Page 1

Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

SKN Designs

Philadelphia University

Tech V and Design IX Fall 2012


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

SKN Center

Philadelphia University Page 2

Table of Contents: Campus Analysis 4-57 Environmental Factors 4 Human Factors 16 4-Site Analysis 32 Chosen Site 54 Program Analysis 58-61 Projected Requirements 58 Project Program 60 Conceptual Studies 62-73 Massing 62 Plan, Section, Elevation 64 Massing and Site Intervention 74-79 Massing Methodology 74 Locust Grove Intervention 76 Lighting Intervention 78

Large Systems Exploration 80-91 Program 80 Circulation 84 Structure 86 Small Systems Exploration 92-107 Envelope 92 Mechanical 96 Lighting 102 Fire Control 106 Appendix 108-113 Final Model Images 108


Project Brief: Philadelphia University is looking to construct a new building for their College of Architecture and the Built Environment program. This program is known as C_ABE within the university and has specific accreditation goals that must be met. Second, third, fourth, and fifth year students must have designated desks for design classes. Each design based program in the undergraduate studies (Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Architecture) must have space that is close to the rest of their program.

The university is also very interested in collaboration between majors, and therefore has given more goals than just the accreditation goals

Give all of the C_ABE program a place to work together. Express the principles of architecture that are taught in the curriculum.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 4

Climactic data can either be ignored or understood through analysis. Projects that understand their environmental factors typically are able to use them as passive strategies to help the efficiency of the final project. Precipitation, temperature and humidity, prevailing winds, solar alignment, and native plantings can all help to connect the building with its site as well as improve the overall performance of the building.

Water flow through Philadelphia County


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

3. 31”

3. 2”

3.16”

3. 88” 2.75”

4. 39”

3.82”

6.6” 6” 3. 29”

3.89”

3.6”

3.49”

3.81”

December November October August

2.74”

3. 52”

September July June May April March February January

Water flow through Philadelphia University

Average Snowfall (inches) Average Rain (inches)


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 6

Run-off is a very large issue for Philadelphia’s combined storm sewer system. A large initiative in Philadelphia is to capture storm water on site before it joins the city wide system. Pervious paving, green space, and rainwater capture are all techniques that can be implemented to reduce the impact of a project on large scale water transportation systems.


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Philadelphia University prides itself on being a “green campus�, however there are many impervious surfaces on campus which create large amounts of run-off. Large manicured lawn space is also not the most ideal surface to absorb water. Naturalized spaces or ground with many differnt types of plants have the greatest permeability rate.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 8

Prevailing winds help the designer to understand where lateral forces will most likely be coming from. They are also important for the architect to start planning natural ventilation strategies for the building. Natural ventilation is important for respiration of the building to illiminate toxic off gassing, as well as stale air. A consistent supply of fresh air is also good for the inhabitants of the building. It has been shown to improve productivity and health of the people working inside.


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 10


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Solar access is also very good for the productivity of building inhabitants. Daylighting the building helps to improve light quality as well as allows for heat gains. Direct light is a free way to get radiant heat into the building, but it also creates glare inside the building. Mitigating the amount of solar heat gain and direct light can help the mechanical and lighting systems of the building.

December Solar Study

June Solar Study


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 12

Qualitative Site Opportunities


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

PhilaU Slope Cross Section 31%

42% 25%

83% 60%

3% 6.5%

16% 4%

3.5%

3.5% 20%

Topography can present challenges or opportunities for site interest or ease of construction. Easy construction prefers flat sites to allow more mobility with machinery, where many people enjoy slopes or rolling hills on the site for visual and experiencial interest. The campus consists of mostly flat pieces of land, with an overall slope away from schoolhouse lane, which is a ridge between two watersheds. 7 1/ 8"

7"

7

7

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"/ 8

/ 1'-

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/ 1'- 0"

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2

2

/ 8"

5 1/8"

4

/ 1'- 0"

4

5 1/ 2" / 1'- 0"

5 5/8"

/ 1'-

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5 1/4"

/

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/

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/ 1'-

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"

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'- 0

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[ No Slope]

3" /

3 1/ 8" / 1'- 0"

1'- 0"

1 '0 "

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3 1/2"

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1 1 / 4 "/

35/8" 1'- 0" /

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9

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8

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1

2 3/ 8" / 1'-

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/ 1'- 0"

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[ No Slope]

7%

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5/ 8"

