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Fayetteville State University Student Press

The Voice For Students, By Students

www.fsuvoice.com

September 21, 2011 • Vol. 3, Issue no. 3

Republican hopefuls gear up for race

by Matt Campbell Staff Writer

The 2012 presidential campaign field is filling up, and with several debates having been televised, voters nationwide are becoming familiar with the competitors. There are currently 11 registered candidates, with eight of those being considered serious contenders. Other popular conservatives, such as media personality Sarah Palin and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie have been urged to run, but have yet to declare their candidacies. Tim Pawlenty, who recently endorsed Texas Gov. Rick Perry, dropped out of the race last month. The batch of candidates includes former governors, state legislators, and businessmen. Michelle Bachmann, Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich, John Huntsman, Gary E. Johnson, Thaddeus McCotter, Ron Paul, Rick Perry, Buddy Roemer, Mitt Romney, and Rick Santorum have been campaigning heavily in historical right-wing states. The crop of eight hopefuls represents a broad political spectrum. On one end stands U.S. Rep. Ron Paul of Texas, who, has been, many arugue, largly ignored by the mainstream media. Last month on The Daily Show, Jon Stewart did a segment recognizing Mr. Paul’s absence from the press. Others have referred to his possible appeal to independents and even some liberals as the partisan media’s disinterest in him. “Unlike Obama, Ron Paul will tell the truth about foreign policy. He’ll talk right to conservatives who have basically allowed their movement to degenerate into just, jingoistic USA, USA, anti-intellectual nonsense,” said bestselling author and senior fellow of Ludwig von Mises Institute Tom Woods, staunch Paul supporter. On the other end of the spectrum stands businessman and former governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney. Although he’s considered one of the front-runners, his campaign has been overshadowed by a law he passed while serving as governor. He implemented a health-care law requiring every citizen in his state to buy health insurance, which he’s come under fire for, because it bears resemblance to President Barack Obama’s health-care law, but is downsized to a state level. His stance of social issues including abortion, have also put him at odds with evangelical conservatives.

Rep. Michelle Bachmann of Minnesota and Gov. Rick Perry of Texas, Tea Party favorites, have had strong leads this summer since the Iowa Straw Poll, in which Ms. Bachmann won. Her tough straight-talk and religious ideologies have earned her fans from the far-right. But, according to some right-wing media pundits, her stock has diminished since Mr. Perry entered the race in August. Though Mr. Perry has attracted many Bachmann supporters, he has also drawn criticism for a book he wrote last year, in which he calls the current social security system a “Ponzi scheme.” Hanging on by threads, Newt Gingrich’s campaign and finance issues have caused his brand to take a hit. The former house speaker’s affair and two divorces haven’t appealed to evangelicals, but he has strong base of Tea Party support, mostly due to his support of far-right fiscal policy. Herman Cain, the only candidate without legislative experience, wasn’t well known among far-right conservatives

and the Tea Party before entering the race. The former chief executive officer of Godfather’s Pizza, “whose conservative fiscal credentials have made him a favorite among some Tea Party backers, has been aggressively crisscrossing the country trying to build name recognition,” according to a New York Times profile, has excited some African-American conservatives. His extremely conservative views on Muslims have somewhat overshadowed his stance on economic policy, though successful businessmen have typically been able to easily garner Republican support. Former Sen. Rick Santorum and former Gov. John Huntsman have also assembled strong conservative bases and media nods. Mr. Santorum, a younger candidate, is popular among young conservatives, but has yet to establish a promising national base, while Mr. Huntsman, a Mormon, may risk being out-shined by his fellow candidates. He is the least popular of the strongest eight, but may have the biggest advantage when it comes to raising funds for his campaign. Although there seems to be a healthy variation of ideas and beliefs between the candidates, it’s still unclear whether or not they can appeal to swing voters and independents, which is key to Republican’s securing a victory next year. According to a recent national poll of Republicans by CNN, Perry is in the lead with 32 percent of conservative support. Romney is in second with 21 percent, and Paul is in third with 13 percent. The Republican primary elections are scheduled from January 31 to June 26 2012, with North Carolina’s being held on May 8. So far, there have been seven debates.

Upcoming Republican Debate When: September 22 Time and Network: 9 p.m. on Fox News Location: Orlando, FL Sponsor: Fox News, Google, and Florida Republican Party Source: www.2012presidentialelectionnews.com

index

USPS May Default page 3

State of Hip-Hop page 8

Movie Review page 11

News page 2-6 Features page 8 Sports page 15


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Puzzleanswers Answer to Sudoko

Answer to Crossword

Voice photo by John Caldwell

Colorful exchange

Dr. Kwami Tuprah (center) associate professor of mathematics and computer science, College of Arts and Sciences, discusses Kente traditions during the “Textile of Unity: Ghanaian Kente” workshop at Rosenthal Gallery on Saturday. The exhibit will be on display through Oct. 16 at Rosenthal Gallery and Seabrook Auditorium.

Answer to Enigma EDITOR’S NOTE: Please take time to explore your Voice today, and then help a fellow FSU friend find their Voice. If you are a commuter, please take your Voice with you out into the surrounding community to share with your family, friends, and neighbors. Help your Voice to

grow by sharing it with any local businesses you frequent. Then let them know how they can help you to strengthen your Voice, while providing them some space so others in the Bronco community can hear their voice. And make sure you honor your Voice by taking a moment to share your voice with your Voice so that we all may hear what you have to say. Your voice does make a difference!

“The same wind snuffs candles yet kindles fires; so, where absence kills a little love, if fans a great one.” Answer to Riddle Lip, Eye, Ear, Arm, Hip, Leg, Toe, Rib, Gum, Gut

LetterTotheEditor Dear Editor, I enjoyed reading your article, “FSU combines events for acclaimed author.” Mr. Robinson’s book, ‘Disintegration’: The Splintering of Black America- is indeed a must read for everyone committed to or at least interested in the well-being of African-Americans, especially those Robinson rightly terms, “The Abandoned.” Your opening quote was well-chosen for how it summarizes and highlights the main thesis of the book, the four Black Americans. Your decision to use the author’s four brief definitions to simultaneously inform and to stimulate our appetites for more from the author is also a good reflection of

your journalistic skills. Equally impressive was your use of relevant quotations from Emily Dickens, the Director of Constituent Relations; Dr. James P. Anderson, the FSU Chancellor; and Ms. Felicia Crittenden, Co-Chair of the Chancellor’s Reading Club. I have no doubt that your article will help bring more students, staff, and faculty to meet Mr. Robinson when he visits for the Fall Convocation, and more importantly, to read his book. I’m not a betting man, but I’m confident that as many as would read the book will come to agree with the Chancellor and yours truly that we chose a great book for this year! My only negative comments are about two minor journalistic sins; a sin of omission and a sin of demotion. Within

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the context of an academic community such as FSU, writers should be careful to identify faculty and staff by their proper titles and ranks. Unfortunately, you omitted my title “Dr.” which precedes my name and “demoted” me from the rank of a (Full) Professor to Associate Professor. But, as a token of my appreciation for your excellent article, I forgive you on both counts.

