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2011 SPRING HOUSING GUIDE

The independent student newspaper at The Florida State University™. Established 1915.

HOUSING | 19 MONDAY FEBRUARY 21-23, 2011

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VOLUME XX ISSUE XV

Baseball gets into full swing BEST OF TALLAHASSEE Vote for all of your favorite Tally businesses online at: fsunews.com/bot

SWEET SOUNDS OF SPRING The ping of aluminum bats returns to fill Dick Howser Stadium SPORTS | 14 INSIDE: For coverage of Saturday’s game, see page 14. For our photo galleries, visit fsunews.com.

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Devon Travis slides into first base during the Florida State vs. VMI game on Feb.18.

New mural painted on Gaines Street Community art project commemorates Seven Days of Opening Nights

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Contributing Writer FSU and Tallahassee community members have turned the blank canvas of a building wall into a community mural celebrating the arts on the corner of Gaines Street and Railroad Avenue, corresponding the mural’s painting with Seven Days of Opening Nights festival. Steve MacQueen, Executive Director for the Seven Days of Opening Nights, came up with the idea for a community mural and approached Dave Gussak, Chair of Art Education Department at FSU, last year for help on the project. Gussak in turn, helped get the art education department involved. “I hope to create a project that the community can be involved in and get excited about, and I hope to help make

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Many local artists, students and faculty help paint the mural on Gaines Street and Railroad Avenue.

Two-day conference aims to spread knowledge of cutting-edge field and showcase potential benefits

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the city look nicer,” said MacQueen. After collaborating with Gussak, MacQueen approached the Tallahassee Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) last summer with the project idea, and the CRA provided an $8,000 grant to fund the project. The mural is located on the south side of Gaines Street, in what’s known as the Greater Frenchtown/Southside Community Redevelopment Area. Rick McCraw, community redevelopment coordinator with the CRA, said this mural is one of many efforts to redevelop and physically improve the Gaines Street area. “The revitalization and creation of a sense of place and a sense of destination is part of our redevelopment

Evolutionary medicine experts to gather at FSU

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A handful of some of the most recognized men and women in evolutionary medicine will be speaking at Florida State University’s two day conference on Feb. 25 and 26 entitled “Evolutionary Medicine: Contributions to the Study of Disease and Immunity.” Keynote speakers include one of the founders of the evolutionary medical field, Dr. Randolph Nesse of the University of Michigan, and co-author of the field’s first textbook, Sir Peter Gluckman of the University of Auckland (New Zealand). Also scheduled to pres-

ent are Kathleen Barnes from the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health; Paul Ewald, director of the Evolutionary Medicine Program at the University of Louisville; and Michael Ruse, the Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University. “We are having some of the world’s leading experts on evolutionary medicine come to speak,” said Joseph Gabriel, an assistant professor in the FSU College of Medicine and a member of the conference’s organizing committee. “It is tremendously exciting.” Evolutionary medicine is the application of evolutionary knowledge to the understanding and

treatment of health and disease. Nesse, who is a professor of psychiatry and psychology at the University of MichiganAnn Arbor, director of the Evolution and Human Adaptation Program at the university and the author of Why We Get Sick, described the field as scientists’ way of understanding why natural selection has left the body with vulnerabilities. David Houle, a professor in the FSU Department of Biological Science, said the organizational committee chose evolutionary medicine as the topic of their symposium because the medical community currently lacks education in evolutionary matters.

“For students who are interested in working in health-related fields, just getting a sense of evolutionary knowledge can be helpful in understanding disease and health in human beings,” said Houle. The first day of the conference will take place at the auditorium of the FSU College of Medicine from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. It will continue Saturday in room 1024 at the King Life Sciences Building from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Speakers will be presenting throughout both conference days with coffee and lunch breaks in between. Registration for the conference is free and open to the public.

To register and to find a complete schedule, visit www.bio. f s u . e d u / Fo w l e r I I / . “This is a rare opportunity for students to learn about an important direction that medical science is taking,” said Gabriel. “Anyone in interested in medicine or the biomedical sciences should attend.” Conference cosponsors include FSU’s College of Medicine, Department of Biological Science, and History and Philosophy of Science Program. Support for the event comes from the Frank and Yolande Fowler Endowment in Modern Molecular Biology and the William H. and Lucyle T. Werkmeister Endowment Fund. *Delivery Extra

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SPEAR Conference discusses human excellence Professors examine what makes an expert 850-561-6653

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This weekend, students in Florida State University’s Sport Psychology Organization and Research Team (SPORT) hosted the third annual Sport Professionals’ Experience and Research (SPEAR) Conference with a focus on “Expertise Across Domains.” Last year’s topic was exercise and the wellbeing of the athlete, but students look to keep the conference current each year. “This year, a lot of books have been coming out where scientists identify how people reach expertise in sports and in other domains as well,” said Itay Basevitch, a sports psychology Ph.D. student. “It’s a relatively new area and we have a few of the best scholars in this area and a few of the best schools. We want the public to attend but also to participate, asking questions and maybe contribute something also to

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this.” Every two weeks, the members of SPORT meet and discuss whom they will invite to speak. They then advertise the event on campus. Since its beginning, the conference has grown from 50 participants to nearly 200. With a topic as inclusive and broad as expertise, organizers hope attendees leave with new motivation. “People who attend will leave thinking about what it takes to become an expert and what being an expert means to them, going back to their area of interest and thinking about becoming an expert in that area themselves, and being inspired to strive for that incredible level of skill and ability in their given field,” said Katy Tram, a sports psychology Ph.D. student. “If people go back thinking about what is means to become an expert in their area and then maybe take a couple steps toward becoming greater in their domain, we’ll have

achieved our goal.” Although the primary focus is sports psychology, organizers hope the conference fosters collaboration among different fields. Graduates of the program can go on to work with astronauts or soldiers, because sport psychology theory is applicable to multiple fields. “We want to talk about the science of expertise to give people from different domains and different levels of performance ideas about what you need to do to become good so you can become an expert in whatever you want to be,” said SPORT President Edson Filho. After hearing speakers like Nobel Laureate Dr. Harold Kroto and Dr. Ericsson, expert on the theory of deliberate practice, Filho hopes students take away new knowledge to apply to their own ambitions. “I want them to better understand the science of excellence,” said Filho. “Everybody wants

develop expertise.” Possible future topics include the phenomenon of burnout among top performers, development of mental skills and group cohesion and group dynamics. Each year, the conference is growing. “In the past three years, the students have laid an incredibly strong foundation for his conference and for spreading information and awareness of not only sports psychology, but also the importance of different domains, so I hope students will stay involved and keep it going,” said Tram. For students involved in the conference, it is both an opportunity to learn and to gain real experience organizing and working with top professors. From skills learned in the conference, they may make progress toward becoming experts themselves. For more information about SPEAR, visit www. coe.fsu.edu/sport/conference.html.

to succeed in life; many people are motivated to professional success. They dream about it, but they don’t know what to do to get there. You need to have good coaching, you need to know how to set goals, you need to know what the coaches are looking for when they select experts. To become an expert, you need to know what to do to become an expert. Many people just dream and they don’t know there’s a science behind it.” Dr. Gershon Tenenbaum, who is talking about how to distinguish experts from non-experts in terms of quantitative measurement, became interested in sports psychology after his own athletic career. “It all started when I was playing handball in Israel,” said Tenenbaum. “I was always interested in the psychology of experts and high-performers, so I became an academic who is looking for ways to define expertise, measure expertise and

Bass fishing team reels in fourth place CHAD SQUITIERI Contributing Writer The bass fishing team at Florida State University recently participated in their first tournament, finishing in fourth place. The tournament, which was held Feb. 12 at Lake Seminole in Georgia, had a total of 18 participating boats. In this particular tournament, the teams were attempting to catch largemouth bass. FSU’s bass fishing team was one of only eight boats to catch fish.

Participants were judged in a variety of categories, including one for the most fish caught according to weight, as well as a category for the biggest catch of the day. Robert Torres, a member of the bass fishing team, was one of the few competitors who managed to catch a largemouth bass and helped propel his team ahead of the other competitors. “I think we performed better than we expected,” Torres said. “We went into the competition

thinking we weren’t going to catch a single fish because the day before, nearly everyone, including us, got nothing. But because one of our boats actually ranked, it was a great turnout.” According to Torres, the team is fairly new but is looking to expand. “We are a competitive fishing team that is a sanctioned club by FSU and we are trying to get it recognized as a sports club,” Torres said. To be recognized as a sports club by the uni-

which will really get us some recognition if we place.” The bass fishing team was created this year and is the first of its kind to be created here at FSU. As the bass fishing team looks to expand, interested FSU students are encouraged to participate. Students interested in joining the bass fishing team can attend a meeting, held every Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Bridge Lounge, or contact the group through their page on Facebook.

versity, the bass fishing team must first apply to be recognized within the Department of Campus Recreation on an annual basis. Once membership is confirmed by the Sports Club Program, the team would be classified as a sports club in accordance with the Student Activities Center. “The size is already growing,” Torres said. “I think we have about eight people when we started with four. We are really trying to get into the FLW tournaments next year,

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College of Medicine sends groups to help needy FSUCares travels annually to distribute medical supplies TURNER COWLES Senior Staff Writer FSUCares will send groups of students to far-and-away places to assist the less-fortunate population by supplying basic necessities. Six students, two faculty members and one resident will travel to Filipinas, Panama, while McAllen, Texas, and Immokalee, Fla., will see host to four students and two members of faculty. Bethann Mohamed is one Florida State University sophomore who will be traveling with the group; this trip will be her second with FSUCares. Bethann and her friends will take bags full of clothing, soap, bandages, sunscreen and many other supplies to these rural villagers. These bags provide an otherwise hard-to-come-by lifeline for many people. “Everything is over the counter, but for some of these people: a Tylenol is hard to come by,” Mohamed said. The medications included in the bags range from acetaminophen and ibuprofen to vitamins and antacids. The bags will also include travel-sized toiletries. “We ask the faculty in certain departments, when they go on conferences, to bring back their toiletries for us,” Mohamed said. “We package them up in bags and we put soap,

shampoo, conditioner and lotion in a bag and we give them out to all the people.” Mohamed said that these locations were chosen because of cultural similarities—all three have Spanishspeaking residents. Immokalee has migrant farmers who work in tomato and other fields; Panama is a village on the side of a mountain; McAllen supports those people who are in transition between countries. McAllen, Texas is a town located about 60 miles inland of the Gulf of Mexico and sits on the U.S.-Mexico border. “There are areas there called the colonias,” Mohamed said. “These are people who are in transition, either coming from Texas going to Mexico, or from Mexico going to Texas. They build makeshift communities that are basically shacks. Students go and make home visits and take these supplies. They make first aid homes that other people in the colonias know that, ‘If I get hurt, if I need Bandaid, if I need pills, [I can] go to this house.’ ” The FSUCares students have affectionately deemed this town as “TexMex.” The group used to cross into Mexico to assist with a clinic there. “There was a lot of violence this year in MexiSEE HELP 3

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Seminoles blow away Miami

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The Seminoles take the field at the Florida State University vs. the University of Miami football game held on Oct. 9 in Miami.

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The pair of red flags with black squares flapping in the fall wind over the Al Dunlap Practice Field declared something Florida State fans have been looking forward to since Sept. 7, 2009: It’s finally Miami week again. Fans of the game often point to Florida as FSU’s biggest rival when, in fact, the rivalry with Miami has been longer-running and has produced some of the more painful losses and triumphant victories for the Seminoles. Florida State (4-1, 2-0 ACC) and Miami have been playing since 1951 and on an annual basis since 1972. Miami owns a 31-23 advantage in the series and has won eight of the 11 matchups since the start of the new millennium, including a 2004 victory in the FedEx Or-

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Jacory Harris (left) and Christian Ponder—two of the ACC’s premier quarterbacks— will be in the spotlight when the Hurricanes and Seminoles meet in Sun Life Stadium.

ange Bowl. “You go in your career and you get involved in some of the great traditional rivalries in college football and you feel very blessed,” FSU head coach Jimbo Fisher said. “When you’re a kid watching TV, you grow up [thinking], ‘Well I wish I could be a part of that,’ and this is one of them that you talk about all the time.” When the Seminoles and Hurricanes meet on Saturday, it will be a primetime meeting with conference championship implications. The probable favorites in their respective divisions, Saturday’s meeting could be a potential preview of the ACC Championship game in December, barring a resurgence by Virginia Tech in the Coastal Division or the emergence of a clear challenger to FSU in the Atlantic. Florida State’s offense

comes into the game in quite the offensive rhythm. The now veritable three-headed monster of Jermaine Thomas, Chris Thompson and Ty Jones in the backfield have the Seminoles averaging 208.6 rushing yards a game, good for 26th in the nation. “Obviously we want to keep establishing the passing game, and develop it,” quarterback Christian Ponder said. “But right now, the running game’s working and we’ll try to take advantage of it.” The ’Noles will be facing a Miami defense that is first in the nation in tackles for loss and second only to Florida State in sacks. A key matchup will be the experience of the Seminole offensive line (with or without starting left tackle Andrew Datko) against an SEE COLLIDE 11

Soccer hopes to avoid Tigers’ trap Seminoles look to tune up against Clemson ERIC ZERKEL Staff Writer

in their last meeting. With history and form on their side, it will be a

of the net in her last two matches. Lim also joined Wys with national recogni-

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Laughable premise turns into one of year’s best films

Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s with The Lonely Forest—Tuesday, Oct. 5, doors 8:30 p.m., show 9:30 p.m. at Club Downunder. Admission: free for FSU students with valid FSUID, $12 for general public Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s is a folksy chamber pop ensemble from Indianapolis, Ind., known for their multidimensional and sometimes bittersweet sound. In 2004, singer/songwriter Richard Edwards and guitarist Andy Fry (of Archer Avenue and The Academy, respectively) joined forces to establish the band along with six other members. Together, they released their debut album, The Dust of Retreat, in 2006 with Standard Recording Company and split their sophomore album as Animal! and Not Animal with Epic Records in 2007. After making some changes to the lineup and leaving Epic Records, the newly minted six-piece released their third full-length, Buzzard, via their own label, Mariel Recordings, on

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Many publications and websites have been touting, seemingly on a nonstop cycle, The Social Network as “the story of Facebook.” But saying that, really, is a little misleading and unfair to the film. We may or may not now know the real “story” behind this thing that rapidly became everyone’s favorite love-hate relationship, but The Social Network is, thankfully, more a character study of its co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, here played by the alwaysadorable Jesse Eisenberg (Zombieland). It’s hardly a secret now the way Zuckerberg, America’s most enigmatic entrepreneur, stepped on a few heads on his way to the top—hell, it’s on the poster. In the

film, at least, it all begins at Harvard, with another rejection by a girl, a drunken Livejournal session and a similarly drunken website for revenge called “Face Mash” that ends up posting tens of thousands of hits in just hours. Under the guise of creating a “match.com for Harvard students” for the rich, overachieving and annoyingly handsome Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss (both played by Armie Hammer), Zuckerberg then begins to create what would be known as “The Facebook” along with best friend and newly minted CFO Eduardo Saverin (newcomer Andrew Garfield, who will soon be our next Peter Parker). After moving to California at the advice of

notorious, charismatic, slightly crazy Napster creator Sean Parker (Justin Timberlake)— and against the advice of Saverin—Zuckerberg and a crack team of heavy-drinking programmers expand and develop a site that would, at a pace that would have been unbelievable if it hadn’t have happened only a few years ago, gain millions upon millions of users. Flash-forward a few years, as the film does sporadically, and the Winklevoss twins and Saverin are both taking Zuckerberg to court in high-profile lawsuits, which would both famously end with unfathomably gigantic out-of-court cash settlements. The Social Network, then, isn’t so much the story of Fa-

cebook, a cultural unavoidability that, yes, I’m currently logged into, so much as it is a story of how, in trying to create a unified social interconnectedness, someone ends up destroying his relationships with anyone who’s ever actually bothered to talk to him. Eisenberg is an absolute perfect choice for Zuckerberg: Eisenberg can play insufferable a**hole all he wants, but can also play it with enough awkward compassion and puppy-dog innocence that he can keep us sympathizing, somehow, every step of the way—with another actor, I’m afraid most would walk out of theaters saying, “Well, great, we just SEE NETWORK 6

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FSU, FAMU host Florida Resident Assistant Seminar Over 300 RA’s visit Tallahassee to learn about other schools’ resident practices JOSH LEVIN Contributing Writer Florida State University and Florida A&M University are hosting the Florida Resident Assistant Seminar this Feb. 25 and 26. An out-of-town attendance of 300 resident assistants and staff from 20 to 30 Florida universities are expected to be in attendance. “We have a lot of fun activities planned for the event,” said Angie Lopez, FSU resident advisor and chair for the seminar. “The seminar is about networking, get-to-know-you activities and getting to know how different schools do different programs.” The seminar will focus on community building, programs for halls and programs for staff development. Dan Oltersdorf, author and founder of

residentassistant.com, will deliver the keynote address for the conference. Different schools will be putting together different presentations and sharing strategies for working with teens in dorms throughout the conference, which starts mid-day on Friday and runs until late Saturday night when it concludes with a banquet, dance and award ceremony. “We’ve been putting things together for the past year now,” said Lindsey Day, third-year FSU resident assistant and another student chair for the seminar. “It’s going to be exciting [to see] how all our hard work pans out.” Day also cautioned that the mix of people at this conference can cause a lot of high energy and school spirit to come out.

