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th

15

Annual

Research Symposium

April 3-4, 2013

JUBILEE HALL • APPLETON ROOM


MESSAGE FROM THE GENERAL CHAIR Fisk’s 15th Annual Research Symposium provides an opportunity for the Fisk family to share results from research conducted in all academic disciplines. The Symposium enables students and faculty to engage in scholarly dialogue and thought provoking exchanges. It is the environment that would be expected on a liberal arts campus recognized for its research productivity. Here at Fisk, students are encouraged to begin inquiry based learning early in their matriculation. Sharing results of research closes the loop of the learning cycle and the benefits gained from the experience are numerous, including a sense of accomplishment and pride in one’s work well done. This year’s program highlight is the keynote presentation, “The Need for ‘Creative Maladjustment’ in Research on Black Men’s Health,” by Derek Griffith, Ph.D., who is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Health and Society and General Internal Medicine and Public Health and the Director of the Institute for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University. We thank Dr. Griffith for taking time from his full schedule to share with Fisk students, faculty, staff and guests. We have grown tremendously since our humble beginning in 1998. Over a two-day period, presentations will be made by representatives of the School of Natural Science, Mathematics and Business and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. Faculty will open the Symposium on Wednesday, April 3, 2013. We are especially excited by the fact that both seasoned and junior faculty members are sharing with us. Undergraduate and graduate students will share the results of their research on the following day. The quality of the abstracts submitted indicates the commitment to Fisk’s mission that states we seek to “emphasize the discovery and advancement of knowledge through research in the natural and social sciences, business and the humanities.” Our students have opportunities to engage in research both locally and nationally. Several of Fisk’s research projects are products of collaborations with universities and national laboratories from across the United States. External collaborators include colleagues from Vanderbilt, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University and Case Western University. In our effort to“cultivate scholars and leaders one by one,” we expose our students to mentors and cutting edge research through mutually beneficial partnerships. We are grateful to Program Co-Chairs, Dr. Sajid Hussain and Dr. Dani Smith, for their hard work and dynamic leadership in promoting the symposium. They have mentored students for presentations, infused new ideas into the event and worked diligently to bring this event to fruition. Their team members who contributed to the success of this event included the Steering Committee, staff, faculty, administrators and students. Deep appreciation is expressed to each person. I welcome the entire Fisk Family and guests to this event of celebration. Come with anticipation. Expect to learn something new. You will be astounded by what you hear, see and experience! Sincerely,

Princilla Evans Morris, Ph.D., General Chair Associate Professor of Chemistry Executive Vice President and Provost 4


15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM KEYNOTE SPEAKER “The Need for “Creative Maladjustment” in Research on Black Men’s Health” DEREK M. GRIFFITH, Ph.D.

Senior Scientist, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Adjunct Professor of Physics, North Central College, Naperville, Ill. Abstract. In September of 1967, Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. addressed a national health organization and he argued that researchers should seek “creative maladjustment” and not accept and adjust to social inequality and inhumanity. Despite this warning, we tend to oversimplify unjust racial and gender differences in health and treat them as though they are normal and acceptable, and therefore the solution lies in simply getting people to engage in healthier behavior. In this presentation, Dr. Griffith will describe how we need to reconsider the factors that determine why Black men, for example, live significantly shorter and sicker lives than all other race by gender groups in the US, and the solutions that are within our grasp of we pursue and answer the right questions, and correct the errors in the ways we have conceptualized, studied and sought to address Black men’s health. Short Biography Derek M. Griffith is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Health and Society and General Internal Medicine and Public Health and the Director of the Institute for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University. Previously, Dr. Griffith was an Assistant Professor of Health Behavior and Health Education in the University of Michigan, School of Public Health, Assistant Director of the Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health and the Director of the Center on Men’s Health Disparities at Michigan. Dr. Griffith’s research focuses primarily on understanding and improving the health and well-being of Black American men. He also has written extensively on community-based approaches to reducing unjust racial differences in health, and he has trained and mentored undergraduate, masters and doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in these research areas. Dr. Griffith has published over 50 papers and book chapters, given numerous conference presentations. His research has been funded by the American Cancer Society, the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and the National Institutes of Health and his work has been covered by such news outlets as MSN, NPR, Time Magazine, United Press International, US News and World Report and USA Today. Dr. Griffith his received a Bachelor of Arts (double major) in Psychology and Afro-American Studies from the University of Maryland at College Park, completed a predoctoral clinical psychology internship at Yale University School of Medicine, earned his Masters’ degree and PhD in Clinical-Community Psychology from DePaul University, and then completed the W.K. Kellogg Community Health Scholars postdoctoral fellowship in community-based participatory health disparities research at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health.

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15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


TABLE OF CONTENTS

LETTER FROM MR. PRESIDENT................................................................................................................................3 GENERAL CHAIR MESSAGE......................................................................................................................................4 KEYNOTE: DEREK M. GRIFFITH, PHD.......................................................................................................................5 The Need for “Creative Maladjustment” in Research on Black Men’s Health SYMPOSIUM AGENDA.............................................................................................................................................7 ORGANIZATION...................................................................................................................................................... 14 JUDGES LIST........................................................................................................................................................... 18 AUTHORS LIST........................................................................................................................................................ 16 Undergraduate Students................................................................................................................................................................... 16 Graduate Students............................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Fisk Faculty.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 17 Fisk Staff................................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 COLLABORATION: RESEARCH LABS AND UNIVERSITIES.................................................................................... 17 7


