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’Nole Notes Welcome to ‘Nole Notes

As you begin to think about college, you’ll have a million questions – from which school to what major best fits you. We’ve designed ’Nole Notes to help answer some of those questions. It’s filled with tips on what to look for in a school, advice from current students, and information on opportunities that are available at Florida State. We hope you enjoy ’Nole Notes and that you find the information useful as you begin exploring colleges and universities.

What’s Inside: Tips for a Successful College Visit. . . . . . . . . . . pg. 4 Jon’s Top Tips for High School Juniors. . . . . . . pg. 7 Stroll Through Florida State University. . . . . . . pg. 8 The Dos and Don’ts of Choosing a School . . . pg. 14 What Can We Do For You? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg. 16 Your Finances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg. 18

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Vol. XXII, 2012


From the Director…

Keep Your Eyes, Ears, and Options Open This is an exciting time in your life – choosing a college is one of the most important decisions you’ll make. We encourage you to make this experience an adventure – have fun with it, keep an open mind, and trust your intuition. Here are a few tips: • Keep in mind what’s important to you. • Look for a school that offers a wide range of courses, majors, and opportunities. • Remember, in addition to choosing a college, you are choosing a home. Pay attention to how you feel when you visit campuses, and interact with students and faculty. • Ask lots of questions – make contact with representatives from the Office of Admissions and, if you can, speak with someone in the academic departments which interest you. As you search for the right school, I hope you’ll keep Florida State University in mind. We offer the advantages of a small liberal arts college coupled with the resources of a large research university – a combination that results in unique educational opportunities. Browse through ’Nole Notes, take some time to peruse our website at www.fsu.edu, and then visit us to experience the campus personally. Good luck in finding the university that’s right for you. If you have any questions about Florida State, please contact us at admissions@admin.fsu.edu. I look forward to seeing you on campus. Sincerely, Janice V. Finney Director of Admissions 2


Florida State University is Florida’s Student University “Find the right fit.” You’ll probably hear the phrase often. While it’s important to find a college that will support your academic dreams and career goals, it’s also important to find a place that you can call home for the next four years. At Florida State, we have a reputation for providing students with a caring and supportive community. • We welcome students from all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and over 125 countries. In fact, most of our student population hails from at least 150 miles. • We offer cultural discovery and educational opportunities on a global scale through the Center for Global Engagement, as well as study abroad opportunities available through our International Programs Office. • We cater to every undergraduate by providing academic support on an individual basis through the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE). • We encourage our students to conduct groundbreaking research right alongside our dedicated faculty, who love to teach and nurture their students. • We uphold our commitment to diversity. Florida State is in the top five among major public research institutions in awarding bachelor’s degrees to African American students. Our College of Medicine boasts a minority enrollment of 25 percent, and the College of Law is ranked in the nation’s top three for Hispanic students. • We give students every opportunity to pursue their post-graduate goals through the support of our innovative and award-winning Career Center. • We connect students to service, leadership, and community action through the Center for Leadership and Civic Education. • We support the development of Rhodes, Truman, and Fulbright Scholars (just to name a few) through the efforts of our Office of National Fellowships. • We provide a complete experience both inside and outside the classroom. The range of campus activities is as diverse as our student population, with over 550 clubs and organizations located right on campus. You can’t help but get involved!

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Tips for a Successful College Visit Preparation is the key to a successful college visit. Learn as much as you can about the college beforehand. Many schools post valuable information for prospective students on their websites. Experience a college or university when classes are in session, and faculty, staff, and students are available to answer your questions. Wear comfortable shoes and clothing. Check the local weather ahead of time. Arrive 15 to 30 minutes early to allow time for parking, check-in, and restroom breaks. Print out directions from the school’s website before you leave home. Your electronic navigational devices can’t help you secure parking. And while you’re on campus, remember to: • Grab a bite to eat. • Visit the main library. • View a residence hall or sample showroom. (For the security of all residence hall students, you may not be able to see a student room.) • Meet with the faculty or staff of your intended major. • Attend a sporting event or musical, dance, or theatrical performance. • Spend some time in the student union (the hub of student activity). While you are there, pick up a school newspaper. • Relax and do some people-watching. • Take photos of your favorite sites on campus. • Visit the campus bookstore. • Check out the student recreational facilities.

Go to www.visit.fsu.edu to schedule a college visit to Florida State University.

