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THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

C o L L e G e o f M e D I C I n e

P R o D U C I n G

C o M P A s s I o n A t e

P H Y s I C I A n s

F o R

t H e

2 1 s t

C e n t U R Y


W H AT M A K E S U S D I F F E R E N T. . .

C o n t e n t s

How we’re different

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Mission

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Educational program

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Teamwork

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Teaching assistants

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Academic departments

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Centers and institutes

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Medical library

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Clinical Learning Center

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Regional campuses

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Rural training

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Reaching out

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Research

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Encouraging diversity

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Honors Medical Scholars

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Scholarships

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Graduate success

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Residency programs

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We’re breaking new ground in medical education. • Our mission shapes everything we do, including admissions. • This medical school is patient-centered and student-focused. • Our students begin in the summer, a semester earlier than most medical schools, completing basic anatomy and getting a generous dose of attention from faculty and teaching assistants. • They learn in small groups that emphasize teamwork and value diversity, mutual respect and open communication. • Our students have multiple opportunities for

• They spend Years 3 and 4 at one of our six regional campuses, learning one-on-one from community physicians and having a campus dean as their mentor. • They get far more hands-on clinical experience than most medical schools offer.

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service-learning and research.

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W e ’ r e o n a m i s s i o n The mission of the Florida state University

College of medicine is to educate and develop exemplary physicians who practice patient-centered health care, discover and advance knowledge, and are responsive to community needs, especially through service to elder, rural, Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

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minority and underserved populations.

“Medical school is stressful enough. This place offers support just from students but from the faculty as well. T h e y ’ r e v e r y become the best doctor.”


our e d u c a t i o n a l P r o g r a m

Years 1 and 2: Students are at the main campus in tallahassee. through coursework, patient encounters, organizations and interest groups, they learn the biological, behavioral and social sciences essential to the practice of medicine; they get training in communication skills, epidemiology, biostatistics, and societal and public health issues; and they meet physicians from primary care, specialty and subspecialty disciplines. they have service-learning

the student support coordinator and the roughly 40

opportunities as near as a tallahassee clinic and as

other students at their campus.

far away as a village in central america, now and throughout their four years. they begin the doctoring

Year 4: Still at the regional campus, students

continuum, which continues through Year 3. they

complete advanced clerkships in family medicine,

have support from their academic advisor, faculty

internal medicine, emergency medicine and

members, tas, their student support coordinator

geriatrics. they use their elective time to identify

and the roughly 30 other students in their learning

knowledge gaps, explore specialty areas and

community.

broaden their experiences. they explore residency options and, on match day, find out where they’ll go

Year 3: Students move to one of our regional

for their residency program.

campuses or our major rural site. they see hundreds across the curriculum, students receive instruction

members in community health facilities to complete

and experience with multidisciplinary content and

clerkships in family medicine, internal medicine,

themes, including ethics, geriatrics, diagnostic

obstetrics-gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry and

imaging, evidence-based medicine, and the

surgery. they participate in a longitudinal, continuity-

appropriate use of bioinformatics and technology.

of-care experience devoted to managing chronic

With such a depth and breadth of knowledge and

illness. they have support from their campus dean,

experience, all career options are possible.

and a caring attitude, not c o m m i t t e d to helping you VANESSA ESCOBAR

‘11

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of patients as they work alongside physician/faculty

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TEAMWoRK iS KEY

for in div idu al st u dy, t h e LCs are des ign ed for grou p st u dy session s.

Th o u gh our exp e c ta t i o ns are g reat , ou r gro u ps a re s mal l . We t hi nk s ma l l g ro u ps

A ll day, every day, you r LC offers a core

crea te a be t te r, st ud e nt- ce nte re d l ear n i n g

collec t ion of m edical tex ts, a prin ter an d

e nv iro n m e nt .

ph otocopier, n etwork an d w ireless i n ter n et access, dVd an d v ideo projec tors, a n d other

it a ll sta rts wit h t he LCs – t ha t i s, o u r Lea rn in g Co mmuni t i es. if yo u’ re a st u den t h e re, yo u’ll b e o ne of a b o ut 3 0 st ud en ts i n yo u r LC. The re yo u ca n re l ax , st ud y, sn ac k, Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

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s h owe r, ke e p yo ur i te ms i n a p e rso n al l oc ker – a n d b e co me par t of a s ma l l g ro up of fel low m e d stu d e nts.