*Presenter

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES.............................................................................................. 19 Department of Arts and Languages............................................................................................................. 19 1. Representations of Black Characters in American Comic Books.....................................................................................19 Alexis Harper* and Lean’tin Bracks English Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Department of Behavioral Sciences and Education................................................................................... 20 2. Political Participation and Interest of Hispanics/Latinos..................................................................................................20 Selena M. Crowley* Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 3. Correlations between Sex, Gender Identity, and Vehicle Personality Perceptions.......................................................20 Charity J. Fonkeng* Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 4. Neighborhood Changes and Redevelopment: A Case Study of Gentrification in Germantown in Nashville, Tennessee...............................................................................................................................................................20 Melissa Garcia* Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS AND BUSINESS....................................................................... 21 Department of Business Administration..................................................................................................... 21 5. Is Boku Worth Expanding Internationally?...........................................................................................................................21 Jade Hendricks* and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 6. Black Employment; Against All Odds.....................................................................................................................................22 Jade Hooker*, Azaria Robinson*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 7. Globalization; To Fight Against or to Support?....................................................................................................................22 Joy Obiokoli*, Chinwike Obiokoli*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 8. The Impact of Ethical Lapses in Corporate America...........................................................................................................22 Christina Lee*, Clementina Ojie*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 9. The Relevance of an MBA in Corporate America.................................................................................................................23 Darica Shine*, Deverter Woods*, Keiarra Gross*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 10. Google Tools for Conducting a Survey on Politics and Young Voters.............................................................................23 Bella Umontuen* and Sajid Hussain Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208

Department of Life and Physical Sciences.................................................................................................. 24 11. Role of Cx43 on the Formation and Expression of Sclerostin...........................................................................................24 Oghenerukeme Asagba*1,2, Yue Zhang2, and Patricia McCarroll1 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, 17033

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15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


*Presenter

12. Developing a PCR Genotyping Protocol for Tracking Mutations in a Gene Involved in Dopamine Neuron Function...............................................................................................................................24 Sarah Kayode * and Brian L. Nelms Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 13. Interfacial Polymerization of Bisphenol A Tetrachlorocyclotriphosphazene Monomers to Synthesize Poly (arylene ether sulfone)......................................................................................................................................................24 Jasmine Robertson*1, Natalie Arnett1, and Tiffany Thompson2 1 Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Carthage College, Kenosha, WI 53140 14. Preparation and Characterization of Polyamide Poly(ether amide) Block Copolymers for Reverse Osmosis Membranes...................................................................................................................................................25 Jameison Rolle*, Maurice Gayle and Natalie Arnett Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 15. Synthesis of Poly(xylitol sebacic-b-glycolic acid) Elastomers with Applications in Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery.......................................................................................................................................................................25 Emanuel Zlibut*, Natalie Arnett and James Poland Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 16. Study of Dye C18-RG Doped PETG Polymer Films for Optical Data Storage.................................................................25 Richard. Akrobetu*, Zhengda Pan, Steven Morgan, and Richard Mu Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 37208

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science................................................................................. 26 17. Finding Communities in Networks Using Greedy Algorithms..........................................................................................26 Olamide Adegbesote*1,2, Mehmet Koyuturk2, and Sajid Hussain1 1 Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 37208; 2Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 18. Fighting Obesity – The Gamified Way....................................................................................................................................26 Bright Dotu*, Prince Addai*, Michael Saarah*, and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 19. Modeling the Evolution of Sexual Imprinting......................................................................................................................27 Olatomiwa Lasebikan* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 20. Mobile Sink and Dynamic Intelligent Energy Efficient Clusters for Wireless Sensor Networks.................................27 Christopher Lee* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 21. Genetic Algorithms for Real Estate Home Selection...........................................................................................................27 Travas Lenard* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 22. Mobile Radiation Detection......................................................................................................................................................28 Travas Lenard* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 23. Genetic Algorithm for Optimal Node Distribution in Ubiquitous Applications...........................................................28 John McGrew* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 24. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Atlantic Tropical Cyclones......................................................................................28 Brandon Williams*1 and Lei Qian2 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208

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*Presenter

25. Quantum Mechanical Wave Equations.................................................................................................................................29 Daniella Howard*1 and W. Eugene Collins 1 Mathematics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 26. A Compartmental Model of HIV/AIDS Epidemic with Stability Analysis.......................................................................29 Shayla L. Nolen* and Sanjukta Hota Mathematics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 37208

Healthcare and Wellness....................................................................................................................................... 30 27. Your Own Little Miracle: Decreasing Infant Mortality Rates in African Americans.....................................................30 Alexis Anderson*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3, 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 28. The Ideal You: Increasing Infant Mortality Awareness.......................................................................................................30 Dominique Anthony*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 29. Reducing Obesity Among African American College Students: Let’s Eat and Live......................................................30 Oghenerukeme Asagba*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll1 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 30. Get Fit and Stay with It! Fighting Against Diseases of Obesity among African American College Students........30 Dana Brooks*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll3 1 Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 31. “A Stroke of Genius,” An Intervention Strategy in Stroke Prevention...............................................................................31 Contessa Davis*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll1 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 32. All for One: Making the Minority the Majority.....................................................................................................................31 Jacquelyn Favours*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 33. Project Big Bone: Obesity Intervention...................................................................................................................................31 Amanishakhete James*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll3 1 Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 34. Men’s Health Matters..................................................................................................................................................................31 Candace Jones*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 35. Stroke Prevention and Intervention among African Americans: Power to End Stroke!.............................................32 Joy Obiokoli*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll3 1 Business Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 10

