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Argo-Noles Medi- 2 cal Mentors Program Class of 2013 Match Results

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Pensacola Gold Humanism and National Conference

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Immokalee Expe- 5 rience Students Attend National Conference

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Class off 2013

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Family Medicine in Alaska

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Welcome 2015

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Campus Highlights

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Faculty Development Sessions June 12 Evidence Based Medicine August 15 Letters of Recommendation

Campus Review

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Message from the Dean It has been ten years since the Pensacola Regional Campus welcomed its first class of third-year students. After the graduation of the Class of 2013 on May 18, this June we will once again welcome 19 third-year students and Dr. Paul McLeod start the exciting process of training future physicians. Since 2005 FSU College of Medicine has graduated 134 medical students from the Pensacola Campus and sent them off to residencies, mostly in Florida, but throughout the United States. We currently have six College of Medicine alumni practicing in the Florida

Panhandle with hopes of many more choosing to return to our community in the years to come as more complete their residency training. More importantly, we have fifty two faculty members from our community that have been with us for the entire ten years. I am sincerely grateful to those of you who, over the years, have been involved and invested in the education of our students – the physicians for our future. As fond as we are of looking back to that first class of ten students, our most important goal is to continue to look forward as we evolve and change and grow as a college. Without the dedication of our faculty, long-time or new, we would not be able to produce the quality graduates we do today. Here’s to our tenth anniversary and to many many more.

Pensacola’s Tenth-Year Celebration FSU College of Medicine celebrated its 10-year anniversary in 2010 and the Pensacola Regional Campus is celebrating its tenth anniversary this year. The Class of 2005 arrived in Pensacola in 2003 kicking off the first regional campus medical education experience for Florida State University College of Medicine. The trusting students, anxious staff, knowledgeable faculty and physicians were pioneers. Their efforts led the way for the three other regional campuses in Daytona Beach, Fort Pierce, and Sarasota. The Pensacola Regional Campus began with ten students and currently averages approximately forty students in their third and fourth years. Their experiences in the Pensacola community prepare them well for step exams, residencies, and careers in medicine. Many of Pensacola’s students have won national and local awards, become Chief Residents, obtained incredible fellowships, and

are becoming amazing physicians. Pensacola Regional Campus is fortunate to still have all of their original Clerkship Directors: Dr. Robert Anderson ( Internal Medicine), Dr. Suzanne Bush (OB/GYN), Dr. Jeff Chicola (Surgery), Dr. Michelle Grier-Hall (Pediatrics), Dr. Donna Jacobi (Geriatrics), Dr. Dennis Mayeaux (Family Medicine), Dr. Ed Mobley (Psychiatry), Dr. Mark Stavros (Emergency Medicine), and Dr. Bob Wilson (Pediatrics). Their dedication and hard work, along with their clerkship faculty, are the reasons why the Pensacola Campus and its students have been so successful over the years. The beautiful beaches of Pensacola leave a lasting impression on the students, but it is the knowledge they gained, relationships they developed and the experiences they had while in Pensacola as part of the Pensacola Regional Campus that will stay with them a lifetime.


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Argo-Noles Medical Mentors Program by Laura Davis Do not wait for leaders: do it alone, person to person. Mother Teresa

Since its inception in 2000, the Florida State University College of Medicine has placed great emphasis on outreach to the community. Its students have taken on leadership roles in a variety of contexts and have been an influential force in communities across the state of Florida and beyond. It is only natural that these medical students utilize their experience and skills to help lead premedical students who are following the same path.

from FSU College of Medicine students, but also have the opportunity to attend FSU College of Medicine weekly doctoring lectures and education seminars at local hospitals. Each semester, the FSU students sponsor an educational question and answer session on the UWF campus open to all students.

The Argo-Noles Medical Mentor Program, a collaboration between pre-professional students at the University of West Florida with the goal of going to medical school and Florida State University College of Medicine students at the Pensacola Regional Campus, is in its second year. The organization was founded by Stefani Altman and Carolina Pereira, Pensacola Regional Campus Class of 2012 graduates. This year, 24 UWF students are participating in the program. Mentors advise their mentees on the medical school admissions process, premedical course requirements, extra-curricular activities, MCAT preparation, personal statement review, and interview preparation. “ArgoNoles is a unique opportunity for me to give premed students the help that I had through the medical school entrance process. It's a maze and I can provide the map,” says Rick Sims, Class of 2014 Argo-Noles Co-Chair. The mentees are not only provided one-on-one mentorship

The program has turned out to be beneficial for the FSU students serving as mentors, too. They have learned what it takes to be a leader in the community and not just on the medical school campus. The medical students are forced outside of their comfort zones, too. They meet with their mentees and learn to juggle their rotations with their volunteer work to the program. The FSU students gain as much from mentoring as the UWF students. The following FSU students are participating in the program this year and have made great investments in the lives of the next generation of physicians by demonstrating FSU College of Medicine’s mission to the Pensacola community.