“There are so many different kinds of people,” she said, “so there tends to be a lot of energy and excitement in the

room. If you’re around campus this weekend, you’ll probably hear our cheers.” Phillip Bryant and AJ

ing the motion of itching, and the patient will say, ‘Oh, picazón,’ and then I learn, ‘Oh, picazón means itch.’ These people are so appreciative of everything you say and do, so even if your grammar is horrible—I could just say ‘¿Tiene picazón?’—‘do you have itch?’ I can point to body parts if I don’t remember. We all have been practicing. Most of

the time you get by halfpointing and explaining.” In order to determine who goes to what location, the students rank their preferences and those who have been more involved receive more seniority. It is based on amount of service, where the more active students usually get their first choice. “Every single student,

even if they didn’t get their first choice, when they come back with all of their stories, say, ‘Oh my God, I had such a great time,’ ” Mohamed said. “No one is ever disappointed.”

There are so many different kinds of people, so there tends to be a lot of energy and excitement in the room. If you’re around campus this weekend, you’ll probably hear our cheers.

Studstill, resident assistants at FAMU, are also co-chairs for this event along with Lopez and

Day. The first day of the conference will be held at FAMU and the second will be at FSU.

Lindsey Day FSU Resident Assistant

HELP from 2 co, so we aren’t crossing over into Mexico, but we normally spend a day with the Border Patrol and would go into a clinic over on that side [of the border],” Mohamed said. “We still call it TexMex but we’re only staying in McAllen, Texas, which is on the border but it’s on the United States side of the border.” Filipinas, Panama was chosen, Mohamed said, because of its proximity to the FSU Panama location. Panama was FSUCares’ first site, which has been in operation for 10 years. “FSU built a little community and a school for the children,” said Mohamed. “Last year, the community was able to build together a building, which is now their clinic,” Mohamed said. “We helped them buy supplies to put in the clinic, finish the floors and get electricity. We’re now helping them fill up supplies with pills and syringes and needles and all kinds of stuff.” All three of these locations are home to a mainly Spanish-speaking population; only some of the students involved with FSUCares speak Spanish. Mohamed said that this didn’t seem to be a problem because most of the people seeking the care were grateful to receive it. “I do not speak Spanish,” Mohamed said. “Last year I took a medical Spanish course. A lot of it is pointing and do-

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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21, 2011

Education Secretary discusses budget proposal Numerous new funding projects and cuts featured in 2012 plan KATHERINE CONCEPCION Staff Writer A U.S. Department of Education conference call on the Obama administration’s 2012 education budget proposal was held Monday. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan led the discussion, which focused on funding cuts, new investments in early learning, reform, innovation and college competition. “We are cutting where we can to invest where we

must,” said Education Secretary Arne Duncan, who joined President Obama for the budget announcement at a Baltimore public school. “These are challenging times, but we can’t delay investments that will secure our future. We must educate our way to a better economy by investing responsibly, advancing reform and demanding results.” Thirteen programs, slated to save $147 million next year, are proposed for elimination. In addition, $265 million in career

and technical education (CTE) grants will be cut, although next year, states will continue to receive $1 billion in CTE grants, $3.1 billion for Vocational Rehabilitation State Grants and $635 million for Adult Education grants. “Career education is vitally important to America’s future, but we need to strengthen and reform our programs before expanding them,” Duncan said. The U.S. Department of Education sees several areas for new investment, including funding for com-

petitive K-12 programs and a $900 million proposal for district-level Race to the Top programs. Excluding federal Pell grants, the budget request for DOE $48.8 billion, an increase of 4.3 percent over the proposed 2011 budget. Next year, Pell grants are expected to reach 9.6 million students, compared to 6 million in 2008. The budget proposal maintains the recent grant increase, which is now a maximum of $5,550, but proposes eliminating a provision allowing students to receive

two grants per year. Another proposed cut is the elimination of subsidies for graduate students who have loans. Despite some of the cuts, a large number of new spending proposals have been outlined in the budget, including a total of $600 million to turn around low-performing schools, $4.3 billion for teacher and principal preparation programs, including alternative certification programs, minority teacher recruitment programs, scholarships for

high-achieving students and $175 million in competitive grants to boost college completion. “These targeted funding increases reflect the administration’s competitiveness agenda and our continuing commitment to protect students most at risk while supporting reform at the state and local level,” Duncan said. For more information on the ED 20-12 budget proposal, visit www2. ed.gov/about/overview/budget/budget12/ index.html.

David Keyes opens doors at FSU Renowned computational scientist and mathematician speaks JESSE DAMIANI News Editor David Keyes, the Fu Foundation professor of Applied Mathematics in the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics at Columbia University, spoke at Florida State University Wednesday, Feb. 16, to discuss notions of exascale summit. At the event, Keyes also explained how new research being conducted is used to discover more effective programming models and algorithmic directions. Keyes was brought to FSU as part of the Sir James Lighthill Distinguished Lectureship Award, created by Provost Lawrence G. Abele in order to honor leaders in mathematical sciences by bringing them to FSU to share their knowledge with the FSU community.

Kristen Alberico/FSView

Students and faculty gather in the Alumni Center Ballroom to listen to David E. Keyes, dean of the Mathematical and Computer Sciences and Engineering Division, give a lecture entitled, ‘Exaflop/s, Seriously!’ on Wednesday, Feb. 16.

NEWSBRIEFS WORLD Libyans in Benghazi mass for another day of protests; Internet service cut again CAIRO (AP)—Libyan protesters defied a fierce crackdown by Moammar Gadhafi’s regime, returning Sunday to a square outside a court building in the flashpoint city of Benghazi to demand the overthrow of longtime ruler Moammar Gadhafi. Witnesses told The Associated Press hundreds of demonstrators gathered early Sunday morning at the court building after a day of bloodshed, during which Libyan forces opened fire on mourners leaving a funeral for protesters. In the hours after that attack, a medical official said at least 15 people were killed. But Mohammed Abdullah, a Dubai-based member of the Libyan Salvation Front, said Sunday that the toll could be much higher. He quoted hospital officials in Benghazi saying the death toll might have reached 300. Witness accounts said a mixture of special commandos, foreign mercenaries and Gadhafi loyalists armed with knives, Kalashnikovs and even anti-aircraft missiles went after the demonstrators. Getting concrete details about the six days of protests in Libya is difficult because journalists cannot work freely inside the country, which Gadhafi has tightly controlled for 42 years. Information about the uprising has come through telephone interviews, along with videos and messages posted online, and through opposition activists in exile.

Banks reopen in Egypt after weeklong closure as officials struggle to revive stalled economy CAIRO (AP)—Banks across Egypt have reopened after an almost weeklong closure triggered by massive strikes and protests in public sector financial institutions. Egyptians lined up early Sunday morning, waiting for their first chance to conduct their business since the banks closed a week earlier on order from the Central Bank. Labor unrest that surged exponentially in the days after the popular uprising that unseated Hosni Mubarak on Feb. 12 have battered an already bruised Egyptian economy. The banks’ closure, however, added a new layer to the troubles, with bankers and economists concerned that it would further undercut investor confidence in the country. The government estimates Egypt lost about $1.7 billion in revenue, over half of which was in the vital tourism sector.

NATION High winds hamper efforts to douse fire at 6-story NYC building; at least 20 firefighters hurt NEW YORK (AP)— Strong winds have meant several hours of work for hundreds of New York City firefighters trying to extinguish a fire that ripped through a six-story apartment building. A fire department spokesman says at least 20 firefighters have been injured while battling Sat-

urday’s blaze in Brooklyn. None of the injuries are life-threatening. Four civilians also suffered minor injuries. The spokesman says strong winds have complicated firefighters’ efforts at the building on East 29th Street, but they’re making progress toward getting it under control as of early Sunday morning. The five-alarm fire was called in at about 6:40 p.m. Over 200 firefighters were called to the scene. The building has about 70 apartments. The spokesman says a shelter for displaced residents has been set up at a nearby school.

LOCAL Board approves new tuition rates for 17 programs TALLAHASSEE (AP)— The board that oversees Florida’s state universities has approved proposals paving the way for higher tuition rates for 17 graduate level programs at four universities. The Board of Governors approved market rate tuition Thursday for 17 programs at Florida International University, Florida State University, the University of Florida and the University of Central Florida. None of the programs are in critical needs areas like education and security. Florida has among the lowest in-state tuition rates in the nation, and market-based tuition will allow universities to align their tuition more closely with that of private and out-of-state institutions. Most of the new rates will go into effect in the fall. The rate of increase will vary by institution. —Compiled by Adam Clement


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GAINES from 1 plans for that area, so, that’s one of the reasons why the agency decided to go ahead and fund it,” McCraw said. The City of Tallahassee assisted by locating the site and negotiated with the property owner, Dean Minardi to secure it for the project. “We talked to the City, and they had a great site for it,” MacQueen said. “They were extremely excited about it.” The mural design itself reflects the different arts represented in the Seven Days of Opening Nights festival. “What we said for this first mural, was we are looking for something that incorporated all of the artistic disciplines in seven days of opening nights, and that’s visual arts, theatre, dance, music, film and creative writing,” MacQueen said. The mural started going up Wednesday, Feb. 9, when artists sketched the design on the wall via a projector. Painting began

Thursday, Feb. 10. “It just amazed me how fast it was coming together,” said Jaclyn Mosing, an FSU graduate student in art therapy and designer of the mural. Mosing said she jumped on the opportunity to help design the mural after Gussak approached students in her class with the need for a design. With the help of others in the Art Education Department, she worked with Gussak and Macqueen to develop, draft and finalize the design. “When we were in class I actually started drawing the concept for it, because I was just so excited about it,” Mosing said. MacQueen said the mural has been a complete community effort, involving the City of Tallahassee, the FSU Department of Art Education, Seven Days of Opening Nights, and even the local Utrecht Art Supply store. Additionally, the project has brought different members of the commu-

nity together. Numerous community members, including local high school students, artists, and even individuals passing by have lent a hand to the painting effort. “I drove up on Tuesday—there were adolescents hanging from the rafters, painting all over the place,” Gussak said. “It was great.” MacQueen is also impressed with the community involvement. “This has been amazing to watch the amount of participation,” MacQueen said. Mosing said that this community connection is what the project is all about. “That’s the whole point, is we want to get the community involved,” Mosing said. “I mean not only is it a piece of art to look at, but it’s one to participate in.” Anna Campell is a graduate student in art therapy who has been involved with the painting of the mural. She said besides

providing a break from school work, getting involved with the mural has helped her to get to know her community better. “I get a great chance to talk to the community, meet people that I probably wouldn’t have crossed paths with originally,” Campbell said. Michael Sperow is a graduate student in Art Education at FSU, also working on the mural. He said he’s worked on mural projects before, and loves the interactions between artists and the community they promote. “I love the idea of arts and community combining, cause a lot of times art is kind of in a gallery with white walls, or in an art studio, in this private place that is not accessible,” Sperow said. “But this kind of project brings out, you know, it introduces the art and artistic to everyone.” Gussak said the mural has been drawing such large numbers of community members to partici-

sult, but the end result exceeded anything we ever could have hoped for,” Gussak said. The plan is to take down the scaffolding and unveil the finished design on Tuesday afternoon at 3 p.m., with a public ceremony being held to commemorate the mural’s completion. FSU President Eric J. Barron, Tallahassee mayor John Marks, and the Dean of the FSU College of Visual Arts, Theatre and Dance plan to be in attendance. MacQueen said he is hopeful to see this mural project continue, and to possibly do a new mural every year during Seven Days over the next decade. “It’s nothing definite, but I think that this feeling of great excitement and enthusiasm among all parties involved, so I would imagine that it could happen again pretty easily,” MacQueen said.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Grad student and local painter helps paint the Mural on Gains street and Rail Road ave.

pate in it, because it belongs to the community. “I think they see that it belongs to them,” Gussak said. “I think they see this as a way to really beautify the area, get rid of the drabness. It’s bright, dynamic colors with wonderful imagery and ideas that they can get behind. I think they see it as belonging to them and that they’re allowed to own it.” Sperow said that the mural promotes a creative atmosphere in the community. “It really kind of is a flashing red light that says hey, there’s art here, there’s art happening in this community,” Sperow said. Gussak had correctly anticipated running into some issues and complications in the process of transposing the design from sketch to wall. Still, he said he’s amazed at the success of the project so far. “Our original idea looks different then the end re-

Grad student and local painter helps paint the Mural on Gains street and Rail Road ave.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Michael Sperow a local artist helps in the effort to pain the Mural on Gains street and Rail Road ave.


FEBRUARY 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Now Showing

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The Expendables light up Tallahassee Drummer talks sound, tours and legalization

ADAM CLEMENT Editor-in-Chief The Adjustment Bureau—Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Based on a Phillip K. Dick short, The Adjustment Bureau stars Matt Damon as a hotshot congressman who becomes entangled with a mysterious ballerina not named the Black Swan (instead, the exquisite Emily Blunt), and the even more mysterious circumstances keeping them from becoming romantically involved. In what sounds like a serious case of cock-blockage, the two lovers on the run even have Mad Men’s John Slattery on their tail, so expect lots of running and maybe some sci-fi elements thrown in for good measure. Because this is an advance screening, be sure to stop the ASLC help desk to pick up your passes, ensuring your admission, as well as your ability to tease your friends for a whole week leading up to the film’s theatrical release. The Wizard of Oz— Feb. 24 at 7:30 and 10:15 p.m. I grew up with a twin SEE GET A LIFE 10

artistdata.com

Reggae rockers The Expendables will perform at Floyd’s Music Store on Feb. 23.

ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer Adam Patterson is your typical guy. His favorite movie is The Big Lebowski, if he had a bowl for two, he’d smoke it with Snoop Dogg and his favorite album is Simon & Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled

Quintron & Miss Pussycat with Ty Segall, Black Cloud and Jane Jane Pollock—Tuesday, Feb. 22, doors 9 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $10 advance, $12 day of Since establishing over 15 years ago, New Orleansbased Robert Rolston has released 12 full-length albums with psychedelic, garage and R&B influences under the musical moniker Quintron. In addition to his albums, Quintron is known for creating and releasing soundscapes inspired by recordings of frogs and neighborhood ambiance. Quintron even has a patented musical instrument called “The Drum Buddy,” a lightactivated analog synthesizer he developed to create lo-fi, murky sounds. Quintron’s wife, who performs under the moniker Miss Pussycat, will join him onstage to sing, play maracas and present her popular puppet show. San Francisco’s nouveau garage/psych tunesmith Ty Segall will also perform, along with local bands Black Cloud and Jane Jane Pollock. Lubriphonic with Suex Effect—Wednesday, Feb. 23, doors 9 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $10 Chicago’s Lubriphonic is a six-piece consisting of SEE LOWDOWN 11

bands that we liked more than we created our own style. We weren’t really as creative because we just didn’t have the talent yet to be as creative. I think with each album after the first we got into our own style more and more.” Creative is a word that can be used to describe

The Expendables’ sound as whole. After 10 years of making music with the band, Patterson still hasn’t found a distinct genre for the group to fit into. “I used to say we sounded as if reggae had sex with metal, punk joined in for a SEE LIGHT 10

Tony nominee Savion Glover performs for Seven Days of Opening Nights Senior Staff Writer

Assistant Arts & Life Editor

for reggae/rock sensation The Expendables, and he’ll be performing at Floyd’s Music Store on Feb. 23. “When we did our first real album, we were fresh out of high school,” Patterson said. “I think, at that point, we were still just really learning to play. I think we kind of mimicked

Savior of tap comes to Tally GRACE NORBERG

RENEE RODRIGUEZ

Water. If he was a rapper, his stage name would be Two Pump Chump, and he finds an avatar in Winnie the Pooh (cuddly and enjoys honey). What separates Patterson from the rest of the guys at Florida State, however, is that he’s not a student. Patterson is the drummer

Legendary tap dancer, choreographer and actor Savion Glover will be showcasing his tap talents at the Seven Days of Opening Nights Festival. Glover began studying dance at the Broadway Dance Center in Manhattan when he was just seven years old, and by the age of 12, he was on Broadway performing The Tap Dance Kid. A mere three years later, he was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance in Black and Blue in Paris and later in New York. Glover began acting in 1989 when he co-starred in the movie Tap with famous dancers Sammy Davis Jr. and Gregory Hines. “He has steps, speed,

clarity and an invention that no one else ever had,” said Hines in People Magazine. “He’s redefined the art form.” Glover also had a stint on the popular children’s television show Sesame Street for two years. The show that really solidified his fame, however was the Broadway musical Bring in ’da Noise, Bring in ’da Funk in 1996, for which he won a Tony Award for Best Choreography. Glover has been on tour with Barbra Streisand and appeared in Michael Jackson’s The One DVD. He was even the cochoreographer and motion-capture dancer for the main character named Mumble in the animated film Happy Feet. Recently, Glover was SEE SAVION 10

njpac.org

Tony-nominated tap dancer Savion Glover has been featured on ‘Dancing with the Stars.’