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ADMISSIONS 101 Grownups, as well as classmates, will have lots of advice for you. Some good – some great – and some just plain inaccurate, although certainly well intended. We’ve come up with a list of a few dos and do nots to help you through the confusing college application process: • DO continue to work hard in your senior year by taking challenging college-prep courses and continuing to earn good grades. Remember, we’re watching. • DO take the time to proofread for misspellings and grammatical errors. This makes an admission rep think that you don’t care, or you can’t spell. • DO follow through to make sure your application and supporting documents have been received and do so well in advance of the deadline. • DO remember to include your signature and date on all required forms. Failure to do so could slow down the review process of your application. • DO keep track of important deadlines for admission deposits, housing contracts, financial aid, and scholarships. • DO NOT procrastinate. Waiting until the application deadline to apply is a common mistake that will create unnecessary stress on you and your parents, as well as the admission staff. Instead of asking “When is the deadline?” ask the professionals, “When should I apply?” • DO NOT let mom or dad fill out your application. It’s fine to get advice, but do the work yourself. • DO NOT use an email address that you and your friends may think is cute, but colleges won’t. In fact, you might want a separate email account just for the application process. • DO NOT forget to check your email. Colleges will communicate regularly through email, so don’t miss out. • DO NOT exclude your parents in your college search! You will need their involvement to help you figure out which colleges will suit your goals, your needs, and your budget. You can’t discount the value of their involvement in your education.

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DO YOU SPEAK COLLEGE? Does your list of foreign languages include “college speak”? What is Early Decision, Rolling Admission, the FAFSA, or an FTIC? It’s really an easy language to master. Trust us, it really is! Aid Package - Different types of aid combined (possibly including a scholarship, grant, loan, and/or work-study), determined by a college or university financial aid office. Credit Hour - A unit of academic credit which often represents one hour of class time per week for a period of study (semester, quarter, etc.). In order to earn three credit hours, you usually need to spend three hours per week in class for one semester/quarter. Early Action - An admission plan which notifies you of a decision prior to the regular notification date. Admission does not obligate you to enroll. Early Decision - An admission plan which notifies you of a decision prior to the regular notification date and obligates you to enroll. Grants - Awards based on financial need that do not require repayment. Grants are available through the federal government, state agencies, and educational institutions. Major - The subject in which you choose to specialize; a series of related courses taken primarily in your junior and senior years. Notification Dates - An admission plan which notifies you of a decision on scheduled dates, based on the date your application and materials were received. Admission does not obligate you to enroll. Rolling Admission - An admission plan which notifies you of a decision as soon as your application is complete and processed, usually in four to six weeks. Acceptance is not binding. Scholarships - Financial awards based on merit and/or need which you do not have to repay. Wait List - Admission on a space-available basis when you meet minimum entrance requirements. FAFSA - Free Application for Federal Student Aid. The application required for you to be considered for federal student financial aid. It is processed free of charge and used by most colleges and universities. Apply online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. FTICs - First-Time-In-College students. New additions to our academic family.

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Jon’s Top Tips for High School Juniors It’s time to start making some big decisions, and you’re probably feeling a bit overwhelmed. I was in your shoes not so long ago, and I know how you feel. I’ve jotted down a few tips to help you navigate the process and get excited for the next stage in your life. • Don’t get Senioritis. Work hard until the very end. Continue taking challenging classes, and you’ll be better prepared for your freshman year in college. • Seek some guidance. Visit your school’s guidance office where you’ll find tons of information to help you with your college search. • Explore your options. Visit different schools’ websites and spend some time exploring their programs. • Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Ask current college students about their experiences. They are a wonderful resource. • Test, and test again. Standardized testing like the SAT or ACT is part of the application process. Prepare for these exams early on, and if you are not satisfied with your score, don’t hesitate to retest. Universities usually look at your best scores. • Be proactive. Start working on those college essays early. The sooner you get them done, the quicker you can get feedback from your teachers, and the faster you can get your application in to your top colleges. Don’t miss those deadlines. • Apply for scholarships. Be sure to start the scholarship search early. Ask your guidance counselor for information, and check out www.fastweb.com. • Make sure to visit before you apply. The summer before your senior year is the perfect time to visit colleges. Make sure you take a tour, eat on campus, and, if possible, check out the residence halls. This will give you a good sense of whether or not the school is right for you. • Don’t stress. You might not get accepted to your first choice, but don’t freak out. There are many colleges out there for you, so take a deep breath. This should be an exciting time, not a stressful one. Best of luck as you begin your college search. Go ’Noles! Jon Bonura is completing his senior year as a Hospitality Management major. He is a graduate of Nease High School in Ponte Vedra, Florida. Jon is a University Ambassador, a member of the Marching Chiefs, and president of band fraternity Kappa Kappa Psi.