Current Mentors Class of 2013: Catherine Acob, Erin Bascom, Brandon Cook, Laura Davis, Amanda Garnett, Andy Hogan, Umar Karaman, Jennifer Miller, Lisa Sappenfield, Shannon Scott Class of 2014: Nader Akhavan, Mohammed Al-Humiari, Sam Borrelli, Chad Brady, Jens Flock, Jim Hughes, Lexie Mannix, Melissa McDole, Jake McKay, Naomi Salz, Kelly Schwirian, Rick Sims, Greg Stepp, Glen Thompson, Jimmy Westbrook

2011 Match Ceremony Left: Amanda Garnett with Dr. McLeod announcing her results Right: Dean Fogarty refereeing the Match Madness Event It was another amazing year for our Pensacola Regional Campus students! We had one hundred percent of our students match and five of our students will be staying in Florida to complete their residencies. The match ceremony provided a wonderful opportunity to have fun and celebrate match results. This year’s theme was “Match Madness” and the basketball theme was a huge success. The Campus Deans wore FSU basketball uniforms and Dean Fogarty dressed as a referee while the audience enjoyed popcorn and cheered on the students with pompoms. REGIONAL

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Erica Steinvorth Delbecq with husband Dillon celebrating her match


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Florida State University College of Medicine Pensacola Regional Campus Class of 2013 Match Results

Catherine Acob - Family Medicine Halifax Medical Center Daytona Beach, FL

Sarah Barnette - Pediatrics SAUSHEC - Air Force San Antonio, TX

Erin Bascom - Pathology University of South Alabama Mobile, AL

Brian Bauerband - Emergency Medicine, University of Alabama Birmingham, AL

Felicia Blais - Emergency Medicine East Carolina University Greenville, NC

Brandon Cook - Orthopedic Surgery Ochsner Clinic Foundation New Orleans, LA

Laura Davis - Family Medicine AnMed Health Medical Center Anderson, SC

Justin Dvorak - General Surgery Loyola University Medical Center Chicago, IL

Amanda Garnett - Pediatrics Louisiana State University New Orleans, LA

Andy Hogan - Family Medicine Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton, CA

Umar Karaman - Urology Louisiana State University Shreveport, LA

David Mendoza - Family Medicine Bayfront Medical Center St Petersburg, FL

Jennifer Miller - Family Medicine Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Winston-Salem, NC

Bethann Mohamed - Emergency Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital New Haven, CT

Matthew Moss - Radiology, Diagnostic University of Florida Shands Hospital Gainesville, FL

Roxanne Samuels - Pediatrics Morehouse School of Medicine Atlanta, GA

Elisabeth Sappenfield - OB/GYN University of South Florida Tampa, FL

Joshua Smith - Internal Medicine Weill Cornell Medical Center New York, NY

Erica Steinvorth Delbecq - Med/Peds University of Maryland Baltimore, MD

Shannon Scott - OB/GYN Orlando Health Orlando, FL


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Faculty Awards and Alumni News Pensacola Gold Humanism Inductees and National Conference

Laura Davis

Shannon Scott

Joshua Smith

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The Gold Humanism Honor Society honors fourth-year medical students with exemplary clinical skills who also demonstrate compassion, leadership and dedication to the service of others. Pensacola Regional Campus Class of 2013 inductees are:

