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INSIDELOOK

The independent student newspaper at The Florida State University™. Established 1915.

MONDAY FEBRUARY 14-16, 2011

W W W. F S U N E W S . C O M

VOLUME XX ISSUE XIII

SEMINOLES SURVIVE CAVALIERS FSU downs UVa, lose leading scorer Singleton in the process SPORTS | 8

WE’RE HOT FOR VALENTINES You’ll want to buy our V-Day coverage a drink, including do’s and don’ts, and romance for gamers

Dance Marathon cuts rug for kids Online Photos & Video

ARTS & LIFE | 5

fsunews.com web poll results

Visit fsunews.com for more from Sunday’s Dance Marathon.

TAG YOURSELF! fsunews.com/facebook

Previous question: How do you really feel about those Valentine’s Day candy Hearts?

thought 7% It’sthatthecounts Chalk covered 74% disappointment Just have to 11% deal with it I actually like 7% the taste

This issue’s question:

Photos by Joseph La Belle/FSView

Baseball season is upon us; what are you most excited about? WEATHER Monday Sunny

39º-68º Tuesday Mostly Sunny

42º-68º Photos by Brian Vallejo/FSView

Wednesday Partly Cloudy

41º-67º

1,300 ‘Party with a Purpose’ at FSU Dance Marathon KARLANNA LEWIS Staff Writer

Thursday T-Storms

43º-70º INDEX ARTS & LIFE SPORTS VIEWS

5 8 11

CLASSIFIEDS 12 BON APPETIT 3 STUDY BREAK 13

Over 1,300 students stood for 40 hours at Dance Marathon this weekend to raise money for the Children’s Miracle Network, Shands Children’s Hospital and Florida State University’s own College of Medicine. This weekend marked the event’s sweet 16. This year’s theme, “Party with a Purpose,” celebrated DM’s presence at FSU.

DM originated at Indiana University and has since taken over many campuses nationwide. At FSU, DM has become its largest student-run event. Students volunteered to stand for one of two shifts of 20 hours. In order to be a dancer, students had to raise $300. Dancers could register as an individual, or they could sign up with an organization. Organizations compete to raise the most money for the event. This

year, the Phi Mu and Chi Phi pairing won the competition. Planning begins the day after DM ends. Committees work on external fundraising, internal fundraising, public relations, dancer relations, family relations and special events. Each year, a few “miracle children” are selected to receive a majority of the project’s funds, and, in

We want dancers to get the feeling that FSU’s all one large community. We all work together for a greater thing, and the greater thing in this situation is kids.

SEE DANCE 2

Ron Barhai, Public Relations Director

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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 14, 2011

Study probes Confederate flag 850-561-6653

FSU psychologist studies possible discrimination link to Rebel flag

Editorial Fax: 850-574-2485 Advertising Fax: 850-574-6578 General Manager Eliza LePorin 850-561-1600 eleporin@fsview.com EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Adam Clement 850-561-1612 editor@fsview.com Managing Editor J. Michael Osborne 850-561-1613 managing_editor@fsview.com News Editor Jesse Damiani 850-561-1614 news@fsview.com Assistant News Editors Bailey Shertzinger Ana Rebecca Rodriguez Arts & Life Editor Agata Wlodarczyk 850-561-1615 artsandlife@fsview.com Assistant A & L Editors Ana Renee Rodriguez Nicki Karimipour Sports Editor Brett Jula 850-561-1616 sports@fsview.com Assistant Sports Editor Nick Sellers Photo Editor Melina Vastola 850-561-1617 photo@fsview.com Assistant Photo Editors Reid Compton Joseph La Belle Digital and Multimedia Editor Reid Compton 850-561-1617 webeditor@fsview.com Assistant Multimedia Editor Matt Clegg multimedia@fsview.com Assistant Web Editor Duncan Graham

ANA REBECCA RODRIGUEZ Assistant News Editor Newly published research suggests that exposure to the Confederate flag, prominently displayed by millions of Americans 150 years after the Civil War may, in fact, evoke anti-black sentiments among whites, regardless of their reported racial beliefs. The research team, led by

Florida State University psychologist Joyce Ehrlinger, published their findings in the journal Political Psychology earlier this year after conducting two studies in 2008. Both studies found that white students at a prominent southern university who were exposed to images of the Confederate flag judged a fictional black character more critically, and were less willing to vote for then-presidential candidate Barack Obama. According to the research team, the flag may, in fact, provoke discrimination, even among individuals who demonstrate little prejudice.

“Whether or not the Confederate flag includes other non-racist meanings, exposure to this flag evokes responses that are prejudicial,” the research team wrote in the journal. The study began after the team became curious about whether or not there were factors present in the American South that could impact an individual’s racial attitude. “We wondered whether there were factors in the South that could impact people’s willingness to vote for a black president,” read the study. “In particular, we focused on the visibility of the Con-

federate flag in the South. While the debate surrounding the Confederate flag has often focused on how people differ in their beliefs about the flag, we are particularly interested in one aspect of the flag’s meaning—its association with racial bias and prejudice toward blacks.” According to the team, the research was particularly exciting around revolutionary elections. “The 2008 election and, in particular, Barack Obama’s nomination as Democratic candidate for U.S. president, presented a timely opportunity to explore the effect of Confederate flag exposure

on evaluation of a black target,” read the study. “Thus, in our first study, we explored the effects of Confederate flag exposure on willingness to vote for Barack Obama, relative to white candidates for president.” The study combined two threads of recent psychological study focused both on the power of symbols and on the continuing reality of unconscious racist beliefs that continue to exist among the general population. The first study conducted in 2008 featured 108 white and 22 black college students.

dancers to get the feeling that FSU’s all one large community. We all work together for a greater thing, and the greater thing in this situation is kids.” Students take a stand for 20 hours non-stop, in honor of the children who cannot because they are confined to bed in preparation for operations. Though it may sound grueling, many dancers return to DM for another 20 hours the next year.

According to the dancers, everybody has something special to get them through the night. “Candy,” said dancer Megan Elkorchi. “Lots of candy.” Others rely on the morale of those around them. “The energy on the dance floor keeps me pumped,” said dancer Pia Kiebach. Because the event is held in the Civic Center basement, dancers don’t

have to think about the time of day. Unless, that is, they check their cell phones. The DM committee ensures no one gets bored by offering everything from coloring, to four square. Over the past 15 years, over $2.8 million has been raised for the Children’s Miracle Network, Shands and FSU’s College of Medicine. Barhai acknowledged that some Seminoles have Gator-based reservations

about Shand’s. “Because it’s Gainesville and UF, it has a sour note for some people, but it’s important to remember it’s a great cause,” Barhai said. Since the event grows each year, DM expects a future full of miracles. “We want to keep it as strong as it is and recruit even more people each year,” said Public Relations Assistant Kiara Provenzano. “If we keep doing that, we’re good.”

DANCE from 1 return, they come to speak at the event. This year alone, participants raised nearly half a million dollars. The positive relationship fostered between the dancers and beneficiary children is the ultimate goal of the project. “We want dancers to connect to the cause,” Ron Barhai, DM public relations director, said. “We feel like it’s important for them to understand why they’re here. We want

Call for Applicants: Editorial

ADVERTISING STAFF Jennifer Eggers 850-561-1603 jeggers@fsview.com

SEE FLAG 4

The independent student newspaper at The Florida State University.

Kristina Greenlee 850-561-1609

FSView & Florida Flambeau and fsunews.com is seeking applicants currently enrolled at Florida State for several editorial positions, including writers, photographers and editors beginning Summer 2011. Please send résumés and writing samples by Feb. 23 to: productionmanager@fsview.com or call (850) 561-1606.

kgreenlee@fsview.com Patrick Toban 850-561-1611 ptoban@fsview.com Sales Assistant Corey Calhoon

850-561-1605

salesassistant@fsview.com DISTRIBUTION Distribution Coordinator Karl Etters 850-561-1608 distribution@fsview.com PRODUCTION STAFF 850-561-1606 Production Manager Justin Christopher Dyke productionmanager@fsview.com Assistant Production Manager Danielle Delph ddelph@fsview.com Production Designers Glenishia Gilzean ggilzean@fsview.com Emealia Hollis ehollis@fsview.com Yves Solorzano ysolorzano@fsview.com The FSView & Florida Flambeau is a Gannett newspaper published by FSView & Florida Flambeau, Inc. Member, Florida Press Association Associated Collegiate Press College Media Advisers Office Location: 954 W. Brevard St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Mailing Address: P. O. Box 20208 Tallahassee, FL 32316 Single copies are free; additional copies are available for $1 per copy. The editorials that appear within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the editorial writer. Any other column that appears in the newspaper is the expressed opinion of the columnist and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers. All correspondence to Editorial can be considered for publication, unless indicated otherwise by letter writer. In accordance with The Associated Press guidelines obscenities, vulgarities and profanities will not be published. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters may be edited for clarity and content, or for space purposes.

Editor-in-Chief

Managing Editor

The Editor-in-Chief supervises all editorial operations of FSView, working with staff members to ensure the publication continues to inform its readers and stay ahead of media trends. Specific Duties: 1. Motivate and maintain entire staff by assisting the other editors and managers in creating and facilitating an open and inviting atmosphere with an intense focus towards web-first publishing. 2. Oversee the organization of the staff and the assignment of tasks so that the paper is published in an orderly manner and by deadline. 3. Supervise all positions to ensure the fulfillment of job responsibilities; explain and enforce all deadlines and policies with the staff; and pursue recruitment opportunities. 4. Hold regularly scheduled meetings for all staff and act as chair at these meetings. 5. Meet regularly with the Production Manager/Tallahassee Democrat advisor to keep them updated on progress and any potential problems or concerns (i.e., legal, ethical, internal discipline, budgets, equipment needs, etc.). 6. Maintain a minimum of 12 scheduled office hours per week — outside of production days and in coordination with fellow editors — in order to address all potential concerns of the staff and FSU community. 7. With the Production Manager, organize workshops for students, staff writers, editors and managers and organize campus and off-campus events for FSView staff and recruits. 8. In conjunction with the Production Manager, determine content and general layout of the newspaper. 9. Oversee all aspects of the newsroom and pursue training and development opportunities for staff. 10.Employ techniques that ensure accuracy (fact checking/verification). 11.Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists. 12.Maintain a relationship with Florida State’s School of Communication and Department of English, including faculty and students associated with the Certificate in Publishing and Editing program.

The Managing Editor oversees staff, including editors, writers, photographers and cartoonists; edits the opinion page; and completes specific administrative duties. Specific Duties: 1. Work closely with Editor-in-Chief and Digital Media Editor on planning and directing content with stories and photos published on the website first. 2. Assist writers with feature stories and coordinate story, beat and photo assignments. 3. ME is well versed in all story assignments. 4. Work with EIC and the Production Manager on training staff in the proper use of grammar and AP style as used in the newspaper; training staff in writing skills; assisting EIC and editors in final copy review, editing and alterations (to include AP style, grammar, spelling, correct titles and fact checking). 5. In conjunction with the Production Manager, determine content and general layout of the newspaper. 6. Oversee opinion page content, working with editors and writers to express the views of the editorial staff and those of readers who reach out to FSView through letters to the editor. 7. Work with EIC and editors to pursue recruitment opportunities. 8. Manages administrative work involved with contractors and new writers. 9. Attend at least one meeting a week and notify the EIC if he/she cannot attend. 10.Maintain 8-10 scheduled office hours per week in coordination with fellow editors — outside of production days. 11.Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists.

