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INSIDELOOK

The independent student newspaper at The Florida State University™. Established 1915.

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 10-13, 2011

W W W. F S U N E W S . C O M

VOLUME XX ISSUE XII

7 days of something for everyone

THINK TWICE... ...before you think outside the bun: Taco Bell’s ‘beef’ under question ARTS & LIFE | 7

SEMINOLES TAKE ON YELLOW JACKETS Men’s basketball tries to avoid the sting of a second straight loss at Georgia Tech FSUNEWS.COM

Photo Courtesy of Museum of Fine Arts

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INSIDE: For more on Seven Days of Opening

Nights, see Arts & Life, Page 5.

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From left to right: Jim Roche, Bill Cosby, Mark Morris Dance Group and Randy Newman will make appearances at Florida State University’s 11th annual performing arts festival Seven Days of Opening Nights. The events start on Friday, Feb. 11.

FSU RSO presents leadership complaints to SGA Senate EMILY OSTERMEYER Members of the Hispanic/Latino Student Union (HLSU) gathered before the Student Government Association Senate to publicly hold accountable their current director and IGNITE Student Body Treasurer candidate, Dayron Silverio, on Wednesday, Feb. 2.

In a meeting held before the Senate, the HLSU committee members, current Assistant Director Stephanie Delgado and current Membership Chair Esteffania Najera, who spoke on their behalf, claimed that Dayron Silverio has not complied nor fulfilled the statutes stipulated in the SGA and HLSU Constitution, specifically asserting that Silverio had failed

to submit a new constitution to SGA this past November. Additionally, HLSU asserted that Silverio had neglected his leadership duties as Director of HLSU, failing to “be the executive head of all functions, meetings, or any related activities relating to HLSU, with the approval of the executive board; make the executive decisions with

the approval, consent, and quorum of the executive board; and call executive meetings no less than 48 hours prior to date and time desired,” according to the statement read by Najera at the meeting. Silverio was contacted, but unavailable for comment on this story. One point of controversy originated two weeks ago, when Silverio termi-

nated an HLSU executive board member in charge of marketing on what Najera describes as unfair charges. “Within the organization they have a three strike rule, and so this individual had three strikes at that point, based on the information I was given,” said Dr. Juan Guardia, one of SEE STUDENT 2

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Pulitzer Finalist Bill Bishop tells the FSU audience about Harrison Maye’s signs made during the ’30s and ’40s, and how the definition has changed over time, at the Globe Auditorium, Monday, Feb. 7.

Pulitzer Prize finalist talks partisanship Bill Bishop hosts free lectures at FSU BRYAN VALLEJO

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HLSU denounces director Contributing Writer

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Florida State University’s Center for Global Engagement at the Globe Auditorium hosted “Explore the Deepening Partisan Divide,” an

event featuring Pulitzer Prize finalist Bill Bishop, Monday, Feb. 7. Bishop spoke about his novel, The Big Sort: How the Clustering of Like-Minded America is Tearing Us Apart, and how, through his re-

search of the economics of communities across the nation, he uncovered partisan America. This was one of two speeches Bishop made during his visit to Tallahassee, SEE PULITZER 2

Contributing Writer Florida State University professor Alex Piquero was awarded the 2011 Academy Fellow Award presented by the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Piquero, who teaches criminology, is one of four Florida State professors ranked in the top 25 in the field and one of eight ranked in the top 65. The Florida State University College of Criminology and Criminal Justice was also named as the top in the nation. The rankings appeared in a study in a special issue of the Journal of Criminal Justice Education, which examines

criminology departments and their staff throughout the country. Associate Professor Nicole Piquero, also from FSU, was ranked in the same journal as being one of the top female criminologists in the country. FSU’s new ranking is an improvement from their previous ranking of seventh. The study counted the amount of articles published in refereed scholarly journals published from 2005-2009. Florida State had 227 articles published with the nearest competitor following with 193. “Because the Academy Fellow Award recognizes distinguished contribuSEE JUSTICE 2

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NEWS

850-561-6653 Editorial Fax: 850-574-2485 Advertising Fax: 850-574-6578 General Manager Eliza LePorin 850-561-1600 eleporin@fsview.com EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Adam Clement 850-561-1612 editor@fsview.com Managing Editor J. Michael Osborne 850-561-1613 managing_editor@fsview.com News Editor Jesse Damiani 850-561-1614 news@fsview.com Assistant News Editors Bailey Shertzinger Ana Rebecca Rodriguez Arts & Life Editor Agata Wlodarczyk 850-561-1615 artsandlife@fsview.com Assistant A & L Editors Ana Renee Rodriguez Nicki Karimipour Sports Editor Brett Jula 850-561-1616 sports@fsview.com Assistant Sports Editor Nick Sellers Photo Editor Melina Vastola 850-561-1617 photo@fsview.com Assistant Photo Editors Reid Compton Joseph La Belle Digital and Multimedia Editor Reid Compton 850-561-1617 webeditor@fsview.com Assistant Multimedia Editor Matt Clegg multimedia@fsview.com Assistant Web Editor Duncan Graham ADVERTISING STAFF Jennifer Eggers 850-561-1603 jeggers@fsview.com Kristina Greenlee 850-561-1609 kgreenlee@fsview.com Patrick Toban 850-561-1611 ptoban@fsview.com Sales Assistant Corey Calhoon

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salesassistant@fsview.com DISTRIBUTION Distribution Coordinator Karl Etters 850-561-1608 distribution@fsview.com PRODUCTION STAFF 850-561-1606 Production Manager Justin Christopher Dyke productionmanager@fsview.com Assistant Production Manager Danielle Delph ddelph@fsview.com Production Designers Glenishia Gilzean ggilzean@fsview.com Emealia Hollis ehollis@fsview.com Yves Solorzano ysolorzano@fsview.com The FSView & Florida Flambeau is a Gannett newspaper published by FSView & Florida Flambeau, Inc. Member, Florida Press Association Associated Collegiate Press College Media Advisers Office Location: 954 W. Brevard St. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Mailing Address: P. O. Box 20208 Tallahassee, FL 32316 Single copies are free; additional copies are available for $1 per copy. The editorials that appear within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the editorial writer. Any other column that appears in the newspaper is the expressed opinion of the columnist and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers. All correspondence to Editorial can be considered for publication, unless indicated otherwise by letter writer. In accordance with The Associated Press guidelines obscenities, vulgarities and profanities will not be published. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Letters may be edited for clarity and content, or for space purposes.

FSU student charged in pregnancy beating TURNER COWLES Staff Writer Florida State University student Devin Nickels, 18, offered three men money in exchange for the violent beating of his 17-year-old pregnant girlfriend. Nickels hoped the beating would cause his girlfriend to miscarry because he said the pregnancy was “ruining his life.” Just after midnight on New Year’s Day, Nickels hired a high school friend, Andres Luis Marrero, to stage an armed robbery just outside of a New Port Richey apartment complex. Nickels offered Marrero $200. According to Pasco County Sheriff’s Office documents, Nickels drove his girlfriend to the location near the woods around 1:30 a.m. When Nickels arrived, he called Marrero. Once Nickels parked, Marrero approached the vehicle wielding a

gun. Marrero told the victim to exit the car. “Don’t hurt me; I’m pregnant,” the victim told Marrero. After leading the victim into the woods, Marrero knocked her to the ground and repeatedly kicked and punched her despite repeated pleas to stop. Marrero was charged with armed kidnapping and aggravated battery on a pregnant female. The FSU Police Department arrested Nickels last week in his Salley Hall dorm room and transported him to the Pasco jail. He remains there on charges of aggravated battery and two counts of solicitation to commit aggravated battery, the St. Pete Times reported. The second solicitation charge was added on Monday. The victim was hospitalized following the attack and the baby, 11 weeks along, seemed to be recovering. That’s when SEE BEATING 3

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 10, 2011

PULITZER from 1 with free access to FSU audience members. Bishop began his research in 2002, but his initial study was based on why some places of America seem to be getting richer than others over time. He stumbled across partisan division during his research when he realized that “communities had been converging economically and educationally after World War II, but beginning in the 1970s, they began to diverge.” During his presentation, he specified three different points that intertwine, resulting in a partisan divide. “The most important sorting isn’t by politics necessarily, but it’s by education, income and by way of life,” Bishop said. “Lifestyle today is much more important than politics or demographics.” Bishop also explained how a trend toward a streamlined culture impacts the partisan divide. “The price we pay for living in a more homogenous community is a declining tolerance and an increase in extremism,” Bishop said. The final point of divide centered around the growing trend of alienation from community to community. “The country that has

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Bill Bishop signs his book before his speech at the Globe Auditorium on Feb. 8. Bishop is a political reporter, and a Pulitzer Prize finalist. replaced trust in the nation with isolated and insolated communities and, more especially, isolated individuals,” Bishop said. “As a result, it will be easier for homogenous cities like Austin to do things than it will be for complicated and mixed states or nation.” As a longtime political career reporter, Bishop

has worked on publications such as The Mountain Eagle, the HeraldLeader, The Bastrop County Times, as well as on special projects for the Austin AmericanStatesman. He currently is co-editor of The Daily Yonder, a web-based publication focusing on rural America.

STUDENT from 1 the faculty advisors for the HLSU. Guardia said that according to the information he received, Silverio acted accordingly with the termination situation. Najera believes otherwise. She said that the termination of the marketing officer appeared as more of a personal issue than that of misconduct and procedure, claiming that the first strike came as a result of the marketing officer not changing his profile picture to an HLSU affiliated image. “Now, last I remember, personal information goes on Facebook, and Facebook is a social network that you’re allowed to put whatever you want on it,” Najera said. Najera said the terminated officer’s second and third strikes resulted from a disagreement between Silverio and the officer. “So his three strikes were Facebook and then a fight,” Najera said. The SGA stipulates that after a position termination, an RSO director must advertise the vacancy of any executive board position for three days with the approval by the executive board. Silverio, they say, has failed to do this. Najera said Silverio instead appointed someone else without anyone’s approval. Under HLSU’s new constitution, the marketing position was an executive board position within HLSU, but, because Silverio did not submit the new constitution to SGA, it was not a position within executive board statutes for SGA. This created a complicated situation for HLSU members, who Najera claimed were prevented from doing an appeals process for the termination

because Silverio failed to submit the new constitution. “Because he hasn’t done something, we can’t do something about what he did wrong,” Najera said. Amanda El Shemi was one of few senators present at Wednesday’s Senate meeting unaffiliated with one of the competing SGA parties in the upcoming elections. El Shemi said that after the meeting, IGNITE Party members quickly tried to do what she assessed as damage control for a potential threat to their political campaign. Dustin Daniels, the current Student Body President and IGNITE party affiliate, spoke before the Senate after the HLSU representatives had left the meeting. Daniels argued that the HLSU members had not taken the proper channel according to SGA statutes, and that they should have first gone to their advisors. El Shemi said that the statutes provide multiple channels for addressing organization concerns. “I wouldn’t judge the route she took at all,” El Shemi said. “It is Senate’s job to [...] hold people accountable, and so she came to who she thought was there to hold that person accountable.” El Shemi said this was an unusual situation, one she and her fellow senators have never witnessed. “It’s only because usually the Executive Branch holds those people very accountable, so surprises like this don’t usually get to us,” El Shemi said. “They usually go to the Student Body President or the Chief of Staff first, and then we’ll hear about it after it’s been resolved.” The SGA Executive Branch was not aware of this situation before the

Senate meeting. “But they would do that by the director, so if he’s saying everything is fine, and everything isn’t fine, it could happen that the student body president wouldn’t know that something was going on,” El Shemi said. Guardia said he is hesitant to jump to any conclusions. “There just seems to be some discrepancies with the overall executive board, and what they believe his responsibilities and duties are,” Guardia said. Guardia said he has met with Silverio and several of the students to try and get to the bottom of the issue. “What I explained to the students was, as an advisor, there’s side A, there’s side B and then in the middle is the truth, so we’re trying to find out what that situation is,” Guardia said. Guardia said he still isn’t sure what the truth is, as he and fellow advisor Sandra Miles are still trying to do more one-on-one discussion with some of the students.