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/ 1'- 0"

/ 1'- 0"

[ No Slope]

27% 3

3 / 8" /

3 " '/1 0" 3 3/ " / 1 4 " '- 0

8.3%

16.7% 3 / / 4" 1 '0" 1"

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[ No Slope]

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6.5% 1/ 8"

Equation: Rise / Run = Slope x / 12� = % x = Rise�

4

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8" /

1'- 0"


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 14

All of these environmental factors help to inform the types of planting that have been encouraged on Philadelphia University’s campus. Naturalized plantings act as a buffer between the heart of campus and the residences that surround it. The campus also has some significant trees both from a historic and experiential standpoint. The campus within Fairmount Park and gives a high priority to tree preservation.


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Residential Educational Unclear Boundary


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 16

Philadelphia University ‐ Grounds Maintenance Guidelines  (Adapted from APPA Guidelines for Educational Facilities ‐ Grounds second edition 2011) Level of Attention Matrix Level of  Attention  Zone Designation 

Philadelphia University Zones Description and  Application

1

1

2

3

4

A (yellow)

B (orange)

C (green)

D (blue)

E (pink)

Campus Greens and Quads

Storm Retention Areas

Naturalized areas of Campus Perimeter 

Corners, Entrance Areas, Formal Gardens State‐of‐the‐art maintenance applied to a high‐quality  diverse landscape. Associated with high‐traffic urban  areas, such as public squares, government grounds, or  college, university, or school campuses.

Athletic Fields High level of maintenance. Associated with well‐ developed public areas, malls, government grounds, or  college, university, or school campuses. Recommended  level for most organizations.

High level of maintenance. Associated with well‐ Moderate‐level maintenance. Associated with  Maintenance limited for safety, visbilty & campus  developed public areas, malls, government grounds, or  locations that have moderate to low levels of  identity. college, university, or school campuses. Recommended  development or visitation, or with operations that do  level for most organizations. not need a high level of maintenance.

Turf Care

Grass height maintained according to species and variety  Grass should be cut once every five working days.  Grass cut once every ten working days. Normally not  Grass should be cut once every five working days.  of grass. Mowed at least once every five working days  Aeration is carried out as required but not less than two  Aeration is carried out as required but not less than  aerated unless turf quality indicates a need or in  but may be as often as once every three working days.  times per year. Reseeding or sodding must be done  anticipation of application of fertilizer. Reseeding or  two times per year. Reseeding or sodding must be  Aeration as required but not less than four times per  sodding only when major bare spots appear. Weed  when bare spots are present. Weed control is practices  done when bare spots are present. Weed control is  year. Reseeding or sodding as needed. Weed control to  when weeds present a visible problem or when weeds re‐ practices when weeds present a visible problem or  control measures normally applied when 0 percent  spent 5 percent of the turf surface.  Some pre‐emergent  when weeds re‐spent 5 percent of the turf surface.   be practiced so that no more than 1 percent of the  of small areas‐ or 15 percent of the general turf‐is  surface has weeds present.  Weed Control: 1) Pre‐ herbicide products may be used at this level.  Weed  Some pre‐emergent herbicide products may be used at  infested with weeds. Control: 1) Pre‐emergence w/ Tenacity (3) times in  emergence w/ Barricade (1) time/year; 2) Post‐ this level.  Weed Control: 1) Pre‐emergence w/  spring; 2) Pre‐emergence w/ Barricade (1) time in July; 3)  Barricade (1) time per year; 2) Post‐emergence w/  emergence w/ Vessel  (2) times per year. Post‐emergence w/ Vessel (2) times per year; 4)  Vessel (1) per year. Insecticide w/ Merit (1) time per year; 5) Fungicide w/  Propiconazole (3) times per year.

Fertilizer

Adequate fertilization applied to plant species according  to their optimum requirements. Application rates and  times should ensure an even supply of nutrients for the  entire year. Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium  percentages should follow local recommendation.   Trees, shrubs, and flowers should be fertilized according  to their individual requirements for optimum growth.  Unusually long or short growing season may modify the  chart slightly.  Fertilizer: 1) Total 3lb Nitrogen / 1,000sf  /year (3) applications per year, 25‐4‐4 (alternate  fertilizer to be determined by soil test); 2) Flower beds  fertilized w/ organic liquid fertilizer, (2) applications per  year, 10‐5‐5.