15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


*Presenter

36. Healthy Minds, Healthy Lives...................................................................................................................................................32 Jackie Ojuka-Onedo*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Psychology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 GRADUATE STUDIES & GENERAL EDUCATION.................................................................................................... 33 37. The Characterization of the T419A SNP in the 5-HT2CR....................................................................................................33 Melanie Brady *1,2, Hugh Fentress3, and Lee E. Limbird3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 38. Investigating the role of FKH-8 in Regulating Expression of Dopaminergic Neuron Target Genes in C. Elegans........................................................................................................................................................33 Bobby Jones* and Brian L. Nelms Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 39. Characterization of EpitopeTagged Serotonin 2C Receptors and the ERK 1/2 Signaling Pathway.........................33 Renita King*1, Ronald B. Emeson2 and Hugh Fentress3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232; 2Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 40. P-modes in Hι – A Comparative Study of Active Flaring Regions Along with Their Quiescent Counterparts..................................................................................................................................................34 Teresa Monsue*1, Frank Hill2, Keivan Stassun3 , and Nathan De Lee3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208, 2National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719; 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 41. Characterization of fkh-8 as a Critical Regulator of Dopaminergic Neuron Function in C. Elegans......................34 Erica M. Tross* and Brian L. Nelms Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 42. The polymerization of Sulfonated Poly (aryl ether sulfone) Copolymers with Applications in Hydrogen Fuel Cells................................................................................................................................................................35 James Poland*, Natalie Arnett, and Emanuel Zlibut Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 43. Synthesis and Characterization of Bisphenol A based Precursors of Hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene for Poly(arylene) Ether Sulfone Hybrid Copolymers..................................................................................................................35 Tiffany Thompson*, Natalie Arnett, and Jasmine Robertson Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 44. Determining if a Bulge-less Galaxy has a Supermassive Black Hole Based on the Broad H-alpha Line................35 Bryan Demapan*1,2, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann1,3, and Jillian Bellovary3 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544; 3Department of Physics & Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 45. Investigation of Structural Properties of Ferroelectric Polymer Films Using Second Harmonic Generation........36 Jennifer Jones*1,2, Lei Zhu3, Norman Tolk2, and Richard Mu1 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Department of Physics & Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; 3Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 46. CdTe Functionalized ZnO Nanowires for Solar Cells...........................................................................................................36 Anthony Mayo* and Richard Mu Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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*Presenter

47. An Investigation of Surface-Plasmon Mediated Emission from Functionalized Zinc Oxide Nanowires...............36 Daniel Mayo*1, Richard Mu2 and Richard Haglund3 1 Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; 2Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 48. Testing and Characterization of SrI2(Eu2+): A Novel Material for Implementation as a Gamma-Ray Detector in the PING Experiment..............................................................................................................................................................37 Rose S. Perea*1, Arnold Burger1,3, Ann Parsons2 and Keivan Stassun1,3 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544; 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 49. Stellar Forensics: Typing the Dead Bodies of Stars (Supernova Remnants)..................................................................37 Charee Peters*, Laura Lopez, Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz and Keivan Stassun Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 50. A Novel Method for Fabricating Ultra-Thin ZnO Nanowires.............................................................................................38 Andrew Trenchard*, Anthony Mayo, Paula Hemphill and Richard Mu Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208. 51. The Growth and Characterization of Ternary Lithium Compound (LiInSe2) for the Application of Neutron Detection..................................................................................................................................................................38 Brenden Wiggins*, Arnold Burger, Liviu Matei, Micheal Groza, Emmanuel Rowe, Pijush Bhattacharya and Eugene Tupitsyn Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 FACULTY PRESENTATIONS..................................................................................................................................... 39 52. Regulation of Dopaminergic Neurons by the Transcription Factor FKH-8....................................................................39 Brian L. Nelms* Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 53. Functional Consequences of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Human Serotonin (5-HT) 2C Receptor...................................................................................................................................................39 Hugh Fentress* Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 54. Nanostructures for Energy Harvesting, Conversion, Transport and Storage................................................................40 Richard Mu* Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 55. Revealing Privilege: Examining how Race, Class and Gender Dynamics Manifest in Health and Human Service Organizations.................................................................................................................................................40 Leslie Collins* Psychology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 NAME INDEX.......................................................................................................................................................... 41 NOTES ................................................................................................................................................................... 42 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS..................................................................................................................Back Inside Cover

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15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


Fisk University

Annual Research Symposium Agenda

“Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One” WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3, 2013 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m............................................................................................................................. Faculty Presentations

THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 8:00 a.m....................................................................................................................................................... Poster Preparation 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m......................................................................................................................................... Posters Display 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m................................................................................................ Dialogue with Student Researchers (Students will be available to discuss posters)

1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Welcome Princilla Evans Morris, Ph.D. Provost and Executive Vice President, Fisk University General Chair, Research Symposium

Introduction of the Speaker Brooke T. Davies Junior, Chemistry Discipline SGA President, 2013-14

Keynote Lecture Derek M. Griffith, Ph.D. Associate Professor Medicine, Health & Society Director of the Institute for Research on Men’s Health at Vanderbilt University

Presentation of Awards H. James Williams, Ph.D. President, Fisk University

Reception

*All sessions are held in the Appleton Room of Jubilee Hall.

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RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZATION

General Chair Princilla Evans Morris, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry Executive Vice President and Provost

Program Co-Chairs Sajid Hussain, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Computer Science Chair, Department of Business Administration Dani A. Smith, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Sociology; Chair, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Education

Steering Committee Arnold Burger, Ph.D. Professor of Physics Vice Provost of Academic Initiatives Cathy Martin, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Mathematics Chair, Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences W. Eugene Collins, Ph.D. Professor of Physics; Associate Provost for Faculty Outcomes Lean’tin Bracks, Ph.D. Professor of English; Chair, Department of Arts and Languages

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15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


Steering Committee (Cont’d) Lee E. Limbird, Ph.D. Professor of Biochemistry; Dean, School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics and Business Lei Qian, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Computer Science; Discipline Coordinator, Computer Science Michael Watson, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics Reavis Mitchell, Ph.D. Professor of History; Dean, School of Humanities and Social Sciences Steven Morgan, Ph.D. Professor of Physics; Chair, Department of Life and Physical Science

Administrative Staff Blanchie Dobson Secretary, School of Humanities and Social Sciences Gladys Truss Secretary Graduate Studies and General Education Marian Burns Secretary School of Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Business

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AUTHORS

(BY NAME/ABSTRACT)

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21.