“We’ve had meetings to try to figure out how we can try to come to a compromise, so we can make sure everything is taken care of, and that HLSU’s name is restored back to what all the folks on campus believe, because they still do great work,” Guardia said. “It just seems like they have some internal issues they’re trying to get over.” El Shemi said the Senate also has the students’ best interests in mind. “We’re not out to get anyone,” El Shemi said. “We just truly want the agency to flourish, and if their director is not doing what he needs to do, then that’s just never going to happen.” Guardia regrets that the HLSU students did not come to see their advisors before approaching the Senate. “I think if they had they come to us, we might have been able to either avert the situation completely, or have had the opportunity to come and have a conversation, where Ms. Miles and I can assist in the mediation of both sides

and figure out what issues were there,” Guardia said. “I felt like if we could have done that beforehand, it may have not gotten to this level.” Najera said the original intent of the making a case before Senate was not to seek Silverio’s impeachment, but rather an effort to hold him accountable for his actions. Najera said that she and the assistant director have personally gone and tried to talk with Silverio, but said it is hard to address conflicts within the organization with him. “That’s why we felt like we had to go to Senate,” Najera said. “Although a lot of people might say it was a drastic move and that we shouldn’t have approached it that way, seeing as how all the attention we’re getting now from it, it’s not a personal attack at all; it’s just something that needed to be addressed with a higher authority, so that something could be done about it.” The reaction they received exceeded expectations. “I thought that in the beginning that we were just doing something that was right and that we were standing up for what we believed in, and at the end, with the reaction that we’ve gotten, it just turned into a revolution, which was not our intent,” Najera said. Now the Senate will begin an investigation to see whether or not Silverio will be terminated from his position. They’ll examine the claims made in the student’s case and determine whether Silverio has neglected to fulfill those responsibilities. At the time of publication, the outcome of the SGA election was unknown.

professional societies.” Since earning his Ph.D. in 1996, Piquero has authored or co-authored over 200 articles that have appeared in leading journals of the field. Other scholars in the field have cited Piquero’s work over 5,000 times. “I am deeply honored and humbled by this recognition,” Piquero said in an earlier interview. “I owe it in large part to the

unmatched intellectual environment, collegiality and support that enables my Florida State criminology colleagues, students and I to thrive as we do. As a professor, I couldn’t ask for anything more rewarding than teaching students, sharing my excitement for criminological issues with them, seeing them continue their education and become academics

and policymakers, and then knowing that they in turn are mentoring their students and collaborating with colleagues.” Professor Piquero will be formally recognized for being named the 2011 Academy Scholar at the Academy of Criminal Justice Science’s next annual meeting, which will be held in Toronto during the first week of March.

Silverio was held accountable for reported leadership discrepencies by members of the HLSU in front of the SGA Senate. Silverio was a candidate for the IGNITE Party.

JUSTICE from 1 tions to criminal justice education and scholarship, it is hard to imagine a recipient more deserving than Professor Alex Piquero,” said College of Criminology and Criminal Justice Dean Thomas Blomberg in an earlier interview. Bloomberg explained why Piquero has been and continues to be a successful educator and researcher.

“His teaching, research and service to the criminological profession are truly exceptional, and his record of successful research and publication collaborations with students and colleagues alike make him an outstanding role model,” Blomberg said. “For these reasons and more, Alex has earned this high honor from one of our discipline’s two leading


NEWS

FEBRUARY 10, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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Conference discusses ‘Expertise Across Domains’ SPORT brings together leaders in various fields KARLANNA LEWIS Staff Writer Florida State University’s Sport Psychology Organization and Research Team will host a conference setting forth ideas about expert performance in various areas, Feb. 18 and 19. For the third annual SPEAR Conference, sports psychology students are expanding and broadening the focus. “This year, we are talking about human excellence and human expertise and we are trying to embrace many domains,� said Edson Filho, president of SPORT. “We have people from music, from chemistry, from sports, from psychology—all of them talking about what’s necessary to achieve a high level in different fields.� For months the student organization SPORT has been planning the conference, advertising around campus, and recruiting eminent professors to present. One topic for debate will include how to define an expert. “When we talk about experts, we talk about the top one percent of the top one percent in a specific field,� said Katy Tram, a sports psychology Ph.D. student. “An expert is someone who other experts agree is an expert.� Although the central focus is sports psychology, speakers from the fields of chemistry, dance and even music and musical theater will also present. The conference emphasizes similarities between disciplines that involve performance. “People from music need to go through a different kind of training, but the motivation behind is similar,� said Filho. One of the similarities is the passing of the torch. “All the experts have a good coach,� said Filho. “A Nobel Prize prepares the next Nobel Prize, a good soccer coach prepares the next top player, and a good musician studies with a top professor. People from music select the musicians in a different way than people from sports, so we want to show the difference but also the similarities.� Graduates from the Florida State psychology program work with a wide range of people and trades. Some help to enhance the performance of actors, soldiers and astronauts. To emphasize the diversity in the field of expertise, the Flying High Circus will also take part. “The Flying High Circus is going to come and talk about how it’s organized, taking people who aren’t experts and making them experts in the circus, which we think is very unique,� said Itay Basevitch, founder of the conference and sports psychology Ph.D.

BEATING from 2 Nickels solicited another man to beat the girl again. Marrero told deputies of Nickels’ second plan after he was arrested for armed kidnapping and aggravated battery on a pregnant woman. A Hillsborough Community College student, Marshall Chapman, was also arrested. He was solicited by Nickels to give a BB gun to Marrero and to drive Marrero to the scene. Chapman was also charged with armed kidnapping and aggravated battery on a pregnant woman.

student. “We’re the only university that has a circus.� The keynote speaker is Dr. Harold Kroto, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, who is speaking about how creativity develops expertise. Dr. Gershon Tenenbaum will talk about measuring expertise, former coaches will talk about the recruitment process, and others will talk about technology and expertise. Sport Psychology professor Dr. Ericsson will speak on the theory of deliberate practice. “Deliberate practice is a certain approach to expertise, saying 10,000 hours over ten years of deliberate practice that’s challenging, systematic and purposeful is the key to reaching expertise,� said Basevitch. “Not so much talent, but focusing more on developing and training—so again, the nature-nurture debate.� Each year, the conference centers on a topic of current popularity in the field, with last year’s focus on exercise and the well being of the athlete. Possible topics for next year include group performance and the mentality and dynamics of a group or team.

Dr. Tenenbaum, who became interested in the psychology of experts after playing handball, hopes the conference allows people of diverse disciplines to recognize their commonality and learn from each other. “Sports and music or theater are performed in front of audiences,� said Tenenbaum. “Athletes are extremely anxious and so are musicians, because they have to satisfy an audience that is expecting them to perform well.

When we talk about experts, we talk about the top one percent of the top one percent in a specific field. An expert is someone who other experts agree is an expert. Katy Tram Sports psychology Ph.D. student

Everything that is performed in front of audiences is under pressure and there is expectation to perform well despite the pressure. That’s what experts actually do; under pressure, they perform their best.�

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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Professor discusses sensuality of books Elaine Treharne speaks at faculty luncheon series JOSEPH LA BELLE Assistant Photo Editor

Joseph La Belle/FSView

Professor Elaine Treharne speaks about the need for real books in the world at the Faculty Luncheon at the Presbyterian University Center/Westminster House.

LOCALBULLETIN Animal Service Center hosts “Adopt-a-FURRYSweetheart” pet adoption event This Valentine’s Day weekend, the TallahasseeLeon Community Animal Service Center (ASC) is encouraging citizens to think beyond traditional Valentine’s Day gifts of chocolate and roses and express their love by adopting a lifelong furry friend during its “Adopt-a-Sweetheart” event. The event will be held at the ASC, located at 1125 Easterwood Drive adjacent to Tom Brown Park, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 12, and from

1-5 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 13. Due to construction on Easterwood Drive at Weems Road, visitors can only access the ASC from the Connor Boulevard entrance to Tom Brown Park. During the event, all adoptions of animals over six-months old are free. New pet owners will also receive a pet starter kit that includes free Hill’s Science Diet pet food and a DVD with tips on caring for your new cat or dog. Report confirms quality and safety of Tallahassee drinking water The City of Tallahas-

see recently received the results of an independent scientific analysis of the City’s drinking water, with the report confirming the safety of Tallahassee’s public water supply. Findings from the report were presented to the Tallahassee City Commission at the Commission’s regular meeting Wednesday, Feb. 9. In addition, a report from Leon County’s Water Resources Citizens Advisory Committee released in January also confirmed the safety of the City’s water supply. Both reports were prepared following a questionable report released to national media representatives in December 2010 by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a Washington, DC-

based environmental (not scientific) advocacy organization. The EWG report claimed that many public water systems throughout the country, including Tallahassee’s, contained above-normal levels of hexavalent chromium (chromium-6). The County Water Resources Committee called the EWG testing “not sufficient to judge the quality of Tallahassee’s drinking water” and as such the Committee stated it “does not see any cause for urgency or alarm at this time.” The good news for Tallahassee water customers is that the City’s water supply meets or exceeds all public health standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state