Digital Media Editor The Digital Media Editor manages and develops FSView’s online content and ensures that the publication stays ahead of current digital media trends. Specific Duties: 1. Work closely with Editor-in-Chief and Managing Editor on planning and directing content with stories and photos published on the website first. 2. Responsible for supervising and training staff to work on the functionality and design of www. fsunews.com (www.fsview.

com) and research digital innovation. 3. DME is well versed in all story assignments 4. DME assigns video stories and other digital projects. 5. Oversee production and maintenance of newspaper’s website and social media. 6. Makes sure all stories and images are posted in a timely fashion. 7. Helps establish onlineonly content, including contests, multimedia presentations, surveys and other appropriate components; and spearheads all website endeavors. 8. Ensure that important breaking news stories are updated between editions. 9. Respond to e-mail related to the newspaper’s website. 10.Maintain 8-10 hours per week in the office, scheduled in increments, based on each semester’s schedule. 11.Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists. 12.Maintain a relationship with Florida State’s College of Motion Picture Arts.

News Editor Focusing on Florida State news and stories that affect FSU students, the News Editor works under the direction of the Editorin-Chief, Managing Editor and Digital Media Editor in determining story coverage as well as supervision and training of writers. Specific Duties: 1. Ensure content is published online as soon it becomes available, following up with regular updates and more in-depth coverage. 2. Enforce and meet deadlines for writers and Production. 3. Review, edit, proof and take responsibility for all copy in assigned section. 4. Actively and aggressively seek and assign stories. 5. Attend staff meetings and supervise senior and staff writers, encouraging reporters to propose fresh ideas for stories from the ground up. 6. Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists. 7. Collaborates with Photo Editor on assignments.

Arts & Life Editor Focusing on art, events, student talent and lifestyle news with a Florida State connection, the Arts & Life

Editor works under the direction of the Editor-inChief, Managing Editor and Digital Media Editor in determining story coverage as well as supervision and training of writers. Specific Duties: 1. Ensure content is published online as soon it becomes available, following up with regular updates and more in-depth coverage. 2. Enforce and meet deadlines for writers and Production. 3. Review, edit, proof and take responsibility for all copy in assigned section. 4. Actively and aggressively seek and assign stories. 5. Attend staff meetings and supervise senior and staff writers, encouraging reporters to propose fresh ideas for stories from the ground up. 6. Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists. 7. Collaborates with Photo Editor on assignments.

Sports Editor Focusing on Florida State sports news, the Sports Editor works under the direction of the Editor-inChief, Managing Editor and Digital Media Editor in determining story coverage as well as supervision and training of writers. Specific Duties: 1. Ensure content is published online as soon it becomes available, following up with regular updates and more in-depth coverage. 2. Enforce and meet deadlines for writers and Production. 3. Review, edit, proof and take responsibility for all copy in assigned section. 4. Actively and aggressively seek and assign stories. 5. Attend staff meetings and supervise senior and staff writers, encouraging reporters to propose fresh ideas for stories from the ground up. 6. Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists. 7. Collaborates with Photo Editor on assignments.

Photo Editor Duties of the Photo Editor include supervising and ensuring completion of photo assignments for the website and print edition of FSView. He/she is responsible for: Specific Duties: 1. Training photographers.

2. Selecting and processing digital photos through applicable software. 3. Coordinating assignments geared toward online photo galleries. 4. Creating and maintaining photo files and archives. 5. Enforcing and meeting deadlines. 6. Collaborating with other editors on story assignments, taking responsibility for following through with plans and ensuring coverage of scheduled events.

Assistant Editor The Assistant Editor works closely with other editors, helping with copy editing duties, training of writers, print headline writing and story development. Specific Duties: 1. Copy edit stories from writers for AP style. 2. Help check facts and verify reporting is accurate and suitably structured. 3. Communicate to writers any feedback from editors about their work. 4. Work with Production on headlines, teasers, refers, captions, info boxes and info graphics. 5. Attend staff meetings and training with editors. 6. Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists.

Digital Assistant Editor The Digital Assistant Editor works closely with the Digital Media Editor and other editors, helping to ensure stories, photos and other digital projects are published online as soon as the content becomes available. Specific Duties: 1. Assist editors with online publishing process. 2. Edit headlines for the Web to boost search engine results. 3. Work closely with Digital Media Editor to track Web traffic in order to provide information about online trends to editors. 4. Monitor social media websites, promoting discussions where commenting is available as well as keeping fresh content on FSView’s pages. 5. Attend staff meetings and training with editors. 6. Maintain e-mail connectivity to ensure breakingnews culture persists.

Senior Staff Writers Specific Duties: 1. Senior Staff Writers work closely with Managing Editor, editors,

staff writers and act as a mentor for new staff reporters each semester. This includes providing feedback to ME regarding mentorship. 2. Keeping schedules in mind, Senior Staff Writers strive to be available to cover breaking news. 3. Senior Staff Writers assist ME with writing workshops. 4. The Senior Staff Writer position may or may not be a steppingstone to an editor’s position, depending on the goals and skill level of the writer. 5. Work with editors to ensure content is published online as soon it becomes available, helping create follow up stories, regular updates and more in-depth coverage.

Staff Reporters All staff reporters report regularly on campus news, on assigned beat (department/division/office) and meet regularly with assigned department/division/office chairs and/or directors. Specific Duties: 1. Cover beats regularly, providing ongoing story ideas and stories on a regular basis by deadline. 2. Responsible for improving the quality and content of all stories, as directed by supervising editors. 3. All staff writers must generate story ideas, attend one meeting a week; participate in workshops and training provided by FSView; collaborate with the Tallahassee Democrat and other media organizations. 4. Work with editors to ensure content is published online as soon it becomes available, helping create follow up stories, regular updates and more in-depth coverage.

Photographers Specific Duties: 1. Contribute both ideas and art for the publication. 2. Consult with the, Managing Editor, Digital Media Editor and Photo Editor as well as writers for assignments. 3. Submit work for print and online publications as often as possible. Content is at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief, ME and DME.


NEWS

FEBRUARY 14, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

Students react to recent violence

Breakfast For A Buck

FSU students weigh in on pregnant woman’s beating TURNER COWLES Staff Writer Students at Florida State University have similar reactions to the recent domestic violence offense in Pasco County involving an FSU freshman and his pregnant girlfriend. When FSU freshman Devin Nickels, 18, wanted someone to beat his 11-week pregnant girlfriend, he turned to his high school friend Andres Marrero, 19. Marrero was offered $200, but, according to the St. Petersburg Times, declined, saying he “wanted to do it for free.” The plan was to have Marrero punch the victim in the stomach to cause a miscarriage. According to police documents, Nickels told Marrero that the pregnancy was “ruining his life.” FSUPD arrested Nickels in his room in Salley Hall. “When the university becomes aware of extremely serious crimes that students have been involved in, they have a number of options that are available to them,” said Maj. Jim Russell of the FSUPD. “One of [the options] is something called an interim disciplinary action.” Interim disciplinary action is when a student is suspended from the university pending a hearing. A suspended student is not allowed to go to class or to participate in university events. “If you’re suspended and can’t be on campus, then you can’t be living on campus as well,” said Russell. “On this particular case, we couldn’t say exactly what has occurred because the student’s information is [federally] protected.” FSU junior Eli Mitrani has a hard time believing the events that have happened at FSU since the beginning of the semester. “FSU has started off pretty badly this year,” said Mitrani. “First the shooting [at Lambda Chi Alpha], and now this? I’m shocked at how this guy went to these means to attack his own girlfriend

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It’s probably one of the worst things somebody could imaginably do to a woman, considering that she was pregnant, but there are just people out there that think that this is an effective way to handle things and it’s horrifying.

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because he didn’t want her to have the baby. It’s probably one of the worst things somebody could imaginably do to a woman, considering that she was pregnant, but there are just people out there that think that this is an effective way to handle things and it’s horrifying.” FSU student Angelica Lopez believes that there should be resources available to women who feel threatened. “Women centers only offer so many resources,” Lopez said. “If this young lady were to feel threatened, I would have hoped that she could’ve felt comfortable to go to a women’s center and asked for help.” There are also other options for terminating a pregnancy. “Abortion is an option, but I don’t know if she did or didn’t want an abortion,” said Mitrani. “It sounds like she wanted the baby, and he didn’t. It’s a tough situation to be in, and not to be cliché, but violence isn’t the answer.” Leon County had the lowest rate of pregnancy among women between age 15 and 19 in Florida in 2009: 19.3 women. Pasco County has a rate much closer to the state average of 40.4: 40 pregnancies per 1,000 women. However, between 2007 and 2009, Pasco County had a significantly higher rate of domestic violence

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NEWS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 14, 2011

Go bald: participants raise money for research CHAD SQUITIERI Staff Writer Faculty members at Florida State University are pledging to participate in a St. Baldrick’s event next month in order to raise funds to help fight of child cancer. St. Baldrick’s is a foundation that helps fund cancer research by having participants raise money and have their heads shaved. In order to raise the funds, some FSU faculty members have agreed to shave their heads completely in an attempt to represent the baldness that often results when a patient with cancer receives chemotherapy

Baldies.” While “Barber’s Baldies” has already surpassed their goal and are currently leading the friendly competition, Judy Nunez and the rest of “Bald to the Bone” are catching up and continuing to raise money. Judy Nunez, the director of University Academic Mapping at FSU, has already raised almost $700 alone. FSU students are encouraged to get involved with the St. Baldrick’s event. To donate to a team, volunteer as a “shavee,” or to find out more information about the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, visit their website at stbaldricks.org.

University staff to shave heads for child cancer treatment. According to their website, St. Baldrick’s aims to help patients for the rest of their lives. “The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is a volunteerdriven charity committed to funding the most promising research to find cures for childhood cancers and give survivors long and healthy lives,” reads their mission statement. In the U.S., more children die from cancer than any other disease. According to the St. Baldrick’s website, each year, 160,000 children are diagnosed

with cancer worldwide. A few colleagues created St. Baldrick’s in 2000 when they decided to turn their St. Patrick’s Day party into an event in order to help raise money to fund children’s cancer research. The first St. Baldrick’s event in 2000 had a goal to raise $17,000, but far surpassed that goal and ended up raising over $100,000. Since 2000, St. Baldrick’s has raised over $87 million dollars and has taken place in all 50 states as well as 27 other countries. Last year, St. Baldrick’s events across the

globe raised over $22 million dollars, which helped set the goal for 2011. The St. Baldrick’s event on campus will be held on March 24, at 7 p.m., at the Cyber Cafe in the Student Life Center. There are currently two separate teams competing against each other to raise money for the local event. “Barber’s Baldies” is the team currently in the lead, having raised nearly $3,000 already. The second team has coined themselves “Bald to the Bone” and has already managed to raise almost $900.