Radiohead: It’s good to be the ‘King’ Biggest indie band in the world surprises with perfect eighth album J. MICHAEL OSBORNE Managing Editor For those who didn’t follow the saga of The King of Limbs, Radiohead’s eighth record and followup to 2007’s In Rainbows, here’s how it went down: Last Monday, in what was easily my best Valentine’s Day present ever, the English band announced they would release a new album that coming Saturday, essentially leaking it before anyone else got the chance to. Then, on Friday, Thom Yorke must have woken up and said, “Screw it, let’s put the album out today,” and we were given the eighttrack oddity The King of Limbs. It’s a move only they would have the stones

to do and, honestly, a move only they could actually pull off. The one thing one can count on Radiohead for between albums is their refusal to put out anything that sounds like anything that came before it—that is, The King of Limbs really sounds like the anti-In Rainbows. (That’s why you’ll probably see a lot of lines being drawn in the sand over the two albums, despite how dissimilar they are at face value.) The two records share several of the same sentiments and thematic content: namely, the fear of environmental crisis. But where In Rainbows was expansive, The King of Limbs is—at 37 minutes, quite literally—claus-

trophobic. Where In Rainbows would put Yorke’s vocals behind a few layers of distant, dream-like reverb, The King of Limb’s brings them front-and-center, and where In Rainbows was generally pleasant and met with almost universal adoration, The King of Limbs is dense and (seemingly) inaccessible. Let’s face it, though: while trying not to fawn over a band who’s already been fawned over too much, Radiohead has put out a perfect album. The five-piece, first and foremost, remains the bestproduced band in the world under the leadership of Nigel Godrich (often referred to as the “sixth member of Radiohead”), and every

track here is intricately layered and woven; it’s difficult to get upset about a measly eight tracks when each has had this much work put into it. If this record, their eighth, holds up like Radiohead’s best—as I think it will—it will take a considerable time to digest, and favorite tracks will almost certainly fluctuate, but early standouts include the aptly named “Feral” and lead single “Lotus Flower.” The frenzied drum-machine loops and ghostly vocals on opener “Bloom” are about as good an introduction to The King of Limbs as we’re likely to get, and is a practical masterpiece of closely controlled chaos, while “Little by Little” is the most classically Ra-

diohead-sounding of the whole bunch. The album ends with a trio of quiet instant classics—“Codex,” “Give Up the Ghost” and, in particular, “Separator”—although longtime fans looking for an end-of-the-album Radiohead blowout like “The Tourist” or “Motion Picture Soundtrack” may feel that The King of Limbs goes out with a whimper. But, as far as I’m concerned, long live the kings.

THE KING OF LIMBS Radiohead Self-released

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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21, 2011

A FEW HUNDRED WORDS TOO LONG FOR TWITTER... ADAM CLEMENT Editor-in-Chief

10). The Fighter Were it not for transcendent performances by Melissa Leo as a pageant-mom of a manager and the always-brilliant Christian Bale as a drugaddled has-been clinging to his glory days of boxing, I might very well have passed on catching Marky Mark’s triumphant return to his topless-in-trunks look that helped propel the r a p p er- turned-mode l turned-actor’s career. Despite having seen the same story told on the silver screen a dozen times before (and a dozen times better, I’d 7). The Ghost Writer Quiet, subdued, and signature Polanski, this mystery not starring Nic Cage as a superhero with a flaming skull but instead about a titular ghostwriter (Ewan McGregor) scribing the memoirs for a sketchyas-hell Tony Blair-esque former Prime Minister (Pierce Brosnan) likely passed through most theatergoers’ radars in its sleeper release. Diehard Polanski fans will rejoice in its delib4). 127 Hours James Franco would take best actor were it not for Oscar-baiting stutterer Colin Firth in The King’s Speech (which, in all fairness, is an exquisitely well-acted bore of a period piece). In its consolation, however, director Danny Boyle has crafted yet another intense portrayal of the triumph of the human spirit—one based, no less, on a true story. What is less a cautionary tale and more a magnum opus of one actor’s revelatory performance, Boyle’s

wager), David O. Russell’s The Fighter remains a bold contender with its inspiring portrayal of Irish Micky Ward in his underdog shot at a welterweight title and, more notably, his brother Dicky’s fall from grace—the latter of which is worth the watch alone.

erately creeping pace and refreshingly unhappy ending; the rest of us can bask in what is a top-notch conspiracy thriller reflective of our times and fears, sans the heavy-handedness.

94-minute retelling of Aron Ralston’s 127 hours spent between a rock and a hard place is as mesmerizing and uplifting as it is wincingly vivid—which, for those familiar with Ralston’s story, doesn’t make “the scene” any easier to watch.

The 10 best films of 2K10

9). Shutter Island Yes, it came out in early 2010. Why? Beats me. Whatever the reason for distancing Martin Scorsese’s psychological thriller so far from awards season, its February dumping ground of a release date wasn’t the only thing that left audiences scratching their heads. Featuring a taught performance by Leonardo DiCaprio as a dually appointed federal marshal scouring for a missing patient who may or may not even exist on an island reserved for the criminally insane, coupled with the kind of ominous atmo-

sphere the likes of which only Scorsese could deliver, Shutter Island, however, escapist from the Oscar-bait lot, should not be forgotten come time to reflect on the year’s best. Not that you could if you tried, really, with a finale that left audiences talking long after the credits rolled.

6). Inception What more is there to say about Christopher Nolan’s imaginative dreamscape that hasn’t already been dissected, applauded or parodied? Solidifying himself as one of the coolest directors working today (and not just for reviving a battered Batman franchise), the auteur’s latest meditation on the architecture of the mind starring a two-fortwo Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Ellen Page and a dream team ensemble effortlessly

weaves brainy, sci-fi action into a mind-job of a caper, continuing his knack for spinning outstanding performances, special effects and story into collectively spectacular yarn. Simply put, it’s the stuff dreams are made of.

3). Toy Story 3 If you’re anything like me, you grew up with Buzz, Woody and the gang. Bittersweet to say the least, then, was it to send off some of Pixar’s most beloved characters in Disney’s more-

than-respectable swan song of a sequel, which sees Andy on the cusp of college and ready (or is he?) to finally put his toys away. Needless to say, if you’re anything like me, the ending no doubt ruined you, as well.

1). The Social Network I liked it, friend-ed it and maybe even poked it. Topping my list as the best film of 2010 is director David Fincher’s retooling of the American Dream, one born out of a college dorm room and built not simply by the friendships forged on a social net-

work, but the deterioration of that between those who created it. A thematic Citizen Kane for the modern age, The Social Network is a triumph of the most reflective and engrossing kind— and not only because it manages to make nerds on keyboards riveting. With star-making per-

the perennial ASLC favorite returns yet again for another midnight showing. And you don’t even need to do the Time Warp again to experience it (though that likely won’t keep most of you from doing it, anyway). If you have no idea what I’m talking about, then “Dammit, Janet,” get ready to lose your cinematic virginity to the cult-classic to end all cult-classics and midnight movies, The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Featuring Tallahassee’s own Cheap Thrills tribute troupe, arrive in drag so you can partake in the sing-a-

long, dance-a-long orgy (in the cleanest sense of the word).

8). Scott Pilgrim vs. the World Maybe it’s because I read all the books before they became geek-chic, maybe it’s because it had chicks fighting with hammers and swords, or maybe it’s because director Edgar Wright pulled off a nerdgasm of a graphic novel adaptation. For all these reasons and more (making Michael Cera cool, for one), the “epic of epic epicness” that is Scott Pilgrim vs. the World made for one of the most fun times to be had in a theater this past year, not to mention the most fun a gamer could have without

a controller. A love letter with a message to gamers, wannabe rockers and the rest of us hopelessly delaying adulthood, Wright’s latest foray is stylish, sharp, sincere and 8-bits of awesome. If only having to deal with your significant other’s exes was always this rousing.

5). True Grit Those dubious that the western genre had long been put out to pasture need look no further than True Grit. More re-adaptation than remake, the Coen brothers breathe new life— led by an expectedly brilliant turn by screen vet Jeff Bridges and a surprisingly welcome one by newcomer Hailee Steinfeld—into Charles Portis’ 1968 novel

that was originally adapted into a less-than-gritty John Wayne feature a year later. The narrative might be shallow (by Coen standards, at least), but what this tale of gunslinging grit lacks in greater meaning it makes up for in humor—a loquacious Texas Ranger played by Matt Damon, for one, as well as the brothers’ requisite stock of unmistakably “Coen” moments.

2). Black Swan Director Darren Aronofsky is nothing if not a master of making the viewer very, very uncomfortable. That is not to say this story of the grueling and torturous life of a sheltered N.Y. ballerina losing her sexual innocence (and sanity to boot) is any less an experience. Complemented—or rather exacerbated—with a largely monochromatic palette and unflinching frigidity, Portman’s unhinged performance is enough to give film and feminist scholars

alike enough to write about for the next few years in what is easily the performance of her career. Go for the big names, stay because you can’t take your eyes off it, and leave reeling from what can only be described as last year’s best mindf**k.

formances by Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Armie Hammer and a brilliant script of rapidfire pith by Aaron Sorkin set to a pulsing, off-kilter score by Trent Reznor, it’s safe to say the World Wide

Web hasn’t seen this kind of drama since the dramatic prairie dog meme of 2007. Unlike the prairie dog, however, don’t be surprised if the Academy happens to “like” it too.

twee demeanor to help others through her own earnest sense of justice while, of course, falling in love. When it comes to getting in good with the ladies, this is pretty much required viewing. Bottom line, fellas: It says you’re affably quirky and, more importantly, have good taste.

the low-budget persuasion. Starring the criminally underrated and underused Guy Pearce as a tattooed fellow who suffers from a bad case of short-term memory loss, which would explain his penchant for tattooed notes (I stick to Post-Its, myself), Memento is a whodunit about a man searching for the person he believes murdered his wife. This becomes really hard, though, with all things considered. Catch this one and pretend like you liked Nolan before he “sold out,” or whatever the kids are saying these days.

GET A LIFE from 8 brother who may very well have watched the VHS tape of this film over 100 times around the 1990-1993 timeframe. While I admittedly won’t be in attendance for that very reason, that shouldn’t stop you from seeing the MGM classic in all its colorful, flying monkey glory on the big screen. Featuring some songs about rainbows you probably have yet to get out of your head, a wicked witch, some politically incorrect use of midgets and a floating, dismembered head that’s supposed to be the great and powerful Oz but only

now reminds me of Zordon from Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, there’s only so little time until director Sam Raimi’s inevitable prequel maybe-or-maybe-not starring James Franco hits. In which case, you can then count my Oz palette cleansed. (Seriously, is there anything Franco can’t do?) The Rocky Horror Picture Show—Feb. 25, with doors open at 11:59 p.m. It’s time to “do the Time Warp again!” That’s right; in this, the third (and last?) time I’ve written about this movie,

Amélie—Feb. 7:15 p.m.

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at

Something of a French equivalent to Wes Anderson, director Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s playfully visceral character piece, Amélie, is a story as beautiful as its heroine, with an eccentric screenplay that knows no bounds. A naïve girl in Paris, Amélie (Audrey Tautou) navigates what I hesitate to call a romantic comedy (in spite of all its American stigmatization) using her infinite

LIGHT from 8 three-way, then ska taped it all and pooped out The Expendables,” Patterson said. In the words of a “very nice man,” the band met in Germany. “[The Expendables] are the band that doesn’t know if [they] are Eek-a-Mouse or Iron Maiden.” Putting this band in a box is really that difficult. The diversity of the group’s style is mirrored by their associated acts. Over the course of their work as band, The Expendables have been on tour with everyone from reggae acts Slightly Stoopid, Pepper and 311, to underground hip-hop mainstay The Kottonmouth Kings. When asked which group had the greatest influence

Memento—Feb. 26 at 10:15 p.m. Long before folks walked into Christopher Nolan movies expecting to come away with their minds blown, the British director made his mark with mind-benders of

SAVION from 8 on the band, Patterson responded with the utmost certainty: “Slightly Stoopid. When we first got [Slightly Stoopid’s second album] The Longest Barrel Ride, it never left our CD player. They were the first band to really incorporate metal and reggae. “We were really fortunate when they took us under their wing and became kind of our big brother band. We really looked up to them— we still do.” In particular, Patterson finds inspiration in fellow drummer Ryan Moran, otherwise known as RyMo. “RyMo, Slightly Stoopid’s drummer, is just incredible,” Patterson said. “There’s no other word to describe it. I’ve learned a lot from just

watching him play and talking drums with him. I really feel like he’s one of the best drummers out there today.” Like Slightly Stoopid before them, The Expendables are commonly pigeonholed as a group that makes music primarily aimed at “stoners.” Not one to lie about his partaking of substances, Patterson responds to the stereotypes with the brutal honesty of a true artist. “Everyone smokes pot,” Patterson said. “You go to almost any concert, party, or get-together, and people are smoking pot. It doesn’t matter what genre or group of people. But, I have to admit reggae concerts do seem to have the biggest

cloud. Just f***ing legalize it already.” Adam Patterson and The Expendables will be at Floyd’s Music Store on Wednesday, Feb. 23. Doors open at 8 p.m.

IF YOU GO WHEN

Wednesday, Feb. 23, doors at 8 p.m. WHERE

Floyd’s Music Store LINEUP

The Expendables, Big B, Ila Mawana, B-Liminal ADMISSION

Advance $13, $15 day of

on Dancing With the Stars showing participating celebrities how tapping is done. He has been interviewed and performed on The Colbert Report, where he was introduced as the “greatest tap dancer in the world.” In his production Classical Savion, Glover tapped to the tunes of a chamber string orchestra. His latest production is SoLo iN TiME, in which he performs tap with a live flamenco band and accompanying dancers. As a kid growing up in a rough neighborhood of Newark, N.J., Glover feels that tap saved his life. “If I didn’t have the

dance to express myself, I would probably be stealing your car or selling drugs right now,” said Glover to People. “I got friends who do that, but tap saved me.” Glover’s phenomenal success in New York has inspired other minorities and children to get into dance. His special way of pounding his feet when tapping is now its own style, known as “hitting.” Glover continues to bring dance into the lives of children with his HooFeRz CLuB School for Tap in his hometown of Newark. For more information, visit www.saviongloverproductions.com.


ARTS&LIFE

FEBRUARY 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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‘Paul’ falls short without Wright Upcoming Pegg and Frost flick ‘Paul’ doesn’t live up to their standards ERIC SARRANTONIO Staff Writer Edgar Wright, the director of Shaun of the Dead and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World, has nothing to do with the film Paul, yet his presence looms throughout the entire production because of his connections with Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, the writers and stars of the film. Thus far in his career, Wright has yet to make a poor decision. He seems to lose himself in each project until the eventual birth of his perfect blockbuster cinema. The same, however, cannot be said about Pegg and Frost. The English comedy duo obviously put a lot of work into Paul, and while the product is not as bad as most other studio comedies, it does not come close to the level of perfection they reach when they work with Wright. Paul is too obviously in Pegg and Frost’s comfort zone. They are nerds in real life and they are nerds

behind the camera, even when they are fighting zombies or solving a mystery. The story seems like it was just too easy for them to write and the roles too easy for them to play. Every artist has their reason for staying within their comfort zone: easiness aside, they often produce strong works under those constraints. With Paul, they have crafted a nerd film that succeeds on just as many levels as it does not. It has always been a talent of Pegg’s to blend multiple genres into a sort of parody of cinema as a whole. Paul is no exception; it is at once a sci-fi alien (reverse) abduction, comedy, buddy, road trip film. It is probably the most diverse of any of their movies yet. With Pegg, there are also built-in expectations that each of those genres will be poked fun at. The fact that Paul looks like the uncreative and generally accepted alien image is funny and cre-

The whole gang is working with their biggest budget yet here and the film does not seem like it appeals to a broad enough demographic to become a box office hit. If Paul does not satisfy as much as the crew’s previous works, there is still the hope that the final film in Wright’s Blood and Ice Cream trilogy, The World’s End, will start production soon.