Alexis Anderson, 27* Alexis Harper, 1* Amanishakhete James, 33* Azaria Robinson, 6* Bella Umontuen*, 10* Brandon Williams, 24* Bright Dotu, 18 Candace Jones, 34* Charity J. Fonkeng, 3* Chinwike Obiokoli, 7* Christina Lee, 8* Christopher Lee, 20* Clementina Ojie, 8* Contessa Davis, 31* Dana Brooks, 30* Daniella Howard, 25* Darica Shine, 9* Deverter Woods, 9* Dominique Anthony, 28* Emanuel Zlibut, 15*, 42 Jackie Ojuka-Onedo, 36*

22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43.

Jacquelyn Favours, 32* Jade Hendricks, 5* Jade Hooker, 6* Jameison Rolle, 14* James Poland, 15 Jasmine Robertson, 13* John McGrew, 23* Joy Obiokoli, 7*, 35* Keiarra Gross, 9* Maurice Gayle, 14 Michael Saarah, 18* Melissa Garcia, 4* Oghenerukeme Asagba, 11*, 29* Olamide Adegbesote, 17* Olatomiwa Lasebikan, 19* Prince Addai, 18* Richard. Akrobetu, 16* Shayla L. Nolen, 26* Sarah Kayode, 12* Selena M. Crowley, 2* Tiffany Thompson, 13, 43* Travas Lenard, 21*, 22*

The * character denotes presenter of the abstract.

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15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


GRADUATE STUDENTS

EXTERNAL COLLABORATORS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Andrew Trenchard, 50* Anthony Mayo, 46*, 50 Bobby Jones, 38* Brenden Wiggins, 51* Bryan Demapan, 44* Charee Peters, 49* Erica M. Tross, 41* Daniel Mayo, 47* James Poland, 42* Jasmine Robertson, 43 Jennifer Jones, 45* Melanie Brady, 37* Renita King, 39* Rose S. Perea, 48* Teresa Monsue, 40*

FISK FACULTY 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9 . 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Arnold Burger, 48, 51 Brian L. Nelms, 12, 38, 41, 52* Hugh Fentress, 37, 39, 53* Keivan Stassun, 40, 49 Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, 44 Lean’tin Bracks, 1 Lee E. Limbird, 37 Lei Qian, 24 Leslie Collins, 55* Natalie Arnett, 13, 14, 15, 42, 43 Nicholas Umontuen, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 Patricia McCarroll, 11, 29, 30, 31, 33, 35 Richard Mu, 16, 45, 46, 47, 50, 54* Sanjukta Hota, 26 Sajid Hussain, 10, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 27, 28, 32, 34, 36 Steven Morgan, 16 W. Eugene Collins, 25

Ann Parsons, 48 Frank Hill, 40 Jillian Bellovary, 44 Keivan Stassun, 40, 49 Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, 44 Lei Zhu, 45 Mehmet Koyuturk, 17 Nathan De Lee, 40 Norman Tolk, 45 Richard Haglund, 47 Ronald B. Emeson, 39 Yue Zhang, 11

COLLABORATION: RESEARCH LABS AND UNIVERSITIES Name, Abstract Number (s) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 Computer Science and Electrical engineering, 17 Macromolecular Science and Engineering, 45 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; 44, 48 Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, 17033 Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, 11 Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 Neuroscience, 37 Physics and Astronomy, 40, 44, 45, 47, 48 Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), 39

FISK STAFF 1. Elizabeth Stewart, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36 2. Emmanuel Rowe, 51 3. Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, 49 4. Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, 49 5. Eugene Tupitsyn, 51 6. Laura Lopez, 49 7. Liviu Matei, 51 8. Micheal Groza, 51 9. Paula Hemphill, 50 10. Pijush Bhattacharya, 51 11. Zhengda Pan, 16

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SYMPOSIUM JUDGES

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36.

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Jennifer Adebanjo, Political Science, Department of History and Political Science Natalie Arnett, Chemistry, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Philip Autry, Music, Department of Arts and Languages Richard Bowers, Teacher Education, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Education Valija Bumbulis, Music, Department of Arts and Languages Alfredo Cambronero, Department of Business Administration Stafford Cargill, Department of Business Administration W. Eugene Collins, Physics, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Adenike Davidson, English, Department of Arts and Languages JaCenda Davidson, Human Resources, Business Office Princilla Evans Morris, Chemistry, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Hugh Fentress, Chemistry, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Phyllis Freeman, Biology, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Cheryl Hamberg, Library Holly Hamby, English, Department of Arts and Languages Alicia Henry, Art, Department of Arts and Languages Sanjukta Hota, Mathematics, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Justus Ike, Biology, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Rolanda Johnson, Nursing, Department of Pre-health Professions Cathy Martin, Mathematics, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Patricia McCarroll, Biology, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Reavis Mitchell, History, Department of History and Political Science Steve Morgan, Physics, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Gary Nash, Music, Department of Arts and Languages Brian L. Nelms, Biology, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Sheila Peters, Psychology, Department of Behavioral Sciences and Education Jill Powers, English, Department of Arts and Languages Lei Qian, Computer Science, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Nancy Rasico, Modern Foreign Languages, Department of Arts and Languages Demetrius Short, HCA Healthcare, Nashville Nicholas Umontuen, Department of Business Administration Bryan Wallace, Biology, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Michael Watson, Physics, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Anthony Williams, Music, Department of Arts and Languages Robert Wingfield, Chemistry, Department of Life and Physical Sciences Linda Wynn, Political Science, Department of History and Political Science