Applied only when turf vigor seems to be low. Low‐ Adequate fertilizer level to ensure that all plant materials  Adequate fertilizer level to ensure that all plant  are healthy and growing vigorously. Amounts depend on  materials are healthy and growing vigorously. Amounts  level application once per year. Suggested  species, length of growing season, soils, and rainfall.  depend on species, length of growing season, soils, and  application rate is one‐half the level recommended. Rates should correspond to at least the lowest  rainfall. Rates should correspond to at least the lowest  recommended rates. Distribution should ensure an even  recommended rates. Distribution should ensure an  supply of nutrients for the entire year. Nitrogen,  even supply of nutrients for the entire year. Nitrogen,  phosphorus, and potassium percentages should follow  phosphorus, and potassium percentages should follow  local recommendations.  Fertilizers: 1) Total 5lb Nitrogen  local recommendations. Trees, shrubs, and flowers  / 1,000sf / year (2) applications 0‐16‐6; 2) Total 5lb  should receive fertilizer levels to ensure optimum  Nitrogen / 1,000lbs / year (4) applications 25‐4‐4  growth.  Fertilizer: Total 2lb Nitrogen / 1,000sf / year,  (2) applications in fall 25‐4‐4 (alternate fertilizers to be determined by soil test).

Low‐frequency mowing scheduled based on species.  Low‐growing grasses may not be mowed. High grasses  may receive periodic mowing. Weed control limited to  legal requirements of noxious weeds.

Not fertilized.


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

With many different types of planting, the campus has a method for maintenance. There are some places where there is no work done, and others that are transformed seasonally. Athletic fields have high maintenance demands where naturalized space have very low maintenance demands.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 18


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 20


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

CAN’T EXCEED KAMBAR & DEC KAMBAR & DEC BUILDINGS RAVENHILL MANSION CAN’T EXCEED RAVENHILL MANSION


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 22


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 24

0.1 miles, 2 minutes -academic -

456 feet, 2 minutes -research -

125 feet, 33 seconds -acedemic -

10 feet, 2 seconds -academic 400 feet, 1 minute -academic 92 feet, 13 seconds -office -

0.1 miles, 3 minutes -academic 75 feet, 3 seconds -office -

0.1 miles, 2 minutes -academic 161 feet, 37 seconds -student center -

10 feet, 2 seconds -office -

0.2 miles, 4 minutes -student center -

345 feet, 1 minute -residential -

95 feet, 10 seconds -academic 400 feet, 1 minute -academic -

0.2 miles, 3 minutes -student center 0.1 miles, 2 minutes -research-

120 feet, 25 seconds -office-

190 feet, 32 seconds -academic-

95 feet, 15 seconds -academic-

0.3 miles, 7 minutes -academic0.2 miles, 4 minutes -residential-

0.7 miles, 14 minutes -main campus331 feet, 1 minute -residential-

0.1 miles, 2 minutes -academic-

This diagram is showing the relationships between a parking lot and its closest surrounding building. The orange leaders let us read the distance and time to each surrounding building. The green diagrams the path or road to the buliding location. A strong difference can be read between Ravenhill and Main campus, where the walking distance is far more lengthy on the Ravenhill side of campus.

95 feet, 15 seconds -residential-


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Parking Garage: Though the garage is sized for all passes, the main allowance is for commuter students. It fills extremely fast and stays full throughout the day. commuter parking

resident parking

Housing: These lots are for residents of IP only. They fill at night but are empty during the day.

Hayward Hall: The center of campus shows a great amount of faculty parking. The lots are situated between both sides of the the Philadelphia faculty parking University campus creating easy access for faculty of the University.

Ravenhill campus: Multiple parking lots open to all parking permits. Lot has a shorter density to show that it is not used as often as main campus lots.

PARKING LAYOUT

all parking

Main campus houses most of the academic buildings, but does not have adequate parking for the density of people who occupy this side of campus. Parking for resident students is also a large issue on main campus. The middle of campus offers parking only to faculty members, which excludes students from easily accessing this part of campus.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 26


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

TRASH ROUTE_LOADING

Another component of campus that is weighted more on the Ravenhill side of campus is security stations. There is a recreational path that is off the street, and this path has a large crime rate, which has led to the heavier weight of security on Ravenhill side of campus. Inversely, the trash collection and removal is more dominant on main campus.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 28


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

The heavility populated social zones are most typically documented in green spaces or in community buildings like the campus center and the gym. Students tend to not socialize much in academic buildings but often group at the entrances to them before classes.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 30

Ravenhill

Tennis Courts


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Town Houses

A+D


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 32

The unused parking lot on Ravenhill campus provides an ideal place to build because of the flat and impervious nature of the site. It has the potential to connect with other buildings on Ravenhill campus to bring academics down closer to the main residential hub. This site also utilizes the vast parking that is underused on the Ravenhill campus.