“Barber’s Baldies” has six “shavees,” which are members of the team who have volunteered to shave their heads. The team’s captain is Kim Barber, who is the University Registrar and has already managed to raise $765 alone, helping her team surpass their $2,500 goal. Judy Nunez, the team captain of “Bald to the Bone,” which has three “shavees,” helped create a friendly competition between her team and “Barber’s Baldies” by setting her team’s goal at $1 over the goal of “Barber’s

Professor discusses past, future state of Turkey Murat Somer gives keynote speech at the beginning of the Turkish Symposium Photographer Murat Somer, associate professor of international relations at Koç University in Istanbul, spoke at the annual Symposium held by the Florida State University Middle East Center. The lecture, held on Feb. 10 at the Center for Global Multicultural Engagement, entitled, “Changing Values, Interests or Both? Turkish Politics, Foreign Policy, and Western Relations in a Changing World,” dealt with a variety of topics of

Turkey’s past and future, ranging from failing secularism and Turkey’s relationship with the European Union. Students and nonstudents alike were invited to The Globe to hear Professor Somer discuss what people could learn from Turkey’s successes as well as mistakes. Many students attended the lecture for a class and walked away with a better understanding of Turkey and the surrounding countries. Undergraduate Justin Bruce attended the lec-

ture for his class, The Ottoman Mediterranean, but enjoyed what Professor Somer had to say. “I thought it was good,” said Bruce. “It taught me a lot about the major teardown between the secular and the religious worlds.” The Middle East Center, which created the annual symposium, was founded in the 1970s under Professor Monte Palmer and continued until Professor Palmer’s retirement, and came back after Sept. 11 with help by Professor Zeina Schlenoff and Dr.

er the effect of Confederate flag exposure extended beyond President Obama, resulting in negative judgments of black targets, in general,” read the study. “We also explored, in Study Two, whether exposure to the Confederate flag made personally held racial attitudes more accessible or whether the effect of flag priming on evaluation of black targets might occur as often among individuals both low and high in prejudice.” In this study, half of the participants were exposed to the Confederate flag via a sticker attached to a folder left on their desk. Participants were told that someone had left the folder behind in a previous, unrelated session. The students were asked to read a story about a black man named Robert, known for engaging in “ambiguously negative and aggressive behavior.” Participants were also given a picture of Robert to coincide with the story. According to the story, Robert refused to pay his rent until his landlord agreed to paint his apartment. The story also featured Robert demanding his money back from a store clerk. Upon reading the story, participants were asked to assess Robert’s character using

a series of negative and positive traits. They were asked to rank the degree to which they considered him to be “kind,” “aggressive” and “selfish.” Participants were also asked to take a survey regarding their underlying, or unconscious attitudes toward black people. The study’s results showed that individuals who were exposed to the Confederate flag before answering the questions rated Robert increasingly more negatively than individuals who were not exposed to the flag. “The size of this effect was not related to participants’ preexisting racial attitudes,” Ehrlinger reported. “[This suggests] the automatic effects of Confederate flag exposure might lead even people low in prejudice to evaluate President Obama and other black targets in a more negative light.” According to the researchers, Study Two revealed that bias was not predicated by individuals’ racial attitudes. “Confederate flag exposure does not increase accessibility of personal racial attitudes,” read the study. “Rather, it seems to increase accessibility of culturally associated prejudice and results in negative judgments of

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Professor Murat Somer speaks at the globe during the Turkish Symposium held on Feb. 10. Peter Garretson. The Symposium focused on Turkey this year, due in large part to the fact that, for the first time in FSU’s history, Turk-

FLAG from 2 Half of the participants were subliminally exposed to images of the Confederate flag, which popped up on their computer screens up to 20 times in rapid, 15-millisecond appearances. The second half of participants was exposed to a neutral symbol composed of colored lines. Following the exposure, participants were asked to rate the likelihood that they would vote for the four major presidential candidates: Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, John McCain and Mike Huckabee. They were then asked to rate their political orientation, as well as the degree with which they identified themselves as a southerner. Although the study found that exposure to the flag had no effect on their self-reported feelings toward liberalism and conservatism, it did suggest that the flag’s psychic impact was on racial rather than ideological attitudes. “White participants exposed to the Confederate flag reported a significantly lower likelihood of voting for Obama than those exposed to the neutral symbol,” read the report. The team’s second study featured 116 white students. “In Study Two, we sought to examine wheth-

black targets among high and low prejudice participants.” The team’s research led them to conclude that although some individuals who hold the Confederate flag in high esteem might be disappointed to hear the newest findings, the outcome suggests that the meaning of the flag is in fact more complex and consequential than what was previously believed. “We argue that the debate over whether it is appropriate to display the Confederate flag in positions of prominence should include a discussion of how exposure to that flag might promote negative judgments of and behavior toward black individuals, by virtue of its association with racial bias,” read the conclusion. “Our studies show that, whether or not the Confederate flag includes other non-racist meanings, exposure to this flag evokes responses that are prejudicial. Thus, displays of the Confederate flag may do more than inspire heated debate; they may actually provoke discrimination even among those who are low in prejudice.” To read the complete report, visit http://ehrlinger.socialpsychology.org/#publications.

by the Middle East Center. For more information on the Middle East Center, visit http://www.fsu. edu/~mec/

ish began to be taught last fall. The symposium was open to the public and was part of a yearly series

NEWSBRIEFS stepped down and turned over the government to the Egyptian military last week.

WORLD Chavez: Venezuela’s ‘revolution’ won’t end CARACAS, Venezuela (AP)—President Hugo Chavez said Sunday that he has no intention of ceasing his efforts to make Venezuela a socialist country, and he expressed confidence that his allies would take the reins of his “Bolivarian Revolution” if he died or decided to step down. Chavez, a former paratroop commander who was first elected in 1998, said his close confidants would undoubtedly assume power and continue his efforts to steer the South American country toward socialism if he were to die or retire from politics. Critics ranging from opposition leaders to representatives of the Roman Catholic Church claim Chavez has become increasingly authoritarian and poses a threat to Venezuela’s democracy. Chavez scoffed at such suggestions Sunday, saying that some of his most outspoken critics have unfairly compared him to former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who

NATION NASA craft set for Valentine rendezvous with comet LOS ANGELES (AP)— After a long-distance courtship, a NASA spacecraft is set to meet up with its celestial sweetheart —a comet half the size of Manhattan that had an encounter with another spacecraft not long ago. The rendezvous between Stardust and comet Tempel 1 occurs on Monday, Valentine’s Day, some 210 million miles from Earth. Hurtling at 24,000 mph, Stardust will fly within 125 miles of the potato-shaped comet, snapping pictures. Stardust has traveled 3.5 billion miles since launching from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in 1999. For the past four years, Stardust had its sight on Tempel 1, adjusting its path several times and even using gravity assist from Earth to put it on target for a Valentine’s date. —Compiled by Ana Rebecca Rodriguez

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FEBRUARY 14, 2011

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F l o r i d a

F l a m b e a u

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 5

What to do and what not to do

Now Showing

J. MICHAEL OSBORNE Managing Editor The Tillman Story— Feb. 14-15 at 7:30 and 10:15 p.m., and Feb. 16 at 10:30 p.m. A headline-making documentary released last year, The Tillman Story tells the beyonddepressingly true story of Pat Tillman, a college football hero who turned down a kajillion-dollar football contract to join the military and fight for his country. Tillman died in the mountains of Afghanistan in 2004, and The Tillman Story picks up from there, when the military began to use his death as a tool for what can only be described as propaganda. But, hey, it’s narrated by Josh Brolin, so hopefully he’ll throw in some loose, affected southern colloquialisms from time to time. Paul—Feb. 16 at 7:30 p.m. (tickets available in advance at the ASLC info desk) SEE LIFE 7

Arts & Life writers dish out Valentine’s do’s and don’ts ROBERT CLEMENT Contributing Writer Every Feb. 14, millions of unsuspecting guys get in over their heads and screw up the biggest Hallmark holiday of them all. This year can be different just by following a few simple guidelines. Do’s Do get flowers. While many people think the most important thing to do on Valentine’s Day is to do something fancy, simplicity is allowed. Nothing g compares p to the smile on your Valentine’s face after getting some roses. Go red, and get a dozen. A single rose is a great way to show you care on a random day, but for this occasion, a dozen is best. Be creative. True, this

JENNIFER GILDAY Contributing Writer

RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor Pile with End Times, Murmurs, The Trees & Me and For The Hell of It—Tuesday, Feb. 15, show 8 p.m. at The Farside. Admission: $3-5 Hailing from Boston, Pile is a post-hardcore indie three-piece consisting of Rick Maguire (guitar, vocals), Matt Becker (bass) and Kris Kuss (drums). The band is currently on tour in support of their latest 10-track album, Magic Isn’t Real, released in October of last year. The band will be joined by End Times, a local punk rock band who’ll be bringing along their demos to the show, and Murmurs, a lo-fi new

Hey, fellows. So, I’m not the master of love over here, by any means; for right now, however, I’m going to act as that third angel on your shoulder. Forget about the “good” or “bad” guy—they never really help you out, anyways. I’m the one with the common sense. Because, let’s be honest, love can make you blind (and you’ll grow hair on your palms, too). In the darkness, I’ll be your saving light. I might lead you the wrong way, but hey, at least we will be able to laugh about this one day, probably alone on Valentine’s Day next year. Do’s Do acknowledge that it is, in fact, Valentine’s Day. In other words, my friend, don’t forget. This could result in the end of your budding romance. Capiche? Feb. 14:

does seem like a contradiction to the advice that, “simplicity is allowed.” However, creative simplicity is an art, which only the true romantics have mastered. Do something unexpected, like making a card from scratch or making a picture frame with a picture of you and your Valentine. A safe bet for how to get the creative juices flowing is to head to a local crafts store and find the cutest, corniest things on the shelves. Do cook. While most of the population will be swarming for reservations at the most romantic restaurant in Tallahassee, you can win your Valentine’s heart b y showing off your skills in

don’t forget. Mark it on your calendar, write hand it it on your h d (don’t let her see this), set an alarm on that fancy phone you don’t really need, anything to help you remember. Easy enough. Do get her flowers, even if they’re just plain old daisies. Chocolate and a nice dinner are also encouraged to keep your lady happy (and still yours at the end of the day). Even if your gal pal says she detests Valentine’s Day and goes on a huge tangent about the superficiality of it, just get her something, no matter how small. You can always just say you forgot it was Valentine’s Day. (Note: this is the one time you can break Rule No. 1) Do call your ma. Let’s be honest; chances are, she’s the first gal you set your eyes on, even your first “girlfriend,” one could say. She fed you, bathed you and set the bar entirely too high for all women (or

the kitchen. If you aren’t ren’t the next Iron Chef, don’t get shy—just find a recipe online. Follow ollow every step exactly how it is written, and find nd a scent-free candle and nd a nice tablecloth to sett the mood. Also, try to steer clear of dishes thatt are loaded with garlic, jjustt in case you do a good job. Don’ts Don’t break the bank. While every time you turn on your favorite reality TV show you will see another commercial for Valentine’s Day jewdon’t feel pressured elry, do spend too much. If to spe aren’t in a serious you ar relationship, a fancy gift relatio will eeither scare them or just make things off o awkward. A good rule awk of thumb is, unless you have had ad an anniversary of at least niv a year, go cute and inexpensive. in ve. Keep in mind, gifts set precedence p ce and

lack thereof)) that will be in iinterested t you. Give her a ring. I can almost guarantee you’ll put a smile across her face. Don’ts Don’t buy her a diamond ring or some other ridiculously expensive gift if you’ve only y been seeing each ach other for a couple uple months. If she’s somewhat normal, ormal, she’ll be running ing for the hills before re you can say with a toothy grin, “I hope it fits.” However, if she’s e’s A-OK with you getting ing her a pricey piece after a short courting period, she may be insane or a golddigger. ger. Happy Valentine’s Day to you, sir.

y o u w i l l b e spending the rest of your relationship trying to outdo yourself. Don’t eat out on Valentine’s Day. While the easy way to impress your date would be to go out to a nice meal, this is played out and overdone. Sure, if you pick up the check, your efforts will be appreciated, but how hard is it to hand a waiter your debit card? Remember, this is not a day to win someone over with your bank account. If you absolutely refuse to cook, get something to go. Bring it home and set it up with some extra touches and let your date think you are meeting at your place to go out. The look on their face when they see a full spread and a candlelit dinner fully equipped with a dozen roses will be one

Don’t act like Valentine’s Day is a huge or chore some type of major inconvenience to you. Honestly, like with any holiday at my house, copious amounts of alcohol can be imbibed to deal with obligation. Have fun with it. It doesn’t have to be a huge ordeal. Flowers, dinner, a few compliments here and there and you’re back in your apartment playing World of Warcraft before you know it. Don’t forget about the little things. I don’t know about you, but my c r u s h

that will rival i l any other th you will ill achieve. Don’t focus on sex. While following this advice will probably make the end of your night something special, nothing is a bigger turn off than making it known that you want to get lucky. Stay away from things like Barry White, massage oils, and movies with crazy sex scenes. Instead, give the impression that you just want to have a fun night with a person you truly care about. After all, this isn’t about you, or else you wouldn’t have read this.

tossed me one of those tasteless candy hearts with “Be Mine” on it in fourth grade, and my heart melted. Granted, he probably gave those to all the girls in our class. Regardless, don’t forget about the basics. It doesn’t have to be too fancy (or expensive). Just let her know how happy you are that she’s all yours (at least until she dumps you for being a cheap date. Sorry, boys, Sam’s Club food court does not constitute a Valentine’s Day dinner). “The heart,” the great author Henry David Thoreau once said, “is forever inexperienced.” So keep it simple, and Happy Valentine’s Day.