PAUL Relativity Media

‘Paul’ fails to live up to expectations despite solid performances its cast. ative. The most obvious jab at cinema comes with a short voice-over cameo by Steven Spielberg. Pegg and Frost are obviously Spielberg fanboys, and this is only proof of how well-equipped they are for this kind of story. Greg Mottola was a solid choice for director. The last two films he helmed, Superbad and Adventureland, proved

his talent with relevant and relatable comedies, the latter being far too underappreciated by the public. Here with Paul, he picks up a cast of older actors but handles them just as well. Seth Rogen’s performance as Paul is also surprisingly strong. Filmmakers should not use major actors for voiceover because it makes the audience picture the ac-

tor, but Rogen still does a good job as the loveable and nerdy alien. It seemed as though so many forces were conspiring to make this one of 2011’s best comedies, but the film sadly falls short on its deliverance. One of the main issues is that it seemed in many ways to appeal to a much younger audience, one that will be alienated by its R-rating.

DIRECTOR

Greg Mottola STARRING

Nick Frost, Simon Pegg, Seth Rogen SCREENPLAY

Nick Frost & Simon Pegg MOVIE STUDIO

Relativity Media RATED R

HHHHH

Web Exclusive Visit fsunews.com for a review of Ira Glass’ appearance at FSU.

Online Photo Gallery Joseph La Belle/FSView

Members of TCC’s dance team perform at Dance Explosion on Feb. 18.

Visit fsunews.com for more from the Dance Explosion Feb. 18.

ala.org

Radio personality Ira Glass visited FSU this past weekend.

LOWDOWN from 8 their most recent, The Gig Is On. According to Corey, Lubriphonic is a “live band first and foremost. There’s a palpable energy emitted by any large gathering of people. When you perform for an audience and give them positive energy, they take what you give them, amplify it and then throw it back to you. It’s a fantastic feeling.” Joining Lubriphonic is Suex Effect, an alternative rock trio hailing from Athens, Ga., with funk, reggae and jam influences. Spiritual Rez—Thursday, Feb. 24, doors at 11:30 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $10, all ages

live shows around. Menace Beach: Sex Cult Party with Alvin Risk, Team Jaguar, Vi and Ben Danner—Friday, Feb. 25, doors 9 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $5 ($7 under 21), ladies FREE until 11 p.m., $10 after midnight Following last week’s Menace Beach with Hot Pink Delorean, The Engine Room will play host to Alvin Risk, a rising singer/programmer/producer from Washington, D.C., who has recently been making rounds on the Web with his hit electronic/pop tunes. Though he’s young, the budding musician has already worked with Tittsworth

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and Designer Drugs (who also signed him to their label, Sex Cult Records), has completed remixes for Risque, Laura Veirs and Glass Candy and also recently released his EP, The Making Of. Joining him are resident Menace Beach DJs Team Jaguar, Vi and Ben Danner. Females are reminded to avoid wear-

ing heels, patrons are urged to arrive early to avoid a long line and, as always, guests can expect a keg’s worth of free PBR tallboys until they run out. Do you have the lowdown on a show coming up? E-mail the details to artsandlife@ fsview.com with the subject, “Local Lowdown.”

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Giles Corey (vocals, guitar), Richard King (drums), Pennal Johnson (bass), Charles Prophet (saxophone), Norman Palm (trombone) and Andrew Toombs (keyboards). The funk/soul/R&B band began in Chicago’s legendary Checkerboard Lounge, where Corey and King worked to recruit talented blues and rock musicians to initiate a band. In their early years, the band opened for legendary blues musicians such as Buddy Guy, Otis Rush and Koko Taylor before embarking on their journey as a fulltime group. Since forming in 2002, the band has toured extensively across the nation, playing soldout shows and releasing various albums, including


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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21, 2011


Study Break FEBRUARY 21, 2011

PAG E 1 3

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is a 6 -There may be conflict with partners today. You can definitely work it out. Put yourself in their shoes. Others appreciate this and ask you for advice.

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

MORI

This week’s prize is a gift certificate Japanese Steak House from & Sushi Bar

Today is a 6 -- To avoid feeling neglected, surround yourself with friends that truly love you. In the face of intensity, keep your calm. Cultivate your own peace.

Two FSU alums play for the Boston Red Sox, name one.

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

Today is a 6 -- Even when your heart’s broken, you can still enjoy simple pleasures, like the miracle of a raindrop or a falling star. Find beauty in small things.

(850) 561-1605 Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Today is a 7 -- If you can telecommute to work, today is the day. You feel inspired and full of ideas. You could share them through many channels. Your productivity increases.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is a 7 -- If you’ve wanted to write a novel and you haven’t started yet, now is a good time. Let the words flow. Don’t worry about form or grammar. That comes later.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is a 7 -- Don’t be too harsh on yourself. Acknowledge any mistakes and learn from them. They may provide opportunities for making income, if you look.

On Feb. 21, 1911, composer Gustav Mahler, despite a fever, conducted the New York Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall in what turned out to be his final concert (he died the following May). On this date: In 1846, Sarah G. Bagley became the first female telegrapher as she took charge at the newly opened telegraph office in Lowell, Mass. In 1866, Lucy B. Hobbs became the first woman to graduate from a dental school, the Ohio College of Dental Surgery in Cincinnati. In 1885, the Washington Monument was dedicated. In 1916, the World War I Battle of Verdun began in France as German forces attacked; the French were able to prevail after 10 months of fighting. In 1925, The New Yorker magazine made its debut.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Today is an 8 -- Get in communication with a client. Make sure to get plenty of attention at home. If you feel ignored, kindly ask for what you need. Use your words.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is a 6 -- You demand attention, and yet it doesn’t seem enough. Perhaps it’s time to hang alone and rest. The lack you perceive may be perfection in disguise.

Today’s Birthdays

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Today is a 7 -- Plans for your future may hit some bumps today, but don’t worry. You have a bigger team behind you that you even know. Look for them and try again.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is a 7 -There may be some conflicts at work. Don’t pay too much attention to the details, and focus instead on long-term goals. Remind others, if necessary.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is a 7 -- It’s a great time to sign contracts or write a business plan. Don’t let work keep you from spending some time outdoors, though. This inspires.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is a 7 -- Don’t rely on an unstable source. There may be confusion in communication. Figure out the costs. Discover you’re worth more than you thought to someone. Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

In 1965, black Muslim leader and civil rights activist Malcolm X, 39, was shot to death inside the Audubon Ballroom in New York by assassins identified as members of the Nation of Islam. In 1972, President Richard M. Nixon began his historic visit to China as he and his wife, Pat, arrived in Beijing. In 1973, Israeli fighter planes shot down Libyan Arab Airlines Flight 114 over the Sinai Desert, killing all but five of the 113 people on board. In 1986, Larry Wu-tai Chin, the first American found guilty of spying for China, killed himself in his Virginia jail cell. In 1995, Chicago adventurer Steve Fossett became the first person to fly solo across the Pacific Ocean in a balloon, landing in Leader, Saskatchewan.

Word Search: Dangerous Cities

Today’s Birthdays: Actor William Baldwin is 48. Rock musician Michael Ward is 44. Actress Aunjanue Ellis is 42. Blues musician Corey Harris is 42. Country singer Eric Heatherly is 41. Rock musician Eric

Wilson is 41. Rock musician Tad Kinchla (Blues Traveler) is 38. Actress Jennifer Love Hewitt is 32. Singer Charlotte Church is 25. Actress Ellen Page is 24. Actor Corbin Bleu is 22.

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Atlanta (GA) Baltimore (MD) Baton Rouge (LA) Birmingham (AL) Buffalo (NY)

Camden (NJ) Cleveland (OH) Compton (CA) Detroit (MI) Flint (MI)

Kansas City (MO) Little Rock (AR) Memphis (TN) Miami (FL) Minneapolis (MN)

Newark (NJ) New Haven (CT) Orlando (FL) St Louis (MO)

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FSU PLAYS SMALL BALL Florida State uses new brand of baseball in sweep of VMI PAGE 15 FSView & Florida Flambeau

FEBRUARY 21, 2011

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 4

Seminoles start 2011 unbeaten

Simon Lopez/FSView

Adam Simmons earned the win in Saturday’s victory over VMI, recording two strikeouts in 4.1 innings of work, and no earned runs.

Baseball opens season with easy sweep of Virginia Military Institute HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer Baseball is back at Florida State, as the No. 11 Seminoles started their season with three dominant performances over the VMI Keydets. The Seminoles (3-0) recorded 12 hits for 12 runs on Opening Day, as they drubbed VMI 12-0, mark-

ing their first shutout victory on opening day since 1985. Devon Travis, who was written in as the leadoff hitter just hours before the game, broke the score with a double down the third base line in the third inning. He then knocked a pitch to the wall to drive two more in the seventh. Travis finished 2-for-4 with

two doubles and three RBIs. The experienced Sean Gilmartin threw seven scoreless innings, retiring 20 of the 26 batters he faced. He struck out six, walked none and notched a near-perfect win to start his season. The bullpen held VMI hitless in the ensuing innings. “Sean’s a steadying,

calming influence on everybody in the field,” head coach Mike Martin said. “He gives us that feeling that he’s been out there before, and you know he isn’t going to have a case of nerves.” Gilmartin received help from the field, as well. Stuart Tapley, who was pulled after one at-bat because of a preexisting leg injury,

capitalized on his first start in left field with a perfect one-hop throw to catcher Rafael Lopez, who tagged out Graham Sullivan to end the first inning. “The whole momentum of the game changed on that play,” said Gilmartin. “It put everything on our

In a Feb. 17 edition of the FSView & Florida Flambeau, in an article entitled, “2011 Florida State baseball forecast,” we mistakenly reported Tyler Holt would be returning for his senior season.

SEE BASEBALL 16

Seminoles dominate Demon Deacons Strong second half leads ’Noles past Wake Forest for second time this season MATT RITTER Staff Writer The Florida State men’s basketball team knows that the road ahead will be a tough one without leading scorer Chris Singleton, but they did a nice job without him for at least one game. After trailing by two entering halftime, the Semi-

noles (19-7, 9-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) came out strong in the second half and outscored Wake Forest 53-33 during the final 20 minutes to secure an 84-66 drubbing of the Demon Deacons Saturday afternoon in Winston-Salem, N.C. Florida State received a balanced scoring effort led by Bernard James’ 15

points. James converted on six of his eight field goal attempts and also finished with eight rebounds. Devidas Dulkys and Ian Miller each added 14 and freshman Okaro White added 13 to help the Seminoles maintain sole possession of third place in the closely contested ACC.

The season has been quite different for Wake Forest, as the loss dropped them to a dysmal 1-11 in ACC play, which is worst in the conference. The Demon Deacons shot just 33 percent from the field and only managed to connect on 3-of-17 3-point attempts. The Seminoles were playing in their first full

game since losing Singleton to a foot injury last week in a win over Virginia. Singleton had surgery last week to repair the fracture he sustained in the foot, which will sideline him for an indefinite amount of time. The win against Wake should provide some confidence for a young team without its

leader, but head coach Leonard Hamilton knows that Singleton cannot be replaced. “We’re not really going to replace a guy who’s 6-foot9, with the quickness to guard anybody from one to five,” Hamilton said. “We have to make some adjustments. SEE BASKETBALL 15

Softball stumbles in Garnet and Gold title game FSU wins four straight games before falling short against Kentucky in final BRETT JULA Sports Editor The Garnet and Gold Tournament was shaping up to be a weekend of redemption for the Florida State softball team after starting their 2011 season

with three losses in five games. That was until No. 24 Kentucky showed up in Sunday’s championship game. The Seminoles (7-4) clobbered Georgia Southern on Friday, Middle

Tennessee State on both Friday and Saturday, and Kentucky on Saturday to advance to the title game, but the Wildcats proved to be too much in the rematch and defeated FSU 6-1 at JoAnne Graf Field. Friday proved to be a

huge day for Florida State from the plate, as the Seminoles combined to collect 27 hits in the two games against Georgia Southern in the tournament opener and Middle Tennessee State in game two. After Georgia South-

ern’s Marie Fogle sent the game’s second pitch of the game out of the park to give the Eagles an early 1-0 lead, the ’Noles responded with a run of their own in the bottom-half of the first when Tiffani Brown advanced home off an illegal

throw to even the game at 1-1. The Seminoles would then find themselves trailing 3-1 before again tying the game when freshman Kelly Hensley’s single

SEE SOFTBALL 15


SPORTS

FEBRUARY 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

FSU goes small in opening series

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BASKETBALL from 14 “I think everyone just has to pick it up a little bit.” With Singleton out, the ’Noles struggled early and connected on just two of their first 12 shots from the field. The Demon Deacons took advantage and quickly built an eightpoint lead early in the first half.

The Seminoles, however, opened the second half on a 12-4 and used a 13-2 run soon after to push ahead by double figures. Miller’s transition basket capped the run and gave Florida State a 50-39 lead with just over 12 minutes to play. Minutes later, White nailed a short jumper and James converted an easy

lay-up to give FSU a 6747 lead with six minutes left and effectively sealed Florida State’s ninth conference victory. The road ahead only gets tougher for the Seminoles, and FSU’s next game will be on Wednesday night, Feb. 23, when they visit the Maryland Terrapins. Tip-off is at 9 p.m.

Simon Lopez/FSView

Jayce Boyd and the Seminoles used singles and sacrifices en route to three victories.

’Noles show ability to win without using long-ball in sweep of VMI BRETT JULA Sports Editor Mike Martin has won more than 1,600 games in his 30-plus years as head coach of Florida State’s baseball team. A vast majority of those wins have featured towering home runs, blazing line-drives and aggressive batting in general. In the Seminoles’ first three games of the 2011 season, the winning remained constant, but the method behind those wins was a bit unorthodox for a Martin-coached team. Florida State put away the big sticks in exchange for patient at-bats, singles and sacrifice bunts and flies in their three-game sweep of VMI this past weekend at Dick Howser Stadium. The ’Noles had a wide number of singles and sacrifices during their opening series that guided them to 36 runs. It’s not exactly the brand of baseball that both Seminole fans and Martin are accustomed to seeing, but Martin will take runs any way his team can get them, if it means another tally in the win column. “We had a chance to drive runs in playing that type of game,” Martin said of winning without using power. “I’m not fired up about it—I like to think our players are capable of driving runs in with long sacrifice flies. But we need to work on it.” Two of the biggest innings the Seminoles had over the weekend were fueled by steady at-bats, as FSU chipped away at the Keydets—and the scoreboard—base by base.

In the series opener on Friday, the ’Noles scored five of their 12 runs in the eighth inning. Four of those runs were scored off a pair of doubles by Parker Brunelle and Peter Miller, but setting the stage for Brunelle and Miller to drive in those runs were two walks and a single by James Ramsey, as well as effective baserunning on passed balls. The Seminoles also scored five runs in the fourth inning of game two on Saturday, and again, it was small but effective hitting that did the damage. After Mike McGee struck out to start the inning, Florida State compiled three straight singles—the third one being an RBI for Rafael Lopez. Later in the inning, Taiwan Easterling drove in another run with a buntsingle and Devon Travis followed with a sacrifice bunt that rounded out the scoring for the Seminoles in the inning. Easterling, who is also a standout wide receiver on the FSU football team, can prove to be a valuable asset to the baseball team with his speed, which enables him to beat out throws on bunts like he did Saturday as well as steal bases. The coaching staff is hoping that some of Easterling’s teammates will follow suit. “Taiwan’s been working on bunting a lot, and he’s so fast that if he just puts it in play, he’s probably got a good chance of being safe,” Lopez said. “I think [the coaches] are really trying to get more people to run and bunt. I think you’ll see a lot of

that.” The ability of the Seminoles to add the dimension of bunts, walks and sacrifices to their game should pay big dividends as the season progresses, given teams now must be aware of their ability to reach base without driving the ball deep into the gaps or over the fence. Ramsey is one player in particular who sees this newfound dimension as a positive for the team, particularly the team’s ability to bunt and move runners over. “I think it’s all just the principle of trying to shorten the field,” Ramsey said. “The corner infielders can get a bit complacent sometimes. I hate to say that we’re going to play more small ball because I don’t think we will, but we’re not afraid to bunt. Every guy’s squared at least once.” A big reason why the Seminoles may appear to be shortening the field is due to a new NCAA rule that changed the specifications for the aluminum bats used at the college level. The results stemming from these new specifications for bats should result in less home runs and less extra bases all across the college baseball landscape. “The only difference is [the balls] are not going to go as far,” Lopez said. “You’re still going to hit hard line-drives as you’ve seen the last couple days. You’re not going to see the [deep] type of bombs anymore. You’re still going to see home runs and you’re going to see the ball hit hard, though.”