Elaine Treharne, professor of textual-studies, spoke at the second in a series of four luncheons for the Spring 2011 Faculty Luncheon Series at Florida State University at the Presbyterian University Center/Westminster House, Feb. 8. The event, titled, “See Me, Feel Me, Touch Me: Who Says Digital Technology is a Good Thing?” focused on the importance of experiencing a text not only through its words, but its sensory, physical qualities. Professor Treharne spoke about the need for books and the meaning they still hold despite the

agencies. In regard to chromium, the City’s level is 100 times lower than what is allowed. As such, there is no scientific evidence to support EWG’s claims. In fact, there are no industrial sources discharging chromium into the Floridan Aquifer, the source of Tallahassee’s drinking water. Celebration of the arts gets larger than life on Gaines Street The arts are coming alive on Gaines Street in a rather significant way. This week, work begins on a roughly 20-feet by 65-feet mural that depicts the variety of art, music and cultures showcased during the annual Seven Days of Opening Nights festival. The mural is a

growing trend toward electronic media. “When you touch a medieval manuscript, you are touching something that someone else has touched a thousand years ago, which is tremendously exciting,” Treharne said. Treharne went on to speak about the sensual side of a book and how a person needs to feel, see and touch them. “I have never used a Kindle or Nook and probably never will,” said Treharne. “You don’t get any real sense of the book reading online.” The luncheon was open to the public and is one part of a series of faculty members coming and speaking about their field of work.

partnership between the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) and FSU. The mural will be located on the eastern wall of the building at 688 W. Gaines Street, owned by Dean Minardi and leased by CenturyLink. Use of the wall space is being donated. On Wednesday, the scaffold was assembled on site. The projection and sketching of the mural also began on Wednesday evening. The site will be active from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. through the duration of the project, which is expected to be completed by the end of the month. —Compiled by Jesse Damiani

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The second installment of DC Comics’ Weird Worlds fared little better than the debut issue. The collection of three short stories are a hodgepodge, but generally rate between worthless and slightly above mediocre. The headliner of the anthology series is still anti-hero Lobo. His story is breezy and filled with fisticuffs. There is no subtlety and there are only a few jokes. Skipping Lobo’s section is highly advised. In fact, boycotting the character’s simplicity is warranted. New readers might not make it past the Lobo story, which is unfortunate, as the remaining two narratives hold vastly more potential in spite of their own problems. Last month, we were introduced to Garbage Man, a lawyer who was turned into a talking pile of trash by a scientist obsessed with genetic engineering and super soldiers. Yes, it’s been done before, but this latest take on a disfigured super-powered being is spot-on with genre convention. It’ll be interesting to see what happens once the character’s origin story wraps up. The third story follows Tanga, a pink-purple alien. Writer and artist Kevin Maguire is creating a funny, immensely entertaining character, who doesn’t SEE COMICS 11

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Assistant Arts & Life Editor National treasure Bill Cosby will be visiting Tallahassee and performing a special stand-up routine on Feb. 13 as part of Seven Days of Opening Nights, Florida State University’s annual performing arts festival. Born William H. Cosby, Jr., the legendary entertainer has become a household name throughout his remarkable career spanning five decades and various

media. Cosby first captured audiences as a stand-up comedian in the ’60s, traveling coast-to-coast and bringing laughs along the way. What followed was a string of best-selling comedy albums, with eight Gold records, five Platinum records as well as five Grammy Awards to his name. Cosby then made history as the first AfricanAmerican to star as a lead actor in a dramatic television series with his role as Agent Alexander Scott on I Spy. Cosby went on to earn three Emmy Awards and two Golden Globes for his role on the show. In the ’70s, Cosby developed The Adventures of Fat Albert, which, while a cartoon, made an impact

on the youth for its messages and lessons about humanity, compassion and the importance of laughter. What he’s arguably most known for, however, is his hit sitcom, The Cosby Show, on which he starred as the wise and lovable father of four, Dr. Heathcliff Huxtable. The show not only helped revive the family sitcom genre but also managed to save the thendwindling NBC Studios. From 1984 through 1992, the show earned Cosby 15 People’s Choice Awards for eight consecutive years. Cosby has also starred in several films and has sold numerous best-selling books.

SEE EXTRA 7

hotnidienews.com

Bill Cosby will perform at Ruby Diamond on Feb. 13.

International dance company to perform for Seven Days

AGATA WLODARCZYK Arts & Life Editor The Brooklyn, N.Y., based Mark Morris Dance Group will be performing at Ruby Diamond Auditorium as part of the annual Seven Days of Opening Nights performing arts festival at Florida State University. Founded in 1980, the group gave their first performance in New York City that year, and by 1988 they were asked to travel to Belgium to serve as the country’s national dance company.

Following a threeyear residence at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, the company returned to the United States in 1991. In 1996 the company began incorporating live music into their performances, working in collaboration with musicians such as Yodancingperfectly.com Yo Ma as well as leading orchestras and op- The Mark Morris Dance Company will perform at Ruby Diamond Auditorium. era companies. For Seven Days of ing four works, Italian mission. Seven Days of Opening Opening Nights, The Concerto, Going Away Form more informa- Nights, visit markmorMark Morris Dance Party, Excursions and tion on the Mark Mor- risdancegroup.org and Group will be perform- Grand Duo with an inter- ris Dance Company and sevendaysfestival.org.

Randy Newman comes to FSU’s premiere auditorium

Staff Writer Everyone’s favorite tight-lipped engineer is back to show us how awesome engineering can be in Dead Space 2, except this time, Isaac Clarke has got a few choice words for those pesky necromorphs. And backing up those words are some new weapons, features and much more in the followup to 2008’s surprising action-horror experience. Dead Space 2 begins three years after the events of the last game, and finds an “insane” Isaac being psychoanalyzed aboard the Sprawl, an enormous space colony located on the Saturnian moon, Titan. Sure enough, the necromorphs have somehow ripped their way into the plot and quickly assert their terrifying dominance over the misfortunate megacity. Whereas Isaac of the original Dead Space was a silent protagonist, this is no longer the case. Normally, activating a oncesilent character’s vocal chords will spell death to a game, but Visceral has managed to avoid this pitfall with flying colors. The protagonist of the first game was arguably the USG Ishimura itself, with the game’s plot revolving around the demise of the ship and its crew. The focus in Dead Space 2 shifts to Isaac, and thanks to fantastic voice acting and well-written dialogue, this shift is a welcome one

PA G E 5

Bill Cosby brings laughs to Ruby Diamond Auditorium

Staff Writer Worlds

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americansongwriter.com

Singer/songwriter Randy Newman comes to FSU.

One of America’s finest singer-songwriters, Randy Newman will visit Florida State University’s Ruby Diamond Auditorium Saturday, Feb. 12 as part of the Seven Days of Opening Nights Festival. Newman is known for blending sharp political satire, heartfelt and often

funny lyrics over piercing piano balladry in many of his popular songs like “Short People.” In addition to releasing numerous albums as a solo recoding artist, Newman has also worked as a pianist, arranger and composer creating scores for various Hollywood blockbusters including James and the Giant Peach, Toy Story and Disney’s recent release, The Princess and the Frog. Throughout his career, Newman has received three Emmys, four Grammy Awards, the Academy Award for best original song for the film Monsters Inc. and has

been nominated for countless others. Following his performance at FSU, Newman will be performing his song “We Belong Together,” from the recent Pixar release Toy Story 3 at the Academy Awards on Feb. 27. An incredible figure in America’s popular music landscape, Newman contributes lasting, cinematic takes on the minutiae of modern life and all its hang-ups. For more information on Randy Newman and Seven Days of Opening Nights, visit randynewman.com and sevendaysfestival.org.

FSU Museum of Fine Arts hosts Jim Roche exhibit

NICKI KARIMIPOUR Assistant Arts & Life Editor For long-time artist Jim Roche, creating art has always been about using multiple mediums. A former Florida State professor for over 40 years, Roche utilizes video, visual, process, photography and performance art—to name a few. His originality and long-standing career will be celebrated as Roche makes his return to FSU at the annual Seven Days of Opening Nights. He is retiring after a multi-

Photo courtesy of the Museum of Fine Arts

The Museum of Fine Arts will feature artist Jim Roche’s exhibition “Jim Roche:Glory Roads.” tude of career accolades, including a photo featured in a 1999 issue of the New York Times, an exhibit at the Whitney Museum in New York City. He has been featured as a visiting artist and given lectures

at 32 institutions in addition to publishing performance works throughout his career. Known for his performance art, Roche has also been shown in New York galleries. He has an affinity for motor-

cycles and draws maps, in detail, of the roads and places he has traveled on his motorcycle. His exhibition is titled “Jim Roche: Glory Roads,” and will be featured at Seven Days of Opening Nights,

accompanied with other works from his career. Jim Roche’s artwork will be featured in a retrospective on Friday, Feb. 11, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the FSU Museum of Fine Arts.


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FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 10, 2011

V-Day DJs return to Tallahassee DJ David Solano and Chuckie to tear up 20/20 on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day GRACE NORBERG Senior Staff Writer For all the single people, or for couples who like to defy the Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day cliche, DJs Chuckie and David Solano will be spinning house and electronic tracks aimed to get you dancing. Chuckie, who is from the small South American country of Suriname, has done remixes with the likes of David Guetta and Lil Jon. DJ David Solano used to be a Tallahassee local DJ before he moved to Miami last year. He recently released two new tracks, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Closureâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Escape,â&#x20AC;? on Robbie Riveraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Juicy Music record label that are on the Beatport charts. He recently spoke to the FSView & Florida Flambeau about how he made it in the music business in Miami, what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been working on lately and what to ex-

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pect at the show. FSView and Florida Flambeau: You used to be a small-town DJ in Tallahassee but you made it big in Miami. How did you make this transition, and how has it been for you in the 305? David Solano: Basically, just working hard in the studio. I think what you do outside of the club shows in the club. So I just really work my a** off in the studio producing music, making more stuff and putting out releases. People want to book you more. FFF: How was it when you first moved to Miami from Tallahassee? DS: It was tough, because everybody in Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot better. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like going from college to professional, you know? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a whole different league, so you have to adjust; you got to understand that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at the bottom and you have to make your way back to the top. FFF: How did you first discover your passion for music, and how has it developed? DS: It started a long time ago. I had a band; I played guitar. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always liked making music. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always been a composer, making guitar riffs, having a band. Then I started into electronic music. I had a video game that I used to make beats. So thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of how it all started. FFF: Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Colombian and moved to South Florida when you were 16. How do you think your heritage has affected your

Photo Courtesy of David Solano

DJ David Solano will spin with DJ Chuckie at 20/20 on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day. music? DS: I think it has in a really good way, because at least down here the Colombian following is pretty big. Obviously, also the influences of Latin music on house is very strong, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m able to incorporate my life influences with the new electro sounds, so I really like it. FFF: You play at a lot of DayGloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for Committee Entertainment, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fun about DJing at DayGlo? DS: The fun thing about DJing at DayGlo is that people go there to lose their minds. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just such a high-energy party that you get to go out and play all your big room tracks. A

lot of times in Miami you have to kind of like drive the night slowly and take it there, but at DayGlo you get to play big room tracks back-to-back. FFF: You made an Australian EP last month while you were on tour there. Can you tell us about it? DS: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three tracks; two of them are collaborations with Willie Morales, whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another big DJ on Juicy, and Tony Puccio, also a big DJ on Juicy. I mean, two tracks are kind of underground, like the Juicy sound, and then the last track is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Talk to Me.â&#x20AC;? I think it will be a hit, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hoping to release it by the summer. I met a Swed-

ish vocalist in Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually worked with big producers over there, and we just got together and made the track and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be incredible. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really vocal, more of a commercial vibe kind of track. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gonna be a huge hit, a smasher for sure. FFF: What else have you been working on lately? DS: I just came back from Vegas; I was in the studio with Starkiller. Starkiller is a really big producer, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been on the scene for a while, has a few hits out, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traveled the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely already in. He invited me to the studio, so I spent

the last couple days in Vegas making some songs with him. That was a great experience. FFF: Will you be playing at Ultra again this year? DS: Yep. FFF: How have your experiences been at Ultra? DS: Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been amazing. Every year it just gets bigger and bigger, you know? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m playing bigger tents; my crowd gets bigger every year. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s definitely been growing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been awesome. FFF: Are you looking forward to being back in Tallahassee? DS: Hell yeah. I definitely miss the place where everything started. People think it came from my family in Colombia, blah blah blah, but it really all started in Tallahassee. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where my DJing career took off. So definitely, going back there and playing with Crespo, ESP, Henderson, all those guys are really good friends. FFF: What can fans look forward to at this Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day show with Chuckie? DS: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to try to play 90 percent of my tracks, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to try to play all my music because thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always wanted to do. All the big DJs can pull off a set playing 90 percent of their music, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hardest thing to do. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really hard to have all these good songs you can play backto-back that you made on your own. I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m getting close to that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to try and do it and see what happens.