Apply Yourself! Start applying to colleges early in your senior year. To apply to Florida State University, simply: 1. Go to www.admissions.fsu.edu, click on “Apply Online,” complete the application in its entirety, and submit the $30 application fee. The application will be available on August 1, 2012. 2. Ask your guidance office to send us your official high school transcript. 3. Make sure we receive your ACT (#0734) and/or SAT (#5219) scores. (The University requires the optional portion of the ACT.) 4. Monitor the status of your application 24/7 at www.admissions.fsu.edu/StatusCheck. 7


I,2011 2011

TAKE A STROLL THROUGH Join us now for a stroll through campus. When you get a chance, come spend the day with us and experience the history and beauty of Florida State. We really think you’ll like what you see. 1. Westcott Fountain marks the oldest continuous site of higher education in Florida. 2. The Francis Eppes Statue honors the grandson of President Thomas Jefferson. Eppes was head of the Seminary West of the Suwannee (River), which would eventually become the Florida State College for Women and, later, The Florida State University. 3. The Suwannee Room was the original dining hall for the Florida State College for Women. Recently renovated to its former glory, it is, once again, a place for students to meet and eat. 4. Dodd Hall is the most elaborate example of Collegiate Gothic architecture on campus and was originally built as the library. Over its main entrance, rendered in gold leaf, is the inscription, “The half of knowledge is to know where to find knowledge.” Vol. XXI, 2011

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5. Legacy Fountain commemorates the school’s transition from the Florida State College for Women to The Florida State University in 1947. The figures in the fountain represent students from both eras, and the wall of water in the center symbolizes the passage of time.

Florida State University 101: orida State State University 101: Intro Intro ToInt Ca orida University 101: To Ca 6. Montgomery Hall, built in 1929, was once the gymnasium and center of campus life. Renovated in 2004, it is now home to one of the top dance programs in the nation.

Join us and now for a pictorial and historical stroll through campus. Whenco y 7. The Integration Statue honors students who worked for integration inWhen all aspectsyou of campus usnow nowfor for pictorial and historical stroll through campus. When you getlife. chance, co us aapictorial historical stroll through campus. get aachance, Maxwell Courtney wasWe the first African American to graduate from Florida in 1965. In that day with us. really think like what you Florida Florida Florida State State State University Junior Junior Junior ’Nole ’Nole ’Nole Notes Notes Notes • •77•State 7 see. Florida Florida State StateUniversity University Junior Junior ’Nole ’Nole Notes Notes •University 7• University 7you’ll with us.We Wereally really think you’ll like what you see. ith us. think you’ll like what you same year, Fred Flowers enrolled and became thesee. first African American to wear a Florida State

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15. The bronze T.K. Wetherell Statue is a life-size memorial to our thirteenth president, who left office at the January 2010.in honor of the Nobel Prize-winning physicist, 08) Theend Paul of Dirac Statue stands

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16. The09) fountain located at the DeVoe L. Moore University Center is known as the Heritage Tower. The DeVoe L. Moore University Center, which houses academic and Its arches administrative represent the matriculation of Florida State students, the cascading waters, which offices, is said to be one of the largest brick structuresand in the nts swho who who worked worked worked integration integration integration ininall inallall 67for 8where 88 – the 9910 9 and our 7 7 flow 8 87 99pool 7forfor Southeast. At its center is Doak Campbell Stadium, Seminoleof Florida State signify the passage of time, into a circulating a symbol rtney ney ey was was was the the the first first first African African African American American American football team plays to the roar of 84,000 garnet-and-gold-clad fans. campus. The torch on top of the Tower was a gift from the graduating classes of 1946, 1947, and 65. .InInIn that that that same same same year, year, year, Fred Fred Fred Flowers Flowers Flowers American merican totowear towear wear aaFlorida aFlorida Florida State State State athletic athletic athletic 1948. These classes experienced the transition the Florida State etic icAmerican 10) The Unconquered Statue celebrates the legacy from of the Seminole people – a College for Women (FSCW) ted dDoby Doby Doby Lee Lee Lee Flowers, Flowers, Flowers, Fred’s Fred’s sister, sister, sister, the the the of courage, toFred’s Florida State. The class of 1946 is considered the lastwhich trueinspires class of spirit integrity, strength, and determination all FSCW. of

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our students today. The spear is lit at sunset the night before each home game and burns until sunrise on the morning after the game. To enjoyphysicist, aphysicist, virtual tour of Florida State University, go to www.fsutour.org. When you’re ready to visit or of,ofthe ofthe the Nobel Nobel Nobel Prize-winning Prize-winning Prize-winning physicist, 1972 m1972 1972 until until until his hishis death death 1984. in1984. 1984. usdeath inininperson, go to www.visit.fsu.edu schedule 11) The Seminole Family Statue is ato tribute to the your Floridacampus Seminolevisit. Indians who

