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WILMINGTON GRAMMAR CO-EDUCATIONAL SIXTH FORM

CURRICULUM BOOKLET 2018/19

Choosing excellence - together


Contents FINE ART 7 BIOLOGY 8 BUSINESS STUDIES 9 CHEMISTRY 10 COMPUTER SCIENCE 11 DESIGN ELECTRONICS 12 DESIGN, ENGINEER & CONSTRUCT 14 ECONOMICS 15 ENGLISH LITERATURE 16 FINANCIAL STUDIES 17 FRENCH 18 GEOGRAPHY 19 GERMAN 20 GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 21 HISTORY 22 MATHEMATICS 23 FURTHER MATHEMATICS 24 MEDIA STUDIES 25 MUSIC 26 PHOTOGRAPHY 27 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 28 PHYSICS 29 PSYCHOLOGY 30 RS: PHILOSOPHY & ETHICS 31 SOCIOLOGY 32 SPANISH 33 EXTENDED PROJECT QUALIFICATION 34 WG6 SCHOOL SPORT PARTICIPATION 35 CLUBS, SOCIETIES AND AFTER SCHOOL ACTIVITIES

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WELCOME TO WG6 You will be embarking on a different type of Sixth Form experience with A Level courses following a linear model. There will be some flexibility in the number of courses you will be able to select and all provisional and final offers will be subject to each individual student’s programme being formally approved by a WG6 senior leader. You will normally choose to study either 3 x A Levels and an AS course or 3 x A Levels. All combinations will fit alongside a personalised complimentary programme which may include the Extended Project AS level equivalent, employability skills through on-going work experience placements, other Enrichment activities and dedicated private study. There is the option to take 4 A2s but this will require true commitment. Choosing your A Level programme is the most important decision you will have to make and it is vital that you choose the right courses for the right reasons. Achievement at GCSE will be a significant factor when considering appropriate combinations of subjects. In students’ best interests, WG6 senior leaders will ensure that their proposed A Level subject choices and combinations are appropriately matched to their GCSE attainment and applicable further progression routes. Full support and advice will be provided during the application process using a variety of ‘Pathway Progression Models’.

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USE THESE 3 PRINCIPLES TO GUIDE YOUR CHOICE 1. Choose subjects you will enjoy If you do not enjoy studying a subject (most of the time at least), it is demoralising and difficult to do well. In the Sixth Form you want to be stimulated, not bored, and if you enjoy the work you will be more likely to achieve highly, though the opposite is not always true. It is vital that you are passionate about your chosen subjects as it is proven that students with intrinsic motivation are more likely to succeed. Studying A Levels should never be about doing just enough! In thinking about whether you will enjoy a subject you should consider two things: the content of the subject and the skills it requires. You should have a real interest in the content - the things that you learn about - but you should also be confident that you have or can develop the skills that the subject requires. Each subject will involve a different mixture of activities. One subject might require a great deal of learning detail, another might require a great deal of independent reading, some subjects involve much essay writing, others a vast array of creativity. The way a subject is assessed might also be important to you, particularly if assessment involves a great deal of project work. Beware of taking a subject just because ‘it sounds interesting’. Investigate all courses thoroughly. Finding out more about a subject is essential if you have not studied it before, but it is also important to review subjects you are familiar with - they are likely to change significantly as you move from GCSE to A Level. Maths and Languages are examples of subjects where there is a real jump in difficulty (and interest too!) when you move into the Sixth Form, so if you are thinking of A Levels in these subjects it is vital that you talk it through with teachers who know you.

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2. Choose subjects that will fit in with your career plans

You should also be confident that you have or can develop the skills that the subject requires. Each subject will involve a different mixture of activities.

If you have clear ideas about what you want to study at university, you should check whether your plans require specific subjects. Look at specific requirements on the UCAS website. Listen to the careers advice you receive and test if you need to clarify your long-term plans before choosing A Level subjects, but do not feel that you have to have exact plans before choosing A Levels. Keeping options open is a good idea but check that your A Level choices do not rule out degrees you are interested in. You will find that there are many degree subjects that you can apply to with any A Level combination. Do not choose a subject you find really tough just because it is needed for a particular career or just because it is a facilitating subject. You will need to have a very good reason to be able to say with confidence that the subject will be easier for you at A Level (and your teachers confirm this) it is far better to rethink the pathway to your chosen career or look for suitable alternatives.

3. Take time to find out all you need to know You will need the time to think carefully about your interests and skills; and about possible directions after A Levels. You then need to match these ideas up to the A Level subjects on offer, which will involve finding out more about them. Time to do the thinking and time to talk to people; and time to change your mind if necessary, are all important. While other people might have good advice and opinions worth considering carefully, this is your choice: you are the person who will be doing the work, and it is your future that A levels help decide. Take advice seriously but do not just take a subject because someone else tells you that is what you must do (or because that is what your friends are taking). The ultimate decision must be yours.

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WG6 Standard Entry Requirements To join WG6 you must have achieved a minimum of at least 6 grade 6s and at least a grade 5 in Mathematics and English Language as well. In addition, most subjects will require at least a grade 6 in the chosen or related subject. To study Mathematics students will be required to pass an entrance examination as well as achieve a grade 7 for Mathematics and a grade 8 for Further Mathematics. Specific subject entry requirements are outlined as accurately as is possible in this booklet as well as on the website www.wg6.co.uk. Please note that there may need to be some alterations made to specific course details when all information has been finally accredited by the examination awarding bodies. How to Apply? Applications are to be made through the WG6 website. The application deadline will be Tuesday 9th January at 5pm. We will not be processing any applications received after this deadline. If you have any further questions regarding Sixth Form please contact the Sixth Form Team on office@wg6.co.uk Students applying to study Mathematics A Level will be expected to pass an assessment which will be held on Saturday 27th January 2018. We offer an additional showcase of subjects with existing students in March 2018. This is an opportunity to discuss any questions you may have regarding your course selection. You will then receive a letter with a decision whether to offer you a conditional place, based on you achieving the required grades at GCSE. Sixth Form Induction: Monday 2nd July 2018 If your application is successful, you will be invited to attend our summer induction. Attendance at this is very important as it will help to confirm choices by giving you an insight into your chosen courses and plan for September 2018. There will be an expectation to complete bridging assignments for the subjects you wish to study. Contact details: Please do get in contact in you have any queries about joining WG6 or the application process. Email: office@wg6.co.uk Tel: 01322 226351 (WGSG site) or Tel: 01322 223090 (WGSB site).

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FINE ART

refine ideas towards producing resolved outcomes. This component consists of three major elements: supporting studies, practical outcomes and a personal study of a minimum 1000 words of continuous prose.

A Level EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

Component 2: Externally Set Assignment (40%) This component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written

The aims and objectives of the Advanced GCE in Art and Design are to enable students to develop: •

intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive capabilities

investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills,

aesthetic understanding and critical judgment

independence of mind in developing, refining and communicating ideas, intentions & personal outcomes

an interest in, enthusiasm for and enjoyment of art, craft and design

experience of working with a broad range of media

an understanding of the interrelationships between art, craft and design

processes and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate

knowledge and experience of real-world contexts and, where appropriate, links to creative industries

knowledge and understanding of art, craft, design and media and technologies in contemporary and past societies and cultures

an awareness of different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of art, craft and design.

observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing resolved outcomes in response to an externally set theme. This component consists of two major elements: supporting studies and the 15 hour period of sustained focus.

Assessment Both components are assessed against the following four Assessment Objectives which are equally weighted: AO1 - Develop ideas through sustained and focused investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and critical understanding AO2 - Explore and select appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes, reviewing and refining ideas as work develops AO3 - Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to intentions, reflecting critically on work and progress AO4 - Present a personal and meaningful response that realises intentions and, where appropriate, makes connections between visual and other elements

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements including: Grade 6 GCSE in Art and Design. Students should have a commitment to and love of the subject and feel motivated to develop visual skills and express their ideas.

Future Career Progression Fine Art and Photography are an excellent combination for those students who are considering Art College or a career in the creative or design industry. Art is also relevant for numerous related careers such as publishing, architecture, museum, theatre or gallery work. There are many transferable study skills and creativity is essential in many career paths and desirable even in the business environment.