Th e LCs are in t he same b ui l d i ng a s t h e cla ss ro o m s, t he l i b ra r y a nd t he c l i n i cal cen ter, so th ey of fe r a have n b e twe e n cl asses or any oth e r tim e whe n go i ng ho me se e ms l i ke too lon g a trip. And a l t ho ug h t he l i b ra r y i s perfec t

in st ru c t ion al tec h n ology.


T E A C H I N G A S S I S TA N T S

Am on g th e Co ll e ge of M e d i ci ne ’s i nnovat i ve app roa ch es to m e d ica l e d uca t i o n i s t he u se of se le c te d se co nd -yea r me d i ca l stu d e n ts a s teaching a ss i sta nts ( TAs) . S tu d e n ts w ith a b ove ave rage aca d e mi c pe rform a n ce a nd exce l l e nt i nte r p e rso na l skills a re se le c te d t hro ug h a co mp e t i t i ve process by a fac ulty co mmi t te e to se r ve as TAs to th e first-year cl ass.

In on e re ce n t year, fo r examp l e, we

effec t ive in gu idin g n ew st u den ts in u n derstandin g

u t ilize d 17 TAs i n g ross ana to my, fo ur i n

con cepts an d ex pec tat ion s, as well as in develo pin g

“Introd u c tio n to Do c to r i ng ” and fo ur a s

con fiden ce du rin g t h e t ran sit ion to m edical sc h ool.

me dica l in fo rmat ics ass i stants fo r a f i rstyea r cla ss of 120 st ud e nts.

Feedbac k t h rou gh cou rse evalu at ion form s in d icates t h e program is popu lar an d is h av in g t h e desired

TAs h ave b e e n c re d ite d wi t h he l p i ng new

effec t of prov idin g a valu ed an d t ru sted resou rce with

stu d e n ts b e tte r inte g rate aca d e mi ca l l y,

n u m erou s ben efits.

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sc h ool env iron m en t . Th e TA program h as been h igh ly

em otion a lly a n d so c ial l y i nto t he me d i ca l

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o u R A C A d E M i C d E PA R T M E n TS

of g ra d u a te stu d en ts a n d P h .d. stu d en ts. Th ey exce l i n a d va n c i n g k n ow l ed ge i n th e m ol e c u l a r

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Th e Co llege of Medi ci ne encourages

ba s i s of h u m a n d i sea se. We h ave g ra d u a te

in terd iscipl i nary col l aborati on and

p rog ra m s i n th ree a rea s : b i om ed i ca l sc i e n ces,

in tegrat io n of the curri cul um through i ts

n eu rosc i en ce a n d m ol e c u l a r b i op hys i cs. (See

st reamlin e d structure.

discoveries, Page 18.)

Biomedical Sciences

Clinical Sciences

Th is is our basi c-sci ence research and

T h i s d epa r tm en t i s p i vota l i n tea c h i n g th e key

teaching arm . Facul ty m embers teach th e

d i sc i p l i n es of i n ter n a l m e d i c i n e, p ed i a tr i cs,

basic med i cal sci ence courses i n Years 1 an d

obste tr i cs, g y n e col og y, s u rger y, e m e rge n cy

2 . Th ey al so teach and supervi se the researc h

m ed i c i n e a n d n eu rol og y. ou r fa c u l ty a t t h e ce n tra l ca m p u s h ave tea c h i n g res p on s i b i l i t i es th rou g h ou t th e fou r-yea r c u r r i c u l u m a n d se r ve a s ed u ca ti on d i rec tors, b u t a l so g i ve l ec t u res, fa c i l i ta te s m a l l g rou ps, tea c h i n th e C l i n i ca l Lea r n i n g Cen te r (see Pa ge 1 2 ) a n d pa r ti ci pa te i n ba s i c sc i en ce cou rses.