Jennifer Rotenizer/AP

Wake Forest’s Tony Chennault gets outjumped by three Seminole players, Bernard James (5), Okaro White (10), and Derwin Kitchen (22) during Florida State’s win over Wake Forest on Saturday. It was the Seminoles’ second victory over the Demon Deacons this season.

SOFTBALL from 14 evened the score at 3-3. Hensley went 3-for-6 in Friday’s games with a home run and two RBIs. FSU would gain the lead in the fourth inning for good, and would gain some much-needed breathing room in the sixth when Ashley Stager recorded a sacrifice fly to make the score 5-3, and Shayla Jackson scored later in the inning on a wild pitch to round out the Seminoles’ scoring. Senior pitcher Sarah Hamilton pitched four innings of relief against the Eagles and recorded nine strikeouts, placing her in fifth place on the school’s all-time strikeout list. Middle Tennessee State would pose far less of a test in game two, as the Seminoles crushed the Blue Raiders 10-3. In this game, Florida State showcased its power when Hensley blasted her aforementioned (and first career) home run in the second inning. Courtney Senas would follow suit later in the inning, hitting a grand slam to make the score 5-0. The Seminoles never looked back from there. FSU would have to rely

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Entering the inning tied at 1-1, FSU got four runs in the inning. Robin Ahrberg’s single scored two runners, and Ahrberg and Brown would later score on throwing errors to round out the scoring for the inning. In the championship game, the Kentucky bats that were silent in the first meeting came to life when they needed to, as the Wildcats scored two runs in the top-half of the first inning and never trailed en route to the 7-2 victory. Hamilton, who had been so effective in the circle throughout the tournament, struggled in the championship, only pitching the first inning and surrendering two runs on four hits. The Wildcats led 4-1 before receiving three insurance runs in the sixth. Two of the runs, however, were unearned. Florida State will be out of action until Thursday, when they travel to Palm Springs, Calif., to take part in the Cathedral City Classic. The Seminoles will open play against BYU.

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more on their defense against Kentucky in Saturday’s opening game, limiting the powerful Wildcats to six hits in a 2-0 victory. It was again Hamilton who answered the call in the pitcher’s circle for the Seminoles, using her full arsenal of pitches en route to a complete game shutout that was headlined by seven strikeouts. “Sarah came out and pitched great for us once again,” FSU head coach Lonni Alameda said. “[Friday] it was our hitting that stuck out for us, and [Saturday] our pitching carried us in both games.” The ’Noles scored both runs in the fourth inning, and it was Brown getting the critical offensive inning going with a leadoff triple. Brown would cross the plate following a Hensley single, and Jen Lapicki sent a double down the left field line to score Ashley Stager. In their second matchup with Middle Tennessee State, the second inning again proved to be the big one for the Seminoles in their 11-1 win.

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SPORTS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21, 2011

’Noles make a splash at ACC Championships Swimming and diving places several members on All-ACC team with notable performances SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer The Florida State swimming and diving team closed out the year in style with an impressive performance at the Atlantic Coast Conference Championships over the weekend. The Seminoles put themselves in prime position to finish strong on Saturday with a dominating performance from their divers on Friday. The men started off by placing four divers in the top eight. Senior Landon Marzullo earned the silver medal with his sixdive total of 402.90, and was joined on the podium

by Jordan Horsley, who finished in third place. In his senior year, Horsley finished with a total of 368.10 and earned his first career all-ACC honor in the process. Mike and Tom Neubacher finished in sixth (358.80) and seventh (349.05), respectively. “I couldn’t have dreamed up a better outcome,” diving Coach Patrick Jeffrey said. “Landon and Jordan, in particular, were very gratifying for me. Landon really settled down and this was really Jordan’s last chance to earn All-ACC honors and it was really nice to see that happen.” On the women’s side,

Lisi Rowland finished in third place for Florida State in record-breaking fashion. With an overall score of 365.65, Rowland managed to break the school record by less than one point. “Lisi really went after it and made a lot of great corrections,” Jeffrey said. “She’s a beautiful diver when everything comes together, and it did tonight and I’m proud of her. Having one of your athletes break a school record is amazing.” To put the icing on the cake, freshman Kelsey Goodman finished in fourth place with a sixdive total score of 314.35, while senior Katherine

Adham took sixth with a score of 308.60, rounding out the dominant performance by the FSU divers. In the pool, junior Jessica Sabotin finished the 400-meter individual medley in sixth place with a time of 4:15.51 for the ’Noles. Freshman Julia Henkel finished in seventh place (4:18.09), while fellow freshman McKayla Lightbourn took 11th (4:17.54). In the 200 freestyle, senior Holly Mills finished in 13th place with a time of 1:48.36, while freshman Tiffany Oliver swam her way to a 17th-place finish with a personal-best time of 1:47.55. The accolades contin-

ued to roll in for the ’Noles on Saturday as well. On the final day of the tournament, two school records were broken and three more Seminoles earned All-ACC honors. Stephanie Serandos finished with All-ACC honors for the third consecutive year by finishing with a time of 1:55.98 in the 200-meter backstroke. Freshman Katrina Young also earned all conference honors on the women’s platform with a score of 299.95, which was good enough for a third-place finish. The last of the All-ACC performers for Florida State was Marzullo, who finished in second place

in the men’s platform dive. The senior finished with a score of 441.25 and was joined on the podium once again by Mike Neubacher, who finished in third with a time of 422.90. Overall, the meet was a huge success for the Seminole swimmers. “We ended on a good note and we still have some things to swim for this year,” swimming coach Neil Harper said. “I’m really proud of the girls banding together and swimming strong on the last day.” The Seminole men will start their ACC championships on Wednesday, Feb. 23.

Seminoles square off with rival Maryland Terrapins

Joseph La Belle/FSView

The Seminoles huddle up at Dick Howser Stadium before their season opener on Friday.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Courtney Ward and Florida State took to the floor Sunday in an important conference matchup against Maryland. Due to the late tip-off time of the game, check fsunews.com for a complete recap of Sunday’s action.

Simon Lopez/FSView

Stephen McGee slides home during Florida State’s 9-2 victory over VMI on Saturday. McGee finished the day 1-2 with two RBI and a run.

BASEBALL from 14 side and we took advantage of it.” The momentum was carried into Saturday’s game, as the Seminoles continued their command over the Keydets with a 9-2 victory. Junior Brian Busch started and struggled on the mound, throwing 71 pitches in under three innings. Adam Simmons took over in the third inning and pitched lights out. Simmons retired the first 12 batters he faced and gave up just one hit in four innings. “Adam Simmons was certainly the pitching story, the way he came in and showed great poise for his first pitching win as a Seminole,” Martin said. “He was a guy we expected to come in and contribute and we’re very happy he had that success today.” Catcher Rafael Lopez brought in the Seminoles’ first two runs with a sacrifice fly in the second inning, then later lined an RBI-single up the middle in

the fourth. Designated hitter Stephen McGee broke the game open two batters later, drilling a double off the centerfield wall to score two more runs and increase the lead to 5-1. Right fielder James Ramsey continued his dominance at the plate from Friday. The junior went 3-for-3 with a triple, walk, three runs scored and an RBI. “It’s fun to know that you got guys in front and behind you that are capable of doing damage in this lineup,” Ramsey said. “We’re pretty solid, from one through nine, and we just have genuine confidence in each other that we can get the job done.” However, a slow start in Sunday’s game yielded only three combined hits through three innings. It took a bunt from Justin Gonzalez to make him the first Seminole to get on base. Gonzalez advanced to second after a wild throw to first, then to third off an Eric Arce ground-

out to first. A wild pitch past Devon Travis brought him home, scoring FSU’s first run. The runs started to flood soon thereafter, though, as the fourth inning proved fruitful yet again for the Seminoles. Ramsey sent one to the wall, bringing in Mike McGee and earning a stand-up triple. Lopez dropped a double to centerfield, upping the score to 3-0. Seth Miller, filling in for the injured Stuart Tapley, cranked the Seminoles’ first home run of the season over the right field wall to score three. The ’Noles scored six runs in all to increase the lead to 7-0. The Seminoles scored eight more runs in the sixth inning to up the lead to its final score of 15-0. Sophomore Scott Sitz won his sixth consecutive start dating back to last season and had little to no trouble locating his pitches. He allowed just four hits over six scoreless innings.

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‘That’s just, like, your opinion, man ...’ The editorials and cartoons within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the writer or illustrator. Any opinion that appears in the newspaper is exclusively that of the writer or illustrator and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers.

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What are you most excited for now that the weather’s nice again?

“I am a competitive cyclist so it’s nice to not be freezing my butt off.” —Chris Mandela, senior

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 7

Mistaken assumptions, mistaken actions Coming to America BRIAN PETRITI Staff Writer

Survey says...

To subit a letter to the editor, shoot us a line via e-mail: managing_ editor@fsview.com. Please include full name, year in school, city and state.

Cutting spending is one of those elusive promises in American politics. It’s the one weird detail that shows up in the collective dream but you ignore it because Pegasus showed up with better prospects. As the national debt rises, there is a sense of urgency with the American public, and rightly so. Costly wars and flooded bureaucracies do have consequences, and we have had a grand problem with the spending therein implied since the Nixon presidency. This issue has come roaring into the public

debate. Our own Rick Scott rejected a highspeed railway proposal very recently under the guise of cutting spending. Congress, governors and political groups have been shaking their fists at the national debt and the GOP has assumed the mandate that sent it to Congress was one of cutting the costs. Was it? People are angry for a good number of reasons. But these reasons are both prioritized and murky. For one, “decreased spending” sounds good to just about everyone. In a February poll taken by the Pew Research Center, there was an increase in support for spending cuts, yet when asked about specific cuts, most people remained either ambivalent or opposed. Fur-

thermore when asked where to prioritize certain issues, people polled put “economy”, jobs, terrorism, education, and social security above “budget deficit.” Mandated indeed. The jobs situation is entirely more important to the public than budget cuts, which themselves are too complicated to easily fix. Although the creation of jobs is not exactly easy either, decisions to reject projects that could lead to jobs for 23,000 people—at least in the short term— may very well end up backfiring for people like Rick Scott. The GOP either is mistaken in its assumption that cutting the deficit is its primary mandate, or entirely ignoring the general public’s concerns when making policy. Especially telling

was Rep. Boehner’s slip this week that in order to cut spending, some Federal jobs may have to be cut. If the GOP is indeed looking for a mandate to fulfill—and job creation was a promise—then why lock the political crosshairs to deficitcutting-even-when-itcosts-jobs scenario? It comes down to a question of constituency. As local issues have become nationalized because of a national media, organizations like the Tea Party have been gaining influence because of how audible they are. Indeed, if one compares the objectives of the GOP-led House of Reps with those of the Tea Party, one will see that they meet more often than not. Yet demographic-wise

and politically speaking, the Tea Party differs from most of the electorate. They are mostly white, male and affluent, according to recent polls, and at least one Gallup Poll shows that they hold a less favorable rating than the GOP might give them credit for. Coupling these statistics with the overall polling of the population, one can see that if the GOP has been mandated by anyone, it must be the Tea Party, which itself is not representative of the overall American electorate. So where do the allegiances of the Republicans lie? What should we think about the socalled “mandate” the GOP claims? There is more to a “mandate” than simply saying you have one.

Drugs in school: the responsibility to prevent HEATHER MCQUEEN Staff Writer

“Being able to walk outside and wear normal clothes without having to layer as much and being able to lay out.” —Gretchen Detios, senior

“Laying on Landis and reading a book.” —Tyler Green, junior

“OMG. Going to West 10 pool, and Spring Break weekend.” —Ashley McDougle, freshman

“Getting out to run.” —Joseph Niedes, junior — Photos and survey compiled by Joseph La Belle

In my hometown of Pensacola, the Escambia County School District recently passed a policy that will require random drug testing of middle and high school students who participate in extracurricular activities, campus parking and athletics— and only those students. The Escambia County School Board is committed to the “detection and prevention of substance abuse by students involved in such activities,” and will implement this policy at the beginning of the 2011-2012 school year. Parents will be required to sign permission forms, and any student who does not have a signed form on file will be unable to participate in any of the previously listed activities. The philosophy behind this policy, like many similar ones implemented nationwide in public schools, is that partaking in such activities is, in fact, a privilege for the student, who is therefore representative of his or her respective school. As a result, this category of students in particular

have a responsibility to be drug-free, and to set and maintain a certain standard for the rest of their peers, by not giving in to pressure and using illegal drugs. According to many cases studies, including an overturned ruling by the Indiana Court of Appeals, random drug testing in schools has proven to be an effective measure in combating and deterring drug and alcohol use among teens. The idea is that having an automatic consequence, or the potential of getting caught, is enough to dissuade adolescents from using drugs, and that it provides an easier route for refusal when faced with peer pressure. In other words, if it is known on campus that anyone can be randomly tested, that serves as a more sufficient excuse for students, rather than just simply saying no. However, as expected, there has been mixed reception by both students and parents regarding the policy. Not surprisingly, many of the parents of the students involved in the activities are objecting to

their children’s potential subjection to an embarrassing violation of privacy. Some parents have argued that the power is being taken away from them and being granted to the school and government, while infringing on the rights of the minor as well. But beyond the parental concerns, it seems that the policy is flawed in a few major ways. Let’s say that random drug testing in schools is a positive measure, one that has the potential to reduce drug use; so, then, why aren’t all students subject to random drug testing? Isn’t it possible that many of the students not participating in these activities are just as likely to be using drugs, if not more? Clearly, the policy should extend to all students if there is to be any potentially significant shift in the rates of drug use among teens in school. Additionally, the philosophy is that the students will set a “standard” for the rest of their peers, but if they are the only

ones being subjected to the testing, it is highly unlikely that students who do not participate will refrain from drug use. Similarly, banking on the hope of positive influence seems to be futile—most “standard setting” examples among students are flawed from the start (i.e., honors students positively influencing the “general population”). There is also the fear that students will move on to harder drugs in order to avoid positive testing, operating with the knowledge that some drugs remain in one’s system longer than others. Also, the statistics gathered in support of random drug testing in schools have to be questioned, in that many rely on surveyed student responses, which are skewed since students are unlikely to reveal on a survey their actual tendencies and actions with drugs and alcohol. Finally, if students are being held to a level of expectation when it comes to drug use, then faculty and staff should be held accountable as well. Yet, it would not be surprising if there were more reluc-

tance to implement this policy as a result. Considering the fact that the likeliness of that happening is slim to none, however, I am hesitant in supporting a policy that not only presents itself as an ethical dilemma, but will also spend tax dollars that should be going elsewhere within the already shortened budget for education. It is not the school’s responsibility to monitor what students are doing outside of the classroom—that is the role of the parent—but, unfortunately for some, that may mean there is little, if any, supervision or intervention when it comes to drug use. Similarly, if the parents are using drugs or supplying alcohol to their teens, there is little outside influence for any type of monitoring or prevention. So the dilemma persists, but is propounded by one critical detail: There are undeniably high rates of drug use and abuse within America, yet it goes far beyond the age bracket of 11-18. For some reason, the phrase, “Do as I say, not as I do,” comes to mind.


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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21, 2011

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HOUSING

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21 2011

Decorating a room of one’s own

Photos by Joseph La Belle

The Other Side Vintage offers various antiques, records, clothes and trinkets to the Tallahassee community.

Nontraditional attire is the norm at vintage shops like The Other Side Vintage.