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JAMES BLAKE James Blake Universal Republic

HHHHH ERIC SARRANTONIO Staff Writer Not everyone reading this review might know who James Blake is, but given a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time, he will probably be a household name among the likes of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest pop stars. For those in the dark now, Blake is the British electronic music composer and producer who has made his name with a signature â&#x20AC;&#x153;empty spaceâ&#x20AC;? sound. That is to say, sometimes the lack of sound is just as important as the presence of sound in any one of his songs. Now on his fifth release since his debut single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Air & Lack Thereof,â&#x20AC;? Blake has proved to be creative with a distinctive sound on each separate release. The sound of his self-

titled album can be best defined as a deconstructed and somber pop. Unlike previous releases, Blake employs his own vocals and lyrics on every song (with the exception of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Limit to Your Love,â&#x20AC;? a cover of the original by songstress Feist), and it is an entirely welcome addition to his music. His singing is contemplative, sorrowful, soulful, longing and beautiful all within the span of a few songs. The vocals have been compared to R. Kelly, the music to Bon Iver and the genre has been uncreatively dubbed postdubstep. But regardless of all this comparative talk, Blake is creating his own style of musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one where he seeks only to please himself, but by a happy coincidence, appeals to many others. The albumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Limit to Your Love,â&#x20AC;? has become an underground hit in England, played nearly every hour on the popular BBC Radio 2. The song has probably become so popular

because it is the most straightforward of the set, but that is not to say it is comparable to a Katy Perry song or has any chance to be a No. 1 single; it is still inaccessible to many. It is strange that Blake would cover another artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s song when he is bursting with originality, but he wants to show listeners his take on the normal conventions of popular music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wilhelm Screamâ&#x20AC;? repeats the same morose lyrics (a tradition held throughout the album) while the music steadily builds to an intense climax that breaks off at the end for one last refrain. Inspiration here comes from two unlikely places, the Wilhelm screamâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; a sound-design in-joke among filmmakersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and video game music. The dreamy synth part that plays through most of the song is reminiscent of MIDI video game music, hinting at the extent to which Blakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical understanding encompasses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lindisfarne Iâ&#x20AC;? and its accompanying â&#x20AC;&#x153;IIâ&#x20AC;? is Blakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best use of empty space

to date. It feels like the song was constructed rather than composed, a technique not so equitable to â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Never Learnt to Share,â&#x20AC;? which sounds more like the product of full group of musicians. Both songs comment on the future of guitar musicâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Never Learnt to Shareâ&#x20AC;? has an overwhelming synth solo at the end that makes guitar solos seem unnecessary and antiquated, and the simple guitar part sampled in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lindisfarne IIâ&#x20AC;? promises the guitar a small role in the electronic music to come. As this generationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s style of popular music is on the decline, a new style must take its place. Blakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music may be too strange to ever see the high sales of popular music, but it is his level of originality and disinterest in what the studios or the people want to hear that will affect the interest of listeners to move in a new direction and inspire a whole new brand of musicians to bring art back to pop.

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Taco Bell has a ‘beef’ with beef Fast food giant wants you to think outside the bun—for good reasons ERIC JAFFE Staff writer The greasy white paper bag hits the counter with a crunch. You swipe your credit card and take a seat. The scent of a delicious meal fills your nostrils and you begin to salivate. This is the meal that you have been waiting for all day. You know that you are going to love it— you always do. What you do not know, however, is what exactly you are eating. For years, Taco Bell has asked customers to “think outside the bun,” but only

recently are we starting to understand why. On Jan. 19, a class-action lawsuit was filed against the fastfood giant claiming that the company’s taco filler doesn’t “meat” federal standards. In other words, Taco Bell wants you to think outside the bun is because, if you knew what was inside, you probably wouldn’t be eating it. According to attorney Dee Miles, Taco Bell’s beef filling contains just 35 percent beef, with the remaining 65 percent containing water, wheat oats, soy lecithin, anti-dusting agent and modified cornstarch.

Taco Bell President Greg Creed responded to Miles’ claims as being “bogus and filled with completely inaccurate facts.” At this point, only two things are certain: America and Taco Bell have “beef,” and this case is a goldmine of puns and double entendres. Knowing what you eat is the key to living a long, healthy life. If you can help it, nothing should be eaten without a quick reading of nutritional facts. Even items labeled as “natural” are to be eaten with a healthy skepticism. Taco Bell is just the latest res-

taurant to be accused of false advertising; it’s not the first and it certainly won’t be the last. Telling college students that their health is important is like telling a threeyear old that they shouldn’t eat their boogers; you can say it as many times as you would like, but few, if any, are going to listen. Most students will probably read that last paragraph and think, “Whateva. I do what I want,” and that’s a problem. Obesity and nutritionally linked disease have been increasing in the United States for years.

learn your Basal Metabolic Rate, determine how many calories you should be consuming daily and work your way toward a healthier lifestyle. The Leech Center is open at various hours and offers free one-on-one workout programs designed to meet your personal fitness needs. Restaurants may try to deceive us, but a nutritionally educated and physically active public can overcome the lies of others and live long, happy lives. If you won’t eat healthier for yourself, then do it for the team.

According to studies conducted in 2008 by the Department of Health and Human Services, 27.1 percent of Leon County’s adult population is obese and at risk of heart disease. In comparison, Alachua County, home of the Florida Gators, has a rate of 25.9 percent. The Florida State Seminoles, for the first time in seven years, have defeated the Gators in football and become state champions. Now, it is time that we claim a second title: healthiest campus in Florida. Hit the Web, calculate your BMI ratings,

New Facebook app delivers random video chats Random Rounds allows Facebook users to meet new people face-to-face RYAN RABAC Staff Writer On Feb. 1, the Facebook application Video Chat Rounds launched a new Random Rounds feature that allows users to meet up via video with others on the Internet. Chatroulette previously caused a storm of media attention when it began in late 2009. Due to its anonymity, the site quickly gave way to obscenity and became the target of jokes and parodies. Random Rounds tries to solve that problem by holding users accountable. Users are always given the name and profile of their partner, and users are matched based on their age group. Those who use Video Rounds must also have at least 100 friends. Random Rounds livens

up random chatting by providing likes and interests to each user as icebreakers. There are also over 20 games and activities the two users can play together. This way, users can really get to know something about each other and be actively engaged in something together. Video Chat Rounds already provides a platform for two friends to watch a YouTube video together, look at photo albums, or draw a picture together. They are trying to bridge the gap between real life hanging out and hanging out on the web. While the prospect of artificial socializing replacing real life is somewhat scary, it’s a good idea when two people are two far from each other to meet up. A family could sit across

from grandma and show their vacation pictures, or two business colleagues could discuss a video or some online content. Calling themselves

play styles. (I found myself partial to shredding limbs at close range with the ripper blade.) Another gameplay tweak occurs in zero-gravity areas, where Isaac can now float freely in space, as opposed to jumping from surface to surface as before, which, as one could imagine, is incredibly awesome. There are also areas where glass walls can be destroyed, causing a vacuum to suck everything, including necromorphs and Isaac, into space unless the player can shoot down a shutter in time (why they put easily destroyed glass windows on a space station is beyond me). The necromorphs boast more varied recruits this time around as well. These include the childlike Pack, who, as their name implies, display their strength in numbers; suicide-bombing babies known as Crawlers; and perhaps the most terrifying of all, the Stalker, a

beaked necromorph who will engage in hide-n-seek tactics before sprinting viciously at you. While the enemy variety has increased, one thing lacking from this game is the giant, epic boss battles from the first, which have unfortunately been replaced by instances where hordes of necromorphs attack you. Dead Space 2 now features online multiplayer that, while decent, doesn’t quite measure up to the fantastic single player experience. The game pits a team of humans against a team of necromorphs (as seen in Left 4 Dead), and focuses on using teamwork to either complete a series of objectives or prevent their completion, respectively. The humans control almost exactly as Isaac did in the single player campaign, which works surprisingly well in an online environment. Playing as the necromorph has its moments of fun, though sometimes the ex-

Photo Courtesy of Video Chat Rounds

New application lets users draw together via Facebook. “the ultimate interactive playground,” the makers of Video Chat Rounds already boast a 300,000 monthly user quota. Users have also taken over two

million snapshots on the platform. They are hoping this new feature will boost those figures even more. Facebook users who want to check out the

new feature can search for “Video Chat Rounds” and install the application. If they’re lucky, maybe they’ll meet someone new.

that I rarely used, and rarely dropped ammo for weapons I used frequently. Almost everything in Dead Space 2 is an improvement from the original. There is more level variety aboard the massive Sprawl, such as an epic train ride, and segments out in open space. There’s

fantastic replay value, with new game + and hardcore mode, which only allows for three saves, though the reward is well worth it (pew pew). The game is even more terrifying than before, thanks to more brutal enemies and the anxiety caused by knowing that literally nowhere is safe.