Me d i c i n e h op es to a d d to F l or i d a ’s n u m b er of

Family Medicine & Rural Health

ce r ti fi ed ge r i a tr i c i a n s, th e d epa r tm en t p re pa res

Primary care and rural medi ci ne are bui l t in to

p hys i c i a n s i n a l l m ed i ca l d i sc i p l i n es to p rovi d e

o u r school’s m i ssi on. Thi s department’s fac u l ty

exem p l a r y ca re to ol d e r a d u l ts. ou r g ra d u a tes

me mb ers teac h i n al l four years of the med i cal

rou ti n el y ra n k a m on g th e n a ti on ’s b est- p re pa re d

cu rriculum v ia l ecture and sm al l groups, a s we l l

to ca re for e l d e rs.

as in t he clin ical center. (See Page 12.) They also are involved l ocal l y and gl obal l y i n the care

Medical Humanities & Social Sciences

of t h e u nd erserved. Thi s departm ent overse es

As pa r t of ou r effor t to n u r tu re we l l - rou n d ed

t h e ru ral t raini ng si tes i n i m m okal ee, Mari an n a

p hys i c i a n s w h o ca n a d d ress th e n ee d s of

an d Th o masv ill e, G a. (See Page 16.) What’s

F l or i d a ’s d i verse p op u l a ti on s, th i s d e pa r tme n t

more, research and schol arl y acti vi ty i s anoth e r

em p h a s i zes n ot j u st th e b i ol og i ca l b u t a l so t h e

p romin ent fo cus.

psyc h ol og i ca l a n d soc i a l a s p e c ts of m e d i c i n e. Fa c u l ty m em b e rs str i ve to c rea te a c u l tu re of

Geriatrics ou r med ical sc hool i s one of onl y a handfu l n at ionwid e t hat dedi cate an enti re departm en t to ge riat rics and i ntegrate geri atri cs throu gh ou t t h e fo u r-year curri cul um. it al so i s one of t h e

h u m a n i s m i n m e d i ca l ed u ca ti on , pa ti en t ca re a n d m u l ti d i sc i p l i n a r y resea rc h . T h e d epa r t m e n t i s for m i n g pa r tn e rs h i ps w i th oth er d epa r tme n ts w i th i n th e u n i ve rs i ty to d eve l op th e rol e of h u m a n i ti es w i th i n th e Col l e ge of Med i c i n e.

few t h at req uire students to com pl ete a ful l ro tat ion in ger i atri cs. Al though the Col l ege of

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C E n T E RS A n d i n ST i T u T ES

i n addit ion to its academ ic depart m en ts, t h e College of Medic in e is h om e to a n u m ber of cen ters an d in st it u tes. Here are a few examples: S ix cen ters are con tain ed in t h e d iv ision of Healt h Affairs, w h ic h is en gaged in teac h in g, Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

researc h an d serv ice in t h e areas of h ealt h policy an d pu blic h ealt h . Th e Cen ter for B rain Repair pu rsu es preven t ion , am eliorat ion , t reat m en t an d repair of in ju ries or dam age to t h e brain an d spin al cord. Th e Cen ter for i n n ovat ive Collaborat ion in Medic in e an d Law (operated join t ly w it h t h e College of Law) ex plores aven u es for cooperat ion between th ese two profession s to ben efit Florida con su m ers. A n d t h e Au t ism i n st it u te coordin ates an d prom otes researc h , edu cat ion an d serv ice

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related to au t ism spec t ru m disorder.


AT T H E L i B R A R Y

Sta ff m e m b e rs in t he M a g ui re M e d i ca l Libra ry a c t as teac he rs a s we l l as l i b rar i an s, coa c h in g in t he ar t of research a nd how best to u se t he near l y 2,0 0 0 e - j o ur na l s, 5 0 0 clin ica l e - bo o ks and asso r te d d a tabases th a t prov ide access to mo re t ha n 7 mi l l i on

resou rces a re a b o o n fo r st ud e nts as wel l as fa cu lty m e m b e rs, es p e c i al l y t hose i n rem ote a rea s of Florid a. “Access to t he FSu Co l l ege of M e d ic in e e - lib rar y,” o ne p hys i ci an/fac u l ty m e m be r sa i d , “has e nha nce d my ab i l i ty to p rov ide up - to - d a te, ev i d e nce - base d dia gn oses a nd me d i ca l ca re.”