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honors the work of Dr. Walter Tschinkel, a renowned expert on fire ants. ehe legacy legacy legacy ofofthe ofthe the Seminole Seminole Seminole people people people ––a–a a dand determination determination which which which inspires inspires inspires all ofofofCollege of Medicine trains physicians who are responsive to community fddetermination 13)allallThe unset nset the the the night night night before before before each each each home home home game game gameespecially through service to elder, rural, minority, and underserved me esunset needs, gng after after after the the the game. game. game. populations. The College is ranked among the top five schools in the United States for percentage of graduates who choose to specialize in family medicine. ute eototothe tothe the Florida Florida Florida Seminole Seminole Seminole Indians Indians Indians who who who ted dStates States States government. government. government. 14) The Call Street Corridor, a manicured pathway which links the medical school

complex to the north quadrant of campus, highlights the rich history of the ne ofofthe ofthe the newest newest newest facilities facilities facilities on onon campus. campus. campus. The The The The The University. 12 snd us biological biological biological images, images, images, such such such as as starfish as starfish starfish and and and 14 14 14 13 13 13 d 14 14 15 15 13 13 endering erendering rendering ofofaofaprocession aprocession procession ofof15) ants, ofants, ants, which which which ch ich The bronze T.K.Wetherell Statue is a life-size memorial to our thirteenth nkel, l,el,aarenowned arenowned renowned expert expert expert on onon fire fire fire ants. ants. ants. president, who left office at the end of January 2010.

ns answho who who are areare responsive responsive responsive totocommunity tocommunity community ycians 16) The fountain located at the DeVoe L. Moore University Center is known as lder, r, er,rural, rural, rural, minority, minority, minority, and and and underserved underserved underserved the Heritage Tower. Its arches represent the matriculation of Florida State mong ng the the the top top top five five five schools schools schools ininthe inthe the United United United dong students, and the cascading waters, which signify the passage of time, flow oe. hoose choose choose totospecialize tospecialize specialize ininfamily infamily family medicine. medicine. medicine. ne. into a circulating pool – a symbol of Florida State and our campus. The torch on top of the Tower was a gift from the graduating classes of 1946, 1947, and pathway dool pathway pathway which which which links links links the the the medical medical medical school school school ol 1948. These classes experienced the transition from the Florida State College mpus, pus, us, highlights highlights highlights the the the rich rich rich history history history ofofthe ofthe the for Women (FSCW) to Florida State. The class of 1946 is considered the last true class of FSCW.

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FAST FACTS Founded: 1851 / the oldest continuous site of higher education in Florida Character: Comprehensive, Research, Traditional, Residential, Public, and Coeducational Enrollment: 41,710 total / 31,851 undergraduate / 45% male / 29% minority / 4.5% international Faculty: 2,306 Affiliation: Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Colors: Garnet and Gold Mascot: Seminole Email: admissions@admin.fsu.edu Website: www.admissions.fsu.edu

The Princeton Review and Kiplinger’s rank Florida State as one of the best values among universities in the country.

“I chose FSU not because of any family expectations but because of the University’s reputation for academic excellence and its renowned program in classical archaeology, which combines my interests in classical civilizations, history, language, and archaeology.” -Aaron Brown 10


Get to Know Tallahassee, Florida’s Capital City Home to the state capital, two major universities, and an array of museums, attractions, and unique experiences, Tallahassee shares a deep-rooted history and culture with unparalleled nature and outdoor recreation. Stretching along the Florida Panhandle, Tallahassee is a place where college town meets cultural center, politics meets performing arts, and history meets nature. Population: 181,376. Forty-four percent of residents age 25 and older have a bachelor’s or advanced college degree.* Location: Northwest Florida, often called the Panhandle. Close to pristine beaches along the Gulf of Mexico. Average annual temperatures: 56.4 to 79.7 degrees; residents experience all four seasons. Outdoor recreational activities: Canoeing, kayaking, picnicking, and swimming at the University’s 73-acre facility, the Rez; boating, fishing, and tubing on nearby rivers and lakes; hiking, biking, and walking on 300 miles of trails; and enjoying recreational pools and parks rated among the best in the nation. Cultural activities: Scores of museums, theatres, galleries, and monuments; Tallahassee Ballet; Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra; Springtime Tallahassee Festival; Seven Days of Opening Nights, Florida State’s annual festival which features a spectacular array of world-renowned artists and performers; and Railroad Square Art Park, Tallahassee’s creative district, which features more than 50 studios, galleries, and small shops. Airport: Tallahassee Regional. Unique opportunities: Internship and research opportunities through more than 100 federal and state agencies. *Population and statistics provided by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Lake Ella

State Capitol

“I took advantage of the research opportunities available to undergraduates at the end of my sophomore year when I began working for the Center for Oceanic-Atmospheric Prediction Studies. COAPS allowed me to fulfill my desire for research and dive right into my field immediately.” -Daniel Gilford 11


It’s a small

World!