Dr. Joseph Osei, Professor of Philosophy and Religion. Phil/Government and History

Meet the staff Staff Writers Nathalie Rivera, April Love, Jasmin Sessoms, Matthew Campbell, Erin Lawson, Tiffiney Lee, Mashawn Corbett Staff Photographers: Jennifer Lucas, Jarred Harris, Shakieviea Gilchrist, Jeffery Pearson, Robert Johnson, Antonio Monroe, Rasheed McClain, Leland Walker, Eldon Alfrod Staff Illustrator: Jovian Turnbull Copy Editor: Anna Lee


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September 21, 2011

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The Voice, For Students, By Students

Convocation Commentary Mr. Eugene H. Robinson delivers the convocation address last Thursday. Mr. Robinson explained some of the material covered in his latest book, “Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America.” Voice photo by Jennifer Lucas

U.S. Postal Service closes in on default date by Nathalie Rivera Staff Writer

Recently the United States Postal Service announced they could possibly default on their financial obligations if congress does not act on their behalf by the end of this month. About 4,300 post offices across the country face the possibility of being shut down along with approximately 250,000 jobs hanging in the balance. The USPS must pay $5.5 billion for retirement and health care benefits for future retirees. But with its fiscal year coming to an end on September 30, they will not be able to make this payment, as they have reached their borrowing limit of $15 billion. The USPS is also expected to pay $1.2 billion dollars to the Department of Labor for worker’s compensation, along with its normal

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payroll by October. Despite Congress’ efforts to place a 90-day delay on their payment dates, postmaster general Patrick Donahoe states that the USPS will not have the capacity to pay any of its bills with or without the delay. USPS officials are proposing a bill that will allow them to reform the infrastructure of its service. Mr. Donahoe is proposing that the bill eliminate mail delivery on Saturday, close down 3,700 post offices across the nation, shrink the workforce, and reform their health insurance and retirement benefits. He believes that this reform will save the postal service $20 billion and will allow the postal service to bounce back and adapt to the evergrowing changes of the 21st century. “Given no action we will be out of cash to pay employers and to contractors”, says Mr. Donahoe. He projects that this will occur next

The business model for the U.S. postal service, which worked for a long, long time, is now broken and we got to help the postal service fix it.”

Sen. Joseph Lieberman year in the August and September time frame. The growing popularity of digital mail and online bill pay has lead to the decline of first class mail service. Last year they processed 167 billion pieces of mail, down by 22 percent just five years ago. And they expect it to continue to decline. They will lose $9 billion this year and have assumed revenues will decline all the way to 2020. The two biggest revenue generators for the postal service are standard mail services, which consists of advertisement mail, and the package business that has been greatly supported by the e-commerce trade.

During a hearing held by the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, Sen. Lieberman expressed his concern for the USPS. “Despite its shrinking business, the postal service still remains a powerful force in America’s economy and life.” “The business model for the U.S. postal service, which worked for a long, long time, is now broken and we got to help the postal service fix it,” said Mr. Lieberman. The USPS directly supports a $1.1 trillion industry that employs approximately 8.7 million Americans according to Sen. Collins. “It is a battle,” says Debbie Smith, a postal worker in Fuquay-

Varina, North Carolina, who is fighting along with other local post offices to pass the bill. There are 20 offices in North Carolina that are expected to be closed. Smith says that the USPS is urging them to support their proposal and present it to their local congressman. Post office workers across the nation are expected to participate in a rally on Sept. 27 at their local congressional offices. The U.S. postal service is one of the oldest institutions in America. It was first established in 1775 and Benjamin Franklin was appointed as the first postmaster by congress. “The U.S. Postal Service is not an 18th Century relic. It is a great 21st century national asset. But times are changing rapidly now so too must the Postal Service if it is to survive,” said Mr. Lieberman.


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Fayetteville State University What’s In A Name? by Demetrius Haddock Guest Columnist

Wow, it’s like clockwork. A name change for Fayetteville State University has once again reared its head. Every few years or so, FSU’s “problem-plagued” name is put up for discussion about the “potential benefits.” Well, how would the institution benefit from a name change? It was 2002 when the discussion last seriously circulated publicly. The discussion circled around the alumni, who were not in favor, as having an “emotional decision” to make. Proponents believe that rising above that emotion to have a logical discussion about the benefits is what the university and the surrounding community need. Well, let’s do just that. But first, let’s look

at how another institution’s alumni and students responded to an apparent heavy-handed attempt to change its name. In 1963, North Carolina State College faced a name change debate. Understandably, renaming the college to the University of North Carolina Raleigh was offensive to many alumni and students because it painted the wrong picture. In William Friday: Power, Purpose, and American Higher Education, it is suggested that the mere notion that NC State was in any way “subordinate” to UNC Chapel Hill, its arch-rival, was unacceptable. Thus, “a rebellion occurred in 1963-65” and by 1965 the state had adopted North Carolina State University at Raleigh, rejecting UNCR. An acute observer may recognize that the NC State situation is not necessarily a fair comparison to FSU’s. [NC] State College was upgrading from college to university status at the time, so a name change was inevitable. FSU has had its university status since 1969 when it was designated a regional university along with several other state HBCs and Pembroke State College. Since there is currently no status change per se, why does FSU continually face this name change issue? Consider Pembroke State College which received its university status in 1969. Status notwithstanding, a name change was still considered and in 1996, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke stepped on the scene. When Elizabeth City State University’s name change was on the table in 2008 (UNC at Elizabeth City), it was suggested that they should look at how UNCP benefited from its name change. Chief among the benefits was a striking boost in enrollment. Let’s look. Over the decade following the 1954 Brown Decision, Pembroke experienced a surge in enrollment. However, that enroll-