EXTRA from 5 as you see Isaac develop into an interesting, threedimensional character. If for some reason you hated the original Dead Space (which, unless you’re a mom, I can’t possibly understand why), Dead Space 2 won’t do anything to change your mind. The general gameplay has remained more or less intact, and veterans will feel instantly at home. Having said that, Isaac now has access to some fun new tools to help him engineer the limbs off his opponents. New weapons include a proximity mine launcher, sniper rifle and a javelin gun that shoots spears at necromorphs, which can then be charged with electricity, killing any enemies nearby. Along with this, Isaac can now use Kinesis to grab dismembered limbs in order to launch them at enemies, impaling them. All of these different weapons and tactics now accommodate a wide variety of

perience degenerates into making kamikaze runs into the chaotic fray and spamming scratches until something dies (most likely the necromorph) or blows up. Furthermore, the tense, terrifying experience inherent in the single player mode is completely lost in translation, which is disappointing, considering it’s one of the game’s finer points. There are very few glitches in Dead Space 2; Visceral did a great job of quality control. What’s more is that the few times the game did glitch, it actually led to fun or beneficial results. One glitch teleported me outside of the Sprawl and had me walking around aimlessly in space at my own leisure. Another allowed me to obtain unlimited power nodes. The only negative glitch encountered was the disproportionate ammo drops in the game, wherein the game kept providing ammo for weapons

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ARTS&LIFE

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Online Photo Gallery Visit fsunews.com for more from Tuesday’s Celtic Woman concert. Joseph La Belle/FSView

(Left) Celtic Woman violinist Mairead Nesbitt performs at the Leon County Civic Center on Feb. 8. (Bottom Left) Celtic Woman Lisa Lambe sings for the crowd at the Civic Center on Tuesday night. (Bottom Right) Lisa Kelly, one member of Celtic Woman, takes the stage on Tuesday, Feb. 8.

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Long days and Sheesha Nights Campus cafĂŠ aims to please and shake off the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hookah stigmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Melina Vastola/FSView

Sheesha Nights Cafe offers snacks and drinks in addition to hooka.

RYAN RABAC Staff Writer Sheesha Nights on West Jefferson Street, which opened last September, serves a number of unique snacks, drinks and desserts; however, due to their other specialty, hookah, the business is often mistaken as â&#x20AC;&#x153;just another hookah bar.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The general feedback has been good with the people we talk to,â&#x20AC;? Manager Quinton Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People often come in and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is a whole lot nicer than I thought it would be.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Everyone walks by the windows and the doors, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really know who we are, which is why we put a sign up to tell people that we have more stuff in here than just hookah and it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really our main focus.â&#x20AC;? When customers read the name on the sign, they may write Sheesha Nights off without checking out everything they have to offer. However, employees pride themselves in attempting to run a true cafĂŠ. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one thinks of cafĂŠs as cafĂŠs anymore,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, huge restaurant chains refer to themselves as cafĂŠs. The art of being an actual cafĂŠ has, to a certain extent, been lost and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to bring that back. I consider us a cafĂŠ because the things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had to learn being here were not about sheesha. The rest of the stuff, like making coffees and deserts correctly, is what we focus on.â&#x20AC;? Another big difference with Sheesha Nights is that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s locally owned and operated. Its proprietor has been in the Tallahassee area for over 15 years, running several successful businesses. The story gets more personal for Brown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He picked me up when I was sort of floating around,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I attended Florida A&M University but it really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for me. Five years ago, I walked in the door and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been with him ever since.â&#x20AC;? Sheesha Nights offers convenient options for students on-the-go. Everything on the menu can be prepared to-go and shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take more

than two to three minutes if they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t busy. It also makes for an alternative place to study with free Wi-Fi, and there are power outlets at every booth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we put the music on, we try to keep a more tranquil atmosphere,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want them to come in, feel comfortable and be able to focus.â&#x20AC;? Brownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal favorite is the Lemon Ginseng Tea. He finds it a better alternative to energy drinks, and it that tastes good too. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With its proximity to Southgate and the dorms over here, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good

breakfast place on the way to class,â&#x20AC;? regular customer Mike Hillard said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open really late at night, so you can come in and grab some tea. They also have the best falafels.â&#x20AC;? Brown also recommended some other unique items to try. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have Whips, which are a heavy whipping cream mixed with a flavor,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These could be chocolate, white chocolate, mocha or vanilla. They are really thick, sweet and savory. We also have granitas, another sweet treat based on shaved ice. The friction between the ice causes

Melina Vastola/FSView

A belly dancer stops by Sheesha Nights Cafe for during an event. part of it to melt, causing the sugar to stick together. We also have a Cinnamon Sip, a cream base with a bang of cinnamon and other ingredients to thicken it up and make it nice. Everyone who tries it really likes it.â&#x20AC;? The most adventurous of customers may want to try a Saplab, a traditional Arabic drink that is similar

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to oatmeal, with coconut rather than oats. The cafĂŠ is planning on a Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day event this month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have a special for couples and for singles, so if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have anybody [to go with], donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We strive to have at least one big event per month. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying to sup-

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port the local music scene, especially people at the school of music.â&#x20AC;? Sunday nights at Sheesha are Open Mic nights, where all are welcomed to come up on stage and perform. Visit Sheesha Nights at 701 West Jefferson Street and for more information visit sheeshanightscafe. com.

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ARTS&LIFE

FEBRUARY 10, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What do you want for dinner?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Five restaurants perfect for you and your sweetie on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day ERIC JAFFE Staff Writer So you secured yourself a date for Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day and now you are looking for a place to eat. Picking a restaurant is never an easy task. Everyone has experienced that â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, where do you want to go?â&#x20AC;? conversation at least once, but on Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, the task becomes particularly daunting. For many couples, Vday will set the bar for what is to be expected in the future. Obviously, the quality of the food is a huge factor when making this potentially life-changing decision (who knows? She could be your future wife), but, for many, the price is just as important. The following restaurants have developed a reputation for their reasonable prices and datefriendly environments.

than Tedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Praised for itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delicious food and romantic environment, the restaurant is offering a â&#x20AC;&#x153;special surpriseâ&#x20AC;? for the holiday. The prices can get a little bit steep on some items, but affordable options are abound.

brings couples together over a common interest: questioning why the rest of the world wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t treat their bodies as well as they do. The restaurant is a bit on the far side, but if you can make the trip, its reputation is stellar.

The Melting Pot: A popular chain that can be found in most of the United States, The Melting Pot may not be an exotic choice, but it is certainly an enjoyable one. Fondue is an interactive and fun experience (provides shyer dates with topics for conversation) and the food at The Melting Pot is always delicious. The restaurant opens at 5 p.m. so dinner dates are welcome. Clusters & Hops: A bit pricier than the last two options, Clusters & Hops makes the list because of its convenient location (just five minutes off of campus), great food, and cozy environment. The wine selection is particularly well received

Tedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Montana Grill: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the closest option to campus, but for students with cars, it is hard to do much better

so, for those of us over 21 years of age, there is quite a bit to enjoy. Outdoor dining is also available.

La Provence: For students who care about their health (Nutritional Science students dating inter-major perhaps), A La Provence

offers a great selection of vegan and/or glutenfree options that are just as good for you as they taste. The restaurant also

Chiliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: In 2009, Chiliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experienced their biggest national sales day ever under Cupidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s arrow. Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day also is typically the highest annual sales day for the Chiliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s To Go service. Why this happens, I cannot say for sure. The good news is that FSU students happen to have a Chiliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right on campus. For those couples that do not have a means of transportation or just want to stay near the dorms (get your mind out of the gutter; he might have homework to do), Chiliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is an affordable and convenient option. Just make sure you get your name in early. If history is any indication, the place might get busy.

receive two major plots points. The first explains why the deaths of two of the seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; main characters were necessary, while the second adds another notch to Aquamanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beleaguered history. With only five issues left until the series finishes, now would be a good time to jump into the series. The writing is generally stronger than it was near the beginning of the 24-issue run. The storylines are coming together, and established characters

are being put through the ringer. If anything, the first several pages of this issue will act as explanation for readers who dropped the run before it hit its stride. Whether everyone will like the explanation is another matter.

an occult lawman, comes across an Old West town with Satanic leanings. This is well and good if presented in a manner than didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drag to the point of boredom. That is to say, it takes a special type of banal writing to make a showdown so boring. The first issue in a five-part limited series, Witchfinder shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be making it into many peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pull list. The art is top-notch, however, and the story is so filled with western conventions that many could

simply skip large sections. Worst still, the panel-tostory ratio is far too high, an indication that the issue is being stretched to fill a page count. This is the equivalent of pulp writers painfully describing every object in a room because they were paid by the word. No one is fooled by thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not neophyte comic readers, and especially not longtime fans of the medium. Readers could do worse, but thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a compliment.

COMICS from 5 have some problems but are generally entertaining. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re feeling generous, pick it up.

quite have control of her planet-destroying powers. The story is comedic in the sense that Tanga is talkative, humorous, andâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to Maguireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creditâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;likable. A complaint that can be lodged is that the story hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really picked up. Some readers who are put off by action will have to wonder why Tanga is wandering space. A little more taste of the characterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s background would be nice. In short, this has a sizable chunk of bad storytelling, and two short stories that

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How many times has DC Comics screwed with Aquaman? Among the publisherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stable of characters, Aquaman has been mangled, killed, retconned and mangled again an absurd amount of times. In the latest issue of Brightest Day, readers

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Dark Horse Comicsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Hellboy tie-in, Witchfinder, doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break new ground. The premise is that Sir Edward Grey, basically

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CLASS OF CONFERENCE T he F l o r i da S t a t e wo m e n’s ba ske t ba l l t e a m l o o k s t o re m a i n i n A C C c o nt e nt i o n a ga i nst GT PAGE 13 FSView & Florida Flambeau

FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Surviving until September

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 2

’Noles eye rebound against GT

NICK SELLERS Assistant Sports Editor Now that the Super Bowl champion Green Bay Packers have made their requisite post-victory trip to Disney World and the empty beer cans have been cleared from Lambeau Field after the ensuing victory rally and “Let’s do it again next year” speech, football fans will have to wait long and hard for a meaningful football game. In previous decades, this would be a problem, but now that football is a booming business in the NFL and a borderline religion in college, fillers and substitutes have sprouted up all over the place to help football fans endure the long months until September. So don’t fret football fans, there are plenty of ways to get your football fix until September. First and foremost, invest in a next-generation video game console (and I do not mean the Nintendo Wii, which has proven itself to be a glorified Playstation 2, but that is neither here nor there) and pick up a copy of NCAA Football ’11 for either the Xbox 360 or the Playstation 3. Although Madden is also floating around out there, NCAA Football offers a deeper experience more tailored to the college fan. NCAA Football ’11 was released in July of last year. The game offers four different game modes that should keep you occupied either until you spend the coin on the new rendition that drops in July 2011, or at least until the real deal finally rolls around again. NCAA Football ’11 has a solid online mode and an exhibition mode that includes “Mascot Mashup,” where the players square off as a whole team of mascots from different schools. It doesn’t get much more entertaining than watching the Oregon Duck waddling down the sideline for an 85-yard touchdown reception. The game even offers a “One-button mode” that allows those with less experience on the sticks to get in on the action. But where you’ll want to spend most of your time is either in the “Road to Glory” mode or the “Dynasty” mode. In Road to Glory, you build your player then compete in your high school team’s state playoffs. Based on your performance in those games, you receive scholarship offers from different FBS schools, and begin your career from there, complete with practice to move up the depth chart, hitting the library (don’t worry, you don’t actually have to study), and commentary on your performance by none other than Erin Andrews. The Dynasty mode is pretty deep too, allowing you to take over at the school of your choice and command the program as you see fit, changing schedules and landing recruits in a revamped recruiting system. The degree of difficulty and time of play here is SEE SEPTEMBER 14

Joseph La Belle/FSView

The Florida State Seminoles will look to rebound from their loss to North Carolina on Sunday when they take on the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets on Thursday at 7 p.m. For complete coverage of the game, including a game recap, check out fsunews.com.

