Andres Bucaro and the Seminoles have been struggling as of late, dropping four in a row.

Seminoles experience trouble out West Softball loses three of five games in California tournament ERIC TODOROFF Contributing Writer The Florida State softball team took part in another tournament this past weekend, but for the first time this season, found themselves playing outside the friendly confines of JoAnne Graf Field. The results from the weekend definitely had FSU eager to get back to the comforts of home. Palm Springs, Calif., was the site of the Cathedral City Classic hosted by the Oregon State University softball program, and the Seminoles (9-7) had a rough weekend by dropping three of their five games in the tournament, including a 10-2 loss to San Diego State

in the tournament finale Saturday. Thursday, the Seminoles split their doubleheader to open the tournament, slipping by No. 25 BYU 6-4 and suffering a close loss at the hands of the host Beavers, 6-5. Pitching was the dominant theme in both games, as each Seminole starter threw complete games. Senior Sarah Hamilton found herself in the circle for a victory against another top-25 opponent. Trailing 4-3 in the third inning, fellow senior Jen Lapicki handed Hamilton the lead for the rest of the game by blasting a tworun a two-run homer. The veteran pitcher found herself in a groove for the rest of the game,

as the Cougar bats could not muster a comeback effort. Hamilton finished the game off herself as she struck out seven batters and only gave up four hits in the victory. It was her fifth complete game this season and second victory against a ranked opponent. The Seminoles were not so fortunate in their second game of the day. Despite hitting three home runs, Florida State came up just short of knocking off Oregon State. Carrying a lead into the fourth inning, OSU tied it up and then took the lead in the fifth with some timely hitting. The ’Noles fought back to trim the deficit to 6-5 after pinch-hitter Briana

Hamilton slapped a tworun shot over the center field wall. But, with runners on first and second in the seventh inning, the Seminoles were unable to spark one last rally. Sophomore Tiffani Brown stayed hot at the plate in the loss with three hits, stretching her hitting streak to 6 games. In their only Friday matchup, the Seminoles lost to the Northwestern Wildcats, 3-0. Hamilton again got the call in the pitching circle and limited the Wildcats to just three runs on four hits, but the offense was anemic as the entire team combined for just three hits. Northwestern pitcher Jessica Smith threw a

complete game and had the Seminoles guessing at the plate the entire game. Saturday featured another twin-bill matchup for the ’Noles, as they were scheduled to face Long Beach State and San Diego State. Against Long Beach, pitchers Morgan Bullock and Hamilton limited the 49ers to seven hits, as the ’Noles cruised to a 4-1 victory. With just four hits on the day, the Seminole offense scored three runs in the first and tacked on another in the third for insurance. Courtney Senas led the offense with a triple and RBI in the game. The ’Noles were unable to sustain the mo-

mentum gained against Long Beach in the finale against San Diego State. The Aztecs jumped all over FSU right from the start, scoring three runs in the bottom-half of the first inning and all 10 of their runs in the first three innings en route to the 10-2 victory in a game that was shortened to five innings. Ashley Stager was the lone bright spot for the Seminoles in the loss, as she collected two of the team’s three hits and recorded an RBI. The Seminoles return to Tallahassee this upcoming weekend as they host the Big Ten/Mountatin West/ACC tournament. FSU will open the tournament Saturday against Big Ten foe Wisconsin at 1 p.m.

“I am very proud of Amy and the job she did today,” Hyde said. “She

got it done in both singles and doubles today and it is great to see her compet-

ing again. She definitely gets the game ball.” Sargeant gets the

chance for another game ball in just three days, as the Seminoles prepare to

host the No. 2 Florida Gators Tuesday, March 1, at 4 p.m.

by as many as 22 late in the first half, but made a large rally in the second half that was started by the play of center Reggie Johnson. Johnson scored 17 points and secured 12 rebounds, but it was his energy in the second half that gave the Hurricanes some hope.

Trailing by 20 entering the second half, Johnson scored the first six points of the half and started to physically outplay FSU forward Bernard James. Every time Miami would make a run, however, the Seminoles would come right back. The Hurricanes weren’t

able to cut the lead to single-digits until Malcolm Grant’s 3-pointer brought Miami to within nine with 4:32 left to play. Grant was held without a field goal until midway into the second half, but started to heat up towards the end of the game. Grant scored nine consecutive

Hurricane points, and his 3-pointer with 56 seconds to play cut the FSU lead to three at 62-59. That was as close as the Hurricanes would get as White connected on a running jumper in the lane with 31 seconds to play to give the Seminoles a fivepoint edge.