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fu ll-text a rti cles. These a l ways - avai l abl e

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P R A C T i C E PAT i E n T S Even before our students start their rotations

When students wonder how well they’re doing,

in Year 3, they get quite a bit of patient contact.

the standardized patients are there to tell them.

Much of it takes place in the Clinical Learning

So are faculty members, who witness these

Center, the next-best thing to an actual

patient encounters via closed-circuit cameras.

physician’s office. There they have a choice of either standardized patients or “manikins” (think high-tech mannequins). Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

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As good as the standardized patients are, there are some things even they can’t do – such as let their heartbeat rise dangerously high and

Standardized patients are recruited from the

plunge daringly low just for the sake of medical

community and carefully trained to portray

education. But the manikins can.

specific medical, psychological and social problems consistently. By doing so, they allow students to become more skillful at conducting a medical interview; communicating with a patient; performing a physical exam; documenting and presenting a case; and making attempts at early clinical reasoning.


in the Charlotte E. Maguire, M.d., and

in by a member of the community. But for an

Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Center for

exercise requiring a diagnosis for a seriously ill

Clinical Simulation, the manikins allow students

baby, a student is using a manikin.

to observe the effects of medical interventions on patient vital signs such as blood pressure, breathing, pulse and heart sounds. on these pages you see students working in

Patient simulators prepare future physicians for challenging medical situations in which they’ll have to think on their feet. ultimately they help reduce medical errors and improve patient safety.

both scenarios. For a well-baby exam, a student is checking the health of a real baby, brought

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ouR REGionAL CAMPuSES

He re a t the Flo r i d a S tate Co l l e ge of Medi c in e,

a teac h in g h ospital an d, t h erefore, m uc h

we d o n ’t have a t ra d i t i o nal tea chi ng h ospital.

m ore h an ds-on ex perien ce. A n d t h e dean of

Afte r a ll, an imp o r ta nt par t of o ur mi ssi on is

t h at region al cam pu s becom es t h eir most

to pro du ce t he p r i mar y- ca re p hys i c i an s t h at

t ru sted adv isor.

Flo rid a n e e d s. We wa nt o ur st ud e nts to l earn fro m co mmunity p hys i c i ans and wo r k w i t h t h e Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

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kin ds of pat ie nts a nd a i l me nts t hey ’ re l i kely

PensacOla

tallahassee

to e n co u nte r in t he i r own p ra ct i ce som eday. d a y t O n a B e ac h

So we se n d o ur st ud e nts to o ne of o u r

OrlandO

s ix re gio nal camp uses – day to na B eac h , Fo rt Pie rce, orland o, Pe nsaco l a, Sa rasota, Ta lla h a sse e – to wo r k i n co mmuni ty set t i n gs. Th e re th ey gain much g rea te r a ccess to th e ir p hys ic ian/teac he rs t han t hey wou l d in

sarasOta

FOrt Pierce


Th e re gio n a l camp uses g i ve o ur me d i cal sch o o l a sta tewid e p rese nce. We have a m a sse d a cle rks hi p fac ul ty of mo re th an 2 ,000 phys ic ians ac ross F l o r i d a.

in a dd itio n , t his ap p roa ch he l ps to p reser ve th e s m a ll- g ro up at mos p he re t hat o ur st u den ts e n joy righ t f ro m t he i r f i rst d ay of me di cal sch o o l. Ta ke a c lass of 1 20 st ud e nts, di v i de it by s ix ca mp uses, and t ha t ’s a n ave rage of 20 th ird-year st ud e nts p e r ca mp us. T h ose grou ps b e co me t i g ht- k ni t . And a s t hey wa tc h th e ir me d ica l teac he rs i nte rac t w i t h th e co m m u nity, t hey b e co me par t of th at com m u n ity as we l l .