Ravenhill


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Site Boundaries

Parking


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 34

College Relationships

Security

C+ABE Buildings K+DEC Buildings C+SHLA Buildings

Security Station


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

The site has areas of very flat and very sloped surface. This can provide interesting architectural and social opportunities. It sits directly next to residencial space that is not connected to campus, which means that privacy is a top priority on this site. Since the site sits on the edge of campus, it’s connection to the other colleges of Philadelphia University beceomes broken and puts the building on a programatic island.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 36

Ciculation

Access to Social Buildings

Amenities Relationship Proposed Site

Pedestrian Automotive Proposed footprint


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Drainage

Existing Vegetation Swales Storm Inlets Manhole Covers High Runoff Standing Water

Existing Trees


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 38

Site Boundaries

College Relationships

Tennis Courts

C+ABE Buildings K+DEC Buildings C+SHLA Buildings


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

This site is also very flat, but is sunk from the parking lot that flanks it. The topography was clearly manipulated with the creation of the tennis courts, and has drains and swales around it to keep water away from the courts. This site is another edge site, which has limited connection to other colleges, but is very close to SEED, which is the graduate center for C_ABE.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 40

Circulation

Access to Social Buildings

Amenities Relationship Proposed Site

Pedestrian Automotive Proposed footprint


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Drainage

Existing Trees Swales Storm Inlets Manhole Covers High Runoff Standing Water

Existing Trees


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 42

Site Boundaries

College Relationships

Town Houses

C+ABE Buildings K+DEC Buildings C+SHLA Buildings


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

This site hase existing residences on it, but is gently sloped toward the water retenion system behind Kanbar. The connection to other buildings on campus is also pretty good because of the proximity to DEC and Kanbar. These are two socail heavy buildings, and can complement the C_ABE program well.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 44

Circulation

Access to Social Buildings

Amenities Relationship Proposed Site

Pedestrian Automotive Proposed footprint


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Drainage

Existing Trees Swales Storm Inlets Manhole Covers High Runoff Standing Water

Existing Trees


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 46

Site Boundaries

Parking

A+D

Proposed Parking Entrances


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Security

College Relationships

C+ABE Buildings K+DEC Buildings C+SHLA Buildings

Security Station


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 48

A&D is a large concrete building that is surrounded by campus, as opposed to many other buildings on campus which line its perifery. It is close to social buildings, and has large quantiites of movement around the building by people of all majors.


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Proposed Circulation

Access to Social Buildings Amenities Relationship Proposed Site

Pedestrian Automotive Proposed footprint


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 50

Drainage Swales Storm Inlets Manhole Covers High Runoff Standing Water

Exisiting Trees

Existing Trees


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Close proximity to academic and social buildings Fluid pedestrian movement and access Preserve locust grove to the south of A&D building Enhance recreation space north of A&D building Redirect storm water to move to bioswale or capture within building Demolish only dysfunctional pieces of A&D, preserve all others


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 52

Our intent is to highlight the best parts of A&D and to improve what needs to be upgraded. The building’s ability to function will be increased to a high level of environmental and programmatic performance. Collaboration is crucial to the success of the C_ ABE program as well as the building, therefore the building gives opportunities for people to experience the student work from inside and outside of the building.


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Campus Analysis Philadelphia University Page 54

People Connect

entice people to move where they normally would not

Adapt

expand public sitting/ dining space from kanbar

Collaborate

studios organized by experience, not by major

Site

Education

create connections allow people to gather between what near work spaces happens inside and outside frame views to simplify structure for Reichlin large flexible spaces

expand garden to weave classrooms and create a programmed studios together social zone