Imagine the chance to travel abroad – to steep yourself in another culture amidst incomparable academics, a distinguished University faculty, and a supportive staff in many breathtaking locations worldwide. International Programs (IP) at Florida State, a recognized leader in international education, offers more than 40 diverse programs and has made this extraordinary experience a reality for our students for over 50 years. Our IP makes it possible for you to spend up to three consecutive semesters in one of over 20 locations, including our four permanent Florida State centers in London, England; Florence, Italy; Panama City, Panama; and Valencia, Spain. Each year, over 1,600 Florida State students spend a semester abroad. They complete coursework which meets their major or minor requirements, undertake internships, and avail themselves of a safe atmosphere in a magnificent location among outstanding academic amenities. For detailed information about study abroad opportunities, go to www.international.fsu.edu.

Meet Sandy Noel

Florida State is known for its top-notch study abroad programs and cultural awareness classes, but this senior is taking the idea of being a global citizen to a whole new level. In addition to taking classes for her major in international affairs, Sandy Noel has plans to complete a Global Pathways Certificate, a program which incorporates cultural and language-based classes with international events on campus and abroad. Sandy’s passion for all things global has taken her around the world. As a sophomore, she participated in a shipboard study-abroad program that sailed around the globe, with stops in Japan, China, Vietnam, India, Mauritius, South Africa, Ghana, and Brazil. “That semester, I participated in several service projects, such as helping to build a women’s center in India and helping to build homes for destitute families in Ghana,” Sandy said. “Seeing so much extreme poverty around the world motivated me to do more after I returned to Florida State.” After her time abroad, Sandy began volunteering as a community ambassador with the Emergency Care Help Organization in Tallahassee. Planning fundraisers and food drives taught her how to help others in her own community. That wasn’t the end of her travels, though. During the summer of 2011, Sandy interned with the Peace Corps in Washington, D.C. and got a full taste of current international issues. She was recently honored for her service with one of six Florida State University Profiles of Service Awards for 2011. “All of my experiences through Florida State, on campus and abroad, have helped me to focus more and, interestingly, make the most out of my studies,” Sandy said. After Sandy graduates this spring, she wants to continue her studies with a master’s degree in public administration, and, one day, she hopes to work for an organization that provides services and aid to people in developing countries. 12

To read more about Sandy’s experiences at FSU, go to www.fsu.edu/profiles/noel.


GET INVOLVED. GET GOING. GET FIT. GET AWAY. GIVE BACK. Your primary reason for attending college is to develop your academic and scholarly strengths, but what will you do after class? We encourage you to get involved, get going, get fit, get away, and give back. Here’s a sampling of things to do at FSU: Get acquainted and make new friends by participating in one or several campus organizations (we have over 550). Get going and enjoy kayaking, skiing, and other outdoor adventures at state and national parks with the skilled staff of Outdoor Pursuits. Get loud at all ’Nole athletic events. Get away from it all as you sunbathe, study, flirt, play Frisbee, or sip lemonade in the bright Tallahassee sunshine on Landis Green, a favorite spot on campus. Get involved with every aspect of University life as a Student Government official. Get rhythm when you perform and march to the sounds of the Marching Chiefs. Get popcorn and gain free admission to independent, foreign, and blockbuster films in the Student Life Cinema. Get moving when you soar with the Flying High Circus, one of the oldest all-collegiate aerial circuses in America. Get entertained by talented students and faculty when our music, theatre, and dance programs present hundreds of performances each year. Get experience while developing leadership and management skills in ROTC. Get engaged with students, professors, researchers, and scholars from over 125 countries through the numerous multicultural activities offered at the Center for Global Engagement. Get active at the Rec SportsPlex, one of the largest collegiate recreational facilities in the country. Get fit on the track or racquetball, basketball, volleyball, and squash courts at the Leach Student Recreation Center. You’ll also find extensive cardiovascular and strength-training equipment at the Center. Give back to the community through ongoing or one-time service coordinated by the Center for Leadership and Civic Education.