‘06

m AT T l E E

“As a third-year student

at a lot of medical institutions, you are the

bottom person on the totem pole of a large

team. Here, as a th irdyear medical student you are actually ta king

in ea c h co mmunity, we par t ne r wi t h a

care of patients. I t hink

m in im u m of ab o ut a d oze n hos p i tal s, m edi cal

that’s a big differen ce.”

ce n te rs, c linics and o t he r i nst i t ut i o ns – n ot to m e n tio n all of t he i nd i v i d ua l p hys i c i an s’ offices th a t also se r ve as cl ass ro o ms.

‘06

STEPHANIE lEE

“The hands-on patient experience in the

third and fourth years

was just invaluable. When we came out into residency, I was how to approach patients, how to behave, how to carry myself in the operating room, how to carry myself in the

labor room.”

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confident in knowing

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S M A L L -T o W n o P P o R T u n i T i E S

Students in our rural program will tell you that smaller towns often offer the biggest opportunity for hands-on medical experience.

The College of Medicine offers a comprehensive program in rural medicine, which includes an outreach effort to introduce students to rural medicine as early as the eighth grade. (See “Encouraging diversity,� Page 20.) Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

Marianna, about an hour’s drive west of Tallahassee, is the heart of our rural program. As many as four of our students spend their entire third year there working with patients, physicians and staff members at Jackson Hospital. They get their psychology training at the Florida State Hospital in nearby Chattahoochee.

in immokalee, a Southwest Florida community famed for its produce, our rural training site allows students to care for migrant farmworkers and other rural patients for one or more rotations in Year 3 or 4. The clinical

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“On e th i n g th a t’s u n i q u e a t th i s sc h o o l i s th a t F l o r i d a S ta te d o es n o t b ea t th e co m pa ss i o n a te e m pa thy o u t of yo u . T h ey foste r i t a n d th ey n u r tu re i t a n d th ey d eve l o p i t .”

‘11

training occurs in offices, clinics and the isabel

aBBY HUnTer

Collier Read Medical Campus in immokalee, with additional hospital experience in naples.

Even for students who don’t visit Marianna or immokalee, opportunities in rural medicine abound. Communities around each of our regional campuses include physicians who care for rural patients, and students can meet them and treat them during their rotations.

synonymous with “rural.” Some residents in the heart of our larger cities also get insufficient medical care, and our students get to learn from them as well.

medical outreach exist. Students care for patients at neighborhood Health Services; they participate in

REACHING OUT

FSuCares’ annual spring break trips to immokalee, the

Because the College of Medicine’s mission includes

Texas-Mexico border and Panama; they take part in

service to the medically underserved, and because

quarterly trips to nicaragua … and that’s just the top of

many students attracted to our mission have a

a very long list.

heart for service, numerous opportunities for

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“underserved,” of course, is not always

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DISCOVERIES

F l o r i d a S t a t e i s o n e o f t h e n a t i o n ’s e l i t e

We offer an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in biomedical

research universities, with the Carnegie

sciences that prepares graduates for careers in

Fo u n d a t i o n ’s h i g h e s t d e s i g n a t i o n : D o c t o r a l /

resea rc h a n d tea c h i n g , i n b o t h a ca d e m i c a n d

Research University-Extensive. College of

p r i va te - se c to r resea rc h e nv i ro n m e n ts. W h a t ’s

Medicine students have the opportunity to

m o re , o u r Po s t d o c t o r a l C a re e r D e ve l o p m e n t

pa rtic ipa te in research l i te ra l l y f ro m t h e ben c h

Pro g ra m a c t i ve l y a ss i sts sc h o l a rs i n b o t h t h e

t o t h e b e d s i d e. We h a ve a d y n a m i c re s e a rc h

College of Medicine and other science programs

agenda in biomedical sciences, geriatrics, rural

on cam pu s.

h ea lth a n d pat ie nt sa fe ty, amo ng o t her areas. We h ave m ore t h an 55,0 0 0 n et squ are feet of FOR MO RE D ETA ILS : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

researc h space w it h w ide access to equ ipm ent an d procedu res, in c lu din g m olec u lar i m aging, st ru c t u ral biology, gen om ics, proteom ics, flow cytometry and others. Students also have a c c e s s t o c o m m o n fa c i l i t i e s i n o t h e r n e a r by u n i t s o n t h e m a i n c a m p u s , s u c h a s B i o l o g y, Ch em ist ry an d Psyc h ology.