SEE LOWDOWN 7

7 Days of Opening Nights

arshtcenter.com

Travel Channel’s Anthony Bourdain visits FSU for festival. SEE BOURDAIN 6

emiclassics.com

Renowned pianist Gabrielle Montenero will play at TCC. SEE MONTERO 6

smallprojectiles.net

PRISM to perform at Seven Days of Opening Nights. SEE PRISM 6


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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 14, 2011

The gamer’s guide to Valentine’s Day Whether you’re single or taken, video games have got your back EXTRA LIFE! COLLIN MIRANDA Staff Writer Valentine’s Day is here, so fire up your consoles to help you light up that spark in your relationship, you lovebirds. Or, if you’re single, it’s time to bask in the soft, comforting glow of your television as you marathon game in a campaign to obliterate any consciousness over what day it is. Whichever you find yourself being this season, I’ve got the list for you. For couples’ games, considering a relationship can involve both a hardcore and casual gamer, I’ve compiled a selection of games which should appeal to both tastes. As for singles, though I don’t mention it below, you might want to go ahead and add Wii Fit to that list to improve your chances for next year. Without further ado, I present a list of the best games for couples and singles on this hallmark holiday. Top five games for couples on Valentine’s Day: We Katamari (PS2) We Katamari is the only game in the series that allows you to play co-op on any level, and will have you and your date rolling the same Katamari together, testing your ability to communicate and cooperate in order to achieve a common goal. Not to mention some Katamari stages, such as the flower or firefly ones, are some of the most un-

abashedly romantic levels in video game history. Scott Pilgrim vs the World: The Game (PSN, XBLA) Prove to your loved one

Wiimote as a gun in this easy-to-pick-up, on-rails shooter and blast through hordes of the undead. Not only will couples have a chance to comfort each other in times of zombie

There isn’t too much the prolific Anthony Bourdain hasn’t yet accomplished. In 2000, he published his first book, Kitchen Confidential, a memoir about his love affair with food and cooking. The book became an immediate success, thrusting Bourdain into the public spotlight. In the years that followed, he earned himself his first television show, earning an almost permanent spot in popular culture. His first show appeared on the Food Network. Called A Cook’s Tour, the show followed Bourdain around the world in search of new and exotic dishes. In 2005, he moved over to the Travel Channel and began hosting his most popular show,

Big

Planet

Minecraft (PC) Show the world that you’re perfectly fine and more than capable on your

screwattacks.com

Geek loving doesn’t get any better than Scott Pilgrim and Ramona Flowers in ‘Scott Pilgram vs. the World: The Game.’ that you’re willing to destroy all of their evil exes just to be with them. Play as everyone’s favorite geekculture couple, Scott and Ramona (or even Stephen Stills, Kim Pine or Knives Chau if you’re into romantic fan fiction, I guess) and beat up some hipsters in what might be the only romantic comedy you’ll both agree on. Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles (Wii) Nothing says “I love you” quite like surviving a zombie apocalypse with your significant other. Use the

terror, but the game makes sure you look out for each other by making you share a life bar. How adorable is that? PixelJunk Eden (PSN) PixelJunk Eden has you and your Valentine (and up to a three players, if that’s what you’re into) working together as cute, tiny “Grimp” creatures in order to grow a garden. Swing and jump around minimalistic, yet visually stunning, psychedelic worlds to collect pollen, grow seeds and heroically rescue each oth-

get his revenge by using anything from machetes to plastic bags in order to stab, strangle, and decapitate any nameless thug that gets in your path. Sure, you’ll be seeing a whole lot of red on a day where you’re trying to escape the wretched color, but I’m pretty sure it will be an exception within the context of the game.

Little Big Planet can almost be an entire date unto itself. Customize your own Sackboy and Sackgirl couple with hundreds of different options, and set out to explore. With over 3.6 million user-created levels, you are bound to find the perfect setting for your dream date. If none of those are up to your standards, you can easily create your own stage together to take a romantic stroll through. On top of this, the game even allows your Sackcouple to hold hands as you play. Aww.

own. While stranded alone on a deserted land, build an empire of architectural marvels and fend off vicious enemies using nothing but a pair of blocky fists and your own underrated ingenuity. That’ll learn ’em. Manhunt (PS2) Valentine’s Day can stir up some pretty strong emotions in single people. Such as red-hot, unfocused rage. What better outlet for that rage than one of the goriest, most controversial games around? Help James Earl Cash (and possibly your own troubled psyche)

Super Metroid (SNES) Super Metroid is a fantastic game for singles, especially for all the gamer girls out there. Samus Aran represents one of the strongest female figures in gaming (except maybe recently, where they started focusing more on her sexuality than her independence, though Super Metroid precedes this). Embrace the feelings of isolation, explore the caves of planet Zebes, and wipe out an alien menace as a badass, lone wolf bounty hunter. Super Smash Bros. Brawl (Wii) Just because you’re single on Valentine’s Day doesn’t mean you have to be all alone. Call up some of your friends with a comparable hatred for the holiday and enjoy an afternoon duking it out with Nintendo’s finest. The cartoonish gameplay and zany antics will have you and your friends laughing so much, you’ll all forget about what’s-their-face in no time.

PRISM from 5

‘No Reservations’ star Bourdain visits FSU for Seven Days Festival Staff Writer

Little (PS3)

Top five games for singles on Valentine’s Day:

World of Warcraft (PC) Chances are, if you play WoW, it’s probably the reason you’re single anyway. Might as well commit to something.

BOURDAIN from 5

MICHAEL FERRARO

er from the inconvenience of death. I should also point out that the game’s soundtrack is ridiculously sexy.

Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations. This Emmy-award winning show follows a similar format to his previous show, only Bourdain definitely brought out his more unique personality. The show has also had a varied amount of guest stars, ranging from actors to authors to even other chefs. Among his guest list are actor Bill Murray, musicians Ted Nugent and Alice Cooper, author Chuck Palahniuk (Choke, Fight Club), and Spanish chef Ferran. There is no place Bourdain won’t travel. In 2006, he and his crew were filming an episode in Beirut, Lebanon, when conflict broke out. Since he had to flee the country before filming there, he instead turned the episode into a documentary about his experiences there. This

climatic episode brought the show its first Emmy win and solidified Bourdain into popular culture for years to come. Bourdain will be taking a journey to Tallahassee for Florida State’s Seven Days of Opening Nights. This yearly series allows students and patrons to expose themselves to various forms of artistic culture such as dance, film, literature, and music. Buordain will be at the Ruby Diamond Auditorium on Feb. 16. To get more of Bourdain before (and after) his visit, seek shelter at your local bookstore. The chef/ author has written seven books thus far, including No Reservations, The Nasty Bits and last year’s Medium Raw: A Bloody Valentine to the World of Food and the People Who Cook.

Musical act PRISM returns to Ruby Diamond on Feb. 15 RYAN RABAC Staff Writer On Feb. 15, PRISM will return to the Ruby Diamond Auditorium as part of Florida State University’s annual Seven Days of Opening Nights festival. The concert will showcase the finest talents of the FSU College of Music, featuring the Campus Band, Chamber Winds, Concert Band, Seminole Sound, Symphonic Band, Wind Orchestra and the Marching Chiefs. It is a once-a-year op-

portunity to experience the best music FSU has to offer under one roof, making it a must-see for fans of classical music or music in general. The concert will be directed by Director of Bands and Professor of Music Patrick Dunnigan. It is described as an “intricately planned, meticulously sequenced, gloriously noisy celebration of all things band, and all things FSU.” Dunnigan has been with FSU since 1991. He directs the University Symphonic

Band, the University Concert Band and the Marching Chiefs. He received the University Teaching Award from FSU in 2003. Dunnigan is nationally recognized, well published and even authored his own textbook, Marching Band Techniques. Music fans who have yet to experience the Marching Chiefs at games, or any other group on campus, are promised an ambitious showcase. Admission is $10 with a student ID, or $25 for GA.

MONTERO from 5

Modern classical musician Gabriela Montero set to play Seven Days ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer Classical music superstar Gabriela Montero has been all around the world. Born in Venezuela, the artist has traveled the globe, showcasing her tremendous talent to an enormous audience. Two years ago, she performed at President Barack Obama’s inauguration with the nottoo-shabby trio of Yo-Yo Ma and Itzhak Perlman, and, this week, she will perform right here in Tallahassee for the annual Seven Days of Opening Nights Festival.

For her Seven Days performances, Montero will be splitting her program between Latin composers and personal improvisations based on audience suggestions. Critics have lauded her improvisational gift, and her concert reviews bring in equally exuberant raves. “When improvising, I connect to my audience in a completely unique way—and they connect with me,” Montero said. “Because improvisation is such a huge part of who I am, it is the most natural and spontaneous way I can express myself.”

Montero will be performing at the Pebble Hill Plantation on Sunday, Feb. 13, at 2 p.m. and at TCC’s Turner Auditorium at 8 p.m. on Monday. For fans of classical music and those who just want to watch a skilled Venezuelan woman play the piano, the concert should be well worth the ticket price. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to see this virtuosic musician live in Tallahassee. For more information on Montero and the Seven Days Festival, visit gabrielamontero.com and sevendaysfestival. org.

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more photos from Randy Newman’s performance at Ruby Diamond. Riley Shaaber/FSView

Seven Days of Opening Nights: Randy Newman performs one of his songs for a Tallahassee audience on Feb. 12 at the Ruby Diamond Concert Hall.