Integrate

faculty offices will be accessible to students

bring people below ground and allow them to experience micro-climates

build in a way that reinforces what is taught in classes

Revitalize

show archived work main entrances relate as a display to inspire to Hayward and students Reichlin

celebrate research and foster inquisitive students

Innovate

give direction to wandering

understand how to pave around existing trees

provide special space for collaborative studio and classes

Experience

System

similar condition delicate relationship through programs between old and new structure shift floor plan for unique perspective and allow for defined mechanical tracts expose as much of the demolition/ construction as possible provide unique and complementary experiences between vertical and horizontal circulation recreate the ramp from an entrance condition to an interior circulation path people can see how new systems work

allow people to alter their environment by opening windows and turning on or off localized lighting thoughtful water management

bring HVAC (passive and active) together with floor slabs

allow daylight into the ground and underground floors through light shafts and atrium develop skin, thermal and ventilation systems to act passively


Campus Analysis

Environmental Factors Human Factors 4-Site Analysis Chosen Site

Connect : To touch by hugging, breaking through, or resting upon. Provide visual and physical access.

Adapt : Change for practical purposes.

React to an existing or unwavering truth.

Collaborate : Combine to form a stronger idea.

Learn from different perspective.

Integrate : Bring multiple pieces together so that they may work together. Allow each piece to be strong in a different way.

Revitalize : To bring life or meaning back to an object or position. Innovative : Performance requirements.

Delicate yet loud (simple but make a statement). Experiential impact vs. physical impact.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Program Analysis Philadelphia University Page 56

In the programming stage, it was important to understand the vast distances between the different buildings which the C_ABE program inhabits. This allowed for a greater understanding of where the university is coming from and what their goal are. It also helped to shape our concepts of how to define space for programmatic pieces. the university enjoys advertising their environmental awareness and so LEED credits were examined to understand the basic requirements for sustainability on Philadelphia University’s campus.

LEED 2009 for New Construction and Major Renovations

Project Name

Project Checklist

Sustainable Sites Y

Y

?

Date

Materials and Resources, Continued

Possible Points: 26

N

Y Prereq 1 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4.1 Credit 4.2 Credit 4.3 Credit 4.4 Credit 5.1 Credit 5.2 Credit 6.1 Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1 Credit 7.2 Credit 8

Construction Activity Pollution Prevention Site Selection Development Density and Community Connectivity Brownfield Redevelopment Alternative Transportation—Public Transportation Access Alternative Transportation—Bicycle Storage and Changing Rooms Alternative Transportation—Low-Emitting and Fuel-Efficient Vehicles Alternative Transportation—Parking Capacity Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat Site Development—Maximize Open Space Stormwater Design—Quantity Control Stormwater Design—Quality Control Heat Island Effect—Non-roof Heat Island Effect—Roof Light Pollution Reduction

?

N Credit 4

1 5 1 6 1 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Credit 5 Credit 6 Credit 7

Possible Points: 10

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3.1 Credit 3.2 Credit 4.1 Credit 4.2

Credit 4.4 Credit 5

Y

Prereq 1 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3

Water Use Reduction—20% Reduction Water Efficient Landscaping Innovative Wastewater Technologies Water Use Reduction

Credit 6.1

2 to 4 2 2 to 4

Credit 6.2 Credit 7.1 Credit 7.2 Credit 8.1

Energy and Atmosphere Y Y Y

Prereq 1 Prereq 2 Prereq 3 Credit 1 Credit 2 Credit 3 Credit 4 Credit 5 Credit 6

Possible Points: 35

Fundamental Commissioning of Building Energy Systems Minimum Energy Performance Fundamental Refrigerant Management Optimize Energy Performance On-Site Renewable Energy Enhanced Commissioning Enhanced Refrigerant Management Measurement and Verification Green Power

Materials and Resources

Credit 8.2

Prereq 1

Possible Points: 14

Credit 1.1 Credit 1.2 Credit 2 Credit 3

Storage and Collection of Recyclables Building Reuse—Maintain Existing Walls, Floors, and Roof Building Reuse—Maintain 50% of Interior Non-Structural Elements Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse

Possible Points: 15

Minimum Indoor Air Quality Performance Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control Outdoor Air Delivery Monitoring Increased Ventilation Construction IAQ Management Plan—During Construction Construction IAQ Management Plan—Before Occupancy Low-Emitting Materials—Adhesives and Sealants Low-Emitting Materials—Paints and Coatings Low-Emitting Materials—Flooring Systems Low-Emitting Materials—Composite Wood and Agrifiber Products Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control Controllability of Systems—Lighting Controllability of Systems—Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort—Design Thermal Comfort—Verification Daylight and Views—Daylight Daylight and Views—Views