ment, having been “opened up to all,” was almost all white. Prior to the civil rights desegregation push, Pembroke served the American Indian population and suffered a severe lack of resources. The surge in white population offered significant infrastructure and funding advances – benefit? Similarly, following the ‘96 name change to UNCP, a symbolic new opening occurred and the institution surged in enrollment from approximately 2000 students in the mid-90s to more than 6000 by 2009. According to Stateuniversity.com, the population surrounding Pembroke is approximately 85 percent American Indian, yet the institution’s American Indian population has trended downward from around 25 percent in the mid-90s to less than 18 percent as late as 2009. Meanwhile the white population is nearly 45 percent – benefit? Is this the benefit that FSU can expect? What’s in a name? FSU is already a state university. It is already a constituent of the UNC System. It is the second oldest NC public institution of higher education. Most alumni, faculty, staff and students have an attachment not simply to FSU’s name but to the hard work that many before us (current generation included) have endured to elevate the name. Despite sparse funding, inconsistent infrastructure support, and low public image, FSU has endured and is thriving. To succumb to external (or unappreciative internal) pressure would be a slap in the face to all the work done thus far. Also, note that the individuals who argue for the name change offer little to no insight into what is currently “preventing” the institution from realizing the new potential that only a name change can bring. The name change is supposed to be a shortcut to more

resources. Bronco Pride will not allow for such shortcuts. Besides, will simply changing the name – in hopes of avoiding more work – really produce new opportunities? If so, why are these resources and opportunities not available now with the current name? Is it a name change or an attitude change that is really needed? Name check aside, as all Broncos know, there must always be an “ATTITUDE CHECK!” Unlike NC State’s resistance to a name change, FSU’s resistance carries with it a racial element. So, this is an issue of race in a “post-racial” society – like it or not. When our society was racial, there were “racial factors” contributing to the “messy” condition of Black people. Now Blacks are atop nearly every negative category as it relates to disease, unemployment rates and death (particularly homicide). Claiming to be post-racial does not fix conditions over night. Institutions like FSU play a very particular and important role in cleaning up the mess. We cannot allow for this vision to be blurred. FSU’s role today is as important to a healthy future for us all as it ever was. If there are truly resources available for the institution, invest them now. Valuing FSU – as it is – will be a huge step toward the post-racial claim. This will show that the “black” institution is okay without being “de-stigmatized” of its “inferior” past. That’s the essence of diversity – respect for more than one group’s history and right to self-determination. Hard work is what will make a better name for this institution. If you want to help, roll up your sleeves – for FSU! Mr. Haddock is a FSU alumnus who graduated in 1998 with a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in 1999.

What’sGoingOn? Endowment Lecture Series

What: Lecture on economic policy When: Today, 6 to 7 p.m Where: SBE, rm. 145

Career & Graduate School Fair

What: Employers & grad schools When: Thursday, 1 to 4 p.m. Where: Capel Arena

NAACP Membership Rally

What: Interested in NAACP? When: Thursday, 6 to 8 p.m. Where: SBE, rm. 116 A Girl’s Fight What: Miss Black & Gold Scholarship Pageant When: Oct. 2, 6 p.m. Where: Seabrook Auditorium Ticket Info: cliffordaparker@ yahoo.com

Workplace Rights

What: A forum about workplace rights and seeking unemployment When: Oct. 12, 6 to 7 p.m. Where: Top floor of Cook bldg WIDU Gospel Celebration

What: WIDU hosts their 53rd anniversary Gospel celebration When: Oct 8, 4 p.m. Where: Crown Coliseum

Royal Comedy Tour

What: A night of comedy When: Oct 14, 8 p.m. Where: Crown Coliseum


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September 21, 2011

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FSU name change: deeds not words by John Caldwell Editor-in-Chief

The Voice reported in it’s Aug. 24 edition that a change in the name from Fayetteville State University to UNC at Fayetteville was raised again during the summer at a trustee meeting. Dr. J. Wayne Riggins suggested that he raised the point after having spoken with three FSU students. It was also reported that trustee Ben Brown said students expressed opposition to the name change, adding “it warrants a good open discussion.” I’m not too sure that prolonged discussion of a name change is the best use of the trustee’s, Administration’s, and the UNC system’s time considering all that is occurring now - severe budget cuts, gut wrenching staff upheavals, and an imploding economy. And when considered in the larger socio-cultural context, the implications of the suggested name change present an even greater dilemma. Changing the name of Fayetteville State University is not a problem as long as the new name honors the legacy of this institution. The UNC at Fayetteville moniker does not do that. A name change like this is another step towards making this campus a satellite of UNC at Chapel Hill. Anyone who argues that the legacy of our university will not be impacted is being disingenuous at best. East Carolina, NC State, Winston-Salem, Elizabeth City, Appalachian, NC A&T, NC Central and Western Carolina are also under the UNC System.  Not one of them has adopted UNC as their name on paper or physically on any of their campus buildings.  Why? PRIDE is probably the reason why!  Being proud of who you are.

NC State was called UNC at Raleigh for about two years, but their alumni would not have it. They made sure NC State would be its official name because they have PRIDE in their school’s distinctive history. FSU is the second oldest public institution in NC, second only to UNC at Chapel Hill, and we deserve respect for such an accomplishment.  This move would not be a slap in the face, rather it is worst.  To allow the 2nd oldest university to be absorbed by its larger sister (or brother) by blurring the lines of distinction is a travesty of the highest magnitude.   FSU has a long rich history that is rooted in African-Americans’ coming together to invest time, effort, and money in education. There are few institutions that have survived that still serve the entire community that black people can lay claim to having started. The Fayetteville community has relied on the blood, sweat, and tears of many AfricanAmericans for so many years, and FSU has been an integral part of that past. Honoring that past should not be the sole responsibility of Black people. Any moves to distance the present institution from that legacy, regardless of some supposed minor benefit, is to dishonor that legacy. Imagine FSU being remembered as having been started as a school for Negroes, and then rescued with a name change gimmick. Because some believe it would improve our campus financially, by attracting better students, faculty, and administrators, does FSU require rescuing? Whatever they come up with only reinforces the notion that some are ashamed of the current FSU, and do not believe we can improve on our own merits. We should ask ourselves what is it about