Laura Davis, Shannon Scott and Joshua Smith Gold Humanism National Conference 2012 by Joshua Smith As one of the three Pensacola students inducted into the Arnold P. Gold Humanism Honor Society for the Class of 2013, I had the distinct privilege of attending the national conference in Chicago in October to represent FSU. This three-day- vent focused on emphasizing humanism in action, and was an opportunity for me to attend workshops, participate in think tank sessions, and network with other medical students, residents, and faculty from across the country. The conference opened with an incredible panel from Dr. Jerome Groopman and Dr. Pamela Hartzband, authors of “Your Medical Mind” (Dr. Groopman is also the author of the bestseller “How Doctors Think”). This panel elaborated on how patients make medical decisions based on their core values, even though they may not realize it. A clip of their session can be seen here or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSrJcyeMLB0. One of the two breakout sessions I chose to attend focused on Self-Care to help prevent physician burn-out, with ideas and research that I later shared during a presentation to the Pensacola campus’s current third-year medical students. The second breakout session focused on LGBTQ health issues and how to enhance care for these patients. One point highlighted in this session was medical school’s lack of formal LGBTQ health education, which means that the responsibility to learn how to care compassionately and appropriately for this patient population falls on the clinicians teaching our students in the field – all as part of our FSU mission to serve the underserved. The personal highlight of the conference was having the opportunity to network with an incredible group of accomplished medical students and residents, who have dedicated themselves to bringing humanism into their programs and incorporating it into their practice. Dr. Janine Edwards, the FSU faculty member who accompanied me to the conference, pointed out that the networking was the most important thing I could take away from the experience. We continue to correspond regularly and in an increasingly interconnected medical arena it is an invaluable resource to have peers to share stories and encourage one another. For my peers I ask that you take the time to seek out opportunities to put humanism into practice on your rotations and as you proceed into your medical careers. As students we have a unique opportunity to foster a culture of humanism with patients across a spectrum of situations – one month you may be talking to an expectant mother on OB-GYN while the next month you may be consoling a geriatric patient recently transferred to palliative care. For our community faculty you have the opportunity to model humanistic medicine for impressionable medical students. By taking the time to discuss with students your personal stories and how you navigate through the constantly evolving patient-care schema you can help mold students into the next generation of compassionate and competent physicians.

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Immokalee Experience by Joshua Smith Unlike a majority of students at the Pensacola campus, I spent my third-year family medicine rotation away, in the small community of Immokalee. The town’s unusual name translates to “My Home” in Seminole, a moniker made even more poignant by the fact that my grandmother grew up on the Brighton Indian Reservation close by and my parents both served as police officers in the neighboring town when I was younger. Although given a Native American name, the backbone of this community was the primarily Mexican and Guatemalan migrant workers, who split their time between south Florida and the Carolinas to take advantage of the differing crop cycles. I had been motivated to apply for a rotation there in order to improve my medical Spanish skills and to practice in a setting that emphasizes our mission of stewardship for the underserved; at the conclusion I considered my goals met and exceeded. The clinicians I worked with were superb and very dedicated to teaching and to their community. Dr. Perez focused primarily on adult medicine as a result of the way the clinic was set up. He would loan out books regularly to me, and would cite studies that I hadn’t even run across yet. In between patient visits he could be found watching the latest medical webinars on his smartphone in the office. To augment the adult medicine experience I had with Dr. Perez, I also rotated with Dr. Salazar, a pediatrician with a penchant for global health, who loved discussing parasitology with me, and Dr. Rosado, a psychologist who not only rendered his services in the clinic but also researches childhood obesity. All of this was spearheaded by the then newly-appointed Dr. Elena Reyes, whose arrival seems to have reinvigorated the Immokalee program. A few months after I had returned from my Immokalee rotation, a doctor I met at a national conference made an interesting statement during his keynote address – “medicine is where you find it.” He was referring to the inner-city hospital where he did his residency but I thought the statement was also reflective of my time in Immokalee, which falls on the opposite end of the spectrum. While the FSU clinic where I was based was truly a state-of-the-art facility, it could not mask the reality that they were really “squeezing blood out of a turnip,” a colloquialism I cited several times to describe to others what I was seeing. Due to a lack of insurance, specialists, and ancillary medical services, my preceptors had to approach patient care from a unique perspective. The question became one of “what is most affordable?” instead of “what is the drug of choice?” in many circumstances. As a result of these barriers, many patients had “bread and butter” medical conditions that had rare and unfortunate endstage manifestations. The physical and financial limitations were not the only barriers I encountered. Many of my conversations with patients took on a more culturally appropriate flavor once I got my feet wet. I know my diet counseling became progressively more focused once I realized that patients were for the most part unwilling to give up their (admittedly delicious) breakfast tortillas. The patient-provider dyad was an anomaly – many of my rooms were filled with not only the patients and family members, but also any other number of concerned citizens from the community, there to participate on the patient’s behalf. Not all of the cultural variances I encountered were quite so benign. Some of the less frequently utilized questions in my interview arsenal were unloaded at an alarming frequency– “do you trade sex for money or goods?” was answered in the affirmative on more than one occasion. The lessons learned from these visits have continued to have an influence on how I approach all of my subsequent patient encounters. Upon my return to Pensacola I was excited to share my experience in Immokalee. It has been a great conversation piece with my preceptors and peers, but more importantly the experience brought to light a lot of the strengths and weaknesses of modern medicine, as well as the impact of serving in communities like this. I encourage other students who will come after me to consider investing the time into completing a rotation in Immokalee, either during your third year or as a fourth-year elective. For the community faculty I would encourage you to discuss the experience with your students who have pursued this option, as I can assure you they will find value in sharing their experience with you.