Course Content Component 1: Personal Investigation (60%) This component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and

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BIOLOGY

Assessment

A Level

Both components are assessed against the following four Assessment Objectives which are equally weighted:

OCR

The A Level course is divided into 4 assessed parts;

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE This course follows a traditional content-based pathway introducing students to the key concepts that they will need in order to understand how Biology affects our lives and to prepare them for further study in this area. They will develop knowledge and understanding of different areas of Biology and how they relate to each other, as well as appreciating how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how Biology contributes to the success of the economy and society. Success in A Level Biology requires a solid grounding in Chemistry and Mathematics as well as strong scientific literacy skills.

Paper 1 is worth 37% of the marks and is based on biological processes. It is made up of multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions.

Paper 2 is worth 37% of the marks and is based on biological diversity. It is made up of multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions.

Paper 3 is worth 26% of the marks and is synoptic, covering all aspects of theory and practical. It is made up of multiple choice, short answer and extended response questions.

Entry Requirements

The fourth aspect of the assessment will be based on mathematical skills.

Future Career Progression

Standard entry requirements and at least two grade 6’s in Combined Science or in GCSE Biology and GCSE Chemistry.

Many universities require applicants to their Biology courses to also have Chemistry at AS or A level, in particular this is essential for Medicine, Veterinary Medicine and Dentistry. Students wishing to pursue these careers should ensure that their A Level combinations meet this requirement. University courses involving Biology are many and varied including Medicine, Dentistry, Biomedical Sciences, Zoology, Marine Biology and Molecular Biology. Studying Biology offers a range of career opportunities locally as well as nationally and internationally, with Biotechnology companies such as Abbott, Diasorin & Remel being among the biggest employers in the Dartford area.

To study Biology AND Chemistry A level students must have achieved at least grade 7s for GCSE Science.

Course Content The only option available to students is the two year full A Level Biology course, we do not offer the AS course. All examinations are taken at the end of Year 13. Modules taken cover Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Physiology and Ecology.

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BUSINESS STUDIES

Theme 3: Business Decisions and Strategy This develops the concepts introduced in Theme 2

AS Level or A Level EDEXCEL

Students will develop an understanding of: • Business objectives and strategy •

Globalisation expansion

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

Decision-making techniques

This is a wide ranging course containing a number of elements which are taught in modular form but which are also integrated through the use of case studies. Frequent reference is made to live business stories and the department makes extensive use of current affairs to support student learning. Students are taught business theory in order to solve business problems e.g., financing expansion abroad, strategies for cutting work forces.

Global marketing (multinational corporations)

Assessing competitiveness

Global markets and business

Business growth

Global industries and companies

Influences on business decisions

Managing change

Entry Requirements

Theme 4: Global Business This develops the concepts introduced in Theme 1 Students will develop an understanding of: • Globalisation expansion

Standard entry requirements and a 5 in English Language and Mathematics or a 6 in Business Studies, if it was taken at GCSE. An interest in current affairs is extremely important in determining how much the student will succeed and be engaged by the subject. Theme 1: Marketing and People Students will develop an understanding of: • Meeting customer needs •

Raising finance

Marketing mix and strategy

Managing finance

Entrepreneurs and leaders

External influences

The market

Financial planning

Managing people

Resource management

Managing finance

External influences

Financial planning

Resource management

Global marketing (multinational corporations)

Global markets and business

Global industries and companies

AS Level: The 1 Year AS Level course has the same content as the first year of the A2 Level course and therefore students can take the AS exam at the end of Year 12 whilst being taught in the A Level group. A Level: This is a 2 year course with all module exams taken at the end of the 2-year period.

Future Career Progression The qualification will obviously help in any businessrelated degree. However, it also has applications in any career; the student will learn about motivational techniques, personal as well as business finance and legal employment issues. The breadth of subjects covered may provide leads for the student then to study one of these specialist topics at university.

Theme 2: Managing Business Activities Students will develop an understanding of: • Raising finance •

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CHEMISTRY

Assessment

A Level

The A Level is divided into 3 examinations (2 x 2hrs 15mins and one x 1hr 30mins) and the Practical Endorsement for Chemistry, which is reported on separately. • Paper 1 is 37% is based on the Periodic Table; Elements and Physical Chemistry. It is made up of A) multiple choice and B) structured questions.

OCR INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The OCR A Chemistry specification. The course is organised into 6 modules: module 1 concerns the development of practical skills and runs throughout the course; modules 2 to 4 cover core concepts and lay the foundations for modules 5 and 6 which focus on Physical Chemistry and the transition elements, and Organic Chemistry and analysis respectively.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and at least two grade 6’s in Combined Science or in GCSE Biology and GCSE Chemistry. To study Biology AND Chemistry A level students must have achieved at least grade 7s for GCSE Science.

Paper 2 is 37% and based on Synthesis and Analytical techniques. It is made up of A) multiple choice and B) structured questions covering theory and practical skills.

Paper 3 is the synoptic element called Unified Chemistry and is worth 26%. It is structured and extended response questions covering theory and practical skills from the course.

The non-exam part of the course is the practical endorsement which is pass or fail. Student will complete a range of core practical work that will contribute to this holistic.

Future Career Progression

Course Content

Other popular and useful companion subjects that can be studied along with Chemistry are Biology, Physics and Mathematics. Chemistry opens the way to studies and careers in Chemistry, Medicine, Dentistry, Chemical Engineering, Biochemistry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Science, Food Science, Physiotherapy, Materials Science etc. Chemistry is a very good companion subject for students studying other Science based (including Geography) or Engineering.

The course aims to develop student’s interest and enthusiasm for Chemistry, including developing an interest in further study and careers in Chemistry, helping students appreciate how society makes decisions about scientific issues and how the sciences contribute to the success of the economy and society. Students will develop and demonstrate a deeper appreciation of the skills, knowledge and understanding of How Science Works and develop essential knowledge and understanding of different areas of Chemistry and how they relate to each other, including practical skills.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

Assessment

A Level

Unit 1: Computer Systems - 2hr 30 mins examination paper—40% of the total A Level Unit 2: Algorithms and Programming - 2hr 20 mins examination paper—40% of the total A Level Unit 3: Programming Project course work—20% of the total A Level

OCR INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE This new specification A Level course is designed to allow progression from GCSE Computing and allows students to develop an understanding of and ability to apply the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer Science including; abstraction, decomposition, logic, algorithms and data representation. Throughout the course students will develop the ability to analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems including writing programs to do so. Students also develop the capacity to see relationships between different aspects of Computer Science, develop their mathematical skills and develop the ability to articulate the individual (moral), social (ethical), legal and cultural opportunities and risks of digital technology.

Future Career Progression A Level Computer Science is a specialised course which is ideal if students are planning on moving onto a Computer Science or Computing-based higher level or degree course. Many of the top universities now recognise the value of a Computer Science qualification. The course is also suitable for students seeking to go into a career in Computing (e.g. software development or programming) or an apprenticeship. In addition, the course will provide learners with a range of transferable skills which will facilitate personal growth and foster cross curriculum links in areas such as Maths, Science and Design and Technology. Computer Science is a very creative subject and skills such as problem solving and analytical thinking will all be refined and explored as learner’s progress through the learning and assessment programme.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and the ability to cope with the demands of an academically challenging A Level course. Students must have completed GCSE Computing or Computer Science and achieved at least a grade 6. Students who only have Level 2 ICT qualifications (including GCSE ICT) will not be accepted onto the course.

Computer Science is often combined with subjects such as Mathematics, Science and Engineering at A Level.

Course Content A-Level students will study: Unit 1: Computer Systems. You will learn about the characteristics of contemporary processors, software and development; exchanging data; data types structures and algorithms; and legal, moral and ethical issues. Unit 2: Algorithms and Programming. You will learn about elements of computational thinking; problem solving and programming; algorithms to solve problems; and standard algorithms. Unit 3: Programming Project. This coursework project involves the analysis of a problem, design of a solution, development of the solution and an evaluation.