“I’ve found my professors to be highly professional and universally welcoming and friendly. Their knowledge, experience, and enthusiasm encourage student involvement and enable our success. I feel honored to be here.” -Emily Lee 13


Spotlight on Alumni Montego Glover (B.F.A. ’96). With a thriving and successful career on Broadway (The Color Purple, MEMPHIS) and in the recording studio (original cast recording for MEMPHIS, the Dreamgirls 20th Anniversary CD, and Life Begins at 8:40), Montego also finds the time to appear in creative outlets such as commercials, concerts, radio, and TV. She is an exciting and innovative artist. Montego recently returned to campus to deliver the commencement address for Florida State University’s graduating class of summer 2011. Jeff Shaara (B.S. ’74). The son of a Pulitzer Prize winner, Jeff Shaara never anticipated having a career in writing. He graduated from FSU with a degree in criminology. But when Ted Turner picked up his father’s novel, The Killer Angels, to make into a miniseries, they needed more of the story, and Jeff volunteered. It was this unexpected opportunity that made Jeff fall in love with writing, and he is now a New York Times best-selling author. He’s published 11 books, mostly historical fiction novels about war heroes, and has three more on the way. Nada Usina (B.S. ’93, M.S. ’94). An executive recruiter for Russell Reynolds Associates, Nada knows talent when she sees it. She has a long list of former titles and positions to back her up. She’s been the president of JumpTV and the general manager and president of Nokia Canada, but she credits FSU with helping her become the leader she is today. Nada was captain of the championship swim team during her time here and still has many ties to the school, including serving on the Seminole Boosters’ Board and the College of Business Board of Governors. Retired Army Colonel Lettie J. Bien (B.S. ’76). This recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award has truly had a life filled with personal and professional achievement. Lettie has served with the Army on active-duty or reserve service for the past 30 years. When she was stationed in Iraq, she was the U.S. senior adviser to the Iraq Ministry of Industry and Minerals. She has also earned a master’s degree in public administration and management, as well as a law degree. In addition to her professional accomplishments, Lettie holds an extensive record as a community advocate and philanthropist.

Helpful Tips DO Choose Your College or University Because: • • • • •

You’ve done your research. You know what’s out there, and your choice is a good fit. It offers a full range of academic programs. Lots of majors; lots of options. The price is right. You’ve studied the costs and the financial aid package. The faculty are widely respected. The professors could have gone anywhere. You’ve visited a number of colleges, and this feels right. Trust your instincts.

DON’T Choose Your College or University Because: • Your girlfriend or boyfriend is going there. Sometimes relationships change after you get to college. • It’s too close to, or too far from, home. Neither matters. • Higher tuition buys a better education. Not necessarily. • It offers a great social life. Don’t they all? • It has a winning football team. How does that affect your degree? 14


The Legacy Lives On If you’ve ever watched a Florida State home game, you’ve witnessed college football’s greatest tradition, according to a poll by ESPN SportsNation and EA Sports. Before every home game, Chief Osceola rides his majestic Appaloosa, Renegade, down the field carrying a 28-pound flaming spear. He rears the horse in front of 84,000 fans and plants the spear in the middle of the field. This tradition has become a cherished pregame ritual, but how did it begin? FSU alum Bill Durham had the original idea when he was a student in the sixties, but it wasn’t until the fall of 1977 that the idea came to life with the help of a new coach named Bobby Bowden. The performance debuted at the home game against Oklahoma State in 1978. Since its inception, Durham has trained a number of the Appaloosas and riders, and the authentic costume worn by the rider is designed by the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Currently, FSU junior Drake Anderson rides as Chief Osceola. “I enjoy everything about game days—all the work and everything that goes into it,” Drake said. “It is a joy for me to be part of the program and be a part of the heritage.”

T he Romanellis

A True Seminole Family Think you bleed garnet and gold? Well meet the Romanellis. With all of her family members graduating from Florida State, Charleen Romanelli can say that attending Florida State was a family affair, and it’s quite possible that she does the Tomahawk Chop in her sleep. Charleen and her high school sweetheart, Dennis, both graduated from FSU in 1976. Originally from Ft. Lauderdale, they returned to south Florida to marry and start a family. Their family grew to three daughters, Dana, Nina, and Jenna, who attended Florida State between 2003 and 2011. Charleen and Dennis still travel to Tallahassee on the weekends to attend sporting events. Their Christmas card this year showed the family decked out in ’Nole garb with diplomas in hand. Now that’s some serious love for Florida State University!