Softball ready for upcoming season No. 23 FSU gears up for challenging schedule in 2011 SCOTT CRUMBLY Staff Writer With their season opener now just around the corner, the Florida State softball team is ready to kick off the 2011 season with visions of returning to the NCAA tournament for a school-record 12th consecutive year. The Seminoles enter the year with high expectations and are expected to compete with the best in the country this season. After finishing 2010 with a 44-19 record, the ’Noles enter 2011 as the 23rdranked team in America in the ESPN/USA Today Preseason Poll. As a result, expectations are high yet again in Tallahassee. “Preseason rankings are always fun to see where your colleagues rank you among the nation’s best,”

FSU head coach Lonni Alameda said. “However, it is not where you start but where you finish.” The road back to the NCAA tournament will not be an easy one for the Seminoles. The ’Noles face a potentially grueling schedule that includes four opponents who finished the 2010 season ranked in the top-25 in Brigham Young, Florida, North Carolina and Georgia Tech, the team that defeated FSU in the Atlantic Coast Conference Championship game. In addition to those guaranteed matchups, the Seminoles could face as many as eight extra opponents that appeared in the postseason last year if all of their tournaments play out as expected. Alameda is entering her third season as Florida State’s head coach and is still in search of her first

Reid Compton/FSView

Head coach Lonnie Alameda and the Seminoles will look to ride a top 25 preseason ranking and their experience to a successful season in 2011. ACC crown. Alameda came close last season, losing in the ACC title game 8-4 at the hands of the Yellow Jackets after finishing the regular season third in the conference. The ’Noles have been picked to finish second in the conference in this year’s preseason predictions, and

will look to improve on their 12-9 conference record from a year ago on their way to proving the voters wrong. “We are very excited for the ACC to get its season going and to see what we have to offer as a conference,” Alameda said. “I think it is going to be a very competitive year and we look for-

ward to the challenge.” One thing that the Seminoles will certainly have going for them this year is experience. Florida State returns seven starters, four pitchers and 13 overall letter-winners from last season. SEE BATTLE 13

Another tall order awaits Seminoles Men’s tennis looks to avenge loss to Florida in matchup with No. 10 Texas HARRIS NEWMAN Contributing Writer

Reid Compton/FSView

Blake Davis and the Seminoles face a tall order when they take on another top-tier team in the Texas Longhorns on Saturday.

After a heartbreaking loss to No. 9 Florida that lasted over four hours, the schedule for the FSU men’s tennis team doesn’t lighten in the least bit. Next up are the undefeated Texas Longhorns, who come in this Saturday as the sixth-ranked team in the nation. Of the Seminoles’ last five opponents, the Longhorns, will be the fourth team ranked in the top 10. Texas (6-0) is coming off a momentous 4-3 win against 10th-ranked Texas A&M. Four singles starters are from last year’s Longhorn team, which won both the Big 12 regular season and tournament titles and later reached the round of 16 at the NCAA Championships for a fifth consecutive year.

While the Longhorns boast the No. 5 doubles team of Ed Corrie and Jean Andersen—who lost in the tie-breaking set to A&M’s No. 1 ranked duo of Jeff Dadamo and Austin Krajicek—the Seminoles shouldn’t be too rattled. FSU’s top doubles team of Vahid Mirzadeh and Connor Smith cruised past the Gators’ No. 11 doubles team with an 8-5 victory last Sunday, which increased their doubles record to 9-0. Mirzadeh isn’t the only senior who’s been hot as of late. No. 37 Clint Bowles picked up a huge win over the Gators’ No. 52 Bob van Overbeek. Head coach Dwayne Hultquist remarked that it was the best Bowles played all year. Both Bowles and Mirzadeh have beaten Texas’ Ed Corrie, who was No. 10 when Mirzadeh faced him last, and thus sent him

into the depths of the unranked. Texas’ highest ranked singles player is now No. 78 sophomore Vasko Mladenov, who was the 2010 ITA Texas Region Rookie Player of the Year. Off the court, though, other Seminoles trace their tracks back to Texas. Freshman Blake Davis is the lone Texas native among the FSU squad players. Growing up in Austin, Davis has played against all of Texas’ players before and is familiar with their styles. He was heavily recruited by Texas before deciding to play at Florida State. “I’d say I’m a Texan, but there’s no doubt I’m a true Seminole,” Davis said. “Florida State’s the school I belong to and I take great pride in that. SEE TENNIS 13


SPORTS

FEBRUARY 10, 2011 | FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU

PAGE

Keeping pace in the tough ACC

TENNIS from 12 “That Texas pride’s hard to let go easily, but I’m more than excited to face them this weekend.” Before his hire at Florida State, coach Hultquist was the assistant coach for Texas’ men’s tennis team for eight years, where his resume was almost as impressive as his current one with the Seminoles. Serving under legendary tennis coach Dave Snyder, Hultquist coached nine All-Americans, helped the Longhorns win six conference titles, and made it to the NCAA tournament Sweet 16 in each of his eight seasons. Coach Hultquist relishes his ties with Texas, but sees it a bit less personally than Davis. “I like having them on the schedule,” Hultquist said. “They’re a good team and they play hard. You remember your times there, but still, in the grand scheme of things, every big match is equally important.” “We feel under-ranked as it is,” Hultquist added. “We were a match away from being [ranked] 12 or 13 in the country, but that’s just something else we’re eager to prove about ourselves.” FSU faces Texas at 11 a.m. this Saturday at the Scott Speicher Tennis Center. Admission is free.

’Noles turn attention to Georgia Tech ERIC ZERKEL

dropping an overtime thriller to 20th-ranked Miami and a three-point loss to No. 10 Maryland. The Seminoles (19-5, 7-2) sit third place in the ACC standings, and still hold onto a sliver of hope in overtaking Duke atop the conference leaderboard. In order to do that, they’ll need to find a way to pull out a victory against Tech. Historically, the matchup between the two teams has been close, with Florida State possessing a 1918 advantage in the series. The ’Noles have won four of the last five, including a 69-59 win in the teams’ most recent meeting last February. The Seminoles average nearly 75 points per game—good for the 25thbest in the nation—behind four players averaging double-figure scoring. Cierra Bravard leads the way with an average of 14 points and seven rebounds per game, while a late scoring push in conference play has catapulted senior guard Courtney Ward to second in the team in scoring at 12 points per game.

Alexa Duluzio and Natasha Howard round out Florida State’s top scorers with 11.9 and 11.5 points per game, respectively. While the ’Noles will look to push the pace on the offensive end, the Yellow Jackets are a team predicated upon defense. They rank 17th in scoring defense, holding opponents to just 54.2 points per game. As good as Georgia Tech is on defense, they have had their share of struggles on offense, ranking a lowly 134th nationally in scoring offense at 65.6 points per game. When Tech does put the ball in basket, it’s most often from the hands of either freshman Tyaunna Marshall or senior Alex Montgomery. Marshall and Montgomery are the only two players scoring in double-figures for the Jackets, with averages of 13.8 and 13.6 points per game. The game will tip off at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 11. Florida State is just 2-2 at home during conference play this season, compared to a perfect 5-0 mark on the road.

SPORTSBRIEFS

You’ve got to be willing to fight. You can’t let people take our stuff.” Despite star guard Brandon Knight saddled on the bench for much of the first half due to two early fouls, the Wildcats came out of the gates quickly and opened up a 19-point lead with three minutes remaining in the half. Tennessee had foul troubles of their own, with Scotty Hopson, arguably the team’s best player, also on the bench with two fouls. But Pearl rolled the dice and put Hopson back in for the final minutes of the first half and it paid off, as the Vols closed the half on a 19-2 run to pull within 35-28 at the half. Melvin Goins led Tennessee with 16 points,

Staff Writer A traditional power, the Atlantic Coast Conference continues to prove week in and week out it is one of the deepest conferences in the nation. This season is no different, with the ACC fielding five teams in the top 25, second only to the Big East’s six. Given this, it comes as no surprise that Florida State’s contest with Georgia Tech will be no pushover. The Yellow Jackets (187, 6-3 ACC), sit at the No. 6 spot in the current ACC standings, lingering just outside the top 25. Backto-back losses have sent Georgia Tech spiraling out of the rankings, but they still possess quality wins over eighth-ranked North Carolina and No. 24 Georgia. Friday’s contest with the Seminoles caps off a tough three-game stretch against ranked opponents for the Yellow Jackets. Georgia Tech played valiantly in their first two contests, but came up short in both,

NCAA

Tennessee falls to Kentucky in Pearl’s return After serving an eightgame conference suspension for lying to the NCAA about his program’s recruiting practices, Tennessee head coach Bruce Pearl returned to the sidelines Tuesday night in the Volunteers’ tilt with No. 18 Kentucky. The Wildcats made sure Pearl’s welcome back was a rude one. DeAndre Liggins scored

a career-high 19 points, and Josh Harrellson added 16, as Kentucky (17-6, 5-4 Southeastern Conference) handled Tennessee, 73-61, in Lexington, Ky. The Wildcats entered Tuesday night’s game on the heels of consecutive losses to Mississippi and No. 19 Florida, marking the first time head coach John Calipari had experienced consecutive losses in six years. UK put an end to their skid primarily with their dominance on the glass, as they outrebounded the Vols 3828. “I showed [my team] how to jab,” Calipari said. “You’ve got to be rough.

Joseph La Belle/FSView

In the consistently competitive ACC, Chasity Clayton and FSU have only dropped two conference games.

while Hopson, who missed the previous two games with an ankle injury, had 11.

ACC

Virginia football suspends three players indefinitely Virginia starting linebacker Ausar Walcott, cornerback Devin Wallace and backup center Mike Price have been suspended indefinitely for conduct detrimental to the team, the school announced on Tuesday. “The players know the expectations I have for

13

them as student-athletes both on and off the field, and as representatives of both the football program and the University,” Cavaliers head coach Mike London said. “I am disappointed in the conduct of these individuals and the fact they chose not to represent themselves in the appropriate manner. They will not participate in any team activities while suspended, but they will continue to attend all study halls and to meet their academic requirements.” Walcott, who had moved from safety to linebacker, finished 2010 third on the team with 56 tackles and started 11 of 12 games. Wallace started seven games and had 38 tackles, but played more

because of injuries. Price played in two games. None of them will be able to work out or practice with the team until the suspension is lifted. Virginia has 10 starters back on defense and returns its starting center this upcoming season. Additionally, London and the Cavaliers reeled in a recruiting class that was ranked by many outlets as a top-25 class. The most likely candidate to replace Walcott while during his time away from the team, and perhaps for the entire season, will come from this recruiting class, given Walcott’s backup, Jared Detrick, has graduated. Fighting for that spot will SEE SPORTS BREIFS 14

Wake baseball coach donates kidney to player dan is expected to be sev- ing to want to go do stuff cause blood and protein to FSVIEW AND FLORIDA right away,” Keith Jordan leak into the urine and could months. FLAMBEAU WIRE REPORT eral Walter said it will be two said. “He’s going to have to result in kidney failure.