T h e Co l l e ge of M e d i c i n e ’s co m m u n i tybased model of education has provided an i d e a l f o u n d a t i o n f o r t h e d e ve l o p m e n t o f o u r

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co m m u n i ty- ba se d C l i n i ca l Resea rc h n e two r k . H av i n g m o re t h a n 2 ,0 0 0 p hys i c i a n /fa c u l ty members statewide in private, group or hospital-based practices allows access to more than 2 million patients in Florida. The CRn p rov ides c lin ical, t rans l at i o nal a nd b e h av i oral re s e a rc h o p p o r t u n i t i e s fo r c l i n i c i a n s , fa c u l ty a n d st u d e n ts i n rea l -wo r l d , co m m u n i ty- ba se d s e t t i n g s . H e a l t h o u t c o m e s c a n b e m e a s u re d a c ro s s t h e s p e c t r u m o f h e a l t h , g e n d e r, a g e ,

ou r Tra n s l a t i o n a l Sc i e n ce L a b o ra to r y st u d i es h u m a n d i sea se w i t h a n u n d e r l y i n g m i ss i o n to se e ba s ic researc h d i scove r i es t rans l ated i n to technologies and therapies that benefit the patient. The lab is open to potential college and u n ive rs ity u se rs at F l o r i d a S tate uni ve rsi ty, as well as users from other universities or entities.

Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w w w. med .fs u.ed u

socioeconomic status and geographic location.

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EnCouRAGinG diVERSiTY

Fo R MoR e D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

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ou r m iss io n is d i f fe re nt f ro m t hat of m ost

on e reason t h e Florida Legislat u re c reated

m e d ica l sc ho o ls. i t o nl y fo l l ows, t he n , t h at

t h is sc h ool was to prov ide physic ian s

ou r way of c ho os i ng me d i ca l st ud e nts i s

for people w h o didn ’t h ave on e – su c h

a lso d iffe re nt . We ne e d st ud e nts who fi t ou r

as in Florida’s sm aller tow n s an d in n e r

m iss io n . Yes, yo u have to b e a to p - notc h

c it ies. A n d becau se people w h o grew u p

stu de n t, but t hat al o ne wo n’t ge t yo u i n . We

in m edically u n derserved areas are more

n e e d a c lass t hat ref l e cts t he d i ve rs i ty of

likely to wan t to set t le dow n t h ere, we go to

Florida , includ ing no nt ra d i t i o nal st ud en ts.

great pain s to seek ou t prospec t ive m edical

You n e e d a heart fo r se r v i ng o t he rs. You n eed

st u den ts t h ere an d n u rt u re t h em alon g th e

to b e lieve in t reat i ng t he pat i e nt , no t t h e

pat h to m edical sc h ool.

disea se. Yo u ne e d to wo r k we l l a s a m em ber of a tea m .

“The Do c to r i n g I a nd Gross A nato my courses, whi c h be g in i n of th e seco n d -yea r m ed i cal stud ents i n the teac hi ng faculty. my p red ecesso rs a nd have a so urce of i nsp i rati o n in my f i r s t


We ca ll th ese o ur p i p e l i ne p ro g rams. one of th e m is SSTRi dE ( Sc i e nce S t ud e nts Toge th e r Rea c hing i nst r uc t i o nal di ve rs i ty & Exce lle n ce). i t reac hes i nto mi d d l e a nd h i gh sch oo ls in n o rt h Flo r i d a, e nco ura ges r ural stu d e n ts to co ns id e r ca re e rs i n me d i ci n e, an d offe rs gu ida n ce, t uto r i ng a nd o t he r s uppor t . in crea s in gly, t hose SSTRi dE pa r t i ci pan ts are b e com in g m ed ical st ud e nts he re.