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DESIGN ELECTRONICS

Course Content

A Level

You will develop essential scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding of the behaviour of electrical/electronic circuits

You will develop and demonstrate a deep understanding of the nature, processes and methods of electronics as an engineering discipline

You will develop competence and confidence in a variety of practical, mathematical and problem solving skills

You will develop and learn how to apply observational, practical and problem-solving skills in the identification of needs in the world around you and then design and test an electronic solution

You will develop and learn how to apply creative and evaluative skills in the development and assessment of electronic systems to solve problems

You will develop your interest in electronics, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with electronics.

EDUQAS INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Electronics Engineering and Computer Science are growth areas in industry. The demand for employees that have the ability to programme software or design new electronic equipment is huge and because of the changing nature of technology will always be a shortage area for employers. The aims of this course are to ensure that students develop their electronic knowledge and learn how to apply this and their mathematical knowledge to a range of situations so that they can develop working solutions to real world problems. The skills they learn will also be transferrable to other Science and Engineering courses either at apprenticeship or degree level. The practical work includes both experimentation at the component level as well as prototyping circuits and this will enable students to see the theoretical knowledge contained in the specification in action and to gain a greater understanding of the knowledge in a practical context. Students will also have the opportunity to work both independently and collaboratively when designing, developing, planning, prototyping and evaluating a design problem.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and students will need at least a grade 6 in GCSE Maths and Physics. A GCSE in Systems & Control, Electronics, Electronic Products or Engineering would be advantageous but not mandatory.

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DESIGN ELECTRONICS (Continued) Assessment Component 1: Principles of Electronics (40% Examination) Component 2: Application of Electronics (40% Examination) Component 3: Extended system design and development tasks (20% Coursework) Task 1: A design and program task to create a microcontroller system programed in assembler language to solve an identified problem, need or opportunity. Task 2: A substantial integrated design and realisation task to create an electronic system to solve an identified problem, need or opportunity.

Future Career Progression The course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop their electrical and electronic knowledge and develop problem solving skills. It will enable students to progress to a degree or apprenticeship in a range of Engineering disciplines including Mechanical/Electrical/ Electronic and Civil Engineering, as long as they have studied Mathematics and Physics at A Level as well. Examples of careers in Electronics Engineering are • Aerospace Engineer •

Broadcast Engineer

Control and Instrumentation Engineer

Design Engineer

Electrical Engineer

Electronics Engineer

IT Consultant

Network Engineer

Nuclear Engineer

Systems Analyst

Related careers include •

Management Consultant

Multimedia Programmer

Project Manager

Technical Author

Technical Sales Engineer

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DESIGN, ENGINEER & CONSTRUCT

The course is split up into two sections: • Coursework - A construction project which comprises of 5 units that you will complete over the two years. You will need to define, design, create, cost and evaluate a sustainable construction project which will be assessed internally and moderated externally. This course works slightly differently to other A Level courses which include both coursework and exams. You will either pass or fail each of these 5 units. When you have passed each of the units, you will be given 30 marks, you can then be entered into the DEC exam.

A Level TLM INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Design Engineer Construct (DEC) is an applied A-Level. It has been developed to create and inspire the next generation of Built Environment professionals. Through a project-based approach, DEC applies pure academic subjects to the latest construction industry practices. The result is young people with real-world practical experience and employability skills.

Thanks to the extraordinary support of industry leaders, professional bodies and progressive universities, DEC delivers an inspiring programme that is up to date and in demand by industry such as our partners White Code Design Associates and Laing O’ Rourke. This subject will compliment Art, Geography and Media Studies if you want to pursue a career in the creative industry such as Architecture and Landscape Designer. For a more technical career such as Engineering, you should choose Maths and Physics and another subject such as Computer Studies or Geography.

Exam - An externally set and externally marked examination to assess knowledge and understanding that you have developed through your coursework construction project. You can only enter the exam when you have had your coursework moderated and it has passed. The exam is worth up to 70 marks and a grade will be awarded accordingly.

Future Career Progression The course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop their research, design and problem solving skills and skills in the built environment, whilst learning the technical knowledge required to under take their project work. It will enable students to progress to a degree or apprenticeship in a range of disciplines in the built environment sector.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements for this course are at least a grade 6 in GCSE Maths and grade 5 GCSE English Language. Ideally students will have been awarded a B grade in a Design and Technology GCSE course or equivalent related qualifications such as BTECs. If you have not studied a DT course at GCSE you will have the opportunity for an interview to discuss your suitability for the course.

Examples of careers in Design Engineer Construct are: • Planning Officer • Architect • Landscape Designer • Building Surveyor • Structural Engineer • Civil Engineer • Building Services Engineer • Quantity Surveyor • Project Management • Environmental Engineer • Sustainability Related careers include: • Building Law • Geologist

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ECONOMICS

the loss of key services. An interest in current affairs is critical for success in this subject – exam questions will cover a wide range of subjects which students can only answer if they are up to date with current events.

AS Level or A Level EDEXCEL

AS Level: The 1 Year AS Level course has the same content as the first year of the A2 Level course and therefore students can take the AS exam at the end of Year 12 whilst being taught in the A Level group.

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The course combines economic theory with application to real world problems. Economic theory involves modelling the economy and studying the behaviour of individual economic agents such as consumers and producers.

A Level: This is a 2 year course with all module exams taken at the end of the 2-year period.

Future Career Progression

Entry Requirements

There is a specific shortage of academic economists in the universities at present because of the strong demand for economists elsewhere, mostly in the financial sector. Economics graduates are sought after by City firms and are ten times more likely to land financial jobs than graduates from other disciplines. Industry uses economists to predict growth, inflation etc. in the markets that they operate in.

Standard entry requirements including grade 5 in Maths and English Language. GCSE Business Studies is useful, though not compulsory. Students studying Economics typically find it offers new challenges and different ways of thinking as popularised by best seller books such as Freakonomics! Students should feel comfortable working with data; there is 20% mathematical content however this is rarely more demanding than calculating percentages.

For example, Ford economists would be estimating the demand for cars whilst also estimating which economy would be growing strongly in the future so that they can exploit this. The government uses economists to plan government policy while the Bank of England is a big employer in its role of regulating the financial sector.

Course Content At a micro economic level, students study how markets work in areas such as commodity markets, transport, healthcare and education. This leads onto analysis of whether governments or markets should provide services (see the current debate about whether the railways would be better run if they were owned by the government). There is discussion about whether governments actually make markets work less efficiently, government failure (there might be even less investment in the railways because the government spends tax revenues on other priorities such as the NHS). In macroeconomics students are introduced to the workings of the economy where the links between different elements such as unemployment, inflation, economic growth and foreign trade are studied. A key issue currently is the very high level of government debt and the debate about whether we should stimulate demand with tax cuts or whether we should cut government spending, some of which may result in

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ENGLISH LITERATURE

A Level (Two-Year Course) Component 1: Drama - 2 hours and 15 mins examination (30% of total A Level) Two drama texts are studied. One Shakespeare play plus one other drama text either tragedy or comedy.

AS Level or A2 Level EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

Component 2: Prose - 1 hour examination (20% of total A Level) Two prose texts from a chosen theme. One text must be pre-1900, one may be modern (See AS list for the themes available).

This course gives students a thorough grounding in the canon of English literature. It develops analytical skills, understanding, evaluating and communication. It develops an awareness of our rich literary heritage and links with the cultural and historical influence on English literature.

Component 3: Contemporary Poetry 2 hour and 15 mins examination (30% of total A Level) A range of poetry from a literary period or a range of poetry from a named poet. Two essays, one will be comparative.

Students are expected to read widely as an essential part of their learning. It is also vital to read literary criticism to inform their responses to texts. It goes without saying that students following this course should have a love of literature and enjoy reading for pleasure.

Component 4: Coursework (20% of total A Level) A free range of two texts may be studied. 2500 – 3000 words. Different texts must be studied from those in component 1, 2 and 3. The A Level examination components account for 80% of the total marks awarded.

Students are expected to purchase their own texts which range from Shakespeare to Modern Literature.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and at least grade 6 in either GCSE English Language or English Literature. It is also preferable that students enjoy reading.

Future Career Progression History and Art are particularly compatible with English Literature, especially with the new AS/A Level syllabus. Students following Maths and Science courses also benefit by demonstrating the diversity of their interests and skills.