AP Photo

Tom Walter donated one of his kidneys to a player of his.

Wake Forest baseball coach Tom Walter has donated a kidney to a freshman player who suffers from a disease that can lead to kidney failure. Both Walter and outfielder Kevin Jordan were recovering Tuesday in an Atlanta hospital one day after the transplant was performed. “For us, it’s almost like it’s been divine intervention,” Jordan’s father Keith told The Associated Press in a telephone interview Tuesday from Atlanta. Dr. Kenneth Newell, the lead surgeon on the team that removed Walter’s kidney, said in a statement issued Tuesday by Wake Forest that he expects Walter and Jordan to recover fully. The school says the recovery time for both the 42-year-old Walter and Jor-

months before he is back to normal. Keith Jordan says his son could swing a bat again in 6-8 weeks, and he expects Kevin to enroll in summer school in June and prepare for the fall semester. For now, though, he said the priority for his son is the early stage of recovery, which includes taking short walks in the hospital Tuesday and making sure his incision doesn’t become infected. “I think he’s feeling great, outside of he’s still got a couple of tubes hanging out of him,” Keith Jordan said. Keith Jordan said he isn’t worrying about when his son, a 19th-round draft pick of the New York Yankees last June, may return to the field. “One of the things we do know for Kevin is, he’s go-

take care of himself [....] His intention is to get back on the field, so I’m sure he’s going to do whatever it takes to do that.” Walter said the “best-case scenario is that Kevin and I just lead a normal life” but added that the great story will come when Jordan “makes it back to the playing field.” Jordan had trouble shaking the flu last winter as a high school senior in Columbus, Ga., and lost 20 pounds. Doctors at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta discovered his kidney was functioning at only 15 to 20 percent. He was diagnosed last April with ANCA vasculitis, a type of autoimmune swelling disorder caused by abnormal antibodies. When those abnormalities show up in the kidneys, they can

He wound up on dialysis — three days a week at first, and then daily. Family members were tested to see if any were a possible match for a transplant, and Walter was tested in December after it was determined that his relatives weren’t compatible. Walter found out Jan. 28, during the team’s first practice of the spring semester, that he was a match. He told the team three days later, and said the players greeted the news with “stunned silence followed by a round of applause.” “A lot of things had to come together for it to happen,” Keith Jordan said. “Everybody wants a feelgood story wherever they can get it.”

Ahrberg, who redshirted the 2009 season after a shoulder injury, is returning for her fifth and final season in Tallahassee. She will give the ’Noles a huge boost at the plate, as she looks to build on her impressive .289 batting average, three homers and 33 RBI from last year. With firepower like that returning to the lineup, it is hard to envision anything less than a conference title

run for the ’Noles in 2011. If their potent offense weren’t enough, Florida State will also have senior right-handed pitcher Sarah Hamilton making life difficult for opposing batters. Hamilton was recently named to the Amateur Softball Association’s Top50 preseason watch list for the 2011 USA National Collegiate Player of the Year award, and is expected to be the workhorse for the

’Noles this season on the mound. Another exciting pitching prospect for Florida State comes in the form of redshirt freshman Jessica Nori. A graduate of St. Thomas Aquinas High School in Ft. Lauderdale, Nori is said to be the hardest-throwing pitcher on the Seminoles’ roster. She figures to break into the starting rotation this season after improving her game dramatically over

the course of her redshirt season. FSU will have a total of eight newcomers on the roster this year, which will help add depth to one of the ACC’s best lineups. The ’Noles will open their season with a double-header in front of their home crowd at JoAnne Graf Field on Saturday, Feb. 11. FSU will take on UNC Greensboro at noon EST and will face St. John’s at 2:15 p.m.

—Courtesy of Joedy McCreary, AP Sports Writer

BATTLE from 12 Even more exciting for Florida State is that they return one of the conference’s most explosive offensive lineups. FSU returns eight of their top-nine hitters from a season ago, including outfielder Shayla Jackson (.338 batting average in 2010), infielder Tiffani Brown (.328) and senior shortstop Ashley Stager (.299). The other five returning sluggers include seniors Mallory Borden, Kristie McConn, Robin

Ahrberg, Jen Lapicki and sophomore Morgan Bullock. In 2010, these eight players combined for an astounding percentage of FSU’s offensive output. As a whole, the group accounted for over 50 percent of FSU’s home runs, 65 percent of their runs scored, 61 percent of their runs batted-in, 71 percent of the team’s total hits, and 68 percent of total bases in 2010.

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SPORTS

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 10, 2011

SPORTS BRIEFS from 13 signed 26 players total for his class of 2011. Of those 26 players, 17 are from the state of Virginia, marking the most signees from Virginia in one recruiting class since 1990.

be one of four linebackers in D.J. Hill, Darius Lee, Daquan Romero and David Watford that the Cavaliers signed. Romero and Watford were early enrollees. London has made his presence felt early in his tenure at UVA, as this offseason was just his first full offseason as Virginia’s head coach, and he

FSU

Mirzadeh named

conference CoPlayer of the Week Senior men’s tennis player Vahid Mirzadeh had a big week last week, knocking off the No. 4 singles player in the country and helping defeat the No. 11 doubles team. As a result, Mirzadeh has been rewarded with the At-

lantic Coast Conference Co-Player of the Week award. Mirzadeh shares the honor with Virginia’s Michael Shabaz. “It’s a nice honor to have after this tough week we had,” Mirzadeh said. “I played a good match with Connor [Smith] in doubles and followed it up with a tough match in singles.

Mirzadeh, the No. 42-ranked player in the country, upset fourthranked Alexadre Lacroix of Florida this past Sunday 7-5, 2-6, 6-4. That wouldn’t Mirzadeh’s only win over Lacroix, as the Wellington, Fla., native teamed up with Smith to defeat Lacroix and Nassim Slilam 8-5. “Vahid had a great

weekend beating the No. 4 singles player and No. 11 doubles team,” head coach Dwayne Hultquist said. “He’s just played well all year. He’s shown a lot of leadership and you know he’s going to give it everything he has every day. He’s such a great competitor.” —Compiled by Brett Jula

want to watch an actual game, then don’t put down that remote just yet. Slide on over to ESPN Classic and see if you can catch some of last year’s great games, as the network constantly rotates games through the decades.

Still in a bind? The Arena Football League kicks off on March 11 (if you’re really that desperate) and college spring games start in the early part of April. The Florida State spring game is April 16 at 4 p.m. April also marks the

NFL Draft and the unofficial start of another losing season for the Bills (sorry Buffalo). And if that can’t get you through to at least April, you should be able to find a good therapist before September rolls around.

SEPTEMBER from 12 totally up to you. Bonus points for starting lower on the food chain (we’re looking at you, Eastern Michigan) and the mode can even be taken online to challenge friends and will last as long as you want it to, up to 60 seasons. If the deepest football game in recent memory cannot satisfy your insatiable craving for football, turn your eyes to every

football fan’s portal for pigskin: the television. Specifically, you should be looking for specialty channels such as ESPNU for the college game and the NFL Network for the pros (that is, if there will actually be an NFL season next year). The Internet age has created a culture of I-want-itnow-ism that has allowed channels like ESPNU to get away with 10 hours

of recruiting coverage on National Signing Day. Want to see where your team stacks up for the upcoming season? Reach for the remote. If the snippets of highlights cannot hold you over until September, and you

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‘That’s just, like, your opinion, man ...’ The editorials and cartoons within the FSView & Florida Flambeau are the opinion of the writer or illustrator. Any opinion that appears in the newspaper is exclusively that of the writer or illustrator and may not represent the opinion and policies of this newspaper, its management or its advertisers.

Have something to tell us? FSView & Florida Flambeau

FEBRUARY 10, 2011

How would you react if your government, like Egypt’s, blacked out your Internet?

Survey says ...

“I think it would be pretty bad I don’t think I could do anything personally but get mad.” —Brandon Kron, freshman

To subit a letter to the editor, shoot us a line via e-mail: managing_ editor@fsview.com. Please include full name, year in school, city and state.

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

PA G E 1 5

Benefits gained or freedoms lost? Atop the Hill CHAD SQUITIERI Staff Writer Complacency: this seems to be the problem. Merriam Webster’s Dictionary defines complacency as “self-satisfaction, especially when accompanied by unawareness of actual dangers or deficiencies.” Each new generation of Americans seems to be losing freedoms that were once considered vital and highly protected. The problem is that each new generation becomes complacent with the amount of freedom they have, and they are unaware of the actual dangers that come with loss of those freedoms. This is a problem, and to fix this problem the people of the United States need to first be awoken so that they realize the dangers, and then take the appropriate steps to change this ever-growing problem that is complacency. As an example, consid-

er income tax. When the Constitution was ratified, there was no income tax. Federal income tax didn’t even come about until the start of the Civil War in order to raise money for the Union war effort, and was later declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1895. The fact that federal income tax was declared unconstitutional may come as a shock to many because, in today’s world, paying income tax is acceptable. We have accepted the idea of the government taking a portion of our income to spend as they see fit because that is all we know. However, before the 16th Amendment was added to the Constitution in 1913, income tax was not a part of normal life at all. Now, some may argue that 2011 is a very different time than pre1913, and federal income tax is necessary to pay for things that the country needs. While this is a valid argument, one must also recognize that, with the ad-

dition of income tax, came the loss of a freedom. Think about it: Congress is allowed to decide how much of your income they will collect in the form of an income tax. While one may see this as the government deciding how much of your income to take, another may see it as the government deciding how much of your income they are willing to let you keep. What this implies is that the paycheck that you work all week to earn does not really belong to you, but the government. In today’s world, however, we do not think of income tax as anything but an ordinary part of life, but if we have come to accept what was once declared unconstitutional, what will Americans another hundred years in the future come to accept? Another thought to consider is how we today perceive the Second Amendment, which allows us the right to bear arms, in contrast to how that same right was perceived when it was

written into the Constitution. In the 18th century, when the Second Amendment was written and ratified, muskets and rifles were the machine guns and rocket launchers of the day. Your average citizen was entitled to own the very same type of weapon used by the military, and this was because the Framers of the Constitution wanted Americans to be able to not only defend themselves, but deter undemocratic government. The Framers did not want Americans to start a revolution against the government whenever they were unhappy, and in fact, the Framers specifically stated that should not happen. At the same time, however, the Framers did not want American citizens to be defenseless if government became undemocratic and oppressive. Now take that perspective and compare it to how we have come to perceive the Second Amendment today. Are citizens allowed to own the same type of

weapons that the military uses? Some, correctly, would argue that machine guns and rocket launchers do not need to be in the hands of any street thug who wants one, and the restriction of certain weapons for civilian use is for our own safety, and that is true. The question remains, however: Is that safety equivalent to the amount of freedom lost to provide that safety? The mandate in the health care bill passed last year requires all citizens to purchases health care in order to keep the cost down. While this has the benefit of ensuring everyone is provided with affordable health care, it also comes with a loss of freedom. The mandate forces you to purchase something, whether you want it or not. If we have become complacent enough to allow the government the power to force us to purchase something, what will the next generation be complacent enough to allow?