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Students Attend National Conference Florida State University College of Medicine had seven students attend the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) National Conference this year, including two attendees from the Pensacola Regional Campus, Laura Davis and Jennifer Miller. All of the students were fourth year students and used the conference as an opportunity to network with residency programs and other students. When the students were asked about their thoughts after the conference, the responses were all similar: all students even remotely interested in Family Medicine should attend the conference and they were thankful for the sponsors that helped them get there. “I believe that it should be strongly suggested that all medical students going into family medicine attend this conference,” said Jennifer Miller of the Pensacola campus. Laura Davis shares, “The opportunity to have most of the nation’s family medicine residency programs in the same place is an incredible resource for applying to residency programs. We get to look at all of the programs there and find out more about them before we even apply. That is a huge advantage!” The students that attended are excited about encouraging their classmates and underclassmen to be open to the idea of a career in Family Medicine during the next year, as well as the amazing opportunities available by attending National Conference next year.

Alumni News Class of 2010 Florida State University College of Medicine Alumna Amanda White, M.D., will begin a fellowship in Pulmonary Critical Care at Medical College of Georgia

Class of 2010 Florida State University College of Medicine Alumna Danielle Barnes, M.D., will begin a fellowship in pediatric gastroenterology at Stanford University.

Affiliated Partners Baptist Health Care Fort Walton Beach Medical Center Naval Hospital Pensacola Nemours Children’s Clinic Sacred Heart Health System Santa Rosa Medical Center VA Gulf Coast Health System West Florida Hospital

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Class of 2014

Front Row: Sam Borrelli, Lexie Mannix, Jake McKay, Jens Flock, Sam Zahedi. Chad Brady, Rachel Slaughter, Kelly Schwirian, Teedha Prak, Mohammed Al-Humiari Back Row: Nader Akhavan, Tony Herzog, Rick Sims, Melissa McDole, Greg Stepp, Jim Hughes, Glen Thompson, Jimmy Westbrook

Faculty Appreciation Reception The annual Faculty Appreciation Reception was held in September and graciously hosted by Gulf Power. This event provides the students and the staff of Florida State University College of Medicine an opportunity to express gratitude to its outstanding faculty. The Class of 2013 prepared a video thanking their faculty and awards were presented: Dr. Brett Parra (pictured left) and Dr. Kip Turnage received the Outstanding Community Faculty Educator Award Dr. Wendy Osban received the Mission Model Award Dr. Steven Jabaley received the Student’s Choice Award Dr. Thabet Alsheikh received the Doctoring 3 Facilitator Award REGIONAL