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STUDENT ABSTRACTS 2013

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES Department of Arts and Languages 1. Representations of Black Characters in American Comic Books Alexis Harper* and Lean’tin Bracks English Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 This research project aims to give an examination of stereotypes in American Superhero Comics. Comic Book characters represent values of traditional masculinity, bravery, leadership and patriotism. The American comic book also serves as a White male fantasy which depicts White males holding all the aforementioned characteristics and being a type of savior while serving as a bastion of traditional western, white, and patriarchal values. The most popular Super Hero comics in terms of sales and exposure will be examined. Concerning Black superheroes, they are few and far between and are found to not live up the standards of the superhero. In the titles and characters analyzed, they are found to exemplify characteristics of Primitivism, Hypermasculinity, and qualities that make them fall short of the characteristics that would make them a full hero and savior. In addition to this, they are often depicted as side-kicks, as opposed to leaders. The Black female is not widely represented, but she is highly sexualized in her characterization. All of this evidence will be used to juxtapose the characters against classic Black stereotypes of primitivism and hypermasculinity. Black and White gender roles for males and females will also be employed and examined in the context of comic book lore. The goal is to prove that popular American superhero comics do not place the Black figure as an entity worthy of being a fully realized savior. As a White male centered world, The Black man and woman are given no truly legitimate place. This project will relate to the greater field of African American studies because it is a study in how Black figures are regarded in a popular genre of entertainment that is represented in games, movies, and other forms of media. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Lean’tin Bracks 19


Department of Behavioral Sciences and Education 2. Political Participation and Interest of Hispanics/Latinos Selena M. Crowley* Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 This study looked at the specific variables generally used to predict political behaviors and added three new variables to analyze the political participation and interest of Latinos/Hispanics. The often-used factors were age, education, and income; the three new factors were experiences with discrimination, length of residency, and birth country. The results were based on survey information obtained in the summer of 2012 in New York City. The 84 participants were randomly recruited using a traditional skip pattern on busy intersections in Latino/Hispanic neighborhoods in Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Harlem, and Queens. The survey consisted of questions that asked about political interest and political participation. Political interest was measured by a “yes” or “no” response to the question, “Are you interested in politics?” Political participation was measured by a “yes” or “no” response to the question asking whether the respondent had attended any political campaign events that supported a candidate running for a political office. The regression analysis revealed that both length of residency and birth country were significant for political interest and participation. Less political interest and participation were found in participants with greater number of years residing in their current city and who had been born outside of the United States. Discrimination was negatively related to political interest, and age was positively related to political participation. The study was limited by the narrow scope of political activities measured and the small sample size. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Dani A. Smith 3. Correlations between Sex, Gender Identity, and Vehicle Personality Perceptions Charity J. Fonkeng* Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 The principles of symbolic interaction and congruency theory have guided several research studies within consumer behavior literature. Studies have questioned whether relationships exist between consumer personalities and the perceived personalities of the products they buy. This paper has used two previously developed instruments to measure gender role attitudes (Scanzoni 1975) and brand personality (Geuens et al. 2009). The sample consists of 88 college students at a small liberal arts university. The students are asked to rate how well each of 12 personality traits describe four vehicle brands depicted in photographs. Students are also asked the extent to which 21 personality items could be used to describe themselves. A significant, moderately strong relationship is found between gender role attitudes and the brand personality of the Nissan Altima Coupe and Ford Mustang. Both vehicles have masculine attributes. No significant relationship exists between sex and participants’ perceptions of the brand personality of the four vehicles. Because of the preference of college students for traditionally masculine vehicles, males and females may be moving toward an era of more shared gender roles. As gender roles continue to overlap, sex may have less of an impact upon brand personality congruency and perhaps even upon brand preference. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Dani A. Smith 4. Neighborhood Changes and Redevelopment: A Case Study of Gentrification in Germantown in Nashville, Tennessee Melissa Garcia* Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Gentrification suggests that neighborhoods change economically and demographically due to higher household income. In most studies, White households move into low-income, minority neighborhoods and displace the original lower-income residents, spurring racial transition in the process. In the present study, a low-income neighborhood that improved economically in the first decade of the 21st century is examined. U.S. Census tract-level data for 2000 and 2010 are used to study patterns of change in a neighborhood called Germantown. Individual-level variables in the analysis include race, age of householder, home ownership 20

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status, general educational attainment, employment, occupation, and household income. These variables permit an examination of Germantown both before and after its redevelopment. The results are consistent with prior findings and show notable changes in racial composition, home ownership, householder age, general educational attainment, and household income between 2000 and 2010. The largest change is the four-fold increase in the number of White residents and the 51 percent decrease in Black residents. The owner-occupied housing units more than triple between 2000 and 2010. Additionally, more individuals ages 25 to 34 own homes in Germantown in 2010 than in 2000, when most of the owners were between 35 and 54 years-of-age. The results also show a large decrease in households earning below $49,999 (94 percent in 2000 compared to 32 percent in 2010). The findings reveal the displacement of Black residents, and an increase in young home owners following the redevelopment of Germantown. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Dani A. Smith

SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS AND BUSINESS Department of Business Administration 5. Is Boku Worth Expanding Internationally? Jade Hendricks* and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Boku is a mobile payment company that uses social media as payment options. Brazil and South Africa are underdeveloped capitalist markets that, over the past decade, are starting to show a significant boosting their economies, with the influence, support and stimulus of the federal government. The US has invested 16 percent of Brazil’s FDI, and South Africa has liberated its financial regulations to attract capital. The target market of Boku is well represented in both South Africa and Brazil. Aside from South Africa having the strongest economy of the continent, this country also has approximately 29 million cell phone users with an 81% retention rate. Brazil currently has 80 million Internet users who spend approximately $10.6 billion online per year, which is the largest in Latin America. When it comes to cell phone usage by the end of 2004, there were over 70 million phone subscribers which made Brazil the 4th largest mobile market in the world. With markets like this, the potential profit for Boku is undeniable. We see the expansion into South Africa and Brazil as Boku’s best option abroad. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nicholas Umontuen