Course Content AS Level (One-Year Course) Component 1: Unseen Poetry and Drama - 2-hour examination (60% of total AS Level)

Communication skills are vital for any managerial post. The ability to express oneself clearly in both written and spoken English is the hallmark of a professional person. Journalism, the law, the media, education and medicine are all career paths which an advanced qualification in English could help the student embark upon.

Section A – Unseen Poetry: one essay question on an unseen modern poem. Modern poetry will be studied in preparation for this. Section B – Drama one essay question. The drama selection is mainly modern with some pre-1900 drama available.

Chance to build up your confidence in public speaking and working with other people.

Component 2: Prose - I hour examination (40% of total AS Level) Two prose texts from a chosen theme will be studied. At least one prose text must be pre-1900. The choice of themes are: Childhood; Colonisation and its Aftermath; Crime and Detection; Science and Society; The Supernatural; or Women and Society.

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FINANCIAL STUDIES

Assessment

AS Level or A Level

Unit 1 - Financial Capability for the Immediate and Short Term Unit 2 - Financial Capability for the Medium and Long Term

IFS INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

Unit 3 - Sustainability of an Individual’s Finances Unit 4 - Sustainability of the Financial Services System

The Diploma in Financial Studies (DipFS) provides an in-depth exploration of the key concepts of financial capability and how they are applied to achieve longerterm financial sustainability.

Each unit is assessed through a combination of Multiple Choice Questions (Part A) and a written paper (Part B) The structure of the assessment ensures that all aspects of the course content are subject to external examination. The written paper for each unit synoptically assesses the students’ ability to integrate the skills, concepts and knowledge from the unit.

Its purpose is to prepare students for further study through the development of the core skills of independent thinking, critical analysis and evaluation, synthesis, verbal communication (through classroom discussion) and written communication. Within DipFS the student explores the political, economic, social, technological, ethical and legal impacts of personal finance in the short, medium and longer terms. Through this, a greater understanding of the impact that global events can have upon consumers and the wider financial services industry is developed.

Future Career Progression The financially related content of this qualification serves as an excellent grounding for undergraduate study within finance and business-related disciplines, with many students going on to study accounting, business, finance and banking. The skills developed and enhanced during the course provide valuable study skills appropriate for these disciplines and others, and students have pursued a wide range of other undergraduate courses following this qualification. However, the core skills of critical analysis and evaluation, synthesis and written communication, and independent learning are transferable and provide a strong grounding for further study in other fields; typical examples include engineering, technology, or not for profit style organisational.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements.

Course Content •

Importance of financial capability in the immediate, short, medium and long term.

The impact of external influences at different stages in the personal life cycle.

Risk and reward in managing personal finance.

Personal and external factors that lead to change.

Maintaining financial sustainability and avoiding long-term debt.

The financial services system and financial sustainability (individual and general).

Marketing techniques.

The transferable skills developed are also valuable for further study in unrelated disciplines.

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FRENCH

Assessment

A Level

Paper 1 – Listening, reading and translation • Students will respond to listening comprehension questions based on a recording in a variety of contexts and sources. • A reading assessment based on a variety of text-types and genres where students will have to respond to questions. • An unseen passage to be translated from French to English.

EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE During this course you will study at least two authentic French language resources (a text and a film) and will study aspects of the contemporary societies, cultural backgrounds and heritages of French-speaking countries.

Paper 2 – Written response to works and translation • An unseen passage to be translated from to English to French. • An extended response to one of the literary texts studied. • An extended response to the second literary text studied or extended response to the film studied

You will also have opportunities to develop your understanding and awareness of spiritual, moral, ethical, environmental, health and political issues. You will extend and develop your knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary of French and will use this to speak, write, read and listen to the language. In addition, you will also be able to equip yourself with transferable skills such as autonomy, resourcefulness, creativity, critical thinking, and linguistic, cultural and cognitive flexibility that will enable you to proceed to further study or to employment.

Paper 3 – Speaking • Students discuss one theme from the specification based on a stimulus containing two different statements. • Students present a summary of the key findings of the written sources they have used for their research and answer questions on this. They then have a wider discussion on their research.

Future Career Progression

Entry Requirements

There are few areas of work or professional life which do not have an international dimension. A qualification in a foreign language is therefore invaluable in helping students to find employment, whether in banking, law, journalism, leisure and tourism, the civil service or teaching.

Standard entry requirements and at least grade 6 in GCSE French.

Course Content Theme 1 - Social issues and trends: Evolving society in France • Changing family structures • Education • The world of work

There are many courses for which an A level foreign language is a direct qualification for entry, including degree courses in the language itself or in studies relevant to the country.

Theme 2 – Political and/or intellectual and/or artistic culture Francophone countries • Music • Media • Festivals and traditions

Many degree courses can now be combined with a language either as joint degrees or as part of the course, i.e. History, Geography, Art, Business Studies, European Studies, Politics, Sociology and English. Modern Foreign Language qualifications are highly valued by admissions tutors and employers as evidence of hard work, intellectual aptitude, intercultural competency and international outlook.

Theme 3 – Social issues and trends: Immigration and the French multicultural society • Integration and multiculturalism • Rise of the far right Theme 4 – Political and/or intellectual and/or artistic culture: The Occupation and Resistance • Occupation • The Resistance

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GEOGRAPHY

Assessment

A Level

Paper 1: Physical Systems (Weighting: 24% of the total A Level) 1 hour 45 minutes written paper - 72 marks in total

OCR

Paper 2: Human Interactions (Weighting: 24% of the total A Level) 1 hour 45 minutes written paper - 72 marks in total

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The main aim of the course is to provide students with a detailed knowledge base of the human and physical geography of the world. It gives them a good foundation in skills involving data handling and the analysis of information and is therefore an excellent subject choice for a wide range of degrees.

Paper 3: Geographical Debates (Weighting: 32% of the total A Level) 2 hours 30 minutes written paper - 96 marks in total Paper 4: Independent Investigation (Weighting: 20% of the total A Level) Coursework based - 60 marks in total

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and a grade 6 in GCSE Geography.

The final paper gives candidates the opportunity to extend an area of the subject content into a more detailed fieldwork study which is examined as a written investigation.

Course Content Students undertake two core papers on Physical and Human Geography. In Paper 1 students will look at Coasts, Water and Carbon Cycles. In paper 2 students will look at the factors concerning Changing Places, Migration and Human Rights. Paper 3 is a synoptic paper which will assesses essay writing skills on Hazardous Earth and Disease Dilemmas.

Future Career Progression Geography is considered a useful subject by employers as it provides the student with good numeracy skills, an ability to collect and analyse data and text effectively and to problem solve in complex situations. The wide range of skills and knowledge obtained also provides a good function to go on to a Geography degree but it is also a good base for other degrees such as Geology and Biology. Other possibilities include careers in accountancy, business management, engineering, environmental monitoring/planning, hazard prediction/ management, journalism, law, media, meteorology, oceanography, philosophy, politics, tourism and town planning.

There is also a 4,000 word Independent Investigation based on fieldwork undertaken during a residential fieldwork course.

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GERMAN

Assessment

A Level

Paper 1 – Listening, reading and translation • Students will respond to listening comprehension questions based on a recording in a variety of contexts and sources. • A reading assessment based on a variety of text-types and genres where students will have to respond to questions. • An unseen passage to be translated from German to English.

EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE During this course you will study two authentic German language resources (a text and a film) and will study aspects of the contemporary societies, cultural backgrounds and heritages of German-speaking countries.

Paper 2 – Written response to works and translation • An unseen passage to be translated from to English to German. • An extended response to one of the literary texts studied. • An extended response to the second literary text studied or extended response to the film studied.

You will also have opportunities to develop your understanding and awareness of spiritual, moral, ethical, environmental, health and political issues. You will extend and develop your knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary of German and will use this to speak, write, read and listen to the language. In addition, you will also be able to equip yourself with transferable skills such as autonomy, resourcefulness, creativity, critical thinking, and linguistic, cultural and cognitive flexibility that will enable you to proceed to further study or to employment.

Paper 3 – Speaking • Students discuss one theme from the specification based on a stimulus containing two different statements. • Students present a summary of the key findings of the written sources they have used for their research and answer questions on this. They then have a wider discussion on their research.