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What Can We Do For You? As a high-achieving student, our University Honors Program can provide you with an enriched curriculum. Students will enjoy the ability to take small, honors-only courses and special topic seminars with exceptional researchers and professors. Within the Honors Program is Honors in the Major, in which students complete a thesis project in a major area of study under the guidance of a defense committee. The Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) can help you get involved in research opportunities at Florida State. You will be encouraged to engage in an academic discipline outside the classroom by conducting experiments in a laboratory, working in an archive, conducting fieldwork, or performing an artistic project in a concert hall. Our Office of National Fellowships (ONF) can help prepare you to compete for the top academic awards and scholarships in the country. Since its inception in the spring of 2005, ONF has mentored and assisted some of our most talented students. In the last six years, our students have won more than 80 nationally competitive awards, including three Rhodes, three Truman, five Goldwater, and seven Hollings scholarships; three Pickering fellowships; and 38 Fulbright grants. The Garnet & Gold Scholar Society will encourage you to become a well-rounded citizen during your time at Florida State by helping you develop skills in three of the following areas: Leadership, Service, Internship, International Experience, and Research. Students who complete this program are recognized as Garnet & Gold Scholars upon graduation. Just imagine what you can accomplish at Florida State! To discover other opportunities for undergraduates, take a look at www.undergrad.fsu.edu.

President Eric Barron lends a hand to an FSU Habitat for Humanity project.

“I have performed a lot of service hours, but honestly, the experience of serving others has become more than ‘hours’ on a transcript — service is what makes me happy. My experiences, especially in AmeriCorps and in El Salvador, changed the entire mission and philosophy of my life.” -Erin Welch 16


Meet a Few of Our Recently Honored Faculty Jawole Willa Jo Zollar Choreographer, dance professor, and founding artistic director of a New York dance company, Jawole Willa Jo Zollar is widely respected nationwide for her unique, cultural dance. However, her talents extend beyond the performance. Jawole uses her dance to make a difference in the community and has even traveled with her company, Urban Bush Women, to South America and New Orleans. In addition, she has led community leadership institutes across the United States, and her impact has not gone unnoticed. • Named a Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor, the highest honor bestowed by faculty, in 2011 • Received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2009 • Won a New York Dance and Performance Award (a “Bessie”) in 2006

Alan Marshall A revolutionary researcher in the field of chemical analysis, Professor Alan Marshall’s work makes him one of the world’s top chemists. Alan not only teaches chemistry and biochemistry, but he also is the director of the Ion Cyclotron Resonance Program at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. • Won the 2012 William H. Nichols Medal for outstanding achievements in chemical sciences and the 2012 Pittsburgh Analytical Chemistry Award for his contributions to the field of analytical chemistry • Named a Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor in 2006

Jill Quadagno Professor Jill Quadagno says she bases her personal success on her students’ success, so it’s easy to see why her students love her. Her experience includes renowned work on aging, health, and social policy issues, and she has written more than 75 articles and 12 books on these subjects. • Received the 2011 University Distinguished Teacher Award • Elected a member of the well-respected Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies in 2010 • Her most recent book, One Nation, Uninsured: Why the U.S. Has No National Health Insurance, was a best seller in medicine for 2005-2006

David Kirby English professor David Kirby knows the formula for literary genius. With 30 books under his belt, David’s work is recognized globally. He has been teaching at the University since 1969 and has earned numerous awards and fellowships for his unique, often autobiographical poetry. David also writes regularly for The New York Times Book Review, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and The San Francisco Chronicle. • His book, Little Richard: The Birth of Rock ’n’ Roll, was named one of Booklist’s Top 10 Black History Non-Fiction Books of 2010 • Selected as one of five finalists for the 2007 National Book Award for Poetry for his collection, “The House on Boulevard St.: New and Selected Poems” • Received the University Distinguished Teacher Award in 2006 • Named a Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor in 2003 17


SHOW ME THE MONEY By researching financial programs and scholarship opportunities in advance of your senior year, you can begin to eliminate some of the worries of paying for college. (You’ll also score big with your parents!) Below, you’ll find a sampling of funding options: The Florida State University awards renewable scholarships to students who have conducted outstanding community service in high school and wish to continue their commitment to service during their college years. You can apply in your senior year; the application and deadline will be posted at www.thecenter.fsu.edu. The Office of Admissions automatically considers accepted freshmen for merit-based scholarships. Through the Southern Scholarship Foundation, qualified students are awarded scholarships in the form of rent-free housing to live in one of 25 furnished scholarship houses that are adjacent to campus. Information is available at www.southernscholarship.org. The Office of National Fellowships sponsors the Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Awards, given to talented students who use the award money to work on original projects in the summer, both on campus and abroad. Visit www.onf.fsu.edu for details. The Office of Undergraduate Research sponsors the $1,000 Mentored Research and Creative Endeavors Awards to help fund students’ research in the fall and summer terms. For more information, visit www.our.fsu.edu. International Programs offers numerous scholarships and discounts to students choosing to study in one of over 20 locations around the world, including our four permanent Florida State centers in London, England; Florence, Italy; Panama City, Panama; and Valencia, Spain. Go to www.international.fsu.edu/Students/Prospective/College/Scholarships.aspx and learn more. You can learn more about scholarships, as well as federal and state financial aid programs at Florida State University by visiting www.financialaid.fsu.edu.