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6. Black Employment; Against All Odds Jade Hooker*, Azaria Robinson*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 In the United States, the unemployment rate continues to increase due to the economic crisis which negatively affects finances. African Americans, specifically, have experienced a dramatic increase in unemployment since 1984. Statistics show that African American unemployment rates are double those of whites, although the rate has decreased by .02% from 2011 to 2012. Unfortunately, that is still not enough to improve the work force within the African American community and stabilize the economy. The purpose of this research is to suggest ways to improve black employment by instilling a sense of independence- while creating a greater outlook on the economic future. Ways we can achieve this is through the creation of more privately owned businesses, promoting vocational training, working with businesses to obtain more jobs, and instilling in the youth positive work ethic. By implementing these plans, we can decrease the number of unemployment among African Americans while stabilizing the economy. Many unemployed people are aided through the welfare system. There are currently 47.7 million Americans on welfare and of that number 37.3% are black. The federal government has spent 422 billion dollars in the fiscal year 2013 for welfare. The proposed plan would assist in decreasing government debt, which is 1.7 trillion dollars. Our goal is to create a better world, a better U.S., and a better economy but first we need to take care of our own. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nicholas Umontuen 7. Globalization; To fight against or to support? Joy Obiokoli*, Chinwike Obiokoli* , and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Before the 1997 financial crisis; globalization has been seen as a safe haven because the opportunities are mostly considered with little attention given to the challenges. This paper looks into Globalization from the perspective of a developing country and generalizes the statement of Dr Mahathir the former PM of Malaysia; that in the process of welcoming globalization, developing countries should remain watchful of the many challenges that comes with it. With focus on Nigeria, the trend of globalization is explained, its opportunities, challenges and dangers as well as how a developing country can welcome the trend of globalization without being exploited. This paper researches the impact of globalization and focuses on Nigeria, a country in West Africa. We consider both positive and negative impacts of globalization as well as whether globalization is a move that should be upheld or fought against. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nicholas Umontuen 8. The Impact of Ethical Lapses in Corporate America Christina Lee*, Clementina Ojie*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Ethics is a concept that encompasses all fields from education to philosophy. Particularly in the many fields of business, ethics is an important aspect to the conduct of business practices and comportment. The importance of ethical standards in all fields of business is exemplified in the Enron scandal that shook corporate America and catalyzed a new emphasis on ethics in that sector. The Enron scandal was truly significant because it showed the world how vulnerable they could be to corrupt business practices. This research delves into the casualties of Enron’s and their accounting firm, Arthur Andersen’s corrupt practices as a representation of the need for ethical standards in the business world. Thousands of employees lost their job with the dissolution of the company, as well as their wealth and savings because they had invested completely in their employer. The stakeholders and the concerned American citizen were shaken in their trust in the reports of accounting information presented from public companies for fear of the same ethical and financial misrepresentations in which Enron and Arthur Andersen engaged. Finally, the solution to the Enron ethical scandal, as well as several others like it, was the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, a specific guideline created by Congress to govern the ethical behavior of public company boards, their management, and public accounting firms. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nicholas Umontuen 22

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9. The Relevance of an MBA in Corporate America Darica Shine*, Deverter Woods*, Keiarra Gross*, and Nicholas Umontuen Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 An MBA (Masters of Business Administration) is one of the most popular post graduate degrees in the United States. This project involves discussing how MBA degrees are used in corporate America and in today’s business world. The goal is to assess the value of an MBA using variables such as salaries of people with an MBA with those without this degree. Comparing the uses of an MBA with other master’s degrees will provide data that will prove whether or not an undergraduate student should pursue an MBA. Considering the cost of a collegiate education, and job availability after graduation will also help determine the applicability of an MBA. Upon completion, this research should either highlight the importance of an MBA, or show the insignificance of an MBA. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Nicholas Umontuen 10. Google Tools for Conducting a Survey on Politics and Young Voters Bella Umontuen* and Sajid Hussain Business Administration, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 In 2012, the presidential election helped determine the path of America as the country asserts itself as an international power. Research has determined an increase of roughly 2.8 million American young adult (ages 18-29) who are eligible to vote since the 2008 presidential election. By the year 2015, one-third of the electorate will represent this demographic, which is a very significant increase in the number of eligible youth voters. The voter turnout for this sect has been on an upward trend since the year 2000. These facts have placed higher importance on the youth vote. Studying the political cognizance and activity of young people is important because this age group has the most malleable opinions meaning that they can be easily swayed, which in turn skews the results one way or the other. Considering the impact that youth had on the 2008 election, the focus of this survey was on recent high school graduates. This sect was chosen as it is the most fluid in thinking, has the least political knowledge, and shows the least party specific chauvinism relative to those in their twenties. The majority of the survey participants were freshmen who graduated from high school in May 2012. There were fifty participants to ensure that the data reflected the views of the nation’s recent high school graduates. This group represented a myriad of socioeconomic levels, ethnicities, and backgrounds which are representative of the nation as a whole. In this poster, the outcomes of the survey are presented. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain

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Department of Life and Physical Sciences 11. ROLE OF Cx43 ON THE FORMATION AND EXPRESSION OF SCLEROSTIN Oghenerukeme Asagba*1,2, Yue Zhang2, and Patricia McCarroll1 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA, 17033 Connexin 43(Cx43) is the most abundant connexin expressed in bone cells and is essential for the survival and function of osteocytes. One cell signaling function of osteocytes is the release of sclerostin which is antagonistic to bone formation. The objective of our experiment was to determine if Cx43 regulates the expression of Sclerostin. Primary osteocytes were isolated from the femur and tibia of four knockout and wild type mice using sequential collagenase and EDTA digestion. Also, osteocytic MLO-Y4 cell lines with Cx43 shRNA knock down (Cx43-) and overexpression (Cx43+) were utilized. Then the expression levels of Cx43 and Sclerostin RNA were measured using a real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that the level of Sclerostin was higher in Cx43+ cell lines than Cx43- cell lines which showed little or no expression of Sclerostin. The results obtained support the hypothesis that Cx43 up regulates the expression levels of Sclerostin. These results may provide potentially new pharmaceutical targets to treat osteoporosis because regulation of sclerostin can be used as a bone-building treatment for patients with this disease. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Patricia McCarroll 12. Developing a PCR genotyping protocol for tracking mutations in a gene involved in dopamine neuron function Sarah Kayode * and Brian L. Nelms Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Dopamine is a neurotransmitter important for controlling movement, behavior, thought, mood, and many more processes in the brain. Problems with dopamine-producing neurons are responsible for a large array of neurological disorders including Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, dystonia, ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) and more. Caenorhabditis elegans is a small roundworm that can be used to experimentally model dopamine neuron development and function in humans because of its simplicity, rapid life cycle, ease of experimental manipulation, and importantly, genetic conservation (many genes are similar to those found in humans). In both worms and humans, dopamine neurons must have the correct amount of signaling molecules, which is controlled in part by transcription factors. Therefore, we are investigating the role of a class of molecules called forkhead (fkh) transcription factors during neural development. Ongoing studies in our lab have found that worms missing the fkh-8 gene (both it and a mammalian counterpart are expressed in dopamine neurons) have dopamine-related movement defects. To further study the role of the fkh-8 gene in dopamine neurons, we plan to combine the fkh-8 mutation with mutations in other dopamine neuron genes. However, these experiments would first need a fast and reliable method to track the presence of the fkh-8 mutation. To this end, we developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) genotyping strategy and designed and tested DNA primers for PCR and have confirmed a successful consistent, reliable, and rapid method for tracking our mutation. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Brian L. Nelms 13. Interfacial Polymerization of Bisphenol A Tetrachlorocyclotriphosphazene Monomers to Synthesize Poly (arylene ether sulfone) Jasmine Robertson*1, Natalie Arnett1, and Tiffany Thompson2 1 Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Carthage College, Kenosha, WI 53140 The objectives of this research were to investigate the effect of the phase transfer catalyst and longer reaction times on the formation of Bisphenol A (BA) based tetrachlorocyclotriphosphazene (BATCCP) hybrid monomers. BATCCP monomers were prepared by reacting hexchlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) monomer with BA monomer (1:2 ratio) via an interfacial procedure at 100°C. The interfacial reaction was carried out in a water/toluene system with the assistance of a various phase transfer catalyst (PTC), leaving behind an orange adhesive solid. 24

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Previous research has shown that reactions carried out at 24 hours have obtained a 92.98 fractional % yield of BATCCP monomer as confirmed by MALDI. Therefore longer reaction times were investigated to increase the concentration of BATCCP and eliminate the formation of undesired side products. The products were characterized using 31P NMR and MALDI. Ultimately BATCCP hybrid monomer will be used as precursors to prepare poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) copolymers that have potential sites for post modification. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Natalie Arnett 14. Preparation and Characterization of Polyamide Poly(ether amide) Block Copolymers for Reverse Osmosis Membranes Jameison Rolle*, Maurice Gayle and Natalie Arnett Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 The goal of this research is to prepare a polyamide poly(ether amide) (PAPEA) membrane for desalination of sea water. Secondary diamines (JEFFAMINEs) were used to prevent chlorine attack on the amidic nitrogen that is the primary site for degradation in commercial polyamide membranes. Additionally the addition of JEFFAMINE to the polyamide backbone has the potential to increase flexibility without sacrificing water flux or other properties essential for high capacity water desalination. In this research, PAPEA copolymers were prepared by the varying ratios of JEFFAMINE ST-404 to phenylene diamine (PP) dissolved in an aqueous phase with different aromatic acid chlorides dissolved in an organic phase via interfacial polymerization. The aromatic acid chlorides investigated were isophthaloyl Chloride (IC) and terephthaloyl Chloride (TC). Solubility tests showed that polymers prepared with the TC were not soluble in any solvents due to the crystalline nature of the polymers as confirmed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). DSC also showed that PAPEA polymer prepared from IC were amorphous and therefore solubility of these polymers in NMP and DMSO was observed. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Natalie Arnett 15. Synthesis of Poly(xylitol sebacic-b-glycolic acid) Elastomers with Applications in Tissue Engineering and Drug Delivery Emanuel Zlibut*, Natalie Arnett and James Poland Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Biodegradable polymers have been used for tissue engineering and drug delivery for the past couple decades. Tissue engineering addresses the need to repair, replace and improve damaged tissue. Synthetic biodegradable polymers have been becoming increasingly important in the field of medicine and bioengineering. Extensive research has been done on several kinds of biodegradable polymers because of their biocompatibility, biodegradability, and high-purity. The objective of this research is to synthesize block polymers using different ratios xylitol, sebacic acid and glycolic acid. Successful synthesis of these block polymers has shown that the degree of crosslinking between these materials can easily be altered to produce a pre-block-polymer that is still viscous enough to take the shape of any mold for any application. This polymer is an elastomer and as such can be used in the construction of three-dimensional scaffolds, which regains its structure after being stretched or twisted. Future work consists of characterizing the polymer using a proton NMR, as well as testing its mechanical properties and degradation profiles. This research is supported by the NSF. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Natalie Arnett 16. Study of Dye C18-RG Doped PETG Polymer Films for Optical Data Storage Richard. Akrobetu*, Zhengda Pan, Steven Morgan, and Richard Mu Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 37208 The C18-RG/PETG film is a melt-processed blend of polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG) and 1.1 % w/w of 1,4-bis(α-cyano-4-octadecyloxystyryl)-2,5-dimethoxybenzene fabricated at Case Western Reserve University. Previous studies have successfully demonstrated the C18-RG/PETG film’s applications as temperature sensors due to the dye monomers’ tendency to aggregate and coalesce to form excimers when the polymer matrix is heated between its glass transition temperature, Tg and its melting temperature, Tm 1. This work further extends Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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studies on the film by investigating its applications in optical data storage. The mechanism of monomerexcimer conversion and vice-versa was studied through oven heating and taking subsequent fluorescence and absorbance measurements. Details on these conversions were successfully studied and applied to optical data storage via laser-treatments on the film. Faculty Advisors: Drs. Zhengda Pan, Steven Morgan, and Richard Mu