Generation Y: who, when and why sound

“I would feel like they are trying to hide what’s going on—[we] would not be able to say what’s going on in our own communities.” —Amanda Young, freshman

Look at It This Way by Daniel Ackerman

byte CAMERON GAUTHIER Staff Writer

“I would feel our freedom would be suppressed. I would feel like some of my rights where taken advantage of.” —Kambria Sims, freshman

“It’s not going to be convenient; it would be really bad for studying if we cannot get on Blackboard.” —Shun Hirohata, Junior

“I think they would be out of their minds for even attempting to do that.” —Juan Huado, senior —Photos and survey compiled by Joseph La Belle/FSView

The Baby Boom generation roughly includes those born between 1946 and the early 1960s. Generation X has been widely defined to include those born between 1961 and 1981. Generation Y— the generation that my fellow college students and I belong to—spans from 1982 until about 2000. The Baby Boomers were the children of recently returned World War II soldiers. They were the hippies. They were the protesters that led to so much social advancement in their time. They are, for the most part, the parents of Generation Y. Members of Generation X were extremely open-minded in the way of personal indulgences. As they grew up, they witnessed the

end of the Cold War, they witnessed the Challenger explosion and they were alive when AIDS first came to be known. Generation X is now predominantly “in charge” of things. Soon it will be our turn, and I think that is promising. Our generation, Generation Y, is the first generation in which many of its members have not lived in a time with-

Letter to the Editor Can Gov. Scott cut $5 billion off the state budget? Gov. Rick Scott is determined to balance the Florida state budget, and every department should get ready to work harder with less funding. As Florida’s budget this year approaches $70 billion, the cuts will be deep and not pretty. Many of our leaders tell us that there is $3.5 billion shortfall, but the number is probably closer to $5 billion. Whatever the true number, there is a budget crisis, and there is a need for immediate action. Gov. Scott has emphasized that the state government cannot

waste a dollar. Programs are getting ready to be eliminated or reduced, and salaries will be frozen or reduced. “We must bring Florida in line with the private sector and nearly every other state in the country by requiring government workers to contribute towards their own retirement,” Scott said in an announcement. Last week, Scott released his plan to cut cost in the state’s pension plan; all government employees would be obligated to contribute 5 percent of their salary to their pension. This is a no-brainer for our governor, because in the private sector, it is standard practice for most employees to contribute a percentage of their salary to their pension plans. This is a very ambi-

out easy access to technology. Our generation, building off the foundations that the Baby Boomers and Generation X laid for us, is the most progressive yet. The majority of people in our generation support same-sex marriage, women’s rights and abortion, and we are not too ignorant to understand how fighting to keep guns fully legal is fighting to keep city tious plan and it would impact the benefits for over 655,000 current state and local government workers. The governor also plans to cut 5 percent of the government workforce by consolidating state agencies. One of his plans is to reorganize the economic development agencies under a new Department of Commerce. Gov. Scott is also promising cuts in the Medicaid program for the state’s poor and disabled. The governor will need approval from the state legislature and the federal government before making major changes in Medicaid, but he is looking everywhere for savings. He also believes that he can find a saving of a billion dollars over seven years in the Florida prison system. The Florida Department of

streets more dangerous. Our generation has the wonderful fortune to be able to learn from the mistakes of those who came before us without having to commit them again. We don’t want to drive 45 minutes to work and back every day; we want to live in the city. We want mass transit. We want green technology. We want to make sure, when the Corrections is the nation’s third largest prison system, with more than 100,000 intimates in 139 facilities. Eventually, the governor’s cuts would represent more than 40 percent of the agency’s $2.4 billion budget. “For those cost that remain out of line, we will look at all available options, including privatization,” said Scott’s transition spokesman Trey Stapleton. All options are on the table, because Scott believes that the corrections system has a bloated budget. Gov. Scott has maintained that Florida’s per-prisoners cost can be reduced and he wants to work with the Department of Corrections in looking for ways to bring cost down. Calling for billions in spending cuts, the question must be raised: “Are the cuts realistic?” Many

members of the older generations that have worked so hard to destroy the environment for the sake of making an extra penny die, that the earth doesn’t die with them. I look forward to graduating and getting out into the world and working alongside of all of you to continue to help make this world a better place. We are the future. of the legislative leaders are not sure if the cuts will work, and they want the governor to explain how much more he will cut from schools, prisons, roads, courts, environmental programs, libraries, parks and health care. The governor will surely get pushback from police unions, firefighters, teachers, social service workers and health care advocates, but he is going ahead full-speed. Never before has a governor tried to cut $3.5 billion to $5 billion off a budget in one year, and balance the budget. It will take time to monitor and analyze the new budget, once it is presented. Nevertheless, our new governor will be taking big bites, and I hope that he is not biting off more than he can chew. —Roger Caldwell


Study Break FEBRUARY 10, 2011

PAG E 1 7

W W W . F S U N E W S . C O M

Horoscopes

Crossword Puzzle

’Nole Trivia

To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Aries (March 21-April 19)

Today is a 7 -- All work and no play sounds boring. Remember to take time to follow your passions. Better yet, play at work and work at play, for some big game.

This week’s prize is a gift certificate from

Taurus (April 20-May 20)

Today is a 9 -You’re on top of the world, and others want what you have. Stop and think, when necessary. It’s a great time to socialize and to rediscover your artistic expression.

What famous frontman attended FSU in 1962?

Gemini (May 21-June 21)

Today is a 6 -- Don’t take other people’s criticism of your appearance personally. They may have a point. Go ahead and laugh at yourself (or with yourself). It’s good for you.

(850) 561-1605 Just be the first caller between 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. tonight and leave a voicemail with your name, number and answer.

Cancer (June 22-July 22)

Sudoku

Today is a 6 -- If your ideas appear clear in your head, but not necessarily on paper, don’t despair. Take a deep breath and try again. You can express them.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)

Today is an 8 -- The day has ups and downs. It might even get emotional at times. Don’t lose your temper. Focusing on work makes everything easier and gets stuff done. Later it all makes sense.

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All Right Reserved.

Today in History

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Today is a 5 -- It may be difficult to focus on work today, as daydreams about your love life keep distracting. Do something routine, and indulge in some fantasizing.

On Feb. 10, 1949, Arthur Miller’s play “Death of a Salesman” opened at Broadway’s Morosco Theater with Lee J. Cobb as Willy Loman. On this date: In 1763, Britain, Spain and France signed the Treaty of Paris, ending the Seven Years’ War.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Today is a 7 -- It’s a very busy day. You’re extremely sensitive to light and sound (which could be a good thing). Get grounded before making a big decision.

In 1840, Britain’s Queen Victoria married Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. In 1841, Upper Canada and Lower Canada were proclaimed united under an Act of Union passed by the British Parliament.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Today is a 5 -- You’re having a difficult time concentrating at work. A great partnership may result if you don’t over think it. Be willing to laugh at yourself.

In 1942, the former French liner Normandie capsized in New York Harbor a day after it caught fire while being refitted for the U.S. Navy. In 1959, a major tornado tore through the St. Louis, Mo., area, killing 21 people and causing heavy damage.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Today is a 6 -- Distractions get in the way of productivity. You could resist them or let them take you away to a place you’ve never been. What’s the deadline?

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Today is a 6 -- Don’t worry about money out loud. Focus your energy on creative projects that provide instant gratification. You’ll have something to show for your time.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Today is a 6 -- Make improvements at home or at your base of operations earlier in the day. Later, things could get confusing. Think twice before you act today.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)

Today is a 7 -- The day begins with many possibilities for self-expression and communication. You may hit some snags later in the day. It’s nothing you can’t manage. Nancy Black and Stephanie Clement, Tribune Media Services

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In 1962, the Soviet Union exchanged captured American U-2 pilot Francis Gary Powers for Rudolf Abel, a Soviet spy held by the United States. In 1967, the 25th Amendment to the Constitution, dealing with presidential disability and succession, was ratified as Minnesota and Nevada adopted it. In 1968, U.S. figure skater Peggy Fleming won America’s only gold medal of the Winter Olympic Games in Grenoble,

France. In 1981, eight people were killed when a fire set by a busboy broke out at the Las Vegas Hilton hotel-casino. In 2001 playwright Arthur Miller died in Roxbury, Conn., at age 89 on the 56th anniversary of the Broadway opening of his “Death of a Salesman. ”Ten years ago: The space shuttle Atlantis’ astronauts installed the $1.4 billion Destiny laboratory on the international space station. Former New York City Mayor Abraham D. Beame died at age 94. Five years ago: Former federal disaster chief Michael Brown told a Senate committee he had alerted the White House to how bad things were in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and agreed with senators who said he’d been made a scapegoat for government failures. The Winter Olympics opened in Turin, Italy, with cross-country skier and gold medalist Stefania Belmondo lighting the caldron. Dr. Norman Shumway, who’d performed the first successful U.S. heart transplant, died in Palo Alto, Calif., at age 83. One year ago: Shuttle Endeavour arrived at the International Space Station, delivering a new room and observation deck. Former Texas Congressman Charlie Wilson, whose funding of Afghanistan’s resistance to the Soviet Union was chronicled in the movie and book “Charlie Wilson’s War,” died in Dallas at age 76.

Today’s Birthdays Today’s Birthdays: Singer Jimmy Merchant (Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers) is 71. Rock musician Bob Spalding (The Ventures) is 64. Walt Disney Co. president and chief executive Robert Iger is 60. World Golf Hall of Famer Greg Norman is 56. Movie director Alexander Payne is 50. ABC News correspondent George Stephanopoulos is 50. Actress

Laura Dern is 44. Country singer Dude Mowrey is 39. Actress Elizabeth Banks is 37. Pop singer Rosanna Taverez (Eden’s Crush) is 34. Country musician Jeremy Baxter (Carolina Rain) is 31. Rock musician Ben Romans (The Click Five) is 29. Actress Emma Roberts is 20. Actress Makenzie Vega is 17. Actress Chloe Moretz is 14.

Thought for Today “Morality is moral only when it is voluntary.” — Lincoln Steffens (1866-1936).

— The Associated Press


PAGE

18

FSVIEW & FLORIDA FLAMBEAU | FEBRUARY 10, 2011

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