Future Career Progression

Entry Requirements

There are few areas of work or professional life which do not have an international dimension. A qualification in a foreign language is therefore invaluable in helping students to find employment, whether in banking, law, journalism, leisure and tourism, the civil service or teaching.

Standard entry requirements and at least grade 6 in GCSE German.

Course Content Theme 1 - Social issues and trends: Evolving society in Germany • Natural living • Education • The world of work.

There are many courses for which an A Level foreign language is a direct qualification for entry, including degree courses in the language itself or in studies relevant to the country.

Theme 2 – Political and/or intellectual and/or artistic culture in the German-speaking world • Music • Media • Festivals and traditions .

Many degree courses can now be combined with a language either as joint degrees or as part of the course, i.e. History, Geography, Art, Business Studies, European Studies, Politics, Sociology and English. Modern Foreign Language qualifications are highly valued by admissions tutors and employers as evidence of hard work, intellectual aptitude, intercultural competency and international outlook.

Theme 3 – Social issues and trends: Immigration and the German multicultural society • Integration and multiculturalism • Economic and social impact of migration . Theme 4 – Political and/or intellectual and/or artistic culture: German reunification • Society in the GDR before reunification • Germany since reunification .

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GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

Course Content and Assessment

AS Level or A2 Level

Unit 1 – Democracy in the UK: 1 hour 45 min exam (33% of final grade) • Participation and voting behaviour: the nature of participation; participation through the ballot box

EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE By studying this course, students will acquire a wide range of skills including the ability to understand, summarise and interpret information from a variety of sources. They will develop research skills, being able to sift through the mass of information available online, via news media, newspapers and magazines and extract and evaluate information that is relevant to a specific line of enquiry.

Electoral systems: the role of elections in a democracy

The nature of representation

Political parties: the role of political parties in a democracy and the ideologies of the main 3 parties

Pressure groups and protest movements: the importance of pressure groups to political communication and policy making in a democracy; pressure group behaviour.

Unit 2 – Governing the UK: 1 hour 45 min exam (33% of final grade) • The British constitution: the nature and sources of the British Constitution; Devolution and the impact of the EU on sovereignty

Students will develop their essay-writing skills, learning how to structure their ideas effectively and construct a cogent and well supported argument. A significant proportion of lessons will be spent debating and discussing theories, issues and key political events of the day, allowing students to develop their communication skills as well. Successful candidates will be able to work independently or in small groups as required. Throughout the course they should collect information about topics they study from quality press articles, journals and online resources. They will also be able to keep detailed and well-organised class notes, work to a deadline and revise effectively for tests and exams.

The judiciary and its relationship to other ‘powers’ of government

Parliament: the role of parliament in the UK’s political system

Parliament and government relationships,

The Core Executive: relations within the core executive; the prime minister and the cabinet system; policy making and implementation.

Unit 3 – The US Political system: 1 hour 45 min exam (33% of final grade) • Comparative focus to the Similarities and differences with the UK.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and at least grade 6 in GCSE English Language or History.

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Presidential and Congressional Elections

Parties & Pressure Groups

Civil Rights and society

Powers of the President, Supreme Court and Congress

Role and importance of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.


HISTORY

Democracy and Nazism: Germany, 1918–1945 (WGSG site) This option provides for the study in depth of a period of German history during which a newly developed democratic form of government gave way to a dictatorial Nazi regime. It explores political concepts such as ‘right’ and ‘left’, nationalism and liberalism as well as ideological concepts such as racialism, anti-Semitism and Social Darwinism. It also encourages reflection on how governments work and the problems of democratic states as well as consideration of what creates and sustains a dictatorship.

A Level AQA INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE This is a course which balances depth studies with broader themes. It builds on but does not depend on the knowledge, understanding and skills developed at GCSE level. The full Advanced Level qualification is a two year course with final examinations and coursework submitted at the end.

Unit 3: Topic Based Essay This involves an assignment, designed, researched and written by the student and focusing on a specific issue, event, debate or character in history of their choosing. This should mainly be based around a historical controversy that has caused fierce debate amongst historians. This unit involves the research and production of a 3000-3500 word written assignment focused around the ‘Changing role of Women in Britain between the years 1850-1950’.

Entry Requirements Standard WG6 entry requirements including GCSE History and English Language at grade 6 or above.

Course Content Unit 1: British Period Study and Enquiry England 1485–1603: The Tudors This option allows students to study in breadth issues of change, continuity, cause and consequence in this period. Such questions as how did the Tudors restore and develop the power of the monarchy, was the country adequately governed in the period, how far did English society and the economy change in the period, and what impacts did religious change are all dealt with in the course. There is a focus on historiographical sources to investigate theories surrounding issues such as the break with Rome, the Mid-Tudor Crisis and success of Elizabethan foreign policy.

Assessment Unit 1: Exam - 2 hour 30 minutes - 40% Unit 2: Exam - 2 hour 30 minutes - 40% Unit 3: Coursework- 3000-3500 word assignment - 20%

Future Career Progression Many students combine History with other humanities subjects like English, Sociology and Modern Languages – but Mathematics, the Sciences and Business Studies will complement logical thinking equally well.

Unit 2: Non-British Period Study The Cold War 1945-1991 (WGSB site) An investigation into the origins of the Cold War conflict, examining how far Stalin’s Foreign policy led to the breakdown of the wartime alliance, the impact of the Nuclear Arms race on international relations, key conflicts such as the Korean and Vietnam wars and the roles of Gorbachev, Reagan and Eastern European national movements in ending the Cold War and the collapse of the Berlin Wall. This unit has focused around Historical Interpretation with the analysis of contemporary sources as the driving focus behind student’s historical understanding of events and debates.

History A Level is seen as a facilitating subject by the Russell group universities and can be seen as a platform for many University courses and diverse careers such as Law, Journalism, the Media, Social Welfare, Business Management, Travel and Tourism and the Police, as well as many others.

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MATHEMATICS

Pure Mathematics 2 Proof, Algebra and functions, Coordinate Geometry in the (x,y) plane, Sequences and Series, Trigonometry, Differentiation, Integration and Numerical methods. Statistics and Mechanics Section A: Statistics Statistical sampling, Data Presentation and Interpretation, Probability, Statistical Distributions and Statistical Hypothesis Testing Section B: Mechanics Quantities and units in mechanics, Kinematics, Forces and Newton’s laws and Moments

AS Level or A Level EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Mathematics is the science of number, quantity and space. AS and A2 are the further development of GCSE concepts to allow problem solving in the real world. It is divided into Pure, Mechanics and Statistics.

Entry Requirements

Assessment

Standard entry requirements including: a grade 7 at Higher Tier in GCSE Mathematics. You will be required to sit an assessment.

There are two papers sat at AS Level: Paper 1 – Pure Mathematics is marked out of 100 Paper 2 – Statistics and Mechanics is marked out of 50. AS Level Paper 1 assesses the same content as A2 level Paper 1, but at an AS level of difficulty.

The assessment does not require any knowledge beyond GCSE. It assesses your ability to use and apply your knowledge and your ability to think through problems and select appropriate techniques.

There are three papers sat at A2 Level all examinations are marked out of 100.

Students need to enjoy the subject and must have a positive attitude and be prepared to work consistently. Students need to be aware that Mathematics is not an easy option.

Future Career Progression You will be able to combine Mathematics with any other subject; recent research shows that people with A Level Mathematics (any grade) earn, on average, 10% more than those without. An A Level in Mathematics is the key to almost any opportunity.

Course Content Students will undertake the following sections of study: Pure Mathematics 1 Proof, Algebra and functions, Coordinate geometry in the (x,y) plane, Sequences and Series, Trigonometry, Exponentials and Logarithms, Differentiation, Integration and Vectors.

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FURTHER MATHEMATICS

Course Content

AS Level or A Level

Students will undertake the following sections of study: Year 12 Modules Core Pure 1: Complex numbers, co-ordinate systems, matrix algebra, series, vectors and proofs. Decision 1: Algorithms, networks, graph theory, minimum spanning trees, Dijkstra’s and Floyd’s algorithms. Further Statistics 1: Discrete probability distributions, Poisson distribution, Geometric and Negative Binomial distributions, Hypothesis Testing.

EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Mathematics is the science of number, quantity and space. AS and A2 are the further development of GCSE concepts to allow problem solving in the real world. Further Mathematics is divided into Pure, Decision and Further Statistics. The full Advanced Level qualification is a two year course which consists of the AS and A2 courses.

Year 13 Modules Core Pure 2: Further calculus, first and second order differential equations, polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions and proofs. Decision 1: Critical path analysis, linear programming, Route Inspection and Travelling Salesman problems. Further Statistics 1: Chi Squared, Probability Generating Functions, Central limit Theorem, Quality of Tests.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements including: grade 8 at Higher Tier in GCSE Mathematics. You will also need to be studying A Level Mathematics. Students need to enjoy the subject and must have a positive attitude and be prepared to work consistently. Students need to be aware that Mathematics is not an easy option.

Assessment There are two papers sat at AS Level which are weighted 50% each and are marked out of 80. There are four papers sat at A Level which are weighted 25% each and are marked out of 75; there is no coursework.

Future Career Progression You will be able to combine Further Mathematics with any other subject; recent research shows that people with A Level Mathematics (any grade) earn, on average, 10% more than those without. Further Mathematics is ideal for those wishing to study Mathematics, Physics, Computer Science or Engineering at University.

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MEDIA STUDIES

Assessment

AS Level or A Level

Written Paper 1 – 2hrs – 84 marks – 35% of A Level Questions will focus on issues and debates in the media. A topic will be released in advance of the exam. Students will be expected to use any relevant elements of the theoretical framework in order to explore the ideas in the paper.

AQA INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Through studying Media Studies you will view, evaluate and analyse a variety of media products, and develop practical skills spanning a range of media forms. You will find contemporary, diverse topics and varied and engaging content, helping you to develop research and problem-solving skills as well as your creativity. You will also refine your debating skills through the discussion of contemporary issues from a range of perspectives. This is an academically demanding course with high emphasis on the theoretical framework which underpins the production and consumption of media texts.

Written Paper 2 - 2hrs – 84 marks – 35% of A Level Questions will focus on the analysis of media products, through the lens of the theoretical framework. Students will be expected to refer to the Close Study Products (CSPs) provided by AQA and other products they have studied. They will also be expected to demonstrate understanding of the contexts in which the products were created. Non-Exam Assessment: Creating a media product – 72 marks – 30% of A Level • A statement of intent

Entry Requirements

Standard entry requirements.

Course Content

Future Career Progression

AS Media Studies engages students in the in depth study of media products in relation to the four areas of the theoretical framework: •

media language

media representation

media industries

media audiences.

Media Studies complements creative and analytical subjects such as English, History, ICT and Art. Media Studies is ideal for careers in ICT, Graphic Design, Journalism, Marketing and the Film and Television industry.

Students are required to study media products from all of the following media forms: •

audio-visual forms (TV, film, radio, advertising and marketing, video games and music video)

online forms (social and participatory media, video games, music video, newspapers,

magazines, advertising and marketing)

print forms (newspapers, magazines, advertising and marketing

Cross-media products made for an intended audience based on briefs set by AQA

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MUSIC

must be a minimum of 6 minutes. Component 3: Appraising One written paper of 2 hours consisting of two sections, A and B. Section A relates to set works that have been studies throughout the course and a short melody/ rhythm completion exercise. Section B requires extended responses to set works and unrelated music heard in the examination. The set works include; Vocal Music; Instrumental Music; Music for Film; Popular Music and Jazz; Fusions; New Directions.

A Level EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Music A Level provides an intellectually stimulating course that challenges the musicality of the student. It is a creative subject that integrates performance alongside composition and the listening and analysing of music.

This qualification develops awareness/understanding of music in a culturally diverse society and develops performance and composition skills, creating thinking skills, time management skills and independent learning. Students will gain confidence and presentation skills through performance and working with students of all ages, and staff, in the music department. The course provides a working knowledge of music software.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements are a grade 6 or above at GCSE Music/Grade 5+ on an instrument with a sound level of competence on a musical instrument (which may include the voice) – grade 5+. Candidates are required to participate in a variety of ensembles and concerts throughout the course.

Assessment

Course Content

Component 1: Preforming Component 2: Composing Component 3: Appraising

There are three components within the course: Component 1: Performing A performance of one or more pieces that total a minimum of 8 minutes. The performance can be playing or singing solo, in an ensemble, improvising, or realising music using music technology.

30% of A Level 30% of A Level 40% of A Level

Future Career Progression This course is aimed particularly at students wishing to study music, popular music or a combined arts subject in higher education or advanced GNVQ diploma in performing arts. It would ultimately be an excellent grounding for anyone wishing to pursue a vocation in music or the arts in general.

Component 2: Composing Two compositions – one in response to a given brief and one free composition. The total time of the compositions

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PHOTOGRAPHY

This will involve: • Developing ideas • Exploring media, developing and applying skills • Researching, recording analysing and reviewing • Creating and presenting outcomes This component consists of three major elements: supporting studies, practical work and a personal study of a minimum 1000 words of continuous prose. Component 2: Externally Set Assignment This component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing resolved outcomes in response to an externally set theme. This will also involve: • Developing ideas • Exploring media, developing and applying skills • Researching, recording analysing and reviewing • Creating and presenting outcome. This component consists of two major elements: preparatory studies and a 15 hour period of sustained focus.

AS Level or A Level EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The aims and objectives of the Advanced GCE in Photography are to enable students to develop: • intellectual, imaginative, creative and intuitive capabilities • investigative, analytical, experimental, practical, technical and expressive skills • aesthetic understanding and critical judgement • independence of mind in developing, refining & communicating ideas, intentions and personal outcomes • an interest in, enthusiasm for and enjoyment of photography, art and design • experience of working with a broad range of media • an understanding of the interrelationships between photography, art, craft and design • processes and an awareness of the contexts in which they operate • knowledge/experience of real-world contexts and, where appropriate, links to the creative industries • knowledge and understanding of photography, art, craft, design and media and technologies in contemporary and past societies and cultures • an awareness of different roles, functions, audiences and consumers of photography, art, craft and design.

Assessment Component 1 is worth 60% of the AS level grade and is assessed against the following 5 headings • Skills • Recording and Research • The Creative Process • Outcomes • Written

Entry Requirements Standard WG6 entry requirements including: GCSE Grade 6 in Photography or Art and Design. Students should have a commitment to and love of the subject and feel motivated to develop visual skills and express their ideas. It is advantageous to have studied Art or Design or Photography GCSE achieving a grade 6 but it is not essential. Portfolio work will be considered.

Component 2 is worth 40% of the AS level grade and is assessed against the following 4 headings • Skills • Recording and Research • The Creative Process • Outcomes

Future Career Progression

Course Content

It is useful for students who have an interest in a career in journalism, fashion, publishing, advertising and film and media industries. Also those with an interest and aptitude for the subject, who do not intend to study it further but will be able to use the transferable study skills and creativity in their chosen career path.

Component 1: Personal Investigation This component allows students opportunities to generate and develop ideas, research primary and contextual sources, record practical and written observations, experiment with media and processes, and refine ideas towards producing resolved outcomes.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Assessment

AS Level or A level

Component 1: Factors affecting participation in physical activity and sport. 35% written paper. • Applied anatomy and physiology

AQA INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The course will enable students to make an entry into a sports and leisure environment, including sports leadership and leisure centre management. It is also a requirement for many courses at university, subjects like Physiotherapy, Sports Science, Human Biological Sciences, Sport Psychology, Leisure Management and PE Teaching. However as mentioned below there is far more to this A Level than meets the eye and the strengths gained benefit almost all professional careers.

Skill acquisition

Sport and society

Component 2: Factors affecting optimal performance in physical activity and sport. 35% written paper. • Exercise physiology and biomechanics •

Sports psychology

Sport and society and technology in sport

Component 3: Non-exam assessment; Practical performance in physical activity and sport. 30% practical moderation.

Entry Requirements Entry requirements include a minimum of one grade 6 in GCSE Science and GCSE English Language and a grade 6 in GCSE Physical Education or Distinction for Sport BTEC. Standard entry requirements and the division of marks are clearly weighted in favour of the theoretical components of the course (70% theory/30% practical). Therefore, this course is most suitable to those with a strong theoretical background. Being good at a particular sport alone will not bring about success.