Innovation and Design Process Credit 1.1

1 to 19 1 to 7 2 2 3 2

Credit 1.2 Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4 Credit 1.5 Credit 2

Credit 1.2

1 to 3 1 1 to 2 1 to 2

Innovation in Design: Specific Innovation in Design: Specific Innovation in Design: Specific Innovation in Design: Specific Innovation in Design: Specific LEED Accredited Professional

Credit 1.3 Credit 1.4

Regional Priority: Regional Priority: Regional Priority: Regional Priority:

Specific Specific Specific Specific

1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 4 Credit Credit Credit Credit

Total Certified 40 to 49 points

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 6 Title Title Title Title Title

Regional Priority Credits Credit 1.1

Y

1 to 2 1 to 2 1 1

Indoor Environmental Quality Y Y

Credit 4.3

Water Efficiency

Recycled Content Regional Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Certified Wood

1 1 1 1

Possible Points: 110 Silver 50 to 59 points

Gold 60 to 79 points

Platinum 80 to 110


Program Analysis

Project Requirements Project Program

Templates were created to maximize the efficiency inside rooms like restrooms, lounge, and conference spaces. These two rooms have specific requirements about how much space is required per person as well as ADA stipulations.

26 '-

0" '18

0"

Restroom Template

25 '-

0" '40 25 '-

'13

0"

Conference Room Template

0"

Lounge Template

0"


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Program Analysis Philadelphia University Page 58

The program is most heaviliy weighted to students and faculty, which is where gave the most variety to the templates. Faculty offices were looked at as pods that can be combined to fill large spaces. The hot desk studios were configured to maximize desks while minimizing square footage required.

8'

-6 "

7'

6"

13 '-

Faculty Office Template

13 '-

0"

0" 6'

'15

0"

Dean and Director Office Template

" -6


Program Analysis

Project Requirements Project Program

25

'-

0"

31

Hot Desk Studio Layout 1

6"

Hot Desk Studio Layout 2

29

0"

'-

0"

26

'-

Hot Desk Studio Layout 3

'25

32 '-

'-

0"

'30

0"

28

'-

38 0"

Hot Desk Studio Layout 4

'-

6"

0"


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Program Analysis Philadelphia University Page 60

#of Rooms

S.F ea.

C‐ABE Classes

4 2

625 900

Admin Office Computer labs Materials Library Tech lab. Digital fab lab. Material Research Lab Archive/ exhibition space Conference/meeting Restrooms Lounge + Kitchen Mechanical

30 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 30 stalls 1

100 750 1049.4 1000 300 400 2098.8 1260

Circulation

Notes

100 S.f/person 1 computer to 8 students 50% of archive

10% of studios 15s.f /person 1 stall for 35 people

275

15% of Total

2500 1800 0 3000 750 1049.4 1000 300 1200 2098.8 1260 2160 275 3000

5757.18

47138.38

without SEED

45838.38


Program Analysis

Project Requirements Project Program

Program

Function

Total of Students (approx. Total of Studios

# Student ea.

S.F /person

S.F ea.

Total S.F

8 6 5 4 4

15 to 20 12 12 to 14 12 to 13 12 to 13

30 30 30 30 30

600 360 420 390 390

4800 2160 2100 1560 1560

Studios First Year (Hot desks) Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year  Fifth Year 

150 70 65 50 50

Architectural Studies

Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

20 20 20

Interior Design

Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

36 36 36

3 3 3

12 12 12

30 30 30

360 360 360

1080 1080 1080

Landscape Arch.

Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year  fifth year

20 20 20 20

2 2 2 2

10 10 10 10

30 30 30 30

300 300 300 300

600 600 600 600

Construction Management

First Year  Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

20 15 15 15

Historic Preservation

First Year  Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

30 30 30 30

2

12

32

384

768

15 15 15

32 32

480 480 n/a

960 1440

5784

20988

Undergraduate Architecture

Graduate M.s. Science in Sustainability Interior Architecture M. of Const. Management Sustainable Design Certificate

40 24 40 5

New Program M.s. Arch M. Architecture M.s. Historic Preservation

30 45 15

2 3 n/a

Total

1017

51


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Conceptual Studies Philadelphia University Page 62


Conceptual Studies

Initial massings about form and system intentions allowed for holistic and detailed explorations of passage and environmental response.