A personal take on fashioning a home away from home RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor

backs that hold drapes made by our mother. My sister and I also picked our comforters, vases, accent pillows, candles, rugs and other home accessories from various stores such as Ikea, HomeGoods, The World Market and antique/thrift stores. For more unique touches, we SEE DECORATE 25

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If you plan on living somewhere for a significant amount of time, it’s essential to make the place feel like home. Otherwise, you’re stuck staring at bare walls or bland, neutral colors around your dorm or apartment. During my first summer at Florida State University, I lived in Landis Hall. Though it’s considered to be among the nicest (if not the nicest) dorms and is located in the heart of campus, I didn’t exactly experience love at first sight with my dorm room. As I hauled all of my belongings into the elevator and made my way up to the fourth floor, I was beaming with excitement as I tried to envision the next four years of my life. Upon first walking in, however, I was immediately hit with the harsh reality that I’d be sharing a tiny space with a stranger (which turned out to be a nightmare, but I’ll save that story for another time). With no other option but to accept the situation, I decided I’d do my best to make my dorm feel more like home, even if the other half of my room looked like an overflowing dumpster. I began by adding a bright comforter and accent pillows to add some muchneeded color to the room and adorning my desk and walls with pictures of friends and family from back home. The top of my dresser housed my makeup, perfume bottles, favor-

ite books, a jewelry box, a vase for fresh flowers and other small knickknacks that usually generated conversation from anyone who visited my room. During my time in Landis, my room was often the spot where my friends and I convened to gossip, to relax after a day’s worth of classes and enjoy movies together. By the time I had to move out, I had grown to love my tiny space because I made it feel like home. However, my creativity really flourished when I moved into my apartment during the fall of freshman year with my sister. Aside from the fact that we’re siblings (which immediately made the apartment feel like home), it was easier to decorate the entire apartment because we have similar interests. Though our bedrooms reflect our personal interests, we agreed that our living room would feature elements from our respective personalities. A Martha Stewart enthusiast, my sister is wellversed in all things décor and made sure that we added unique touches to our apartment. Since my sister and I have a strong attachment to our native country, we agreed to incorporate elements of Honduran décor into our new apartment, including original paintings by Honduran painters and home accessories made of fine handcrafted pewter (common in Honduras), such as mirrors and curtain tie-

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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21 2011

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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 21 2011

Join the FSView Tuesday, February 22nd from 10am to 2pm at the Union Green for the 2011 Spring Housing Fair!

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Cost-cutting tips help lessen the load, wallet Lower your electricity use with these simple ways to keep bills down JESSE DAMIANI News Editor These days, it seems like just about everybody wants to cut costs, and why not? With the looming possibility of a rough job market or grad school bills, saving every dollar counts, so here are a few of the simpler ways to hang on to a few extra bucks. First, get back to the ba-

sics. When you’re not using something, turn it off. Your lamp doesn’t need to stay on all day while you are at school, and neither does your fan. Likewise, it might be a good idea to kill the water while you’re scrubbing soap on your hands or brushing your teeth. For those of you who enjoy falling asleep to the TV, set a timer so that it shuts off automatically. And don’t forget to unplug

your appliances from the walls even when they’re not being used to prevent phantom leaching. Outside of utility bills, food is another big area for saving. Simple and quick meals (black beans and rice, spaghetti, mac ‘n’ cheese, baked chicken) are not only relatively easy on your wallet/purse, but you can make enough to squeeze a get-together with friends out of it. On

that same note, potlucks are another great way to not only be social, but eat well for cheap. If you are going to eat out, watch out for coupons and discounts. Sites like dollarsavershow.com are effective new opportunities to eat at some of your favorite restaurants at a discounted rate. The Campus Special coupon books are also a must-have, with coupons for food options,

as well as hair care and auto repair. If you’re looking to get especially savvy, and don’t mind spending a little bit of money to do so, there are some more advanced techniques. First, look into power strips. They’re cheap, make your life easy by keeping your plugs organized in one location, and help limit the amount of power you use with their ability to be turned

on and off. Also, many new shower heads offer options for low-flow to conserve water, and LED/ fluorescent light bulbs use only a fraction of the energy older light bulbs do. For those looking to get extra fancy, photosensors and motionsensors are also great ways to improve efficiency by only using energy when somebody is actually around to use it.

to our living space. We also added rocking chairs to our patio which, weather-permitting, allowed us to enjoy the outdoors. The end result is an eclectic apartment that we’ve called home for three consecutive years. While not everyone has access to Honduran paint-

ings or homemade drapes per se, it’s still easy to reflect your personality and interests by finding ways to separate your home from everyone else. Visiting antique/thrift stores—such as The Other Side Vintage—is one way to do this, as they offer unique, vintage items not

found anywhere else. Other outlets, such as etsy. com, feature thousands of homemade items. If you can’t paint your walls, add unique paintings or posters (if you prefer them) to add some life to the room and, if you can, find affordable drapes in stores like Ikea

or HomeGoods. If you live in a small space, adding one or two mirrors can help to make a room feel larger, and can be found virtually anywhere. Including candles, pillows, flowers/plants, coffee table books and even a record/DVD collection on display are all elements

that add life and style to any type of living space. Whatever you choose to incorporate in your dorm or apartment, the most important thing is to make sure that it genuinely reflects you and your interests in order to make a space feel more like home.

DECORATE from 20 hung up original paintings by Ugandan children that were created as part of The Greenhouse Project, completed by FSU student Rachel Rossin. Since we enjoy being outdoors, we also have flower vases and plant pots throughout our apartment, which add more life

Photos by Joseph La Belle

The Other Side Vintage specializes in unique, one-of-a-kind clothes.

Even the dressing rooms at The Other Side reflect the store’s eccentric take on fashion.

Other items, such as furniture and antique trinkets, can be found at The Other Side Vintage.


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Savvy students sublease and save The what, where and hows of subleasing AGATA WLODARCZYK Arts & Life Editor College students are notorious for many things, two of which are: being broke, and barely getting by. In their four (or five) years at Florida State, many students will have to make sacrifices in order to keep their account balance on the plus side of zero. Sacrifices include but are not limited to: Ramen week, Natty, tap water (vs. bottled), offbrand almost anything— and so on. Most students will learn that while some things are expendable (like Netflix or weekly mani/pedis), others, like an apartment (or house), are simply nonnegotiable. Apartment, townhouse and house rent prices vary based on size, location and amenities provided. Off-Campus housing close to FSU can range anywhere from $250 to $650 a month, making rent the biggest bill (aside from tuition) for many students. For students staying in town over the summer, looking for a change of scenery between semesters, or just scoping out the best deal, subleasing may be the right way to score low rate. In Tallahassee, most student-oriented apartment complexes allow current residents to sublease their space to a third party. Most standard leases last 12 months from move-in to move-out, but the typical school year is about nine months. In the three

months between, students who choose to spend the summer away from school must still pay rent on their lease. Additionally, FSU seniors graduate every semester and many don’t stay in town to finish out their lease. In both cases, many students opt to sublease, sometimes offering lower rent rates. Subleases are relatively simple, but rather than talk about lessee and lessor, which can get a little wordy and complicated, lets set up a hypothetical scenario. Sally has a 12-month lease on an apartment close to campus. Her rent is $500 a month for a one bedroom, one bathroom. Sally plans to spend the summer abroad and can’t afford the summer rent on an empty place, so she chooses to sublease. John is staying in town for the summer. He just moved out of his dorm but the lease on his townhouse for next semester doesnít start until August, so John decides to sublease from Sally. Aside from rent, John will be responsible for damage to the property for the duration of his sublease. As an incentive, Sally offers to cover $100 of the rent each month, so John is getting a deal. By covering the $300 over three summer months, Sally saves herself $1,200. Everyone wins. Subleases are easiest to find toward the end of each semester when students are graduating or leaving for the summer. Many students take to campus with

Students looking to get away from their lease-binding residence are wise to sublease to other students. flyers, plastering them everywhere from legitimate bulletin boards to hallways, bus stops and bathroom stalls. Most flyers are equipped with pull tabs on the bottom that include a name and e-mail or phone number to contact. Other students choose to post listings on internet marketplaces such as Craigslist or the Face-

book marketplace. These listings are simple to sort through quickly rather than strolling around campus, and can sometimes provide the added bonus of photos. For those seriously opposed to searching, fear not. If you have taken a large (100+ person) lecture class, chances are at least one person in it wants

to sublease their place and will likely send out a class-wide e-mail informing you (whether you like it or not). Whichever way the search leads, there are a few things to keep in mind when searching for the right sublease. First, location. Think about bus routes, bike paths and distance to where you need to be

most often. Second, space. Is it too big, too small or just right? Third, amenities. Does the place have a pool, tanning bed, computer lab or game room? Does it matter? Next, is it worth it? Are you getting a sweet deal or are they just a sweet talker? Once you’ve found the right one, grab it quick before someone else does.

Student-housing developer flourishes as market stabilizes KERRY HALL SINGE McClatchy Newspapers CHARLOTTE, N.C.— Two years ago, Campus Crest Communities Inc. faced potential ruin when its only lender, Wachovia, nearly failed. But the developer scrambled to find new money and regained its footing building off-campus student housing. Many developers are at a standstill because demand has disappeared or they can’t get financing for new projects. But Campus Crest rebounded from the financial crash and in October went public, raising $382 million in an initial public offering. Now the Charlotte-based real estate developer is embarking on ambitious plans for 2011. It’s expanding into California and plans to break ground on seven projects nationwide in the fall. Co-chairman, co-founder and CEO Ted Rollins said the firm is exploring 80 potential sites. Off-campus student housing is a relatively new, and promising, piece of commercial real estate

for investors. College enrollment was up in 2009, according to the National Multi Housing Council, prompting the trade group to say the business is “recession-resistant.” Other promising trends: More foreigners are enrolling in U.S. universities, and students are taking longer to graduate. Budget cuts may also force states to turn to private developers for student housing. Starting with one project in Asheville in 2005, Campus Crest operates 27 apartment communities nationwide. The developer focuses on medium-sized universities and has built heavily in the Southeast and Texas. Rollins lives in Greenville, S.C., while co-founder and fellow Duke University graduate Michael Hartnett resides in Greensboro, N.C. The men chose Charlotte as the company’s base because they thought it would help attract workers and was near a major airport. Their apartments, branded as The Grove, offer “resort-style” swimming pools, tanning booths, clubhouses with gyms, basketball and volleyball

courts and coffee bars. The fully furnished apartments also feature private bedrooms, walk-in closets, Internet access and washers and dryers. Campus Crest organizes social activities for residents and encourages people to volunteer and get involved in the community. “We keep them busy. It’s an apartment that’s like a cruise ship,” Harnett said. Smaller, local owners once dominated the market, said Jim Arbury of the National Multi Housing Council. Regional and national investors became involved during the past decade. Governmentbacked mortgage providers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are also lending to apartment developers, sweetening the niche. With an ownership interest in more than 13,500 beds, Campus Crest is ranked the seventh-largest owner of student housing, according to Student Housing Business magazine. The largest owner, American Campus Communities, is a publicly traded real estate investment trust with more than 62,000 beds. Campus Crest is the

third REIT specializing in campus housing to go public. With plans to add roughly 4,000 beds a year, Campus Crest employs 550 people. The company owns separate general contracting, wholesale supply, property management, asset management and development divisions. Competitor Donna Preiss, president of Raleigh, N.C.-based The Preiss Co., said the industry is rooting for the newcomer. If a publicly traded company were to fail, it could scare investors, she said. “The jury’s still out for whether they are good operators. They’ve had a very quick ramp-up with construction,” said Preiss, whose company is the largest off-campus housing provider for N.C. State University and Clemson University. “They continued to build when the rest of us pulled back,” she said. “As it turned out, that was a gamble that has paid off royally for them.” Campus Crest hasn’t turned a profit, despite its quick growth, posting significant losses during the past five fiscal years.

For the first nine months of 2010, Campus Crest reported a net loss of $7.3 million on revenues of $73.6 million. Campus Crest’s chief financial officer, Donnie Bobbitt, said in a statement that a large portion of its expenses is related to depreciation, which “distorts the cash flow picture of the enterprise.” “As part of our IPO, we retired roughly $300 million of debt and recapitalized the company, giving us a solid foundation from which to grow,” he said. Campus Crest will report its first earnings as a public company in a couple of weeks. The company has hit snags as it has grown. In 2008, its most active year with nine projects under way totaling 2 million square feet, Campus Crest found itself needing cash when its only lender, Wachovia, was sold to Wells Fargo & Co. The men canvassed the country, meeting with 120 lenders, mostly small banks, and were able to get financing and avoid making layoffs. More recently, residents in Fort Collins, Colo., last

fall criticized a proposed project as looking like Army barracks. Residents also faulted the company for not using more sustainable building practices. Rollins said Campus Crest plans to explore new solar energy programs, become more energy efficient and seek Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification for future projects. Preiss said the industry is poised to see better returns this year because of increasing rents. Her company saw average rents rise 4.3 percent in January compared with the previous year. Average occupancy is also up to 98 percent from 93 percent. Rollins said because of the money raised by the initial public offering, Campus Crest is able to do projects it couldn’t before, such as move into the California market. In one case, the company bought discounted land near San Diego that had belonged to a busted condo development. “We’re a little tired. We birthed the baby,” Rollins said. “But we’re OK. We don’t stand still.”

Bed bugs get attention from pest busters MARTHA QUILLIN The Cary News, N.C. via MCT RALEIGH, N.C.—In the take-no-prisoners world of pest control, where the eternal fight between man and vermin plays out in crevices and crawl spaces and every victory is fleeting at best, bedbugs are just the latest Public Enemy No. 1. They are today’s Al Capone of the insect-management industry, the subject of public and private study and daylong sym-

posiums, or short courses such as the recent 2011 Pest Control Technician’s School at the North Raleigh Hilton. “Their world looks different than our world,” Jay Breusch told several hundred members of the N.C. Pest Management Association gathered for his pre-lunch discussion of bedbugs in commercial settings. After 28 years in the business, Breusch seems to relish getting inside the tiny heads of the various

critters he stalks across 10 states for a company based in Fridley, Minn. When he’s not on the road with his PowerPoint presentation helping pestcontrol workers get their annual certifications, he’s exploring the dark, funky spaces of buildings where maintenance crews fear to tread. “I’m having a ball,” said the former seventh-grade German teacher. “I get to solve mysteries every day. I get to be a counselor, a carpenter, a detective, a

cop. No two days are ever the same. And, I get to kill stuff.” About 750 people attended the three-day school, one of the largest such gatherings in the country, according to Kristin Dodd, association president. Passers-by on Wake Forest Road did occasional double takes at the scores of exterminator trucks in the hotel parking lot, wondering, perhaps, if management had discovered a major infestation.

In fact, for the duration of the school, the hotel might be the most inhospitable place in the state for an insect. One grand ballroom and a lobby have been temporarily converted into a pest-elimination marketplace, with vendors offering the latest in pheromone lures, chemical applicators, mattress encasements and rodent “jails.” As it turns out, America has built a better mousetrap. The industry has evolved in many ways.

When Breusch got into it, he said, customers weren’t satisfied that their pest problems had been solved unless they could smell chemicals. Now, he said, they equate that odor with elevated cancer risks and other things they fear even more than bloodsucking insects. So the business uses safer chemicals and fewer of them, relying also on traps and even heat treatments to keep pests at bay.


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Living it up, dorm style On-campus residence provides students plenty of benefits NICKI KARIMIPOUR Assistant Arts & Life Editor For most FSU students, opting to live in a dorm for their freshman year can be a viable option when considering all the benefits living on campus provides. First, the convenience factor of being right where all your classes are is unbeatable. Eliminating the need to scour all ends of campus for parking, residing in a dorm may be a wonderful choice for first year students who are not yet acclimated with the inner workings of FSU and the Tallahassee area. At Florida State, there are different dorms with varying floor plans depending on the student’s needs. The process of obtaining a dorm room begins when students fill out forms via the Housing Department, where they rank their preferences in order. However, with so many incoming and returning students to accommodate, sometimes students do not receive the dorm of their preference. The residence halls labeled “community style” have community bathrooms for each of the hall members to share. On the other hand, “suite-style” halls have one bathroom between the two-person rooms for four roommates to share. In the community style dorms, University Housing’s custodial staff cleans the bathrooms, whereas the suite-style bathrooms are left up to the roommates to clean. When two roommates do not agree on a cleaning schedule, it can inevitably cause strife between

Nikki Unger-Fink/FSView

Kristine Franklin heats up some soup for dinner in her dorm room. them. For this reason, it’s generally best for roommates to plan out how cleaning and other issues will be handled. For example, if there is a common item shared by all roommates like paper towels or toiletries, who is responsible for purchasing when they’re finished? Another item worth discussing would be visiting times. Most of the dorms have “selfenforced” visiting times, which basically means that friends can come

and go as they please into the dorm, as long as they get swiped in the doors via a valid FSUCard. This means that only residents of Salley hall have the authentication on their FSUCards to gain access to their dormitory, and a resident of Salley Hall cannot swipe into Wildwood because their card isn’t valid for that dorm. Some roommates are more “outgoing” than others and would prefer to have guests over almost all of the time. For

roommates who may be shyer and prefer to keep to themselves, this can be a problem. Therefore, establishing some preliminary ground rules can prove to be beneficial to a set of roommates’ mutual respect and sanity, especially as the semester progresses. Asking your roommate not to have guests past midnight when you have an 8 a.m. class the next morning is a perfectly valid concern. But, as with anything else, communication is

the key to solving most problems. There is no way for two people to be on the same page about an issue if they have not first created a rapport of open communication. As a simple fact of life, living in a dorm will test your tolerance. You will meet people you only thought existed in movies. Many students who don’t come from a large family may find this slightly unnerving at first, but you will get used to it. Many television shows about

college portray residence hall living as more exciting than it usually is. For example, shows portray that everyone is friends with each other. This is certainly not always the case. There might also be some disrespectful neighbors or roommates, but talking to a Resident Assistant, or RA, can sometimes help absolve any disagreements. Many who have lived in resident halls their first year have had the complaint about not meeting as many people as they thought they would. Aside from a few close friends, many people treat the dorms as just a place they crash at the end of the day and between classes. It’s not always the constant party you may have seen in college party movies like Animal House—something you’ll soon be thankful for. It’s also worth noting that living in certain dorms requires the purchase of a university meal plan. This enables students who have the meal plan to eat at the various on-campus dining halls such as Fresh Food Company and the Suwannee Room. If the student has Flex-Bucks, they can also visit other campus eateries such as the Union, Starbucks, Quizno’s and more. Community style dorms include Dorman, Smith, Kellum and Deviney. Suite-styles include DeGraff, Salley, Wildwood, Reynolds, Landis, Jennie Murphree, Cawthon, Bryan, Gilchrist and Broward halls. For more information, visit housing.fsu.edu.