the present day institution that some find unacceptable in their request to change the name. And why are no other groups of people so readily asked to forget the past like African-Americans have been asked to. “Heritage not hate” and “never forget” are words that resound with many in regards to their ancestors. FSU’s mission has been long ago changed to include educating anyone who wanted to attend. Suggesting that we will somehow gain “prestige” with such a move says what exactly about who we really are today? And what about the many efforts that have been underway for some time now to raise the level and quality of education students receive at FSU? One only need review the “FSU’s Strategic Plan 2009-2014” initiative to see a framework around which the entire Bronco community can rally to lead the way into this new millennium. Or spend some time thoroughly reviewing, then supporting through much needed funding, the “FSU Tomorrow: Economic Transformation through Teaching, Research, and Service” to gain insight into the potential that already exists. Take time to maximize efficiently and effectively what we do have. To better allocate those precious resources so that professors can deliver the best services they have capacity to provide will make more “sense” as well as more “cents.” The “Bang for the Buck” principle ought to be the guiding light of the Board of Trustee’s, the Chancellors Office, and the UNC President. Lest we forget, as a public institution, FSU still serves a very unique, somewhat neglected or underserved element of North Carolina. Our mandate concerning who enters this campus may not resemble our “prestigious”

sister campuses, yet that does not mean that the end-product cannot be equal to or exceed the level of output of the other universities. It is only a matter of resolve. Furthermore it is imperative that we redouble our individual and collective efforts to demonstrate a belief in our institution. “Res non Verba.” I believe if you want UNC on your diploma, you should apply to UNC at Chapel Hill. If you’re not accepted or it’s too far away, try UNC at Pembroke. If you desire to say you work at UNC, send in your resume to one of the five satellite campuses or the main one at Chapel Hill.    If you come to FSU, come to make it a stronger, better, greater institution. Don’t come to make it disappear because you don’t “feel” comfortable at a historically black university,” or because you believe it is too black (whatever that means). If you are not happy with anything on campus, work to change it substantially, by raising your voice, not superficially by changing the name to merge with who you want us to be. Strive to make us all we can be by the merits of our institution, not by the coattails of our sister institution.  Make a greater name for ourselves is what I believe the founders of this institution would be telling us today, not to be absorbed into another. We “all” owe that much to the ancestors who came before us, for it is on their backs - dripping with their blood, sweat and tears - that we all can live in true brotherhood. Anything less is total disrespect of our culture and our heritage. And to be sure, honoring one’s heritage should not and is not the exclusive domain of an elite segment(s) of our society.

24 Hour Theater Jovian Turnbull, senior, and Cressdon Avery, sophomore, work on sound effects for the 24 Hour Theater Project on last Saturday.

Voice photo by Rasheed McLain

Voice photo by Antonio Monroe

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Myka Webster, junior, on stage rehearsing for play number 4 at the 24 Hour Theater Project last Saturday.


Homicide 6 The Voice, For Students, By Students

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Leading cause of death among African-American youth

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f the many differences that can be drawn along accepted races, the most alarming for our nation has been the most neglected, and has gone virtually unnoticed and unresolved. The leading cause of death for young white, Hispanic, Asian, and Native Americans males between the ages of 15 and 34 is accidents. The only other group not previously listed— black males—have a significantly different cause of death. The first time I reviewed the National Vital Statistics Report (NVSR) generated by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), I came across some disturbing statistics that etched deep into my consciousness; where it remains today. That day in 2002, I discovered that the leading cause of death for African-American males between the ages of 15 and 34 was homicide. As I began to comb through the numbers, a cold chill ran through my spine. How could such alarming figures not be the focus of our community? I had to lift my jaw off the table as these facts sank in. I still remember the fact that, for a single year, the homicide rate of black males between the ages of 15 and 24, was nearly 50 percent of all the deaths reported. When I compared the figures to other groups—whites, Hispanics, Native Americans and Asians—I found the leading cause of death was accidents. In other words, for every other group of young men in our society, the leading cause of death was something unintentional as opposed to the leading cause afflicting young African-American males being murder, an act that is intentional, therefore preventable. The CDC is a government entity funded by our tax dollars to study, compare, and contrast tremendous amounts of information to determine circumstances and trends that require attention. Anytime a serious outbreak of a disease that was previously not on our national radar comes to light, our society is at least made aware and enormous amounts of resources are devoted to remedy the situation. Almost always, the best minds to confront the challenges are summoned to determine a viable course of action. If we consider the efforts to minimize accidental deaths, we can begin to see the normal approach taken. Again, by definition, accidents happen unintentionally and often by chance. Yet if we take a close look at nearly every facet of life in our nation, vast amounts of resources are expended to analyze and develop solutions to prevent accidents no matter where they occur. From the work place, to travel by car, rail, or air, to our home and in our schools, many people earn a good living examining the accidents that happen in each of these settings and figure out ways to pre-

“Black leaders and individuals are hesitant to endorse any stereotype that feeds into cemented racial perceptions. In our homes, churches, and among ourselves, some of us do talk about the senseless acts of violence. However, publicly we still wear the mask of duality, clinging to the ludicrous notion that we can keep our dirty laundry in the hamper. We will, however, tsk-tsk, moan, and wail about a lost life in front of news cameras and dutifully deliver teddy bears to the porches of murdered children. We perpetuate the myth. If we expose the Founding Fathers’ contribution to America’s creation of the heartless monsters roaming 21st-century concrete jungles, we’re afraid we might be dismissed as radical, paranoid, or “stuck in the past.” What we won’t do is recognize that, collectively, we have the inherent power and responsibility to address black-on-black violence.” “There’s no upside to living in communities where deadly violence rages out of control. We cannot keep burying our young. Our race will never heal as long as we allow or ignore senseless killing and violence. Black-on-black violence must be denormalized-- in real life and pretend life.” - From “Brainwashed: Challenging the Myth of Black Inferiority” by Tom Burrell