Th e n th e re ’s t he maste r ’s p ro g ram ca lle d Brid ge. i t ’s d es i g ne d to ex pa nd th e p o o l of s u ccessf ul a p p l i ca nts f ro m m e dica lly u n d e rse r ve d r ura l a nd i nne r- ci ty com m u n ities. The 1 2- mo nt h p ro g ram p rov i des b oth e d u ca tio n in me d i ca l k nowl e d ge an d exp e rie n ces in clini ca l p rac t i ce, of fe r i ng a

Th e Hon ors Medical Sc h olars Program reac h es

b rid ge to m e dical scho o l o r a ca re e r i n

ou t to top h igh sc h ool st u den ts in Florid a an d

h ea lth ca re.

invites them to commit to Florida State; to s a t i s f y t h e i r p re - m e d re q u i re m e n t s ; t o b u i l d

Th ese p ro grams p ro d uce a r i c h d i ve rs i ty t h at

early m en torin g relat ion sh ips w it h t h e College

is refle c te d eve ry year i n t he co mp os i t i o n of

of M e d i c i n e ; a n d , i n so m e ca ses, to a p p l y fo r

ou r first-yea r c lasses.

early adm ission to t h e m ed sc h ool.

SCHoLARSHiPS

Th rou gh th e ge ne ros i ty of t he Co l l e ge of

t h e Sou t h ern Sc h olarsh ip Fou n dat ion inv ites

M e d ic in e a n d d o no rs, seve ra l scho l ars hi p

st u den ts to apply for ren t-free h ou sin g ac ross

op p ortu n ities re late d to me d i ca l e d uca ti on

t h e st reet from t h e m edical sc h ool.

a re ava ila ble. Also, o ur f i na nc i al ai d of f i ce can

ava ila ble fro m o uts i d e so urces. i n a d d i ti on ,

t h e s u m m e r of f i rst yea r, i n cl ud e a q uar ter It was an i nva l ua b l e ex p e r i ence to l ear n f rom semeste r.”

‘14

Fo R MoRe DetA ILs : w w w. med .fs u.ed u

h e lp id e n tify co unt l ess o t he r sc ho l ars hi ps

BRETT THOmAS

21


G R A d u AT E S u C C E S S

RESidEnCY PRoGRAMS

our graduates have joined some of the top

Florida needs medical residency programs,

residency programs in Florida and across

and the College of Medicine is helping to

t h e c o u n t r y, a n d t h e y ’ re c re a t i n g a s t e r l i n g

prov ide t h em . We spon sor residen cy program s

re p u ta tio n fo r t his sc ho o l . We re g ul ar l y recei ve

i n o b s t e t r i c s /g y n e c o l o g y a n d p e d i a t r i c s a t

c o m p l i m e n t s f ro m re s i d e n c y d i re c t o rs a b o u t

S a c re d H e a r t H o s p i t a l i n Pe n s a c o l a , i n t e r n a l

t h e qu a lity of o ur st ud e nts. i n fac t , as of m i d-

medicine at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and

2011, approximately one-fourth of the graduates

fa m i l y m e d i c i n e a t Le e M e m o r i a l H o s p i t a l i n

from our first three graduating classes had been

Fort Myers.

se le cte d a s c hief res i d e nt .

‘05-’12

m aT C H r e s U L T s B Y s P e C i a L T Y ‘ 0 5 - ‘ 1 2 oTHer sPeCiaLTies* 10.4%

FoR Mo Re D etA ILs : w ww. med .fsu.ed u

inTernaL meDiCine 17.3%

anesTHesioLoGY 4.5% orTHoPeDiC sUrGerY 3.2% PsYCHiaTrY 2.8%

FamiLY meDiCine 14.5% GeneraL sUrGerY 11.1%

emerGenCY meDiCine 11.2%

22

*_ includes diagnostic radiology, dermatology, urology, otolaryngology, pathology, radiation oncology, vascular surgery, plastic surgery, ophthalmology, neurology and physical medicine and rehabilitation.

PeDiaTriCs 13.5%

oBsTeTriCs-GYneCoLoGY 11.9%


Fo R MoRe DetA ILs : w w w. med .fs u.ed u

23


P R O d U C I N G

C O m P A s s I O N A T E

P H y s I C I A N s

f O R

T H E

2 1 s T

C E N T U R y

1115 W. Call St. Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (850) 644-1855 Fax (850) 644-9399

w w w . m e d . f s u . e d u

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