Future Career Progression There are a number of professional career paths available from this A Level. Many students have gone on to study the more recognised career paths such as Sport Psychology, Physiotherapy and Sports Science. However, this A Level is more than that, it has given students the chance to develop their leadership, their understanding of team work and team ethics, understanding of group cohesion, the nature of anxiety and much more.

Course Content Unit 1: Opportunities for and the effects of leading a healthy and active lifestyle

This knowledge has benefited many students that have gone into all sorts of professional careers from financial managers to teachers. An understanding of what makes people work effectively, mentally, physically and socially is an undoubted skill and requires valuable knowledge, which can all be gained through this A Level. If you have ambitions to do any of the professions mentioned above then this A Level is a must, however you need to take this A Level into consideration if you intend to work with people in your professional career.

Unit 2: Analysis and evaluation of physical activity as a performer and/or an adopted role/s Unit 3: Optimising performance and evaluating contemporary issues within sport Unit 4: Optimising practical performance in a competitive situation

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PHYSICS

Assessment

A Level

Paper 1: A 2-hour paper that is worth 34%. It is a split of multiple choice, short answer and long answer questions. It is based on topics 1-6.

AQA

Paper 2: A 2-hour paper that is worth 34%. It is split into multiple choice, short and long answer questions. It is based on the later topics.

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The Physics course is organised into teaching units, each of which is freestanding and builds upon work carried out in GCSEs. There are a total of 5 teaching units in Year 12 and 4 in Year 13, one of which is an option. There are also core practicals that must be carried out in both Year 12 and 13. These will be assessed in the written examinations.

Paper 3: A 2-hour written paper. It is worth 32%. It contains questions based on practical skills and data analysis. There is also a section of long answer questions for the option topic. Students will also be given a practical endorsement grade for Physics. This is separate to the A Level and will not affect the overall grade. Students will be assessed by the school and will be awarded a pass or fail for this element of the course.

If you are already interested in the Physics topics in your science studies at GCSE then do consider studying Physics. If you would like to know more about fundamental ideas such as quantum mechanics, relativity and cosmology, then Physics may be for you. If you are good at Maths and if you enjoy finding mathematical solutions to problems, then studying A Level Physics is worth serious consideration.

Future Career Progression Other subjects that can be studies with Physics are: Mathematics, Chemistry and Biology. These are popular useful companion subjects for Physics.

Course Content Students will study measurements and their errors, particles and radiation, waves, mechanics and materials and electricity in Year 12. Whilst in Year 13, students will study topics including further mechanics, thermal physics, fields and their consequences, nuclear physics and an option from astrophysics, medical physics, engineering physics, turning points in physics.

A Level Physics opens the way to studies and careers in Physics, Engineering, Mathematics, Chemistry, Radiography and Medical Physics, Medicine, Dentistry, Materials Science, Biochemistry, Pharmacy, Veterinary Science, Food Science, Physiotherapy, Materials Science, Geography, Geophysics etc. Physics is an essential companion subject for students studying other Physical Science based subjects including all forms of Engineering. Physics is also desirable to a wide range of non-scientific careers such as Finance, Banking and Actuary related careers.

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PSYCHOLOGY

Learning objectives are set for each module and these may be assessed in a variety of ways, for example, essays, presentations and research reports. Students are expected to take part in discussions and conduct extended learning outside of the classroom. There is an increasing emphasis on students taking more responsibility for their own learning as the course proceeds.

AS Level or A level AQA INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Psychology is the scientific study of behaviour and mental processes. It is primarily concerned with the investigation of what people do and why they do it. Psychology gives us an insight into the influence of a person’s environment on their behaviour, as well as the influence of biological factors such as genetics, the central nervous system, hormones and neurotransmitters. The full Advanced Level qualification is a two-year course.

Assessment All examinations will take place at the end of Year 12; Paper 1: Social Influence, Memory, Attachment and Psychopathology. • Written examination: 2 hours

Entry Requirements

Total Marks: 96

Total A Level: 33.3%

Paper 2: Approaches, Biopsychology and Research Methods • Written examination: 2 hours

Standard entry requirements including: English Language, Mathematics and at least one Science at Grade 6 or above.

Course Content In Year 13 students will study the course content for Paper 1 and Paper 2, which consists of the following topics; Social influence, memory, attachment, psychopathology, research methods, biopsychology and approaches in psychology.

Total Marks: 96

Total A Level: 33.3%

Paper 3: Issues and Debates and: • Relationships, Gender or Cognition and Development; Schizophrenia, Eating Behaviour or Stress; Aggression, Forensic Psychology or Addiction.

In Year 13 students will study the course content for Paper 3, which consists of the following topics; issues and debates in psychology and one topic from the following three option blocks. These are subject to change: • Relationships, Gender, Cognition and Development,

Written examination: 2 hours

Total Marks: 96

Total A Level: 33.3%

Schizophrenia, Eating Behaviour, Stress,

Aggression, Forensic Psychology, Addiction.

Psychology is an excellent preparation for Higher Education as it develops the relevant skills necessary for success at this level. Universities also recognise Psychology as a science in the same right as Chemistry, Physics and Biology. Some careers which follow directly from the study of Psychology are; Doctor of Psychology (clinical, educational, forensic and counselling), marketing, advertising, human resource management, police, teaching, social work, occupational psychology, mental health nursing, and disabilities support worker (SEN).This subject links well with many others including; Biology, Mathematics, Sociology, English and Medical Sciences.

Future Career Progression

The study of Psychology A Level encourages the development of skills in comprehension, interpretation and analysis for both quantitative and qualitative data, as well as the construction of balanced, logical and coherent argument. This increases confidence and selfawareness and will enhance students’ future education and career opportunities. A range of approaches are used, including in-depth studies of previous research, student research, video, discussion and note-taking.

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RS: PHILOSOPHY & ETHICS

Unit 3: Development in Religious Thoughts - Christianity Learners will study: • religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world

AS Level or A level OCR INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Philosophy of Religion is the philosophical study of religious beliefs, religious doctrines, religious arguments and religious history. Ethics is a branch of philosophy which seeks to address questions about morality; that is, about concepts such as good and bad, right and wrong, justice and virtue. The course aims to develop the ability to evaluate and think critically. These are useful academic skills that can be applied to a range of situations.

sources of religious wisdom and authority

practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition

significant social and historical developments in theology and religious thought

key themes related to the relationship between religion and society.

Assessment The A2 course culminates in three 2 hour exams all weighted at 33.3% of the A Level.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements and a grade 6 or above in English Language or Religious Studies.

Course Content

Each examination consists of 4 questions containing structured essays, covering the topics that are studied, of which you have to answer 3. These essays require the development of logically reasoned and evaluative argument.

Unit 1: Philosophy of Religion Learners will study: • ancient philosophical influences

Future Career Progression

the nature of the soul, mind and body

arguments about the existence or non-existence of God

the nature and impact of religious experience

the challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil

ideas about the nature of God

issues in religious language.

Ethics and Philosophy can be studied at university as single or joint honours and graduates enter a range of careers in the public services as well as in the private sector. Furthermore, it opens up roots to other subjects at university such as Religious Studies and Theology. With the unique range of skills acquired through this study. Philosophy and Ethics A-Level is also a popular option for entry to many professional careers including: teaching, social work, human resources, the legal profession, nursing and the police or any job that requires you to think well, clearly and rigorously.

Unit 2: Religion and Ethics Learners will study: •

normative ethical theories

the application of ethical theory to two contemporary issues of importance

ethical language and thought

debates surrounding the significant idea of conscience

sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs.

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SOCIOLOGY

Year 13: Topics in Sociology: Beliefs in Society This unit provides you with an opportunity to explore ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions. The relationship between social change and social stability, religious beliefs, practices and organisations. It will further your understanding of religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief. We will debate the significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context.

A Level AQA INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE Sociology is the study of society. This subject provides a thought provoking analysis of how social groups and individuals relate to each other and how society is organised. The course aims to develop the ability to evaluate and think critically. These are useful academic skills that can be applied to a range of situations. A commitment to the subject and the willingness to participate in class discussions is essential. Students will need the ability to examine unfamiliar ideas and models of thought with an open mind.