vent the last accident from happening again. This is problem solving at its best, deployed in the interest of society, targeting socially threatening conditions, by effectively engaging the human and technological resources to this end. I applaud this type of response, because it only makes sense that we would try to learn from these errors. The point raised here is that the leading cause of death for African-American males is a problem in our society, one that has been quantified by real statistics, and deserves to be receiving just as much attention as our collective national efforts towards accidents. Instead it seems that what occurs in many African-American neighborhoods across our country is considered a by-product of a “sub-culture” riddled with crime and drugs, of which these statistics are a result of. For many, it is outside the mainstream of concern because these young men choose to live a certain lifestyle. Oddly enough, no regards are given to any number of factors which all have converged at this moment in time to produce the current conditions in many African-American communities. This state of disorder plaguing neighborhoods from coast to coast is believed to be of “those peoples” own doing - not even worthy of a national discussion. For an overwhelming portion of our nation, when presented with the statistics, it is seen as something happening to “them.” I believe we will not begin to get at the heart of this matter until we are able to distinguish between symptoms and the disease. We have to identify the problem(s) and not be distracted by the symptoms. We have to have an open dialog to begin to flush out the differences. We must remember all problem solving techniques begin with identifying the problem. That requires an honest look at what is happening; the total picture no matter how uncomfortable. A skilled doctor will take into account all the symptoms to make a diagnosis. She may offer relief of the symptoms, yet it is the disease she goes after to resolve the condition. Only then will she claim her patient to be healed. And just as a doctor wants to know your family history to aid in her diagnosing your condition, we must start with a historical perspective. The impact of unexamined historical factors such as 400 years of slavery, followed by 100 years of Jim Crow, and more importantly the past 40 years of amnesia, denial, and inadequate redress play a role. This aspect of the condition is hard for many people to appreciate or acknowledge. Regardless of the majority view, these factors still have

See, Homicide, page 13


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RESTAURANTREVIEW

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September 21, 2011

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The Voice, For Students, By Students

Restaurant serves up European flavor

by April Love Staff Writer

Every so often when one travels downtown, you’ll see construction on a new building, renovation on an existing one, or maybe a beautification project underway. Of course, all of these things are serving to attract people to a place full of culture and history, while also trying to implement a sense of relevance residents can relate to. Lido’s has accomplished all of those things. The Eastern European restaurant, which opened last year, boasts traditional European and Russian cuisine including goulash and stuffed cabbage. The outside seating that has become popular with other downtown restaurants, especially during warm Southern nights, inspired Lido’s to do the same. The walls are covered in calm, soothing tones of green, but if you listen carefully, you’ll hear upbeat Euro-pop being played, letting you know it’s also a place to have a good time. The seating isn’t overwhelming, indicating a homely,

personal touch to the place, and the quaint bar, with exotic looking bottles of top shelf spirits, says the same. The close proximity of the tables suggests reflects on the interactive European culture. On the other side of the restaurant is a dance floor and stage for nights when patrons want to get up and dance to live music or DJ. Offerings Greek salads, meatballs, different types of schnitzel and Borsch, and a soup served cold or hot made from a base of beets, the dishes are reflective of Eastern European culture. The appetizers are fairly light, while the main dishes are comprised of heavy sauce laden items. The potato soup seemed like a good start (they were out of Borscht, and ever since I watched Tommy Pickles’ grandparents make it on Rugrats I had wanted to try it.) I ordered the smallest portion to ensure I had room for my entrée. The soup was a hearty serving of potatoes and dumplings in what I wouldn’t be considered a broth, but instead, had almost a stew like consistency. Although this wasn’t my idea of what a soup should be, it was delicious nonetheless, full of light, pillowy dumplings and firm potatoes and a hint

of spice that warmed the dish up perfectly. As for my main course, I thought it would be too easy to order stuffed cabbage or goulash, since those are the items many think of being typical Eastern European food; instead I opted for the veal pelmeni. The menu described the dish as two dozen veal stuffed dumplings with sour cream, and although this may sound fairly simple, the taste was anything but. A complicated combination of spices made for tasty veal filling, which was encased in perfectly cooked dumplings and paired with the sour cream. It tasted very much like stroganoff, something that’s not too unfamiliar to the American palette. Overall, my experience at this restaurant was completely enjoyable. Lido’s has the type of atmosphere that someone older can enjoy, but is also very welcoming to a younger, more hip crowd looking to step outside of the box and try something new. I would quickly recommend Lido’s to anyone looking for a quality, inexpensive, international dining experience. Lido’s Restaurant is located at 102 Person St.

December  2011  Graduates Yearbook  Portraits Monday,  October  03 12p   6p     Tuesday  thru  Friday

October  04   October  07 10a   6p Saturday,  October  08 12p   6p Cap  and  gowns  will  be  provided.    There  is  no   sitting  fee  for  the  yearbook  photo.    If  you  wish  to   take    extended/additional  poses,  there  will  be  a   $5  &  $10  fee  payable  at  the  time  of  the  additional   sitting.

7

Location  of  Photos: Jones  Student  Center  Room  229 More  Information  Contact:

Stop  by  room  234  Student  Center  /  call  672.1704  or   email  dmcnair@uncfsu.edu

To  schedule  an  appointment: go  to  wkmphotography.com /    select   YB  only  pose  

Free beneath  Senior  Poster  /  TEC  Network  Page  appear/  click  on  FSU  Yearbook  Photo   October  38,  2011/  click  a  Date  &  Time  /  complete  information  /  submit  confirmed   information   /


8 The Voice, For Students, By Students

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September 21, 2011

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The State of Hip-Hop Dead Art-Form or an Evolving Genre?