Agnes Scott College lets students judge electricity use DECATUR, Ga. (AP)—A suburban Atlanta women’s college is giving students a way to judge how much electricity their dorms use.

Agnes Scott College in Decatur is putting touch-screen displays in two freshman dorms where students can figure out how much power their building

is eating up compared to other buildings on campus. The college hopes to add the displays in more buildings and add water and natural gas consumption to

the options. The displays—called energy dashboards—compare electricity use from building to building and track consumption

over time. Agnes Scott has been working to make its campus more environmentally friendly with recycling and food composting programs.

UH president addresses criticism of housing allowance LEILA FUJIMORI The Honolulu Star-Advertiser via MCT University of Hawaii President M.R.C. Greenwood defended herself before the UH Manoa Faculty Senate yesterday after a professor criticized her for taking a $60,000 annual housing allowance while College Hill, the recently renovated traditional residence of UH presidents, sits unoccupied. “Sixty -thousand dollars happens to be more than the average Hawaii household income,” ethnic studies professor Noel Kent

said at the group’s regularly scheduled meeting. “It undermines your credibility and undermines the credibility of our whole institution,” said Kent, who stood holding a copy of yesterday’s Star-Advertiser article detailing Greenwood’s housing allowance. Kent demanded that Greenwood forgo the allowance she receives to live at a Waikiki-area condo and that she reimburse UH for the College Hill renovations. Greenwood, who had just finished discussing the budget crisis and possible cuts by the Legisla-

ture, responded by saying that “many people in the audience think I make too much.” Her annual salary is $475,000, minus a 10 percent cut she took voluntarily. Greenwood then explained that her partner’s severe disability renders her unable to climb the stairs and live in the twostory house. UH officials told the Star-Advertiser earlier this week that it would cost an estimated $1 million to bring the second floor of the Manoa mansion into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. But she said that was

just part of the reason the decision was made to use College Hill for UH functions rather than her residence. Greenwood said that before her arrival there were discussions that when the president was living at College Hill, it was used only a few times a month for UH functions. She said they made the business decision to use the house for 100 fundraising events a year, with the goal of raising a half-billion dollars. Greenwood said the Star-Advertiser “chose to interpret it as a sparse number of events” held

there, “but we didn’t get the house back until November” after renovations were completed. As reported yesterday, UH officials said five events were held each in September, October and November; 10 in December; nine in January; six have been held or are scheduled for this month; and nine for March. The article also quoted former UH President Al Simone, who said he used the home up to six days a week to host breakfast, lunch or dinner functions and receptions, when he lived there from 1984 to 1992. Greenwood also said the

recent renovations, which cost nearly $440,000, were to repair the termite-damaged house, and not to accommodate her family. David Duffy, vice chairman of the Manoa Faculty Senate, said a $60,000 housing allowance may sound like a lot, but it is in line for a university president. However, he questioned whether keeping College Hill as a site for fundraisers and other UH functions is worth the $115,000 a year for maintenance. “It’s a beautiful Victorian fixerupper that you’d be insane to buy. The question is, do we keep the Victorian?”

Calif. college area neighborhood debates guards KEN CARLSON The Modesto Bee, Calif. via MCT Several college area residents said Wednesday that security officers carrying firearms would be a strong deterrent against crime in their central Modesto neighborhood. But some of their neighbors countered that unarmed security could be effective and feared that residents were at risk of lawsuits if an armed guard harmed someone. “It creates an unnecessary risk,” said Carrie Rasmussen, an attorney and College Area Neighborhood Alliance steering committee member.

If an officer mishap resulted in serious injury, she said, attorneys would likely name the security firm and neighborhood residents in a lawsuit and then “it’s your problem to get out of the suit.” The residents aired their views at an alliance security committee meeting attended by 70 people at Emanuel Lutheran Church near Modesto Junior College. The alliance committee plans to move forward with promoting the private security service to college-area residents and see if enough people sign up to justify hiring a security firm. The committee has chosen Rank

Investigation & Protection Inc. of Modesto to serve the area bordered by Tully Road, Orangeburg Avenue, McHenry Avenue and Needham Avenue. The alliance needs to sign up 200 residents who would pay $25 per month for eight hours of daily patrol. As more people subscribe, the service could expand to 24 hours, seven days a week, alliance members said. Most of the 90-minute discussion Wednesday centered on the proposal for armed private security. Bill Anelli, a college-area resident, said security

guards receive less training and pay than professional police officers. And he challenged the committee to produce data showing that an armed patrol gets better results than an unarmed one. Business owner speaks out Steve Rank, owner of the security business, said his officers receive firearms training every three months. Several are former law enforcement people and some are police academy graduates who can’t get hired by police agencies in the bad economy, he said. About half of the 40 officers have gone through the police academy, he

said. Besides sidearms, the officers may carry batons, Mace or Tasers. “I’m not going to put an officer out there with a gun until I know they are competent and able to do the job,” Rank said. His officers have never discharged a firearm while on duty, he said. The security firm has a rural patrol covering 750 square miles for farmer clients in Stanislaus and Merced counties, and also provides security for apartment complexes and a homeowner association in Stockton. Todd Aaronson, an alliance steering committee member, said an armed patrol used for 2

1/2 years in Modesto’s La Loma area reduced crime in that neighborhood. Others said the intimidation factor of an armed officer makes the service more effective. College area resident Dianna Morris said she plans to sign up, after finding a burglar in her living room Christmas Eve morning. Committee members said city police can’t offer enough protection to prevent home burglaries or other property crimes. Some residents questioned how the security guards would handle calls regarding the homeless or people with mental illness.


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Livening up your living room Painting tips and tricks for your place of space AGATA WLODARCZYK Arts & Life Editor

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Next, lay down the drop cloth in front of the wall you are starting with, ready the paint and let the rolling begin. For a thick coat that covers the first time, try Behr Ultra. This paint is effective both as a onecoat color and as a heavy white to cover over that color when the lease is up and it’s time to move out. An idea for those weekend warriors taking on large painting projects: invite friends. Painting might not be the most exciting activity, but adding music and snacks will make the whole process will go a lot faster. Though many students consider living in Tallahassee necessary to simply going to school (as opposed to really living here), the fact of the matter is that school is in session most of the year, so even if it is just a crappy apartment, you should make it your own (within the grounds of your lease, of course).

Bedroom

The average college student lives surrounded by drab white walls, and while the sterile look may work for hospitals, it’s a little boring to come home to. The best way to breathe life into those dead walls is with a little splash of color, and those who have ever seen the paint swatches at Home Depot know there are plenty to choose from. Before the real painting begins, consider the space. First determine which room is to be painted and then decide on a color (or even color family) that would make the room more enjoyable. Next, head over to a hardware store and pick up a few color samples. Remember lighting in the store is much different than the lighting in your home or apartment. The lighting difference may cause the color to look a little different at home than it did in the store. It’s a good idea to take a few variations of the color to see what they will look like in the room before making a decision. If it comes down to two colors, or the sample swatch just isnít cutting it, Home Depot offers eight-ounce samples for $2. This way, painters can take a little home and test it out before committing to a whole room. Once the color is finalized it’s time for supplies. Obviously paint will be necessary, but be sure to measure the room first, so as not to buy excess paint. Next on the list are rollers, possibly with an extender to reach the upper wall area, paint pans, drop cloths and tape. Once the supplies are purchased, the painting begins. Tape off all light switches and moldings (around doors or near the floor) to avoid unintentionally painting them. Keep a damp cloth nearby. Most paints today are latex-based and will wipe off with a little swipe.

“It’s a good idea to take a few variations of the color to see what they will look like in the room before making a decision.”

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Upperclassmen enticed to live on campus WHITNEY BRYEN Colorado Daily, Boulder via MCT While most University of Colorado freshmen are scouring Boulder for off-campus housing for the fall, freshman Axel Urie has already snagged a newly renovated unit in a prime location on campus. Urie will return to resident hall living as a sophomore, with a remodeled room in CU’s Smith Hall. Urie said he knows staying on campus isn’t the typical housing situation for sophomores, but the advantages will make it worth at least one more academic year in the dorms. “It’s so convenient,” Urie said. “Being on campus makes it easier to attend campus events and take advantage of opportunities offered for students.” And while Urie is convinced that living on cam-

pus is the best option for him, university housing is hoping to instill the same attitude in upperclassmen with new programs in the residence halls geared toward non-freshmen, said John Fox, assistant director of resident life at CU. During the 2010-11 academic year, 12 percent of students living in residence halls were upper division students, Fox said, making the majority of residents freshmen. The campaign is part of CU’s Flagship 2030 Plan, which has a goal of 20 percent upper-division students living in residential colleges. After increasing residence hall capacity for the upcoming academic year, Fox said housing officials are hoping to fill the extra space with a more diverse community of students. CU Housing is introducing a sophomore program -- Sophomore Peer Initiative Network -- this fall to

address the specific needs and concerns of secondyear students in Willard Hall. A pilot program began this spring to help transfer students in the dorms get acclimated to the campus. The program will continue next year in Williams Village and Sterns West. CU junior James Boyd transferred to Boulder last summer and has lived in Baker Hall since. He said the dorms were ideal for him when he moved to Boulder, unfamiliar with the students and atmosphere of the campus community. But even after a year at CU, Boyd said he will stay in the dorms next year because of the convenient location, dining halls and friendly atmosphere. Fox said despite an aggressive awareness campaign and recent reapplication hype across campus, getting upper classmen into the dorms

will not be an easy task. “Part of the challenge is about the culture change,” Fox said. “It will take time for upper classmen to see on-campus housing as an option. “In general, it’s not something many students have taken advantage of in the past,” he said. “We want them to know we’d like them on campus and we’ve created some new opportunities for them.” Other housing programs to begin this fall include two sustainability programs and healthy lifestyles program that will include information about outdoor activities and nutrition, all in Williams Village. These programs are also open to freshmen, but are expected to connect students from various levels and majors, Fox said. Students returning to the residence halls after their freshman year also get priority housing with

a better chance of being placed in a single room, remodeled hall or prime location, Fox said. Urie is looking forward to getting a renovated room next fall but said having a flat cost instead of varying utility and cable bills every month is also easier to budget. And while students like Urie said the cost of campus living is worth the benefits, other students said they will continue to look for the cheapest option. CU junior Nick Collins moved out of the dorms as soon as he finished his freshman year. “I live in a nice house on the Hill with my friends and I pay significantly less then I did in the dorms,” Collins said. Collins said the dorms were crowded with students, putting residents at risk for spreading viruses and creating uncomfortable living spaces with lit-

tle privacy. But for Collins, cost and comfort weren’t the only reasons to move off-campus. “Moving out of the dorms is another factor of growth,” Collins said. “It’s a new level of life to be living in your own house or apartment. It’s nice to be managing how you live on your own versus having RAs or campus security watching out for you in the dorms.” To see more of the Colorado Daily, go to http:// www.coloradodaily.com/. Copyright (c) 2011, Colorado Daily, Boulder Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. For more information about the content services offered by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services (MCT), visit www.mctinfoservices.com, e-mail services@mctinfoservices. com, or call 866-280-5210 (outside the United States, call +1 312-222-4544).

Experts: Students need education on safety Teaching crime awareness easier said than done

In my professional opinion, I don’t believe we’re responsible. But I do believe we have an obligation to provide them with information that they can use to protect themselves while they’re not here. Paul Cell, chief of the Montclair State University Police Department

NICK CLUNN The Record (Hackensack N.J.) via MCT HACKENSACK, N.J.— The key cards and security guards that provide a layer of protection on college campuses might as well be a world away when a student steps beyond the front gates. Within several blocks, students might see a campus police officer on patrol and the familiar faces of their peers. Expand the radius, however, and the occasional shuttle bus may be the only sign of a nearby college. The call boxes and other safeguards installed on campus—and often stressed to prospective students and their parents during tours—can’t help out here. “In my professional opinion, I don’t believe we’re responsible,” said Paul Cell, chief of the Montclair State University Police Department, about protecting students from off-campus crime. “But I do believe we have an obligation to provide them with information that they can use to protect themselves while they’re not here.” Because university police can’t be everywhere, educating teens and young adults to make common-sense decisions to protect themselves is an important weapon against off-campus crime. It’s easier said than done, however. An overwhelming number of incoming freshmen have never lived on their own. Students who leave suburban and rural settings to attend colleges in cities, where crime is typically more prevalent, can face additional challenges amid an unfamiliar landscape. While many students who encounter crime off campus fall victim to theft, such as having a GPS unit snatched from a car, others in rare instances face tragic ends. Last month, Jessica Moore, a 19-year-old sophomore from Seton Hall University, was shot dead while attending a private party at an apartment. Police say the shooter, who has since

Policemen (like the one pictured above) take responsibility for training citizens in the ways of crime detection and prevention—a taller order, it seems, than they’re prepared for. been arrested, was denied access to the party, but returned later with a handgun. Moore was killed in East Orange, N.J.—one mile and two towns away from Seton Hall. The university responded by organizing a prayer service and encouraging students

to travel in groups when walking off campus. It is unlikely that Moore could have done anything to protect herself from a shooter with no set target. In other, more common, situations there are certain precautions that students can take.

The website for the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark contains a detailed list of recommendations for what students should do when walking off campus, using public transit and even dating. Education programs at NJIT start at open

house events, when police officers staff a table to answer questions of prospective students and their parents. They continue at freshman orientation and into the school year. NJIT police routinely extend patrols a few blocks off campus. Offi-

cers are assigned to monitor a city subway stop on campus, even though it’s technically covered by NJ Transit police. Robert Sabattis, director of public safety at NJIT, said “it’s all about awareness.” “For any police department, crime prevention is something you always have to keep beating the drum for,” he said. Improving student safety off campus has also become the mission of many college organizations. The Student Government at Notre Dame University runs a website specifically geared toward off-campus life. It contains information about restaurants and bus routes. But there are upto-date maps pinpointing the locations of recent crimes, and contact information for municipal police departments. One not-for-profit organization based in New York, PEACE OUTside CAMPUS, has protecting students from off-campus crime as its sole mission. It has established several chapters at colleges. The organization was established by Mark and Kathleen Bonistall after their daughter, Lindsey, was raped and strangled in her apartment near the University of Delaware, where she attended school as a sophomore. The website for the group contains a checklist of questions to ask and security measures to verify when students are looking for an apartment. Another list tells students how to safeguard their apartments once they’ve moved in. Visit the website here: http:// www.peaceoutsidecampus.org/. Colleges can better convey that kind of information through police if students view the officers as approachable resources, and not just law enforcers who like to arrest teens and break up parties, said Cell, of Montclair State. Police at Montclair have attempted to change their image by offering free self-defense courses, assessing the safety of foreign travel destinations for spring break vacations and mentoring students who run into trouble with municipal police over minor offenses, such as a noise violation. But Cell said university police can’t get students out of paying a fine or appearing in court. “If the town needs to enforce, they need to enforce,” he said. “We’re not going to interfere with the legal system.”