Theory and Methods and Crime and Deviance. This unit provides you with the opportunity to explore the role of crime, deviance, social order and social control in the contemporary world. Patterns and distribution of types of crime, offenders and victims will be explored as well as theories on how to prevent and punish behaviour that threatens the order of society. New areas of green crime and state crime have taken this topic to an international level and there is also a focus on the challenges that sociologists face when trying to study criminal and deviant behaviour. The paper is synoptic in that it requires you to take a sociological theory and assess its usefulness in understanding society – in essence taking examples from family, education, beliefs as well as crime and deviance.

Entry Requirements Standard entry requirements including: a grade 6 in English Language.

Course Content Year 12: Topics in Sociology: Families and Households. This unit will introduce you to how the family fits into society particularly in relation to state policies and the economy. You will also study how changes in society have influenced changes in the family leading to an increase in diversity of family forms. Roles and relationships will also be explored between adults and adults and children. An understanding of the wider trends in marriage, divorce, cohabitation, illegitimacy, fertility rates, births, deaths and life expectancy will also be gained to broaden the debate on how the family in changing in contemporary society and on a global scale. Education with Theory and Methods. This unit provides you with the opportunity to explore the role and purpose of the education system in contemporary society. The impact of state policies will be explored to see political views on education. Reasons for different educational achievements between social groups will be explored in depth studying the influence of both home background and the school environment. Your analytical and evaluative skills will then be used to assess the usefulness of a research method to a particular area of the education unit you have studied. This unit will also focus upon the methods used to research society.

Assessment A2 Level: 3 examination papers • Education with Theory and Methods 2 hours 33.3% of final grade. •

Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods 2 hours 33.3% of final grade.

Topics 2 hours (Families and Beliefs) 33.3% of final grade.

Future Career Progression Sociology compliments most other Social Science or Humanities subjects. It could also be combined successfully with a science subject where it would offer a contrasting view of methodology. Sociology A level is also an option for entry to many professional careers including; teaching, social work, human resources, the legal profession, nursing and the police.

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SPANISH

studied Paper 3 – Speaking • Students discuss one theme from the specification based on a stimulus containing two different statements. • Students present a summary of the key findings of the written sources they have used for their research and answer questions on this. They then have a wider discussion on their research.

A Level Edexcel INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE During this course you will study two authentic Spanish language resources (a text and a film) and will study aspects of the contemporary societies, cultural backgrounds and heritages of Spanish-speaking countries. You will also have opportunities to develop your understanding and awareness of spiritual, moral, ethical, environmental, health and political issues. You will extend and develop your knowledge of the grammar and vocabulary of Spanish and will use this to speak, write, read and listen to the language. In addition, you will also be able to equip yourself with transferable skills such as autonomy, resourcefulness, creativity, critical thinking, and linguistic, cultural and cognitive flexibility that will enable you to proceed to further study or to employment.

Future Career Progression There are few areas of work or professional life which do not have an international dimension. A qualification in a foreign language is therefore invaluable in helping students to find employment, whether in banking, law, journalism, leisure and tourism, the civil service or teaching. There are many courses for which an A level foreign language is a direct qualification for entry, including degree courses in the language itself or in studies relevant to the country. Many degree courses can now be combined with a language either as joint degrees or as part of the course, i.e. history, geography, art, business studies, European studies, politics, sociology and English. Language qualifications are highly valued by admissions tutors and employers as evidence of hard work, intellectual aptitude, intercultural competency and international outlook.

Course Content Theme 1 - The evolution of Spanish society (in Spain only) Theme 2 - Political and artistic culture in the Spanishspeaking world Theme 3 - Immigration and multicultural Spanish society Theme 4 - Dictatorship of Franco and the Spanish transition to democracy

Assessment Paper 1 – Listening, reading and translation • Students will respond to listening comprehension questions based on a recording in a variety of contexts and sources. • A reading assessment based on a variety of text-types and genres where students will have to respond to questions. • An unseen passage to be translated from Spanish to English. Paper 2 – Written response to works and translation • An unseen passage to be translated from to English to Spanish. • An extended response to one of the literary texts studied. • An extended response to the second literary text studied or extended response to the film

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Extended Project Qualification

Assessment

AS Level

Completion of a detailed activity log

Written report

Short presentation of the process and the final project

EDEXCEL INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE The Extended Project requires students to create a single piece of work, requiring a high degree of planning, preparation and autonomous working. The projects that students complete will differ by subject, but all will require persistence over time and research skills to explore a subject independently in real depth.

Future Career Progression An Extended Project is an excellent way to build up and develop excellent research skills while learning how to be more critical and analytical in evaluations. It presents a unique opportunity to examine a subject at considerable depth and uncover new interests whilst working towards a qualification.

All projects must include a written report of approximately 5000 words. However, this will depend on the nature of the project undertaken. Students can complete their project as a dissertation, investigation, artefact or performance. The project will conclude with a short presentation to a non-specialist audience.

Universities view the Extended Project very positively. The Extended Project gives students the opportunity to develop independent learning skills (e.g. project management, decision-making, problem-solving, planning research, critical thinking) that are important at university but which are undeveloped during A Level courses. Many universities will offer lower grades based on an excellent Extended Project result.

Entry Requirements All students will follow the EPQ programme with organised lectures and seminars. The Extended Project Qualification is worth a maximum of 28 UCAS points for an A* grade.

Course Content Students may study any topic they wish; there is no requirement for students to study an area within the range of subjects offered at A Level. Students may wish to study a topic related to the subject that they intend to study at university or an area of specific interest.

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WG6 School Sport Participation

groups and a coach from Kent cricket leading the net sessions. As with all sporting activities this gives all students the opportunity to represent their school and have a valuable reference for their future. We actively encourage students to take part in these activities because we feel that a healthy body is a healthy mind. Relaxation and sport as a catharsis is integral to achievement at A-Level.

WG6 are pleased to be able to offer exciting opportunities for enrichment to all our students. You have the opportunity to play for the one of the most successful football teams in Kent and join WG6 1st XI football team. The team play in the North Kent Premier League and traditionally do very well in this competition having won this league 3 times in the last 8 years. We aim to build a squad that if big enough will provide enough players for two teams, a 1st XI and 2nd XI.

Clubs, Societies and After School Activities

We also have an excellent Rugby team that compete in the NatWest Cup and a local league. Over the years we have built up an excellent reputation for excellent performances and a challenging opposition. We are still

At WG6 we recognise the importance of developing transferable skills as well as building and developing academic skills. We have a wide range of activities on offer for students to participate in and we encourage all students to play their part in the wider community of WG6.

working hard to develop the rugby at the school and this has been showing great progression. We also have a wonderful Old Boys match at Christmas time that welcomes the last 3 years of alumni back to challenge our 1st XV for the Keith White Cup.

Work Experience Work Experience is part of the WG6 Study Programme. All Year 12 students are expected to undertake a one week experience placement, and some students undertake a weekly placement, which will likely contain

Netball is a games option for WG6 girls with the focus on skill and team development as well as fitness and overall enjoyment. All girls are welcome to come along and just train or take it up as a competitive option; we usually have matches on Wednesday afternoons or after school on Tuesdays along with the rest of the schools netball fixtures. This season started with a great success and the girls won their first match away, 19 – 0. There are other activities available; we have a fully equipped fitness suite that WG6 students have free access to. WG6 students can also take advantage of the clubs that are on offer after school. Currently we have Basketball, Handball, Squash and Badminton; from December we start winter cricket nets open to all age

some observation, learning and carrying out a variety of tasks involving increasing responsibility; allowing students to gain a clear understanding of expectations in the work place.

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WILMINGTON GRAMMAR CO-EDUCATIONAL SIXTH FORM

Wilmington Grammar School for Girls Site Wilmington Grange, Parsons Lane Wilmington, Kent DA2 7BB Wilmington Grammar School for Boys Site Common Lane, Wilmington Dartford DA2 7DA Tel: 01322 226351 or 01322 223090 Email: office@wg6.co.uk Website: www.wg6.co.uk

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