kids out here are slinging cocaine, crack and heroin, and shooting at one another. What about the black kid who works at After perusing through reviews from Haagen-Dazs in Brooklyn? He or she is this summer’s hip-hop releases, the fa- not represented. What about the black kid miliar debate has risen yet again: Is hip- who just goes to church with his grandmother on Sunday? I don’t hear their hop dead? That depends on who you ask. Lil story in any of these records! All I hear is Wayne’s Tha Carter IV and the Jay-Z bang, bang, shoot ‘em up.” Perhaps their stories are not being and Kanye West collaboration, Watch the Throne, were this season’s most hyped heard (or played on the radio) because and anticipated albums, yet a significant that’s not what sells. It’s obvious; indusamount of listeners had mixed feelings try insiders know this, but they’re not willing to offer an alternative because after hearing both. It seems many fans, young and old, they know that’s not what’s good for are tired of the irrelevant, uninspired mu- business. In that same Walter sic that passes for hip-hop Dawkins interview, these days. DeAndre BrabCommon chimed in, ham, sophomore, confirms What’s not arguable “When you look at the the sentiment. “Back in the is that the quality of state that (rap) is in, day it was more soul that it’s very corporate and was put into the music, hip-hop during the that’s what takes away more thought. Now it’s all past ten years has a lot of the purity of it. about creating a dance or But I think it’s starting fighting somebody, and it strayed far from its change as people ain’t even about that. It’s roots of the protest to such as myself, The about love and soul.” What’s not arguable is music that came out Roots, Talib Kweli and Mos Def are getthat the quality of hip-hop ting more exposure during the past ten years of New York in the (and) balancing out has strayed far from its mid-1970s. some of the other hiproots of the protest music that came out of New York in the mid- hop that lacks the love for the art and the 1970s. Sure, you can still find socially effort of innovation.” Some will say it’s simply the evoluand politically conscious artists out there, but you have to really look. Industry tion of the genre. But when the genre heavy-weights aren’t banking on most of “evolves” so much that it practically turns into something else, can it still be them. The big names that come to mind dur- called hip-hop? There’s a rock-doc that was just reing discussions on “conscious rap” are Mos Def, Common, Dead Prez, and the leased chronicling the ups and downs of Roots. There are also underground artists alternative hip-hop group, A Tribe Called like Little Brother, who hail from North Quest. Directed by actor Michael Rapaport, the documentary is titled Beats, Carolina’s own Durham. In an interview by Walter Dawkins of Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Davey D’s Hip-Hop Corner, Bill Steph- Called Quest. It details an era when hipney, co-creator of the pioneering Public hop knew authenticity. And for the sake of hip-hop, it’s time Enemy, said, “There is an over-representation of the criminal aspects of black to get back to the Roots (pun intended). youth culture from the videos and the records.” He continued, “Not all black

by Matt Campbell Staff Writer

illustration by Stacey Robinson


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September 21, 2011

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Miss Kappa Alpha Psi Crowned

Camellia Sansberry, sophomore, is comforted by Finale Williams, senior, after being announced the 2011-2012 Miss Kappa Alpha Psi on Sept. 8, at the Seabrook Auditorium. Camellia Sansberry, sophomore, performs during the talent segment of the Miss Kappa Alpha Psi pageant on Sept. 8. Her monologue, about HIV and sex on a college campus, helped her win the crown. Asia Scales, junior, answers a question from fraternity member Brandon Hooker, senior, about Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc during the Miss Kappa Alpha Psi pageant at the Seabrook Auditorium on Sept. 8. Voice photos by Rasheed McLain


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| September 21, 2011

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The Voice, For Students, By Students

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MOVIEREVIEW

She does it, but she bored me... by Nathalie Rivera Staff Writer

If you want to put your seven dollars to good use this weekend, don’t go see “I Don’t Know How She Does It.” The title was enticing, but within the first five minutes I wish I would have minded my business and not cared about “how she does it.” In the film, Sarah Jessica Parker plays Kate, a successful investment broker facing the cliché challenges of juggling the demands of work, life, and motherhood. After a prominent broker in New York City accepts her proposal of a new retirement fund, she is faced with the bigger task of informing her

CROSSWORD

husband that she’ll be away for two months to participate in her new business venture. Throughout the movie she is plagued with the guilt of not being with her kids during their “precious moments” and the possibility of jeopardizing her marriage by spending a substantial amount of time with her attractive male business partner. Unfortunately, that pretty much sums up the entire movie. I hope you didn’t fall asleep while reading that. As for a plot, I don’t recall any climaxing moments due to its monotonous theme throughout the film. It’s very average. Very Sarah Jessica Parkerish. Kate Hudsonish. Jennifer Anistonish. There were lots of exaggerated mishaps

meant to portray the broker mom as clumsy and awkward, while also trying to force the image of looking capable and managing a hectic life. It also drew awareness to the double standard and disparities of men and women in the work place. The movie was filled with tedious moments that were interjected with semi-funny jokes and side-bars that captured messages from the characters’ thoughts. I assume they were supposed to be funny. Fail. Although it wasn’t very exciting to watch, it can still serve as a learning experience to viewers that sympathize with the main character of the movie. If they can stay awake. Rating: 1 star

SUDOKO

Riddlemethis

Can you name ten body parts of three letters each? riddle courtesy of funshun.com

Answers to all puzzles can be found on Page 2.

ENIGMA


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September 21, 2011

Feds sue banks over bad securities by L’Asia Brown Contributing Writer

In a bold move on Sept. 2, the Federal Housing Finance agency filed lawsuits against 17 banks for their alleged practice of fraudulently selling close to $200 billion in securities linked to subprime mortgages. Several of the banks are major American financial institutions, who some economists say were nearly single-handedly responsible 2008’s recession. Bank of America, Merrill Lynch & Co., JPMorgan Chase & Co., and Goldman Sachs & Co., were among the banks listed in the FHFA’s legal filings report. A subprime mortgage is “a type of loan granted to individuals [or couples] with poor credit histories (often below 600), who, as a result of their deficient credit ratings, would not be able to qualify for conventional mortgages,” according to Investopedia.com. These mortgages often have higher interest rates than traditional loans of the same type. And most commonly, they’re adjustable rate mortgages, in which many individuals with poor credit do not understand. Investopedia continues, “Many lenders were more liberal in granting these loans from 2004 to 2006 as a result of lower interest rates and high capital liquidity. Lenders sought additional profits through these higher risk loans, and they charged interest rates above prime in order to compensate for the additional risk they assumed. Consequently, once the rate of subprime mortgage foreclosures skyrocketed, many lenders experienced extreme financial difficulties, and even bankruptcy.” The 17 banks are being accused of participating in this unethical lending practice. A mortgage-backed security is a risky investment in which an investor indirectly purchases “ownership” in a mortgage. “When you invest in a mortgage-backed security you are essentially lending money to a home buyer or business. An MBS is a way for a smaller regional bank to lend mortgages to its customers without having to worry about whether the customers have the assets to cover the loan,” explains Investopedia. In the lawsuit report, the FHFA alleges banks did not disclose decisive information about the mortgages which were linked to the securities