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HOUSING

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Decorating can enhance atmosphere KIM COOK The Associated Press “Atmospheric” decor is characterized by soft textures, transparency, iridescence, opacity ‚Äî or even all of those at once. It can create a mood of quietude and retreat. And it is, some designers say, popular now as an antidote to an increasingly jarring and sped-up world. “We’re seeking balance and understanding, and we want to unclutter our minds,” says design consultant Laura Guido-Clark of Berkeley, Calif. Despite atmospheric decor’s quiet, it has “an inherent energy,” she says. Many of these elements were on the runways of Monique Lhuillier and Chanel this spring, and in furnishings, they offer a counterpoint to the season’s alter ego, an exuberant jumble trunk of hot hues and wild colors. The colors in atmospherics tend to be lightweight and sheer ‚Äî as GuidoClark notes, “veiled like mist or air.” Yet there can be elements of strength and purity. We see a lot of dreamy hues ‚Äî soft whites, blush, silver ‚Äî but also hefty colors ‚Äî graphite, charcoal. Textures include voile, moire silk, slubbed wool, crystal, hammered metals, blown glass, ceramic, even translucent concrete. Mud Australia, a top ceramics studio, creates beautifully curvy vessels and plates in soft, chalky hues with names like “ocean,” ‘’milk,” ‘’powder,” ‘’dust.” Japanese designer Tokujin Yoshioka creates conceptual furniture out of interesting materials. He’s designed a line of thick, clear polycarbonate furniture for Kartell called The Invisibles. And Paper Cloud, created for Moroso, is a white, fluffy sectional sofa. Describing his interest in light and wind, Yoshioka says, “I’m fascinated by elements that stir and stimulate the imagination.” Italian designer Diego Grandi, who along with

Manola Bossi created the voluptuously elegant goldglazed Oppiacei Table, says, “I call myself a ‘slow addict.’ I listen to silence with pleasure.” Trove’s dreamlike wallpapers include Ciel, with a cloud motif; an oceanic Sargasso; and Nekkar and Askella, both featuring a cascade of feathery petals. At Design Within Reach, find One & Co.’s 47 Table, a chunk of timber given a shimmery coat of silver. Or gravitate toward the Toto Cube Lamp, created by a French wine tank manufacturer during its quiet season; the lamp is large enough to use as a seat or table, and is lit from inside with a warm glow. Pier 1 has the Swirl Lamp, a sinuous twist of antiqued silver, and ruched, voile throw pillows in foggy, smoky hues. Ruffles in lightweight fabrics work nicely in this theme; check out Urban Outfitters and Pottery Barn for frothy, watercolored shower curtains and bedding. Z Gallerie has a spherical lamp made of hundreds of oyster shell tiles; its iridescence is both organic and jewel-like. Find here also the Cloud vase, a milky swirl of cirrus glass. Roubini Rugs has Tony Duquette’s Malachite rug, an eddy of emerald and ink like a sliver of the mineral itself. And Campion Platt’s Mariner rug collection, inspired by travels through the Turks & Caicos, uses the soothing natural patterns of waves and the landscape. Art Addiction offers several large format prints that would create instant atmosphere, and provide a launch point for other furnishings. A series of dandelions, about to catch the wind. A collection of X-rayed sea urchins and shells, elemental and artistic. And a dramatic group of horse images in which the animals have been photographed, all sinewy muscles and whipping manes, on a blustery, misty day. There’s something of the dream world about them.

AP Photo/Eighteen Karat

This product image courtesy of Eighteen Karat shows their honed marble bowls. “Atmospheric” decor is characterized by soft textures, transparency, iridescence, opacity—or even all of those at once. It can create a mood of quietude and retreat.

AP Photo/Trove

This product image courtesy of Trove shows their Nekkar wallpaper.

AP Photo/Design Within Reach

This product image courtesy of Design Within Reach shows the Toto Cube Lamp.

AP Photo/Z Gallerie

This product image courtesy of Z Gallerie shows cloud vases, in opaque, milky blue hues. AP Photo/Pottery Barn

This product image courtesy of Pottery Barn shows ruched and ruffled lightweight bed linens from the Pottery Barn Hadley collection.

Eco-friendly LED bulbs contain lead, arsenic Toxic materials could increase risk of cancer, kidney disease, other illnesses PAT BRENNAN The Orange County Register via MCT

Supposedly eco-friendly LED lightbulbs may have a dark side.

The LED bulbs sold as safe and eco-friendly can contain high levels of lead, arsenic and other hazardous substances, a new UC Irvine study shows—the same bulbs widely used in headlights, traffic lights, even holiday lights. The toxic material could increase the risk of cancer, kidney disease and other illnesses, although the risks are more long-term than immediate; a single exposure to a broken bulb is unlikely to cause illness. “I wouldn’t worry about an immediate release of vapor,” said UC Irvine public health and social ecology professor Oladele Ogunseitan, principal investigator and an author of the study. “But still, when these residues hang around the house, if not cleaned up properly they could constitute an eventual danger.” The lights should be treated as hazardous materials, and should not be disposed of in regular landfill trash, he said, because of the risk of leaching into soil and groundwater. High intensity, red

bulbs contained the most arsenic, while low-intensity red lights harbored as much as eight times the amount of lead permitted by state law, the study showed. White bulbs had low amounts of lead but higher amounts of nickel, also a potentially hazardous substance. Ogunseitan and a team of scientists from UCI and UC Davis crushed bulbs of different colors and intensity, simulating acid rain in landfill conditions to produce a “worst case scenario.” Then they made precision measurements of toxic material in the resulting liquid. Although immediate risk from a broken bulb is low, Ogunseitan still advises consumers to wear a mask and gloves and use a special broom when sweeping up the pieces. Emergency crews also should use protective equipment when dealing with car crashes and broken traffic lights, and should consider the material hazardous waste, Ogunseitan said. And while LED or lightemitting diode bulbs are marketed as a safer replacement for compact fluorescent bulbs, which contain mercury, Ogunseitan, also a member of

the state Department of Toxic Substances Control’s “green ribbon” science panel, said consumers should be careful that they’re not “exchanging one risk for another.” “We want to make sure we don’t get carried away with the no-mercury thing,” Ogunseitan said. “That is why finding these other potentially toxic chemicals is important.” A state law that would have required advanced testing of such products was weakened, he said. Then it was place on hold by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger shortly before he left office. He said the law is under review, and that he hopes it will be revived within a year. Ogunseitan and his team recently published their findings in the science journal, Environmental Science and Technology, and plan to publish further findings on larger LED bulbs such as those used in street lights. __________ ONLINE Read the full report (PDF): http:// pubs.acs.org/doi/pdfplus/10.1021/es101052q


FEBRUARY 21, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Great Firewall of China grips Internet Even more than Mideast, PRC controls traffic, digital flow of information TOM LASSETER McClatchy Newspapers BEIJING—As Arab governments from Bahrain to Yemen and the clerical rulers in Iran alike wrestle with how to get a grip on the Internet’s role in spreading unrest, the Communist Party in Beijing has steadily applied one of the world’s most sophisticated censorship programs. Instead of shutting down the Internet completely, as Egypt briefly did in an unsuccessful bid to save former President Hosni Mubarak’s regime, China carefully picks and chooses what material is allowed to filter through. And while troops in Bahrain opened fire on crowds of demonstrators, China so far has been successful in keeping dissidents from gathering momentum, in part by crushing their ability to post manifestos or form groups online. While the Internet hasn’t carried the momentum of those upris-

ings nor has it addressed the myriad of complex underlying factors, it’s thought to have galvanized groups of key protest organizers. But Beijing so far hasn’t had to roll back or reconsider Internet access issues, because in China, they didn’t exist to begin with. Widely known as the Great Firewall, the restrictive measures emanating from Beijing keep a majority of China’s estimated 457 million Web users from accessing anything online that the government considers politically sensitive, including sites—such as Facebook and Twitter— that have been used to organize or report on recent standoffs between troops and protesters in Bahrain and Egypt. The result is a parallel system in which the bare news of events such as those now roiling the Arab world can be reported while any analysis that might draw parallels to domestic issues in China is omitted. Or, as has been the

case recently, it can be accompanied with dire warnings about the dangers of turmoil. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton challenged that authoritarian approach in a speech on Internet freedoms this week, contending that it ultimately leads governments to a “dictator’s dilemma” in which they have to continue doubling down on oppressive tactics or finally relent and let the “walls fall.” China, however, has given no indication that it intends to change course. In fact, a chief architect of China’s Internet monitoring program said in an interview published Friday by state media that the country should bolster its efforts. Despite the efficiency of China’s censors, Fang Binxing, nicknamed the “Father of the Great Firewall,” told the Global Times state newspaper that he was concerned about software platforms that could circumvent those measures

with virtual private networks, which allow groups of people to use the Internet to communicate privately. While exact figures aren’t available, it’s widely assumed that only a small portion of China’s Internet users have access to VPN subscriptions, which often require credit card transactions in foreign currency. Still, Fang said he’d concluded that “so far, the GFW (Great Firewall) is lagging behind and still needs improvement.” Fang, the 50-year-old president of the Beijing University of Posts and Te l e c o m m u n i c a t i o n s , said that he kept six different VPN connections at home “to test which side wins: the GFW or the VPN.” The aricle paraphrased him saying there was a “war” between the technologies and that calls to open up the Internet represented a “soft power threat to China from foreign forces.” Fang used the totali-

tarian regime of North Korea, which counts China as its key backer, as an example. “Some countries hope North Korea will open up its Internet,” he said. “But if it really did so, other countries would get the upper hand.” On Tuesday, Clinton announced $25 million in additional funding this year to “fight against Internet repression,” which presumably would include Chinese efforts along those lines. When the U.S. Embassy in Beijing attempted to post Clinton’s address, which specifically mentioned China five times, it was blocked on several Chinese sites. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Ma Zhaoxu slammed the White House initiative Thursday, saying, “We are against any other countries using Internet freedom as a pretext for interfering in others’ internal affairs.” Across some of China’s own Web pages, though, there have been calls for

more access and less oversight. Fang’s role in developing the Great Firewall program has made him a target of derision for some “netizens.” When Fang created a page on a popular Chinese blogging site in December, users posted a torrent of insulting, and at times profane, remarks attacking him. Amid the bluster in the Global Times piece, Fang acknowledged that the Great Firewall could use a bit more nuance in, as the article put it, “distinguishing between good and evil information.” When a website contains sections with “sensitive” language, everything else is blocked as well, an issue Fang said he hoped would be addressed with smarter software in the future. “It’s like when passengers aren’t allowed to take water aboard an airplane because our security gates aren’t good enough to differentiate between water and nitroglycerin,” he said.

Shedding a light on lighting up A bit of tarnish on marijuana’s benign reputation SHARI ROAN Los Angeles Times VIA McClatchy Newspaper LOS ANGELES—In 1969, Carol McDonald was 28, married and the mother of two young children, out for an evening of fun with a couple who smoked marijuana. By the end of the evening she was on her way to a 19-year addiction. “Within a few months, I was smoking every day,” said McDonald, a retired bookkeeper, now 69. “I had to smoke before going to work. If something was upsetting, I smoked over it. If there was a celebration, I smoked over it.” People like McDonald may be largely overlooked in the statewide debate over legalizing marijuana. The drug has a benign reputation: Many baby boomers smoked and emerged unscathed, and medical marijuana facilities with their friendly images of seven-fingered leaves have popped up all over Los Angeles. That might be why Proposition 19, the Nov. 2 ballot measure that would legalize marijuana and regulate it similarly to alcohol, has generated scores of reports and debates regarding the potential effect on business revenue, tax dollars and law enforcement but scant discussion on the potential fallout on people’s health. In California, addiction counselors are split on the legalization issue largely because of their long-standing support of treatment over jail and legal penalties for marijuana addicts. Yet nationally, public health experts mostly are against legalization. They say it will increase the number of people who become addicted to the drug, contribute to more automobile accidents and erode school performance. “It’s bizarre to me when people say, ‘Make marijuana legal, and we’ll have no problems with it,’ “ said Keith Humphreys, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral science at Stanford University who recently served as a White House senior adviser on the nation’s drug

control policy. Because the science of marijuana’s health effects is in many cases unclear, experts on each side of the legalization debate can point to scientific studies that support their own position. They do agree that marijuana should be avoided during pregnancy and that it is harmful for people with mental illness or who are at risk for developing a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia. And they agree, too, on some basic statistics: Marijuana is addictive for about 9 percent of adults who use it (compared with about 15 percent who use alcohol and 15 percent who use cocaine), according to federal data. Because it is the most widely used illegal substance in the country, marijuana dependence is more common than addiction to either cocaine or heroin despite its lower addiction potential. “We generally think the problems with marijuana aren’t as serious as the problems you tend to see with cocaine or heroin,” said Alan J. Budney, a leading researcher on marijuana at the Center for Addiction Research at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences who opposes legalization. “But they are still pretty substantial.” The science of marijuana becomes murky when one steps beyond addiction statistics to examine effects on health. A series of studies conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration published in 1998 found that the effects of marijuana alone on driving were small or moderate, but severe when combined with alcohol. But other studies show little impairment from a moderate dose: A 2004 study in the journal Accident, Analysis and Prevention found no increased risk of motor vehicle accidents causing traumatic injury among drivers using marijuana. “Even after smoking, there aren’t any real deficits in driving ability that we can detect in the

laboratory,” said Mitch Earleywine, an associate professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Albany who serves as an advisory board member at the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. The data on lung damage and smoking-related cancers are similarly mixed, in part because a large portion of heavy marijuana users also smoke tobacco, which muddies the picture of marijuana’s effects. And though experts tend to agree that smoking marijuana causes short-term memory loss, they disagree widely on the overall cognitive effects of the drug. Several studies have also dismissed the fear that marijuana is a “gateway” drug that will lead children and adolescents to experiment with harder illicit drugs — although numerous studies suggest that the earlier in life someone uses marijuana, the riskier it becomes. Among 14- and 15-year-olds who start to smoke, 17 percent will be dependent within two years, said Dr. Tim Cermak, an addiction psychiatrist and president of

the California Society of Addiction Medicine. The effect on school performance and learning could be significant if more minors use the drug, Cermak added. “Marijuana is not devastating in the same way alcohol is,” he said. “But to an adolescent, it can impact their life permanently. When you take a vacation from development in school for five years, you just don’t get to the same endpoint that was available to you earlier in life.” The fact is, however, that no one knows how many more people will try marijuana if it becomes legal. Some experts predict a 50 percent increase while others say that the numbers are unlikely to rise because California’s relaxed medical marijuana laws have already made the drug easy to obtain. “It’s a vast exaggeration that more people will take this up,” said Stephen Gutwillig, California director of the Drug Policy Alliance, a national group that advocates for changes in the nation’s approach to illicit drugs. Gutwillig supports legalization. “The bottom line is

that marijuana is far less dangerous than alcohol and cigarettes,” Gutwillig added. “It’s far less addictive than either of them. People tend to use marijuana in smaller amounts. It does not have alcohol’s noxious association with violence and reckless behavior. And you can’t overdose.” Members of the California Society of Addiction Medicine are divided on legalization. In a recent survey, more than twothirds of the members believe there will be an increase in the amount of marijuana addiction if the drug were legalized. And close to 70 percent think there will be increased use by adolescents. Though the association itself takes no position, its website lists controls that should be in place if the drug becomes legal. Among them: creating restrictions to minimize minors’ access to the drug; advertising and marketing rules; warning labels on marijuana products; use of fees and taxes from marijuana sales to fund marijuana addiction treatments; treatment instead of legal punishment for adolescent marijuana users; and periodic evaluation of the law for its ef-

fect on health and driving under the influence. Cermak noted that Proposition 19 lacks many of these safeguards. Furthermore, he added, “If you read Proposition 19, the assertion is that it’s not physically addictive and doesn’t have long-term toxic effects on the body. We are asking people to memorialize the acceptance of those myths.” McDonald, who lives in Baldwin Hills, certainly didn’t think marijuana was addictive. It had seemed so harmless. Inhaling from bamboo bongs made popular by returning Vietnam War vets, she began to feel some relief from the depression that had plagued her since youth. But, with a $5,000-ayear habit and chronic bronchitis, she tried repeatedly to quit. About a dozen times over the years she checked in alone to a hotel in Desert Hot Springs to whiteknuckle herself through nausea, sweats and tremors. Short periods of abstinence were followed by relapses. She could barely get through her workdays, and her husband grew increasingly exasperated by her behavior. At 42, after several months of abstinence, her depression without the drug was so great that she attempted to kill herself by taking “every pill in the house.” She resumed smoking. Five years after the suicide attempt, she checked into a hospital rehab program. “I finally decided I had to have help to quit,” she said. “I smoked my last joint in the car on the way to St. John’s Hospital with my head under the dashboard.” Even after what she went through, McDonald said she would like to see marijuana legalized so that people who have problems with the drug will be steered into treatment. Even “as someone who has been far down the rabbit hole, I still don’t think it’s as dangerous as alcohol,” she said. “But if I’d had any inkling of what it would do, I would have been more careful.”


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