Bernard James converted a free throw in the closing seconds to secure the win. Florida State hopes to continue its unbeaten conference record at home when they welcome North Carolina on senior night Wednesday. Tip-off is set for 7 p.m.

rally Florida State on her way to 16 first-half points to give the Seminoles a 34-26 lead entering halftime. Deluzio would star in the absence of Hunnicutt, leading all scorers with 22 points. The star of the second half would see more of the same for Deluzio and

the Seminoles. The ’Noles would stretch their lead to as much as 11 within the opening minutes of the second half, only to see Clemson pull back within striking distance at 50-43. That was as close as the Tigers would get, however, and with strong second-half

performances by Cierra Bravard and Chelsea Davis, FSU would ice the game down the stretch. Bravard finished with 15 points and Davis had 12 to round out the scoring for Florida State. The Seminoles have now won six straight against

Clemson and 17 out of the last 18 contests. The ’Noles will now turn their attention to the ACC tournament, which tips off Thursday, March 3 in Greensboro, N.C. FSU will look to avenge last year’s disappointing performance in the conference tourna-

ment, where they were the No. 2 seed and were upset by seventh-seeded Boston College, 67-60, in the quarterfinals. The Seminoles will again receive a firstround bye in the tournament as a result of finishing in the top-four in the final conference standings.

nior Gary Merians got the start for FSU and struck out six batters in five innings of work.

The ’Noles managed fewer runs on Sunday, but still found success at the plate.

Mike McGee knocked a two-run home run to start the eighth inning, and Taiwan Easterling drove

in one more on an RBIdouble to close out the scoring for Florida State. Johnson also turned in

another rock-solid performance, going 4–for-4 with an RBI and two runs scored.

ATLANTA from 10 one and reasserting herself as a strong contributor for the Seminoles.

HURRICANES from 10 Miami connected on only 2-of-15 in the first half. For the game, the Hurricanes were 8-of-32 from long distance. “Florida State is a great defensive team,” Miami head coach Frank Haith said. “They were more aggressive than us.” Miami (17-12, 5-9) trailed

FALL from 10 season. FSU (23-6,10-4 ACC) followed up their poor shooting at the end of the Miami game with a 2-for-10 performance to start against Clemson, putting them in an 8-2 hole early in the first half. But Alexa Deluzio would

BASEBALL from 10 Hofstra was held to just two hits on the afternoon and failed to record a run in the 7-0 loss. Ju-


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COMPUTERS/ ELECTRONICS

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FOR RENT

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SERVICES

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SERVICES

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Study Break FEBRUARY 28, 2011

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Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is a 6 -- It’s funny how confidence can turn so quickly into self-doubt. Accept your thoughts, learn from them and love yourself. Trust your intuition.

This week’s prize is a gift certificate from

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Today is a 6 -You’re yearning for adventure but are afraid of dangers ahead. Don’t let negative thoughts block your imagination. Follow your dreams anyway.

Who is the station manager for WFSU-FM?

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

(850) 561-1605

Today is a 7 -- Negative thoughts come into your head. Just thank them for their opinion, and move on with your day. There’s plenty of work to do. Reframe with new language.

Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Today is a 6 -You’re right to be suspicious and trust your intuition. Not everybody is who they say they are. Choose your friends by their actions, not who they say they know.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is a 7 -Negativity looms and threatens your health. Make sure to get plenty of rest, and don’t take yourself too seriously today. Tell those fears you’ll get back to them later.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is a 6 -When you strive for perfection, you can be too harsh on yourself. Notice your successes, rather than lingering on failures (that gave you lessons to win).

On Feb. 28, 1911, President William Howard Taft nominated William H. Lewis to be the first black Assistant Attorney General of the United States. (Lewis took office in March 1911 and served until April 1913.)

Libra

On this date: In 1844, a 12-inch gun aboard the USS Princeton exploded as the ship was sailing on the Potomac River, killing Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur, Navy Secretary Thomas W. Gilmer and several others. In 1849, the California gold rush began in earnest as regular steamship service started bringing gold-seekers to San Francisco. In 1898, the Territory of Colorado was organized.

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Today is a 6 -- Your family will always have an opinion. Don’t take it personally. They love you and want the best for you, even if it doesn’t seem so. Look from a new angle.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is an 8 -- It’s difficult to believe your creative productivity over the last few days. Take time to acknowledge your accomplishments with a special celebration.