YOUR FINANCES Given the current economic climate, it’s very important that you and your parents get the most value for your money. As you’ll see when you compare the typical first-year expenses at Florida State to other institutions, we offer a top-notch education at an affordable cost.

2011-2012 Academic Year Basic Costs *

Tuition / Fees**

FLORIDA RESIDENTS

NON-FLORIDA RESIDENTS

$5,825

$20,992

On-Campus Housing

5,424

5,424

Food (Meal Plan)

3,900

3,900

Books / Supplies SUBTOTAL Health Insurance*** TOTAL

1,000

1,000

$16,149

$31,316

1,455

1,455

$17,604

$32,771

*Fees for 2012-2013 have not been determined at this time. Refer to www.admissions.fsu. edu/freshman/finances/costs.cfm for the most recent tuition information. **Estimated Costs cover two semesters (15 hours per semester).

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***FSU has a mandatory health insurance policy for new students admitted to the University. The cost represents the annual individual premium for domestic students. (The premium for international students is $1,601.) Costs of meeting these requirements will be included in financial aid considerations. Students who currently have health insurance may show proof of comparable coverage and may not be required to purchase the University policy. Refer to www.studentinsurance.fsu.edu for additional information.


Seminole Speak

ACC – the Atlantic Coast Conference; a Division 1 collegiate athletic league composed of FSU and 11 other universities.

Blackboard – an online platform that allows students to keep track of their courses and view their grades, submit assignments, watch lectures, participate in group discussions, and email classmates and professors. Club Stroz – the main library on campus; The Robert Strozier Manning Library (Club Stroz) is known as the “social library.” Club Stroz represents the evolution of the modern college library — a one-stop academic and campus community spot for every Seminole — 7 days a week. It’s the premier location to immerse yourself in your coursework and browse book collections, as well as the place to congregate, snack, satisfy your caffeine fix (home to the nation’s first double-sided Starbucks), and make valuable peer connections. FIG – high-demand freshmen courses that are linked to a theme or academic program. Freshman Interest Groups only consist of about 20 to 25 students and allow students to meet freshmen with similar interests to their own. Garnet and Gold Glitter Guys – you’re not a true Seminole fan until you have your photo taken with the Garnet and Gold Guys! Started in 1998 at the home opener against Duke, two fervent student fans painted themselves with paint and glitter and raced around the stands encouraging fans to cheer for the team. Golden Girls & Co. – FSU’s prestigious dance team that performs at all home basketball games, PowWow, and numerous events throughout the year. Marching Chiefs – the largest collegiate marching band in the world; the Marching Chiefs perform at all home football games, select away games, and the annual post-season bowl game. Market Wednesday – every Wednesday during the school year, the Oglesby Union courtyard hosts a combination of local vendors and recognized student organizations.

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PowWow – the annual homecoming pep rally, PowWow takes place the night before the homecoming game and features performances by the FSU Flying High Circus, the FSU cheerleaders, the Golden Girls & Co., the Marching Chiefs, and headlines a well-known entertainer. The evening is concluded with the coronation of the new Homecoming Chief and Princess. Rec Sportsplex – this 104-acre facility serves as the perfect place for students to participate in Intramural Sports and other recreational activities. Rec Sportsplex is located on FSU’s southwest campus and has 21 fields with 12 multipurpose fields, four tournament fields, and five softball diamonds. The Globe – a state-of-the-art facility that houses the Center for Global and Multicultural Engagement. Designed to promote student interaction among diverse groups within the University community. The Rez – scale the climbing wall, canoe, kayak, picnic, swim, enjoy a game of sand volleyball, or play disc golf at our 73-acre facility located on beautiful Lake Bradford. RSO – Recognized Student Organization; over 550 RSOs exist at Florida State, offering a variety of opportunities to get involved. RSOs range from careerbased to academic to athletic to artistic. SLC – the Student Life Cinema (SLC) features movies five to six nights a week, FREE for our students. The movies range from newly released flicks to indie films and documentaries. Suwannee Room – the original dining hall for the Florida State College for Women. Restored to its original glory in the William Johnston Building, it once again serves as a dining hall for students, offering an extensive buffet, casual seating, TV, and wireless internet service. Tomahawk Chop – a cheer performed at every Florida State sporting event that unites Seminole fans. Accompanied with the Seminole War Chant, the Tomahawk Chop (“The Chop”) is a motion involving a repetitious bending of the arm at the elbow, intended to symbolize a tomahawk swinging down.


admissions.fsu.edu The Florida State University Office of Admissions 282 Champions Way Tallahassee, FL 32306-2400 20

Junior 'Nole Notes 2012  

Volume XXII, 2012

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