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Students lack sleep

by Erin Lawson Staff Writer and Photographer

Are You Depriving Yourself of Sleep? they sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Uninformed and confident in these purchases, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac purchased these unstable securities; hence, the housing collapse three years ago. An independent firm, Clayton Holdings, who analyzed mortgages for several bank firms, is “near the center of the allegations,” according to a Sept. 2 Huffington Post article. The article continues, “Wall Street banks bought pools of subprime home loans to turn into securities, and submitted a percentage of those loans to Clayton for review. Clayton found that as many as 28 percent of these loans failed to meet basic standards, the company revealed in September of last year.” Investors were made aware of this data. And, “Nearly half the time, banks went ahead and purchased the bad loans anyway, using this information to go back and buy the loans on the cheap, according to Clayton data and testimony from the former executive,” said the Huffington Post article. Fannie Mae, the Federal National Mortgage Association, and Freddie Mac, the Federal Home Mortgage Association, are two privately funded lending agencies that were originally designed to make home ownership easier and more affordable for Americans. Fannie Mae began as a government agency in the 1930s under President Roosevelt’s New Deal. In the late 1960s, President Lydon B. Johnson privatized Fannie to alleviate financial pressure on the government, caused by the Vietnam War. Freddie Mac was created in 1970 to ensure Fannie did monopolize the secondary mortgage market, according to Rob Alford’s “What Are the Origins of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae.” The 17 banks being sued are: Ally Financial, formerly known as GMAC, LLC, Bank of America Corporation, Barclays Bank PLC, Citigroup, Inc., Countrywide Financial Corporation, Credit Suisse Holdings (USA), Inc., Deutsche Bank AG, First Horizon National Corporation, General Electric Company, Goldman Sachs & Co., HSBC North America Holdings, Inc., JPMorgan Chase & Co., Merrill Lynch & Co., Morgan Stanley, Nomura Holding America Inc., The Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC, and Société Générale.

When Jasmine Hammond, a freshman, was asked, “What is sleep deprivation?” Her response was, “When an individual burns out energy, without replenishing it with sleep.” Though most freshmen are often unaware of this common condition, Ms. Hammond was correct. Sleep deprivation is the lack of required of sleep that allows the body to function properly. When it comes to this condition, statistics proves that people, especially college students, are not getting the correct amount of sleep. Sometimes it boils down to whether or not students know how much sleep they really need. Often they don’t know what causes sleep deprivation or what it can lead to. The National Sleep Foundation states that 63 percent of college students don’t get enough sleep. This means more than half of Fayetteville State University’s population may be suffering from the symptoms that come along with this potentially dangerous condition. Sleep deprivation is usually the result of busy schedules and stressful lives. College students, in particular, must balance a heavy workload, a social life, and with the less-than-stellar economy, often a part-time job. Bad time management and too much partying also drains students. And when the student misses sleep, he or she rare makes it up within 24 hours. Say a student gets six hours of sleep during a night out. The next night, the student attempts to cram for a test, getting out four to five hours of sleep. After a while, the student begins pulling several all-nighters, giving him or her little to no sleep. The lack of rest builds exponentially, causing headaches, nausea, weight-gain, and in some instances, feelings of depression. Sleep deprivation is also closely related to low academic performance. A study from the Journal of Adolescent Health

states that about 20 percent of college students pull all-nighters at least once a month. Stress is also a big factor in the lack of sleep among students. Whether it’s about social issues, homesickness, or school work, students are faced with a barrage of responsibilities upon leaving home. Often they don’t know how to handle it properly, and their stress levels skyrocket. And while stress isn’t the only cause of sleep deprivation, the partying and other activities students get involved in play a big role. Sleep deprivation hampers physical and mental health. Sometimes students are able to see the effects of sleep deprivation before feeling them. Their eyelids may appear puffy or they may gain or lose a substantial amount of weigh in little time without major changes to their diets. Georie Briggs, a nurse at FSU, says focus and concentration in class are threatened if students become sleep deprived. The most common symptom of sleep deprivation is fatigue. Fatigue causes behavioral changes, frequent mood swings, and exhaustion. Students also become less alert and irritable. They begin lacking in reasoning and problem solving, and may not want to participate in class discussions or complete their assignments. In addition to possibly causing depression, sleep deprivation can lead to heart disease and high blood pressure. It also affects hormonal levels. Ms. Briggs recommends a healthy diet, exercise, sleep, and good hygiene practices. Students need seven to eight hours of sleep per 12 to 15 hours they are active each day. This helps keep memory and concentration skills sharp. Of course, time management skills are essential if a student wants to ensure they get enough rest. The more prepared and organized a student is, the less stress he or she is likely to run into. It is also best for students to avoid junk food, caffeine, and sugar before bed. Seeking counseling or assistance is highly recommended when students feel as if they’re combating unbearable amounts of stress that are taking tolls on their livelihoods.

let your voice be heard Write a letter to the editor The Voice is only as strong as yours. We encourage participation by seeking and printing letters to the editor. You may write a letter about any topic in the paper, on campus or in your life. Please refrain from personal attacks, instead stick to issues and ideas. Letters should be 300 words or less, signed with your full name and include your phone number for verification. You can submit your letter by email to TheVoice. FSU@gmail.com


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| September 21, 2011

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The Voice, For Students, By Students

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HOMICIDE Continued from page 6

impact. The whole first section of the Kerner Commission report, published in 1968 by our government, makes all the relevant connections. One only need to revisit it to make the connections. We have to look at the full spectrum of human needs expressed thoroughly in Maslow’s Hierarchy, to recognize the many shortcomings that contribute to people not reaching their potential. Basic needs not being met and other conditions that exist that cultivate the type of behavior that leads toward young Black men killing young Black men. Some conditions are blatant factors that have long been known to contribute to the type of “disease” taking place in the African-American communities. But we cannot stop there. We must also

be willing to do self-reflection to understand how we as African-Americans contribute to the current condition. We have to be willing to leave no stones unturned. We must answer difficult questions like what kind of self-hatred are we stewing in that allows for young men to take another’s life, while we go on about our lives oblivious to this carnage unfolding. We must ask ourselves why we chose not to be aware even when the problem is happening right before us. We should want to know if there is anything we can do to impact this before tragedy strikes in our own home, or to someone close to us. We have to take responsibility. Like any adverse condition, this requires that we willingly own the problem so that we can do something about it.