A+D

Ventilation Gain Solar Gain View Gain

Massing Plan, Section, Elevation


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Conceptual Studies Philadelphia University Page 64

Archive Computer Lab

WC

WC Crit

Studio

ClassroomClassroom

WC

Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Entry

Computer Lab

Exhibition/ Archive

Entry

Crit

Studio

Office

Studio Entry

Classroom

Crit WC

WC

Classroom Meeting/Crit

Plan 1

Plan 2

Plan 2.5

WC

WC

WC

Occupiable Green Roof

Studio

Studio Classroom

WC Studio

Studio

Plan 3

Plan 4

Plan 5

Studio


Conceptual Studies

Massing Plan, Section, Elevation


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Conceptual Studies Philadelphia University Page 66

Sectional and elevational explorations allowed for developments in the skin system as well as the way in which people interact inside of the building.

Section A

Section B

Southeast Elevation

Southwest Elevation


Conceptual Studies

Northeast Elevation

Northwest Elevation

Massing Plan, Section, Elevation


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Conceptual Studies Philadelphia University Page 68

Wrapping the building on the eastern sides, allowed for two different approaches to creating an addition. The truss bears on top of the A+D structure so that the weight of the addition flows through the columns. On the eastern mass the addition clamped onto the original structure and allowed for a unified interior. The only piece of A+D that was left on this side was the floor slabs and the columns.


Conceptual Studies

Plan -2

Plan -1

Plan 1

Plan 2

Plan 3

Plan 4

Massing Plan, Section, Elevation


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Conceptual Studies Philadelphia University Page 70

The facade was mostly glass, so the screen helped with the solar gains and also collected water. Copper was added to the facade for privacy and opacity in the envelope.

Section A

Section B

Northeast Elevation

Southwest Elevation Southeast Elevation


Conceptual Studies

Northwest Elevation

Southwest Elevation

Massing Plan, Section, Elevation


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Conceptual Studies Philadelphia University Page 72


Conceptual Studies

Massing Plan, Section, Elevation


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Massing and Site Interventions Philadelphia University Page 74


Massing and Site Intervention

Massing Methodology Locust Grove Intervention Path Lighting

Massing Methodology 1. Remove what does not perform 2. Minimize new footprint 3. Bear on existing structure or away from the building 4. Create an entrance overhang at the northeast side 5. Break through walls to create efficient space 6. Build up from the pod footprint


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Massing and Site Interventions Philadelphia University Page 76


Massing and Site Intervention

Massing Methodology Locust Grove Intervention Path Lighting

8” TREE COLLAR 3” ADBRUFS GEOPAVE RESIN 4” LOOSE FILL GRAVEL EXISTING SOIL


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Massing and Site Interventions Philadelphia University Page 78


Massing and Site Intervention

Massing Methodology Locust Grove Intervention Path Lighting

Between the hardscape intervention and the lighting scheme, the landscape is transformed to accentuate A+D as a beacon on campus. Seating was added where people currently congregate and lighting was implemented where people currently recreate.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Large Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 80

MECHAANICAL

COMPUTER LAB

WOOD FAB LAB TECH FAB CLASSROOMS

TECH FAB CLASSROOMS

METAL FAB LAB

PLASTIC FAB LAB

TECH FAB CLASSROOMS

TECH FAB CLASSROOMS

OFFICES

EXHIBITION/CRIT SPACE

LASER/3D LAB


Large Systems Exploration

Program Circulation Structure

Our main programmatic change is to use the select studio spaces for other core classes that an entire studio can take together. Studios take up large amounts of square footage, and this is a way to ensure that the space gets more use. Classes can become more collaborative because of the joint nature of the two classes, which deepens learning.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Large Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 82 Program

Function

Total of Students (approx. Total of Studios

# Student ea.

S.F /person

S.F ea.

Total S.F

8 6 5 4 4

15 to 20 12 12 to 14 12 to 13 12 to 13

30 30 30 30 30

600 360 420 390 390

4800 2160 2100 1560 1560

36 36 36

3 3 3

12 12 12

30 30 30

360 360 360

1080 1080 1080

Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year  fifth year

20 20 20 20

2 2 2 2

10 10 10 10

30 30 30 30

300 300 300 300

600 600 600 600

Construction Management

First Year  Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

20 15 15 15

Historic Preservation

First Year  Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

30 30 30 30

2

12

32

384

768

15 15 15

32 32

480 480 n/a

960 1440

5784

20988

Studios First Year (Hot desks) Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year  Fifth Year 

150 70 65 50 50

Architectural Studies

Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

20 20 20

Interior Design

Second Year  Third Year  Fourth Year 

Landscape Arch.