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Family Medicine in Alaska by Elisabeth Sappenfield At Florida State University College of Medicine, we are trained to practice patient-centered health care, taught to discover and advance our knowledge, and are motivated to respond to community needs, especially through service to elder, rural, minority, and underserved populations. Our fourth year of training provides the perfect opportunity for students to explore their many interests and goals in medicine through electives and even vacation time. For me, this occasion meant gaining a deeper understanding of the Alaskan Native population and learning rural health care by providing health care services to this unique group. American Indian and Alaskan Native people have a lower life expectancy, a disproportionate disease burden, desperate poverty, and less education compared to other Americans. The Indian Health Service (IHS) is an agency within the Department of Health and Human Services that provides a comprehensive health service delivery system for approximately 2 million of the nation’s American Indians and Alaskan Natives. There are many singular medical school and residency elective rotations all over the country provided by the IHS to advance knowledge of this high-risk population. My destination was Kanakanak hospital in Dillingham, Alaska. The hospital is a part of the Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation that services 5,295 Alaskan natives, provides health care services to 27 villages, and is 46,714 square miles in size. Kanakanak hospital is a 16-bed facility that provides general medical, pediatric, obstetric, and emergency medicine services as well as multiple ancillary services and specialty care services such as flexible sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy. Transportation between the nearby villages and Dillingham is mainly by air, and supplemented by boats in the summer and snowmobiles in the winter. Supplies must be shipped by air-freight or water transport. The salmon industry, or actually commercial fishing, is a key part of the local economy. Day one, twelve hours into my flight from Pensacola, I am informed that my plane might not fly to Dillingham from Anchorage that night due to inclement weather. This is a common issue in the region. A snowmobile ride during the wrong time could result in walking fair distances in white-out conditions. Patients who need a medical evacuation from a nearby village to Dillingham, or transport from Dillingham to Anchorage, are occasionally unable to do so due to the weather. This leaves their care in the hands of their trained local health aides, telemedicine conferencing, and the skilled abilities of the family physicians and midlevel care providers in Dillingham. Incredible is how I would describe my experience in Alaska. These isolated family medicine physicians are the only local care providers for these people. I truly enjoyed working alongside family medicine physicians who operated independently in a community without sub-specialist physicians, and without the ability to rapidly transfer critical patients. This compelling rotation allowed me to enhance my skills in all areas of medicine, develop confidence in my medical training, learn about the unique culture of the natives in Dillingham, and develop extreme cold weather wilderness survival skills. By experiencing different cultures and ways of life, we can build a heart for diverse community needs, change our cultural biases, and increase our awareness of different health care systems and their individual challenges. I encourage all of my peers to take on such adventures.

Join our Facebook Group to stay connected with the Pensacola Regional Campus!

http://www.facebook.com/groups/Pensacolaregionacampusfsucom/

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Welcome, Class of 2015

The Class of 2015 made their Regional Campus selections during Mini-Match held in Tallahassee on August 24, 2012.

Front Row: Linh Tran, Yen Chau, Stephen Sheridan, Sarah Schmidt, Blakele Bakker, Juliana Matthews, Alexa Buchanan, John Hahn, Back Row: Nathan Nowalk, Miranda Mack, Joshua Gordon, Cameron Ward, Geami Britt, Kevin Yan, David Ullman, Chris Johnson Not Pictured: Lamar Echols, Adam Engel

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Campus Highlights Umar Karaman, Elisabeth Sappenfield and Joshua Smith (Class of 2013) were selected for the Alpha Omega Honor Medical Society. AOA is a medical organization that recognizes excellence in academics and conduct.

Pensacola Regional Campus is currently involved in its annual fund campaign. Our annual fund is the vehicle for unrestricted giving to the Pensacola Campus of the FSU College of Medicine.

Erin Bascom and Laura Davis (Class of 2013) along with Rick Sims (Class of 2014) have been inducted into the Seminole Torchbearers. Kelly Schwirian (Class of 2014) has been selected to receive the H.O.W. (Hearing the Ovarian Cancer Whispers), Dr. Robert C. Knapp Medical Student Award for 2013-2014. Dr. Robert Wilson, Jr. “Dr. Bob” is our 2013 AAMC Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award Nominee. This award honors a medical school faculty physician who exemplifies the qualities of a caring and compassionate mentor in the teaching and advising of medical students. Dr. Teresa Mahaffey was named “2012 Woman of the Year” by the Pace area Chamber of Commerce for her service and involvement in the area.

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Much-needed gifts to this fund support key initiatives and are apportioned at the discretion of the campus dean.

For your convenience we now offer an electronic funds transfer option for faculty to donate. You can elect to have all or a portion of your rotation stipend donated to our campus annual fund. Please contact Dana Johnson at (850)494-5939, extension 104, for more information.

Thanks For Your Support!

Dr. Wendy Osban has been named President of the Escambia County Medical Society for 2013.

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Pensacola Regional Campus  8880 University Parkway, Suite A Pensacola, Florida 32514 Phone: 850-494-5939 Fax: 850-494-5962 Website: http://www.med.fsu.edu/?page=pensacolaRegional.home

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May 2013 Newsletter  

Pensacola FSUCOM Newsletter