ARTS&LIFE

FEBRUARY 14, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Lucy & Leo’s serves up sweets Local business Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery provides specialty cupcakes

NICKI KARIMIPOUR Assistant Arts & Life Editor For the owners of Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery, the inspiration to open a shop that serves only cupcakes began with a trip they took to Notting Hill, London. Upon discovering a small shop that served up sweet treats, owner Jean Bates wondered if such an endeavor could work in Tallahassee. With further investigation, she realized that one of the top 10 new businesses to start up in 2010 was a cupcake shop. Taking this as a sign to open one of her own, Bates and co-owner Paula Lucas opened Lucy & Leo’s, located at Midtown, on Thomasville Road. Bates is also a graduate of FSU, receiving her MBA in 2008. The name Lucy & Leo’s comes from the owners’ dogs: “Leo is a Pointer

and Bulldog mix and Lucy is a Bassett and Labrador mix. We had difficulty finding a name that had not been taken already.” Lucy & Leo’s was also featured on the popular Food Network show Cupcake Wars. Bates described the experience as quite interesting. “They left a message on a day that we were closed,” Bates said. “I thought it was one of my friends playing a joke on me. It wasn’t—they had seen our website and were impressed with our attitude and product. We started talking and they asked us to audition. We had 36 hours to fill out tons of paperwork and make a three-to-five minute video for YouTube. If you haven’t seen the audition, you should. It is hilarious.” Lucy & Leo’s didn’t end up winning the episode, but they made it to the third round. Most of all, however, they succeeded in bringing some recognition to Tallahassee and their shop. Free Wi-Fi is in place for patrons of the cupcak-

ery, making it a fun place to grab something sweet and fit in some studying at the same time. They also serve coffee and assorted sodas. Students who are fans of simple ingredients will enjoy Lucy & Leo’s approach to cooking up tasty treats. “Our cupcakes are made from scratch daily using the freshest ingredients possible,” Bates said. “No preservatives. Just real butter, flour, sugar, et cetera. On very busy days, we bake several times throughout the day.” Far and away their most popular flavor is red velvet, according to the owners. “Lucy & Leo’s is a unique little shop that offers giant-sized cupcakes in a variety of tasty flavors,” FSU student Jenna Gerstein said. “The friendly service and great atmosphere will be sure to keep you visiting time and again.” Store hours are Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, visit lucyandleos.square-

a “solid album [that] it is hard to pick a standout song.” Their music is suited for fans of bands such as Napalm Death and His Hero Is Gone. Tallahassee’s sludge metal band Atrocitus (fronted by professional wrestler Hallowicked) will also be performing along with fellow local band Brainstorm, consisting of David Green (vocals), Cody Diefenthaler (guitar), Pedro Carvalho (drums) and Ben Rand (bass). The thrash punk four-piece are also in charge of organiz-

ing the annual local music festival, Fresh Fest, which will take place once again from Feb. 25-27. Also playing is local band Rickety Cricket, a ska/punk band about to embark on their first Florida tour.

Zachary Goldstein/FSView

Customers can order specialty cupcakes at Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery. space.com. For more information about daily special flavor offerings, follow them on Twitter @ LucyLeo.

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more

Zachary Goldstein/FSView

photos from Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery.

Freshly baked cupcakes are placed on the display counter at Lucy & Leo’s Cupcakery.

Al Ingram (bass, vocals), John Paul Miller (guitar, vocals), Derrick Johnson (trombone, background vocals), Mary Frances (keys, vocals), Lee Allen (drums) and Greg Hollowell (saxophones, background vocals). The band has played together and shared their funky sounds with audiences across the nation since meeting in Boone in 2002. Joining Yo Mama is local band Catfish Alliance, a Beastie Boys-inspired rock band consisting of Casey (guitar, vocals), Dil-

lon Bradley (drums), Jeff Davis (bass), Big E ( who brings the “hype”) and Scott Campbell (guitar).

ent from the real Rapunzel story,” said my niece Tyler of Tangled’s magical twist (Rapunzel’s hair is filled with the magically restorative power of the sun— or something). “And he [love interest Flynn Rider] is not really a prince or anything.” So, there’s that. When approached for comment, my nephew and alleged cutest thing ever Tate, who closed his eyes

every time the main characters seemed like they were going to kiss, did not remember seeing the film.

LOWDOWN from 5 wave cassette synth project. The Trees & Me and For The Hell of It will also perform. Flying Snakes, Atrocitus, Brainstorm and Lagwagon—Thursday, Feb. 17, doors 9 p.m., show 10 p.m. at The Farside. Admission: $3-5 Flying Snakes is a metal three-piece from Tampa and St. Petersburg. In 2009, the band self-released their album Bludgeoning Frequency, which Deaf Sparrow hailed as such

Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band with Catfish Alliance—Thursday, Feb. 17, doors 9 p.m., at The Engine Room. Admission: $7 Based in Asheville, N.C., Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band is a nu-funk six-piece consisting of

Menace Beach: Club Crashers Edition with Hot Pink Delorean, Team Jaguar, Mustache FL and Ben Danner— Friday, Feb. 18, doors 9 p.m. at The Engine Room. Admission: $5 ($7 under 21), ladies free until 11 p.m., $10 after midnight The Engine Room will be hosting their first Menace Beach since January

with Hot Pink Delorean, an electro/house/dance music trio from Cambridge, Mass. Though members Chris Barlow, Jon Spero and Matt Simmers were originally in a drum and bass act called Terravita for six years, they decided to experiment with electro, which propelled them to their current level of fame. As always, remember to get there early to avoid a line, a keg’s worth of free PBR tallboys is available before they run out and, ladies, no heels allowed.

LIFE from 5 Well, this is exciting: The ASLC will be hosting extra-super-special advance screening of Paul, which isn’t set to reach theaters until March 18, followed by a similarly special panel discussion with Close Encounter of the Third Kind’s Richard Dreyfuss (Ed.: Richard Dreyfuss appearance has been cancelled). Paul is the first film written by and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost since 2007’s Hot Fuzz, and the first apart from their Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz directing partner Edgar Wright, who was apparently off adding weirdly meticulous sound cues to his Scott Pilgrim vs. the World while Paul was filming. Of course, the plot more seems to follow <nerd_alert> the future lives of Pegg and Frost’s best-friend characters in their English TV classic Spaced if they decided to leave 23 Meteor Street </nerd_alert> and roadtrip across America, where they come across an alien escaped from Area 51. And the alien is named Paul, and is voiced by Seth Rogen. So, yeah, the alien will have an endearingly robust laugh. Remember to pick up your ticket at the SLC early, and stick around, because Richard Dreyfuss will be joined onstage by a real-life alien! (Ed: Real-life alien and Richard Dreyfuss appearances have been cancelled.)

Tangled—Feb. 17-19 at 7:30 and 10 p.m. Yes: I’ve seen Disney’s Mandy Moore-starring princess musical Tangled, a gritty reboot of the Rapunzel fairy tale. But, in my defense, I saw it with my nine-yearold niece and four-yearold nephew. And, yes, I left the theater saying the seven

words every delightfully jaded adult filmgoer says when leaving a celebrityvoiced, computer-animated romp that isn’t a Shrek spinoff: “It was certainly better than I expected.” I thought it appropriate, then, instead of lobbing a few Mandy Moore jokes, to just ask my niece and nephew what they thought. “I like how it was differ-

Silents!—Feb. 18 at midnight (Friday night) and Feb. 20 at 3 p.m. Silents! is a special trio of short films set to live compositions by FSU students—check the Thursday issue of the FSView &

Florida Flambeau for a full report. Although, early word is, one of the films shown will be an early short by one of my all-time favorite actors, Buster Keaton, called Cops, which means you’ll get your daily fix of Buster Keaton running in old-timey fast-motion, also known as one of the funniest things ever put on film.

BARRY LAW is ... hands-on legal education “The small class sizes and the faculty’s open-door policy sets the learning experience at BARRY UNIVERSITY apart from other law schools.” Kaylynn Shoop, JD 2010 Barry University School of Law Judge Advocate General Attorney, U.S. Air Force (January 2011)

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www.barry.edu/Law Barry University School of Law is fully accredited by the American Bar Association (Section of Legal Education & Admissions to the Bar, ABA, 321 N. Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60654, 312-988-6738).

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’Noles rise to the occasion

Men’s tennis team drops second straight match to top-10 power HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer Between Saturday’s match versus Texas and last Sunday’s against Florida, the difference was hardly noticeable. For the second straight match, the No. 26 FSU men’s tennis team (5-4) left another beautiful afternoon on the downside of a 4-3 thriller against a top-ranked opponent. In doubles play, No. 5 Texas (7-0) filled all three courts with tandems in the top 25. Senior Vahid Mirzadeh and sophomore Connor Smith lost 8-5 to the No. 5 doubles team Ed Corrie and Jean Andersen, marking the first loss of the spring season for the Seminole duo. Sophomores Anderson Reed and Andres Bucaro lost 8-4 to the No. 25 team of Kellen Damico and David Holiner and the Longhorns took the 1-0 advantage. Senior Clint Bowles and freshman Blake Davis pulled off a tight 8-7 (7-3) win on court three versus the No. 15 duo of Ben Chen and Daniel Whitehead to net the only doubles victory on the day for the Seminoles. Florida State opened on the prowl in singles, led by the consistently strong play of Mirzadeh. The No. 42 senior beat Corrie 6-0, 6-1 on court one to increase his singles winning streak to eight matches. Blake Davis carried Mirzadeh’s success over on court four. After Davis was the final player versus the Gators last week, the freshman used the loss as fuel and had No. 100 Ben Chen seeing zeroes all afternoon with the 6-0, 6-0 win. It was Davis’ first win against a ranked opponent in his young career. “A match like last week is tough to get out of your head, and it was definitely in the back of my mind,” Davis said. “It gave me an edge, though. It made me want to win that much more this week.” The Longhorns picked up two more points with wins on courts three and five to take the 3-2 lead, leaving Reed and Bowles with must-win matches on courts six and two, respectively. Court six featured a see-saw of a match, as Reed lost his first set 6-0 then stormed back to win 6-1. He won the first two games of the second set, but started to slide afterward and eventually lost 6-3. The Longhorns clinched the victory with that win and the Seminoles let another opportunity slip away. “We don’t know who is going to be the last one on the court,” added Davis. “But that person has to step up and say I want it more than my opponent.” No. 37 Bowles closed out the match with a 7-5, 2-6, 6-4 win over Kellen SEE LONGHORNS 10

Melina Vastola/FSView

Michael Snaer came up big for Florida State in Chris Singleton’s absence, scoring 13 of his team-high 16 points in the second half of Saturday’s 63-56 victory over Virginia at the Donald L. Tucker Center.

Men’s basketball rides Snaer, defense in win over Virginia

BRETT JULA Sports Editor Florida State head coach Leonard Hamilton has learned a lot about his young basketball team throughout the 2010-2011 season. This past weekend marked another enlightening experience, as he learned his team can win

without its most valuable player. Chris Singleton, the Seminoles’ star forward and team leader in points, rebounds and steals, suffered a broken foot midway through the first half Saturday against Virginia, but Michael Snaer’s 16 points and yet another stout defensive effort was enough to carry the ’Noles (18-7, 8-3 Atlantic Coast Conference) to a hard-fought, 63-56 win over the Cavaliers at the Donald L. Tucker Center. The win marked the fifth straight over Virginia and assured Florida State

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more from FSU’s win over Virginia. a .500 record or better in ACC play for the third year in a row. A quick turnaround from a road game just two nights earlier against Georgia Tech seemed to have an effect on the Seminoles early on, as FSU came out against Virginia only 3-of10 from the floor with eight turnovers in the first nine

minutes. The slow start, however, didn’t seem to affect Singleton, who scored the ’Noles’ first nine points and 11 of the first 13 on 4-of-4 shooting. Singleton, the reigning ACC Defensive Player of the Year, left the game with his injury shortly after collecting his 11th point with Florida State trailing 17-13. Just when it looked like the Seminoles were doomed, Singleton’s teammates immediately came to the rescue. FSU would outscore the Cavaliers 21-10 over the next 10 minutes to take a

34-23 lead into halftime. Eight different Seminoles scored a basket during the run. “We needed Chris to get us going because we started out really slow,” Snaer said. “The buckets he got in a row really helped us hold on until everyone got on their feet. It seemed like we came out a little flat. Chris just had to set the spark and we all caught on fire from it.” The Seminoles continued their surge into the second half, building their SEE OCCASION 9

Softball opens with rocky start

Twenty and counting

Seminoles overcome early losses, but fall to Hofstra in Kick-Off Classic title

Women’s basketball tops Georgia Tech for 20th win of season ERIC ZERKEL Staff Writer

NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor The No. 23 Florida State Seminoles kicked off the 2011 season with a fivegame tournament in Tallahassee this weekend that included UNC Greensboro, St. John’s University and Hofstra. After going 0-2 on the first day of the tournament, Florida State (2-3) snagged two victories on Saturday, but fell in the tournament final to Hofstra, 2-0, at JoAnne Graf Field. Friday saw the ’Noles suffer two losses, including a nine-inning heartbreaker to UNC Greensboro in the first game, which Florida State dropped 1-0. Senior Sarah Hamilton pitched all nine innings, striking out 15 and allowed just five hits and one run. That one run came in the ninth inning, as Kait-

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Sarah Hamilton gave up two earned runs on four hits and struck out eight batters in FSU’s loss to Hofstra Sunday. lin Merkt lined the gamewinning RBI single to right center field, putting the Spartans up for good.