Undergraduate Architecture

Graduate M.s. Science in Sustainability Interior Architecture M. of Const. Management Sustainable Design Certificate

40 24 40 5

New Program M.s. Arch PLANS LEVEL 1 M. Architecture M.s. Historic Preservation

30 45 15

Total

1017

2 PLANS LEVEL 2 3 n/a

51

PLANS LEVEL 3

PLANS LEVEL 4


Large Systems Exploration

Program Circulation Structure

#of Rooms

S.F ea.

C‐ABE Classes

4 2

625 900

Admin Office Computer labs Materials Library Tech lab. Digital fab lab. Material Research Lab Archive/ exhibition space Conference/meeting Restrooms Lounge + Kitchen Mechanical

30 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 30 stalls 1

100 750 1049.4 1000 300 400 2098.8 1260

Notes

100 S.f/person 1 computer to 8 students 50% of archive

10% of studios 15s.f /person 1 stall for 35 people

275

Circulation

15% of Total

2500 1800 0 3000 750 1049.4 1000 300 1200 2098.8 1260 2160 275 3000

5757.18

47138.38 PLANS LEVEL 1

PLANS LEVEL 2

PLANS LEVEL 3

without SEED

PLANS LEVEL 4

45838.38


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Large Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 84

PLANS LEVEL 1

PLANS LEVEL 2


Large Systems Exploration

Program Circulation Structure

PLANS LEVEL 3

PLANS LEVEL 4


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Large Systems Exploration

CTURE LEVEL STRUCTURE 1 LEVEL 1

Philadelphia University Page 86

STRUCTURE LEVEL STRUCTURE 2 LEVEL 2


Large Systems Exploration

STRUCTURE LEVELSTRUCTURE 3 LEVEL 3

STRUCTURE LEVELSTRUCTURE 4 LEVEL 4

Program Circulation Structure


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Large Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 88


Large Systems Exploration

Program Circulation Structure


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Large Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 90

TUBE FRAMING-HSS12/12/5/8

FLASHING GROWING MEDIUM

INSULATION BATTING TRUSS PEG CONNECTION

EXPANSION JOINT STRUCTURAL CAP

DRAINAGE FILTER MEMBRANE

INSULATION/WATERPROOFING

LIGHT WELL MULLION


Large Systems Exploration

Program Circulation Structure

CONCRETE ON METAL DECK EXPANSION JOINT FLOOR FINISH

TUBE FRAMING-HSS12/12/5/8 GUSSET PLATE BASE PLATE/STRUCTURAL PEG ANCHOR BOLTS

EXPANSION BOLTS ACOUSTICAL PANEL WIDE FLANGE BEAMW-18X175


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 92

VERTICAL MULLION L-BRACKET DOUBLE PANE GLASS SINGLE PANE GLASS LOOSE WEAVE FABRIC

BASE FRAME/WATER COLLECTOR


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control

PASSIVE VENTILATION INTAKE TEMP. SENSOR DAMPER


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 94


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control

The screens diffuse the light, which allows for daylight that does not create glare. The screens’ color was chosen as black because it is the most transparent of the possible colors. This preserves the view of the locust trees which were saved.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 96

Mechanical ducts run allong the ceilings so that spaces can remain flexible, yet enclosed spaces can be made within the system by allowing it to be easily added onto.


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 98


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 100


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control

Active and passive systems work together to moderate the temperature and humidity inside the building. There are active mechanical ducts that have sensors to allow the air heated between by the skin in to offset the heating demands on the mechanical units. There are also operable windows to allow building users to moderate their climate. In the summer the windows can be opened to flush the hot air out of the building using pressure created in the skin.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 102


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control

By penetrating the waffel slab light tubes were able to be dropped through to bring daylight into the center of A + D. They were also placed so that they create an object inside of the crit space for people to gather around. The massing of the additions were kept more slender so that daylight can penetrate into the spaces easily.


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 104


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Small Systems Exploration Philadelphia University Page 106


Small Systems Exploration Envelope Mechanical Lighting Fire Control


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Appendix

Philadelphia University Page 108


Appendix

Final Model


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Appendix

Philadelphia University Page 110


Appendix

Final Model


Erika Krueger, Fellycia Sutanto, Nikos Nasis

Appendix

Philadelphia University Page 112


Appendix

Final Model


SKN Design Center  

SKN design Center