Also it is imperative we do not continue to play the “either/or” game. Rather we must put the “both/and” model on the table. That is we cannot take the approach that the affliction is strictly caused by “either” this “or” that, rather there are times when it is “both” this “and” that causing the pain. This allows for a broader perspective that requires out-the-box thinking. And through this approach we allow for more voices to be heard so that viable alternatives can be derived at for remedy of this epidemic. It is only when we raise the volume to the highest levels possible using our “Sacred Voice,” that we can and will make the needed changes. If we don’t raise the volume, if we chose to remain unaware of the situation, the problem will only worsen.

The CDC publishes these reports for our consumption so that we can use the information to benefit our society. In order to do that, we have to be vigilant in reviewing such reports, and ensure statistics such as homicide being the leading cause of death in a single group of people does not go unnoticed. We have to be innovative in our approach so that we can garner wide support as we call attention to conditions such as this. National attention is the only way we can begin to resolve this most devastating affliction. And we have to be willing to call out those who would rather ignore something they believe does not affect them, so that the full force of our public resources can be aimed at resolution. Contrary to popular belief, we all are our brother’s keeper.

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Campus Life 14 The Voice, For Students, By Students

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September 21, 2011

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Voice photo by Rasheed McLain

Brandon McLendon, freshman, enjoys a game of ping pong in the game room of the Rudolph Jones Student Center last Friday.

Voice photo by Jennifer Lucas

5CTA Volunteers from left Tiffany Bowden, Tiona Pittss, Jarraye Dainiels, and Vasmin Reid serve pizza at the organization fair Sept. 12, in Capel Arena.

Voice photo by Rasheed McLain

Amber Wingo, senior, participates in the “Going Green� project last Friday. The project helps to beautify the campus.


SPORTS The NFL is back from the brink September 21, 2011

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The Voice, For Students, By Students 15

www.fsuvoice.com

by Charnell Harris Features Editor

NFL Sunday Game Schedule

Games Station Roaring crowds and modern-day giants of men Philadelphia vs. New York Giants FOX running at neck- breaking Green Bay vs. Chicago FOX speeds rule the fields once more, as fans filled stadiums Indianapolis vs. Pittsburgh NBC across the United States to Baltimore vs. St. Louis CBS enjoy what is most likely the most watched sport in the Jacksonville vs. Carolina CBS country. After this summer’s frightNew Orleans vs. Houston CBS ening lockout, NFL fans were dazzled by, and perhaps more thankful than ever, for the first weeks off for 108 yards. Helping the Packers win their opening game against the New Orleans of football. Brian Urlacher of the Chicago Bears made Saints. Though the Super Bowl is months away, a great game-changing interception against the Atlanta Falcons, leading the Bears to a teams are preparing for vicious competition, 30-12 victory. New York Jets running back, as is the case for the Philadelphia Eagles. Joe McKnight, in a play rarely seen, blocked Quarterback Michael Vick told the Philadela critical field goal, giving the Jets their first phia Sports Daily that the team is on their Super Bowl run this season. But before they can season win. Week one was definitely the “Week of the start talking about the big finale, they need to Rookies.” The newcomers spent their open- defeat last year’s nemesis, Green Bay, who ing games showing fans and spectators why beat them out of the 2011 playoffs. However, when you’re throwing to one of the fastest they’re here playing with the big boys. Carolina Panther’s new quarterback, Heis- wide receivers, DeSean Jackson, in the NFL, man winner, Cam Newton, started his profes- maybe Mr. Vick knows something the rest of sional career throwing more than 400 yards us do not. Players bargained to have less work-outs in his opening game, setting a new record for rookie quarterbacks. Randall Cobb, a during the off-season in order to prevent the draft pick for Green Bay, returned a kick- likelihood of injuries. Many players opened

Time 1 p.m. 4:15 p.m. 8:20 p.m. 4:05 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:00 p.m. this season with career threatening injuries. A spokesman for the Indianapolis Colts confirmed the likelihood of franchise quarterback, Peyton Manning returning to the field is very slim. Doctors suggest his recovery can take from two to six months, possibly making him inactive until March of 2012. While recovering from a neck surgery, the Colts coaches have been scouting some of the rising and most known college quarterbacks such as Andy Luck from Stanford University. Recent interviews with Colts vice chairman, Bill Polian, confirmed the Colts are indeed interested in getting a new quarterback. “Peyton and I did talk when we did his last contract that the time is approaching to look at new quarterbacks’ and we have to evaluate whether they could be starting quarterbacks for the Indianapolis Colts,” said Mr. Polian

in an article written by the Associated Press. T h i s S u n d a y, f a n s should expect to see some great match-ups, like the Super Bowl champions, Green Bay Packers going against the Chicago Bears. The New York Giants will play the Philadelphia Eagles, while the Pittsburgh Steelers will play the Indianapolis Colts. Cam Newton broke yet another record this weekend, passing 432 yards in his second NFL game, with an overall count of 854 yards this season. The most so far by any other rookie in NFL history, however, even with those kinds of statistics it wasn’t enough to defeat the reigning champs. The Panthers struggled against Green Bays’ superior defense. At the end of the first half the score was 7-13 with the Panthers in the lead. However, after three interceptions thrown by Mr. Newton, the game changed in the reigning champs favor. Green Bay won 30-23. The worst play of the game was a major fumble by Panthers wide receiver, Steve Smith, which led to an immediate touchdown for Green Bay. Even better moments for Green Bay were the two interceptions caught by cornerback, Charles Woodson.

FSU vs ECSU

Voice photo by Rasheed McLain

Voice photo by Jennifer Lucas

Bryan Houston (32),a junior linebacker, recovers an ECSU fumble for the Broncos on Struday night which lead to the Broncos second of three touchdowns. The broncos fell victum to the Vickings of Elizabeth City State University with a final score of 21-42 give the Broncos a current standing of 0-3 on the season.

Brandon Blumears-Cluff (7), a junior quaterback, runs the ball of bounds on Staturday night while gaining yards for the Broncos. Through the yards were gained the Broncos, they still went on to lose the game with a final score of 21-42 making the Broncos season standing 0-3.

Voice photo by Jennifer Lucas

Antionio Allen (81), a sophomore wide receiver, celebrates the Broncos first touchdown of the game against Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) on Saturday night. FSU lost to ECSU, 21-42. Including the lost to ECSU this brings the Broncos to a current overall standing of 0-3 on the season.



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