Spartan pitcher Cory Mattson silenced the SEE ROCKY 10

No. 15 Florida State ran away from Georgia Tech in the second half to secure a 73-60 victory Friday night at the Donald L. Tucker Center for their 20th of the season. The victory ensured the ’Noles would reach 20 wins for the third straight season, an indicator of the leaps and bounds the program has made in recent years. Florida State looked poised for victory early, jumping ahead to a 20-12 advantage with just nine minutes to play in the first half after Natasha Howard drained a 3-point jumper. But the physical Yellow Jackets would rally due in large part to the play of leading scorer Tyaunna Marshall. Marshall had 18 points, five rebounds, five assists and three steals, and assisted Sasha Goodlett on a lay-up that capped off a 16-9 run to end the first

half, pulling the Jackets within one at 29-28 at the break. The Seminoles would shake off the pressure in the second half behind the play of Alexa Deluzio. Deluzio led all scorers with 20 points—15 of which came in the second half—and scored six of the first nine points to open the half for the ’Noles. “We came into this game knowing that it was going to be a battle,” Deluzio said. “We have so much respect for Georgia Tech and we worked hard this week in preparation for them.” Florida State would never relinquish the lead in the second half behind 52 percent shooting and four players scoring in double figures. Senior leader Courtney Ward had 15 points, nine rebounds and five assists, while junior forward Cierra Bravard chipped in with SEE TWENTY 10


FEBRUARY 14, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

SPORTS

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Seminoles tame Tigers Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis rebounds from Washington loss, dominates with win over Auburn HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer Two weeks is more than enough time to get over a heartbreaking loss. Following their close loss to Washington on Jan. 30, the No. 15 FSU womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tennis team answered convincingly on Friday night with a 6-1 victory over the No. 61 Auburn Tigers. FSU (3-1) opened with another strong start and took early leads in all three doubles matches. Sophomore Francesca Segarelli and freshman Ruth Seaborne are becoming quite the pair in doubles play. The powerful forehand of Segarelli allowed Seaborne to have full reign at the net, and the duo handily defeated the No. 21 doubles team of Paulina Schippers and Jacqueline Kasler, 8-2. Seconds later, seniors Katie Rybakova and Federica Suess won their set 8-1 to clinch the doubles point and put Florida State ahead at 1-0.

Zachary Goldstein/FSView

Federica Suess was dominant in doubles play with teammate Katie Rybakova against Auburn.

start in singles. Segarelli took care of business early and efficiently, being the first one off the court with a 6-2, 6-0 win on court three. Freshman Manon Veldmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 6-3, 6-2 loss tightened the match score to 2-1. At that point, Auburn (0-3) validated their feisty reputation, and forced four of the matches into third sets. In the third sets though, each Seminole blew away the opposition. Suess closed her match 6-0, 3-6, 6-1. Seaborne followed suit with a 6-3, 6-7 (3-6), 6-1 win on court four. Rybakova ended the night with a 6-3, 6-7 (3-6), 6-1 victory on court one. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We dug ourselves out of a couple holes tonight, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very good at that,â&#x20AC;? Seminoles head coach Jennifer Hyde said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to get those leads and keep them, though.â&#x20AC;? No. 18 Noemie Scharle, who was redshirted last year due to a wrist injury,

The Seminoles carried

the advantage with a hot

SEE TENNIS 10

worth, responding to Snaerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-pointer with a 14-2 run to trim the deficit to four. The run was fueled by the Cavaliersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hot shooting from outside, as 12 of those 16 points came off 3-pointers. Virginia entered Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game as one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top teams from long range, connecting on 41 percent of their 3-point attempts. The Cavaliers would hit 11-of-30 attempts from long distance for the game. Nine of those 3-pointers were by Sammy Zeglinski

and Joe Harris, who had 19 and 17 points, respectively. Zeglinski connected on 5-of-9 from long range, including a pair during UVaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second-half run. Florida State also aided the run with errant play on the offensive end. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once we got the lead up to 16, we had three straight turnovers,â&#x20AC;? Hamilton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sign of a team thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still trying to learn how to close games out. Those are the types of spells we have to eliminate.â&#x20AC;? The Seminoles would receive a big basket from

forward Bernard James shortly after the Virginia run. James made a nice move on the right baseline and got a friendly bounce on a turnaround jumper to extend Florida Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead to five at 58-53 with 37 seconds left. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I caught it, I really had to make up my mind in a split second,â&#x20AC;? James said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I saw [Assane] Sene coming and he was the only guy on me. I just gave him an up-fake and he came up out of his stance. It gave me just enough to get it over him and I just happened to

9

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nolesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; big win comes with big loss Singleton suffers potentially serious foot injury in win over UVA SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer Midway through the first half of Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 63-56 win over Virginia, Florida State forward Chris Singleton appeared to be on his way to a huge game. The junior scored FSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first nine points of the game and had 11 in the first 10 minutes. Without Singleton, the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Noles may have been facing a double-digit deficit at that point, thanks to eight turnovers in the first eight minutes of action that led to easy points for Virginia in transition. But with 9:46 left to play in the half, Singleton landed awkwardly on his right foot and limped

into the locker room for evaluation. By the time Singleton returned to the bench in the second half, he was wearing street clothes and a protective boot. The â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Noles suffered a huge blow when the results of X-rays taken during the game revealed the Seminolesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; worst fear had been realized: Singleton suffered a fracture in his right foot. Florida State head coach Leonard Hamilton said at the postgame press conference that Singleton will undergo surgery to repair the fracture â&#x20AC;&#x153;as soon as possible,â&#x20AC;? but he did not know the SEE SINGLETON 10

OCCASION from 8 biggest lead at 16 when Snaer connected on a 3-pointer to make it 53-37 with 9:48 remaining. The second half was where Snaer did a bulk of his damage, scoring 13 of his 16 points in the final stanza. The injury to Singleton provided some extra incentive for Snaer to take his game to a higher level coming out of halftime. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew something had to be done,â&#x20AC;? Snaer said. Virginia (12-12, 3-7) refused to go quietly and gave the 10,000-plus fans in attendance their moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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get the lucky bounce.â&#x20AC;? Snaer would hit four free throws down the stretch to ice the game. On top of his 16 points, Snaer contributed eight rebounds. Also stepping up on the rebounding end was guard Deividas Dulkys. With Terrance Shannon out nursing a knee injury followed by the injury to Singleton, the usually perimeter-oriented Dulkys was forced to play inside at times, and he answered the call by grabbing six rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have had Chris get injured for [Sn-

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aer and Dulkys] to start rebounding,â&#x20AC;? Hamilton said, laughing. The fact that Florida State stepped up to earn a key conference win without Singleton was encouraging for the team moving forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of been our safety net all season on offense and defense,â&#x20AC;? James said of Singleton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The fact that we stepped up in his absence I think brings the team closer together and gives us the feeling that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re holding down the fort until he comes back.â&#x20AC;?

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SPORTS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 14, 2011

SINGLETON from 9 timetable for his return. “You never know the timeframe that it takes for different people to heal,” Hamilton said. “It can be from whatever to whatever. A lot just depends on his recovery time. But that’s going to cause us to have to readjust again.” Coach Hamilton did not rule out the possibility of a return before the end of the season, but the outlook was grim following the game, and it would not be surprising if Singleton does not start again this year for the ’Noles. Coming into Saturday, Singleton was FSU’s leading scorer, averaging 14 points and seven rebounds per contest this season. The loss of their No. 1 option on offense leaves the ’Noles with a lot of slack to pick up. Guard Derwin Kitchen is the team’s second-leading scorer with an average of 10.2 points per game. Most of the scoring duty will now fall onto the shoulders of Kitchen, as well as fellow guard Michael Snaer and swingman Okaro White. Big men Bernard James and Jon Kreft each scored seven points in FSU’s victory

TWENTY from 8

Melina Vastola/FSView

Chris Singleton’s injury could prove to be costly to Florida State coming down the stretch. Saturday, and are capable of contributing on the offensive end when called upon. It will be an effortby-committee to make up for Singleton’s lost scoring production, but the ’Noles

believe they have the ability to overcome the loss, as they clearly exhibited on Saturday. “I think our kids will be up to the challenge,” Hamilton said. “We’ll have to

figure out a way.” On Saturday, it was Michael Snaer who stepped up, scoring 16 points on 5-of-11 shooting against the Cavaliers in Singleton’s absence. Snaer saw FSU’s performance after Singleton’s injury as a sign of good things to come. “Chris was a big part of that win,” Snaer said after the game. “It was a good test to see how a lot of our role players could step up and be a big part of our win.” Guard Deividas Dulkys, who chipped in with nine points against Virginia, is also confident that FSU can overcome the loss of their leader. “If somebody falls down, we’re going to pick it up and keep going,” Dulkys said. “It put us [against] a wall, like, ‘Hey, Chris would have stepped it up and we need somebody else to step it up.’ ” Whether or not the ’Noles are able to handle the loss is crucial to their success down the final stretch of the regular season and into tournament play. Florida State’s first test without Singleton will be against at Wake Forest on Saturday, Feb. 19.

Florida State flexed their physicality in large part on the defensive side of the ball. Georgia Tech had three players in doublefigure scoring, but only managed to shoot 34.4 percent from the field, struggling the entire game to shake the size and strength of Florida State to find any sort of rhythm. Florida State will next travel to WinstonSalem, N.C., to take on Wake Forest Thursday, Feb. 17.

15 points of her own. Howard rounded out the double-digit scoring for the ’Noles with 11 points. Despite the big win, head coach Sue Semrau remained impressed with the Yellow Jackets. “It’s like this every time we play Georgia Tech,” Semrau said. “The great thing is that we have a physical team that can compete like this. This is as physical a game as we have played all year.”

Simon Lopez/FSView

The Florida State women’s basketball team donned all-pink uniforms for the first time ever in their win over Georgia Tech to support breast cancer awareness.