Today’s Birthdays

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Today is a 5 -- Don’t worry. Just get busy. Economic distress is temporary, and you still have the juice. Besides, money can’t buy health or love. Enjoy what you have.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is an 8 -Don’t get intimidated by the ideas of others. Get support from someone with more experience to keep you on the right track. Postpone travel until later.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is a 6 -- Work schedule is full. Bring your top game as you’re going to need it. Leave aside all complaints and negative thoughts, and narrow your focus to win.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is an 8 -- You have many work and social responsibilities. Figure out how you can combine them both, to save time. Get plenty of rest when you can or you’ll wear down. Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

In 1972 ,President Richard M. Nixon and Chinese Premier Zhou Enlai issued the Shanghai Communique at the conclusion of Nixon’s historic visit to China. In 1975, more than 40 people were killed in London’s Underground when a subway train smashed into the end of a tunnel. In 1986, Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme (PAHL’-meh) was shot to death in central Stockholm. (The killing remains unsolved.) In 1993, a gun battle erupted at a compound near Waco, Texas, when Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents tried to serve warrants on the Branch Davidians; four agents and six Davidians were killed as a 51-day standoff began.

Word Search: Programming Languages

Today’s Birthdays: Actress Bernadette Peters is 63. Energy Secretary Steven Chu is 63. Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman is 58. Comedian Gilbert Gottfried is 56. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Adrian Dantley is 55. Actor John Turturro is 54. Rock singer Cindy Wilson is 54. Actress Rae Dawn

Chong is 50. Actor Robert Sean Leonard is 42. Rock singer Pat Monahan is 42. Author Daniel Handler (AKA “Lemony Snicket”) is 41. Actress Maxine Bahns is 40. Actress Ali Larter is 35. Country singer Jason Aldean is 34. Actor Geoffrey Arend is 33. Actor Bobb’e J. Thompson is 15.

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“Who will give me back those days when life had wings and flew just like a skylark in the sky.” — Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, French actress (1786-1859).

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Perl PHP Python RPG Ruby

SAS Transact SQL Visual Basic

Thought for Today

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(850)-575-0050


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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 28, 2011

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BY THE NUMBERS 5.9 77.0 30.2 13’10” 2-8 7-0

Florida State is ninth in the nation in blocks, swatting down 5.9 shots per game. North Carolina is in the country’s top 10 percent in scoring, averaging 77.0 points per game. Opponents shoot an abysmal 30.2 percent from 3-point range when they face the stifling Seminole defense. The combined height of North Carolina forwards Tyler Zeller (7 feet) and John Henson (6-foot-10). Florida State’s combined record against North Carolina since the 2005-06 season. The Seminoles’ conference record at home this season.

2010-2011 SCHEDULE Nov. 12 Nov. 14

UNF @ UNC-Greensboro

W, 77-55 W, 97-73

Nov. 16 Nov. 18 Nov. 23 Nov. 28 Nov. 30 Dec. 5 Dec. 12 Dec. 15 Dec. 18 Dec. 23 Dec. 24 Dec. 25 Jan. 3 Jan. 8 Jan. 12 Jan. 15 Jan. 19 Jan. 22 Jan. 29 Feb. 1 Feb. 6 Feb. 10 Feb. 12 Feb. 19 Feb. 23 Feb. 26 March 2 March 6

Gardner-Webb @ FIU Mercer Florida Ohio State Hartford Clemson* Stetson Loyola-Marymount Hawaii% Butler% Baylor% @ Auburn @ Virginia Tech* Duke* N.C. State* @ Miami* Boston College* @ Clemson* Wake Forest* @ North Carolina* @ Georgia Tech* Virginia* @ Wake Forest* @ Maryland* Miami* North Carolina* @ N.C. State*

W, 78-53 W, 89-66 W, 79-55 L, 55-51 L, 58-44 W, 60-38 W, 75-69 W, 97-63 W, 74-63 W, 70-62 L, 67-64 W, 68-61 L, 65-60 L, 71-59 W, 66-61 W, 84-71 W, 55-53 W, 67-51 L, 62-44 W, 85-61 L, 89-69 W, 72-63 W, 63-56 W, 84-60 L, 78-62 W, 65-59 7:00 p.m. ET 6:15 p.m. ET

* = ACC game % = Diamond Head Classic in Honolulu, Hawaii Designed by Emealia Hollis


Photos by Melina Vastola, Joseph La Belle/FSView • Design by Emealia Hollis

02.28.11  

View the E-Edition from our February 28, 2011 issue.

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