ROCKY from 8 Seminole bats in the most literal sense, going all nine innings and pitching a nohitter. The Seminoles ran into more trouble in their second game on Friday, as the Red Storm of St. John’s handed Florida State their second loss of the season, 11-5. St. John’s jumped out to a five-run lead in the second inning and never looked back. After a re-seeding process on Saturday that matched up the team with the best record against the team with the worst re-

cord through the first day of play, the Seminoles rebounded, recording victories in both of their games on the tournament’s second day. In what would prove to be a prelude to Sunday’s championship game, the ’Noles got off to a hot start against Hofstra when Robin Ahrberg nailed an inside fastball off the left field foul pole for a homerun to open the scoring for Florida State. The contest would be tied at 1-1 until the Seminoles posted a four-run

sixth inning that saw Ahrberg, Shayla Jackson, Ashley Stager and freshman Courtney Senas all drive in runs for the Seminoles. That proved to be the decisive innning, as Florida State won the game, 5-1. In Saturday’s second contest, the ’Noles took vengeance for their Friday loss against UNC Greensboro, burying the Spartans by a score of 13-3. Sophomore Morgan Bullock pitched a complete game for Florida State, and, by the strength of their bats,

TENNIS from 9 opened her fourth match back by dropping the first set 6-4. While physical strength can fully recuperate, mental strength typically takes longer to develop. Coach Hyde saw this test in confidence. “Noemie came to me in the second set and said, ‘I’m not losing this match,’ ” Hyde said. “I said, ‘Alright, roger that. Let’s see it.’ ” Scharle followed up on her promise and caught fire soon thereafter. She

battled back on Saturday, Hofstra proved too much for Florida State on Sunday during the championship game, as the Pride downed the ’Noles 2-0. The Seminoles sent their senior ace in Hamilton to the mound for the third time during the weekend on Sunday. Hamilton preformed admirably, going six innings, allowing Hofstra’s only two runs of the contest on four hits and striking out eight batters.

The trouble for FSU on Sunday was their offense. The bats that had thunderously led the charge on Saturday fell silent on Sunday, as Florida State recorded only two hits against Hofstra’s Olivia Galati, putting a punctuation mark on an up-and-down weekend for the Seminoles. FSU will try and bounce back from a frustrating weekend later this week when they take on the Rattlers of FAMU Saturday, Feb. 19, at 6 p.m..

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only lost one game in her final two sets, thus clinching the Seminoles’ victory with a 4-6, 6-1, 6-0 win. “Wins like this always help your confidence,” Scharle said. “I saw all my teammates winning, and I just thought, ‘OK, it’s on now.’ And I’m really glad I was able to follow through.” The Seminoles dominated the Tigers, but only two days stood between this win and the start of ACC play. The ’Noles play No. 10

Miami in Coral Gables on Sunday. A full recap of that match can be found at fsunews.com. “We had a great week of practice, and we’re fully prepared,” Hyde said. “We’re on that plane [Saturday]. As soon as our feet hit the ground, it’s all about that state rivalry.” The Seminoles’ next home match isn’t until March 1, when the Florida Gators travel to Tallahassee to continue their rivalry with yet another installment.

LONGHORNS from 8 Damico. This loss was the fourth of the season for the Seminoles, but all four were against teams in the top seven. “We could play smaller

the ’Noles implemented the eight-run mercy rule, ending the game early. “I think the mark of a good program is to respond well to bad days and have short-term memory,” Florida State head coach Lonni Alameda said on Saturday. “We understand that we have a long journey, and to see them bounce back, make adjustments, and win both games and get to the championship game is a good mark for us.” Although the Seminoles

schools and be 7-1,” head coach Dwayne Hultquist said. “But we specifically chose to have a tougher schedule, and I think that’ll just make us better.”

The Seminoles have two weeks before continuing their rivalry with the No. 38 Miami Hurricanes. The match is on Feb. 26 at noon at the Scott Speicher Tennis Center.

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‘That’s just, like, your opinion, man ...’ The editorials and cartoons within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the writer or illustrator. Any opinion that appears in the newspaper is exclusively that of the writer or illustrator and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers.

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FEBRUARY 14, 2011

How do you feel FSU President Barron has done for you in his first year in office?

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

“I haven’t really noticed any differences; I am not aware of what he has or hasn’t done. There hasn’t really been much publicity about him.” —Patricia Grey, senior

PA G E 1 1

SGA elections—nonevents? Retracing Our Steps ERIK EMBREY

Survey says...

To subit a letter to the editor, shoot us a line via e-mail: managing_ editor@fsview.com. Please include full name, year in school, city and state.

Staff Writer In recent years, Florida has had quite the history of controversy come election time. Going back about a decade, there were those recounts in 2000 with the Bush/Gore election that resulted in the Bush administration securing the White House. Just a few years ago, another storm sprang up when Florida moved up its primary from early March to late January, depriving Democrats of Florida their representatives to the national committee. Now it seems as if the 2012 primaries may have another racket brewing with Rep. Martin Kiar of Davie and Sen.

Arthenia Joyner of Tampa introducing legislation for moving the primary date back to its original place. When will the madness end? On a more localized level, the lunacy seems a bit better. There exists more of a problem of exposure here; I’ve been wondering if I was the only one who didn’t realize that the SGA elections were going on until the day they actually happened. A few days prior, I had met an old friend by chance who happened to be with a contender that was running, but after that it slipped my mind until the day of the election as I was walking by the library. Even then, it took walking by twice before I realized what was actually going on. Now, normally I feel a strong responsibility to vote for those who are

going to be in charge of running something I exist within. FSU has been my home for the last few years, so it fits that bill fairly well. Walking by the library that second time, however, I honestly couldn’t be bothered. I knew I was graduating in April, and I was able to brush away any cognitive dissonance that I should care with that rationale. It was a straw poll that I ran later that revealed I wasn’t the only one; a fair amount of my friends didn’t know and/or care either, including those who weren’t graduating in April. Clearly a deeper apathy was present. It isn’t to say that I view student government as unimportant. I would certainly rather FSU have one than not have one, all other things equal. They serve an important pur-

pose to act as an advocate for the student body with the goal to improve student life. They are also the ones who hold and delegate the RSO funding, so on-campus organizations definitely need them. I would rather have other students decide on how organizations get funding than someone who was further removed that worked in the budget office. But I still felt fairly apathetic, and in reflection, I can understand how it happens on a larger scale. Presidential elections get just over half the eligible voters in this country out to the polls, so in a way, we only get about half the story. Imagine how different it would be if the U.S. had a similar policy as Australia and it was mandated that voting-age citizens must vote; inter-

est groups would probably lose much of their influence having to cater to everyone versus just those who make it to the polls. And midterm turnouts are even worse; people already couldn’t be bothered to vote for the president, much less just representatives on a state level. “What difference does it make?” seems to be the rallying cry of this indifference. It’s that feeling that their single vote doesn’t matter in the grand scheme, although the less people who vote is what allows the minority who do vote to have a greater say. So, in the end, this was my last chance to vote in a student election as an undergraduate, and I passed up on the opportunity. I can only watch from the sidelines what happens next.

“I think he has done a very good job—it takes a lot of responsibility and leadership to be the president of a university.” —Katie Lewis, senior

“I love that he is looking for ways to make the university green and recycle; I also see there is more going on with international students—this is important to me because I am an international student from Nicaragua.” —Alicia Berrios, senior

Carpe Aegyptus: understanding Egypt Coming To America BRIAN PETRITI Staff Writer

“I think he is doing great. He is very involved and is willing to do a very good job as president.” —Esther Koutnik, senior

“I think he has done a pretty good job. I met him once at a function, and he is a really nice guy and seems to have the university’s best interest at heart.” —Craig Mayers, freshman —Photos and survey compiled by Joseph La Belle/FSView

A natural revolution is a truly historic occurrence. Natural revolutions are the momentum that drive modern history. Whether it’s a defenestration in Prague or men in Philadelphia crafting a document which to this day we have yet to idealize, natural revolutions are never neat or entirely decisive—or “positive,” whatever that means. The Egyptian revolution is in the process of becoming a momentous affair in our times. Whether you find yourself in the “pro” or “con” aisle, it is important to not have any illusions.

Letter to the Editor Owned by foreign countries The Obama administration is spending our money at unprecedented levels and it is projected to con-

What does that mean? For starters, people who will expect a shining beacon of democracy in the Middle East need to be reminded that the American Revolution was not an immaculate conception. The centennial of the Declaration of Independence found black people in the South very much lacking suffrage. In fact, our Republic had to near its bicentennial to live up to Jefferson’s declaration— which, ironically enough, even he chose to ignore. In fact, very few revolutions have been immediately decisive. In fact, there is tension in the air as of Thursday night, when Mubarak decided to not exactly step down—if you’re confused, join the club: President Obama is, too.

The Egyptian people may have to survive a tough crackdown to have their day in the sun. Nonetheless, the Egyptian revolution, if successful, presents a historic moment. If completed with the objectives intact (read: if Egyptians gain actual democracy), the Egyptian democracy should not be something that is feared or resisted. Unlike the “quagmire” that resulted from our fabricated regime change in Iraq, the Egyptian revolution is more akin to the failed “Green Revolution” in Iran. If the American president and the American public side against it, then it is an alienation of a whole populous. Egypt is not synonymous with Muslim Brotherhood. Turning our back

on the protesters and backing Mubarak will be detrimental in the long run. Extremist recruiters reach out to alienated Muslims when they most feel pushed away by western societies. We would be creating more enemies than friends in such an event. Americans remain reluctant to back democracy, ironically enough. Besides the glaring ideological gap in this, there are a few empirical facts to take into account; democracies are less likely to go to war with other democracies. Israel and Egypt no doubt have some bad blood between them—especially since Israel doggedly backs Mubarak—but all incursions made into Israel were at the hands of dic-

tators. Mubarak himself was a member of the Air Force during the 1967 conflict against Israel. There are yet a lot of questions to be answered and there are murky details in the situation. However, unlike 1979 Iran, there has been less hostility toward the United States and the masses are peaceful. A democratic—truly democratic— Egypt is nothing to be scared of and so far there seem to be few details that support an Islamic takeover. Whether our national interests align with the protesters’ intent is a complex question that cannot even begin to be answered. But Egypt is in the midst of an upheaval, and we—as a beacon of democracy—owe it its time in the sun.

tinue for years into the future. Our annual federal deficit is approaching $1.5 trillion. Our national debt is projected to go from $14 trillion now to $25 trillion in five to eight years. As of Nov. 30, 2010, the following are the top 10 countries holding U.S. Treasury Securities in billions of dollars:

1) Communist China, $896 2) Japan, $877 3) United Kingdom, $512 4) Oil Exporters (including Venezuela, middle east), $210 5) Brazil, $184 6) Caribbean Countries, $146 7) Hong Kong, $139 8) Canada, $135

9) Taiwan, $131 10) Russia, $123 We are indebted to some countries that could decrease their purchases of U.S. Treasury Securities, which would increase interest rates; or they could sell their U.S. Securities, which would hurt the dollar and significantly increase inflation.

Harold Myerson, editorat-large of American Prospect and the L.A. Weekly in his article “Think bigger, Mr. President” has it right. He stated, “We need to either raise tariffs on unfair foreign competition or reduce taxes on companies that keep, bring or create jobs at home.” —Donald A. Moskowitz


Study Break FEBRUARY 14, 2011

PAG E 1 3

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is an 8 -- Today especially, you work well with others. You may feel drawn to stay at home for dinner with a loved one. Express your feelings. Why not?

This week’s prize is a gift certificate from

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Today is a 7 -Spend wisely on your Valentine. Use creative methods and chosen words. It’s about sharing love with people, not money. Get outside and burn some calories with someone.

FSU became co-ed after which major war?

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

(850) 561-1605

Today is a 7 -- Are you tired of your old role? It’s never too late to recreate and reinvent your persona. Balance intelligence with intuition to regenerate character.

Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Today is a 6 -- The day may start looking gloomy and full of limitations. Warm up and stretch your muscles (including your mind), and, soon enough, opportunities open up.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is a 6 -- The emotions of the day may run amok and turn to frustration. Burn some anguish by getting your heart rate pumping and your body moving. Work it out.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is an 8 -- A wise man once said, “It’s easier to love than to be loved.” Accept love, it won’t be on your doorstep forever. Listen for it and give it away.

On Feb. 14, 1961, the radioactive element lawrencium was first synthesized at the University of California, Berkeley. On this date: In 1778, the American ship Ranger carried the recently adopted Stars and Stripes to a foreign port for the first time as it arrived in France. In 1859, Oregon was admitted to the Union as the 33rd state. In 1895, Oscar Wilde’s final play, “The Importance of Being Earnest,” opened at the St. James’s Theatre in London. In 1903, the Department of Commerce and Labor was established. (It was divided into

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Today is an 8 -- As your day proves productive at work, don’t get sucked in too deep. Leave time for your special ones. Love them, and notice how reciprocal that is.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is a 7 -Why don’t you skip the restaurant tonight and cook dinner at home? You could follow this with a walk under the stars and conversation by a fire.

Today’s Birthdays

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Today is a 6 -- Today’s perfect. It’s a day for intimacy, sharing and exploring relationships. Don’t spend more than you need to. Everything happens for a reason.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is a 7 -- Be careful, something you try doesn’t work. New information threatens assumptions. Romance works best later in the day, so get work done early.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is an 8 -- Be happy wherever you are. Find comfort in those who love you. Joy can be found in the smallest details, if you allow it. Balance your heart and mind.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is a 6 -- You come up with creative dinner plans and Valentines. Make sure that your good intentions are clear, and share the love. A little chocolate can be nice. Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

separate departments of Commerce and Labor in 1913.) In 1912, Arizona became the 48th state of the Union In 1920, the League of Women Voters was founded in Chicago; its first president was Maud Wood Park. In 1929, the “St. Valentine’s Day Massacre” took place in a Chicago garage as seven rivals of Al Capone’s gang were gunned down. In 1941, “Reflections in a Golden Eye” by Carson McCullers was first published. In 1979, Adolph Dubs, the U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, was kidnapped in Kabul by Muslim extremists and killed in a shootout between his abductors and police.

Word Search: Valentines Day

Today’s Birthdays: TV personality Pat O’Brien is 63. Magician Teller (Penn and Teller) is 63. Cajun singer-musician Michael Doucet (doo-SAY’) (Beausoleil) is 60. Actor Ken Wahl is 54. Opera singer Renee Fleming is 52. Actress Meg Tilly is 51. Pro Football Hall of Famer Jim Kelly is 51. Singerproducer Dwayne Wiggins is 50. Actor Enrico Colantoni is

48. Actor Zach Galligan is 47. Actor Valente Rodriguez is 47. Rock musician Ricky Wolking (The Nixons) is 45. Tennis player Manuela Maleeva is 44. Actor Simon Pegg is 41. Rock musician Kevin Baldes (Lit) is 39. Rock singer Rob Thomas (Matchbox Twenty) is 39. Actor Matt Barr is 27. Actress Tiffany Thornton is 25. Actor Freddie Highmore is 19.

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Admirer Candy Card Chocolate Cuddle

Cupid February Flowers Heart Kiss

Love Mine Pink Red Romantic

Roses Sweetheart Valentine

Thought for Today “A life without love is like a year without summer.” —Swedish Proverb

— The Associated Press

Mondays: Live Trivia at 7PM Tuesdays: $5 Cheese Calzones

$5 Pitchers $2 Wells All Day Every Day

Mellow Mushroom Pizza Bakers Since 1974

Thursday: $5 Small Cheese Pizza Sunday: $10 Large Cheese Pizza 1641 West Pensacola St.

(850)-575-0050


PAGE

14

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 14, 2011

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Volleyball defeats Clemson, downed by Georgia Tech over the weekend

MONDAY OCTOBER 11-13, 2010

W W W. F S U N E W S . C O M

VOLUME XIX ISSUE LIII

Seminoles blow away Miami

SPORTS | 10

SCHOOL IS IN SESSION NY’s School of Seven Bells and LA’s Active Child go Downunder on Oct. 12

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We’re recruiting

ARTS & LIFE | 5

WORD ON THE STREET

Got a great photo?

The ‘FSView’ takes it to the streets to gauge students’ candid thoughts on the changes to Bright Futures and possible tuition increases; new feature inside VIEWS | 12

INSIDE: For coverage on Saturday’s game: see Page 10. For our photo galleries: visit fsunews.com

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FSU’s PBM holds relationship forum with Tony Gaskins Jr. MICHAEL SAMPSON Contributing Writer

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The Seminoles take the field at the Florida State University vs. the University of Miami football game held on Oct. 9 in Miami.

National speaker comes to FSU

Previous question: Were the Miami Heat as hot as you thought they would be in their first preseason game? So hot

The Florida State Chap-

JUST FOR KICKS F S U k i cke r H o p k i n s a n x i o u s t o h av e o p p o r t u n i t i e s t h i s w e e ke n d against Miami. PAGE 11 OCTOBER 7, 2010

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 0

Sunshine State rivals collide Seminoles, Hurricanes meet again under the lights on Saturday night NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor

sports@fsview.com

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felt weren’t addressed, so this whole week we have been dealing with issues like helping children and

FSView & Florida Flambeau

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Share your opinion.

author, life coach and relationship expert, previously appeared on nationally syndicated shows

The pair of red flags with black squares flapping in the fall wind over the Al Dunlap Practice Field declared something Florida State fans have been looking forward to since Sept. 7, 2009: It’s finally Miami week again. Fans of the game often point to Florida as FSU’s biggest rival when, in fact, the rivalry with Miami has been longer-running and has produced some of the more painful losses and triumphant victories for the Seminoles. Florida State (4-1, 2-0 ACC) and Miami have been playing since 1951 and on an annual basis since 1972. Miami owns a 31-23 advantage in the series and has won eight of the 11 matchups since the start of the new millennium, including a 2004 victory in the FedEx Or-

Joseph La Belle, Melina Vastola and Reid Compton/FSView

Jacory Harris (left) and Christian Ponder—two of the ACC’s premier quarterbacks— will be in the spotlight when the Hurricanes and Seminoles meet in Sun Life Stadium.

ange Bowl. “You go in your career and you get involved in some of the great traditional rivalries in college football and you feel very blessed,” FSU head coach Jimbo Fisher said. “When you’re a kid watching TV, you grow up [thinking], ‘Well I wish I could be a part of that,’ and this is one of them that you talk about all the time.” When the Seminoles and Hurricanes meet on Saturday, it will be a primetime meeting with conference championship implications. The probable favorites in their respective divisions, Saturday’s meeting could be a potential preview of the ACC Championship game in December, barring a resurgence by Virginia Tech in the Coastal Division or the emergence of a clear challenger to FSU in the Atlantic. Florida State’s offense

comes into the game in quite the offensive rhythm. The now veritable three-headed monster of Jermaine Thomas, Chris Thompson and Ty Jones in the backfield have the Seminoles averaging 208.6 rushing yards a game, good for 26th in the nation. “Obviously we want to keep establishing the passing game, and develop it,” quarterback Christian Ponder said. “But right now, the running game’s working and we’ll try to take advantage of it.” The ’Noles will be facing a Miami defense that is first in the nation in tackles for loss and second only to Florida State in sacks. A key matchup will be the experience of the Seminole offensive line (with or without starting left tackle Andrew Datko) against an SEE COLLIDE 11

Soccer hopes to avoid Tigers’ trap Seminoles look to tune up against Clemson ERIC ZERKEL Staff Writer

in their last meeting. With history and form on their side, it will be a

of the net in her last two matches. Lim also joined Wys with national recogni-

managing_editor@fsview.com

F S V i e w

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OCTOBER 4, 2010

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W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 5

‘social’ commentary J. MICHAEL OSBORNE Managing Editor

Send all Arts & Life inquiries, stories and story ideas for consideration to:

artsandlife@fsview.com Deadlines: Monday’s Issue: The deadline for all content is Wednesday by 5 p.m.

RENEE RODRIGUEZ Assistant Arts & Life Editor

Laughable premise turns into one of year’s best films

Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s with The Lonely Forest—Tuesday, Oct. 5, doors 8:30 p.m., show 9:30 p.m. at Club Downunder. Admission: free for FSU students with valid FSUID, $12 for general public Margot and the Nuclear So and So’s is a folksy chamber pop ensemble from Indianapolis, Ind., known for their multidimensional and sometimes bittersweet sound. In 2004, singer/songwriter Richard Edwards and guitarist Andy Fry (of Archer Avenue and The Academy, respectively) joined forces to establish the band along with six other members. Together, they released their debut album, The Dust of Retreat, in 2006 with Standard Recording Company and split their sophomore album as Animal! and Not Animal with Epic Records in 2007. After making some changes to the lineup and leaving Epic Records, the newly minted six-piece released their third full-length, Buzzard, via their own label, Mariel Recordings, on

DIRECTOR David Fincher STARRING Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield SCREENPLAY Aaron Sorkin MOVIE STUDIO Columbia Pictures RATED PG-13 +++++

Brett Jula

Craig Costigan

Melina Vastola

Jesse Damiani

Reid Compton

Adam Clement

Many publications and websites have been touting, seemingly on a nonstop cycle, The Social Network as “the story of Facebook.” But saying that, really, is a little misleading and unfair to the film. We may or may not now know the real “story” behind this thing that rapidly became everyone’s favorite love-hate relationship, but The Social Network is, thankfully, more a character study of its co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, here played by the alwaysadorable Jesse Eisenberg (Zombieland). It’s hardly a secret now the way Zuckerberg, America’s most enigmatic entrepreneur, stepped on a few heads on his way to the top—hell, it’s on the poster. In the

The FSView Production Department is seeking creative, enthusiastic student graphic designers who pay close attention to detail and are capable of meeting deadlines.

film, at least, it all begins at Harvard, with another rejection by a girl, a drunken Livejournal session and a similarly drunken website for revenge called “Face Mash” that ends up posting tens of thousands of hits in just hours. Under the guise of creating a “match.com for Harvard students” for the rich, overachieving and annoyingly handsome Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss (both played by Armie Hammer), Zuckerberg then begins to create what would be known as “The Facebook” along with best friend and newly minted CFO Eduardo Saverin (newcomer Andrew Garfield, who will soon be our next Peter Parker). After moving to California at the advice of

notorious, charismatic, slightly crazy Napster creator Sean Parker (Justin Timberlake)— and against the advice of Saverin—Zuckerberg and a crack team of heavy-drinking programmers expand and develop a site that would, at a pace that would have been unbelievable if it hadn’t have happened only a few years ago, gain millions upon millions of users. Flash-forward a few years, as the film does sporadically, and the Winklevoss twins and Saverin are both taking Zuckerberg to court in high-profile lawsuits, which would both famously end with unfathomably gigantic out-of-court cash settlements. The Social Network, then, isn’t so much the story of Fa-

cebook, a cultural unavoidability that, yes, I’m currently logged into, so much as it is a story of how, in trying to create a unified social interconnectedness, someone ends up destroying his relationships with anyone who’s ever actually bothered to talk to him. Eisenberg is an absolute perfect choice for Zuckerberg: Eisenberg can play insufferable a**hole all he wants, but can also play it with enough awkward compassion and puppy-dog innocence that he can keep us sympathizing, somehow, every step of the way—with another actor, I’m afraid most would walk out of theaters saying, “Well, great, we just SEE NETWORK 6

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02.14.11