Department of Mathematics and Computer Science 17. Finding Communities In Networks Using Greedy Algorithms Olamide Adegbesote*1,2, Mehmet Koyuturk2, and Sajid Hussain1 1 Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 37208; 2Department of Computer Science and Electrical engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 Communities are natural structures observed in networks and are usually characterized as “relatively dense” subsets of a set of elements (nodes) with connections or interactions between them. The discovery and analysis of community structures in networks is a topic of considerable interest in the scientific community as many systems of current interest can be usefully represented as networks. Examples include the World Wide Web, social networks, food webs and biochemical networks. The purpose of this research is two-folds. One, to develop a measure to score groups of nodes in a network according to the likelihood that they form a community, based on the statistical significance of the strength of the connections between them. Two, to develop a greedy algorithm to discover sub-networks that optimize this defined score function and implement this algorithm as a plug-in to the wellknown Cytoscape network analysis software. This proposed scoring function represents the difference between the observed weight of the edges within a sub network and the expected value of this quantity. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 18. Fighting Obesity – The Gamified Way Bright Dotu*, Prince Addai*, Michael Saarah*, and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Obesity has progressed from a trivial abnormality to a national pandemic that deserves our maximum eradication efforts. In 1990, the obesity average in the US was 12%. By 2005, the U.S. average almost doubled, with 23 percent of Americans considered obese. Five years later, that amount doubled again with the U.S. obesity rate weighing in at 35.7% between 2009 and 2010[1]. Apparently, America looks on helplessly as the percentage of 26

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obese people in the nation bursts at its seams. Many advocate medication as the ultimate weapon for effective assault of the obesity canker. However, this option has unpleasant side effects. This leaves us with oldest known solution to obesity—exercise. At this juncture we employ a concept known as gamification. Gamification is simply turning work into fun by harnessing the fun in work. This paper explains how we can use gamification to extract or introduce fun into exercise to encourage more people, not necessarily obese individuals, to exercise. The upshot of this will culminate into a reduction of the percentage of obese Americans. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 19. Modeling the evolution of sexual imprinting Olatomiwa Lasebikan* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Sexual imprinting occurs when individuals learn mate preferences by interacting with other members of their population. So far, there have been experiments and models for the evolution of female sexual imprinting, but none that explicitly do so for males. This research focuses on finding the conditions where sexual imprinting in males can evolve and predicting which mode of imprinting can be expected under those conditions. We ran genetically explicit simulations on a haploid population. We varied female imprinting strength and the cost of male courting for each different mode of imprinting investigated, maternal, paternal, and oblique. We ran simulations to see what imprinting strength each mode evolves to. The evolutionary stable strengths of each mode were compared pairwise. We found that male imprinting can evolve, but only when the cost of courtship is sufficiently high. Maternal imprinting by males is favored across much of parameter space; however, males switch to paternal imprinting when female choosiness is as high as the male imprinting strength. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 20. Mobile Sink and Dynamic Intelligent Energy Efficient Clusters for Wireless Sensor Networks Christopher Lee* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are commonly used for various pervasive and ubiquitous applications such as military, environment monitoring, security, surveillance, and healthcare. In WSNs, numerous sensor nodes, equipped with communication, processing, and storage capabilities, are deployed in a specific region. As long range radio transmission cost is significantly higher the radio receiving cost, the energy efficient communication protocols can extend the battery lifetime from a few days to several years. We use genetic algorithm (GA) to create energy efficient clusters based on the residual energies of the sensor nodes. Each cluster has a cluster head and a few cluster members. The cluster head receives messages from the cluster’s members and transmit the aggregated data to the base station. The sensor node serves in the role of a cluster head for a given number of transmissions (100). Then, at base station, the GA is executed and a new set of clusters is created. All the cluster heads are informed about their status for the next round of messages. Further, a mobile sink is used to collect data from the cluster heads and to disseminate the reorganization of clusters, if needed. The proposed algorithm provides the engineering tradeoff between the frequency of flights of the mobile sink and extending the WSN monitoring lifetime (delaying the first node death). The proposed scheme is implemented in Java; the simulation results prove the feasibility of the proposed scheme in delaying the battery drainage of the sensor nodes. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 21. Genetic Algorithms for Real Estate Home Selection Travas Lenard* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 In our growing economy, the value of homes has fluctuated up and down, revealing opportunities for many sellers and buyers in the real estate market. Buyers hoping to move to new areas may have trouble finding homes that match exactly what they want, not because they are not available but because the homes themselves are inconspicuous. Real estate agents and brokers often do not show the ideal home to the buyers because of a lack of communication and misunderstanding between the buyer and seller. Searching for and selling homes can Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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often be a cumbersome experience and our algorithm aims to take that experience and streamline it. We will take user real estate preferences and apply a genetic algorithm and knapsack problem application to match a potential buyer with homes specialized to their selection. Our algorithm simplifies the home selection and purchasing process for both buyers and sellers. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 22. Mobile Radiation Detection Travas Lenard* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Radiation is one of the most powerful and dangerous forms of energy known to man. It is completely invisible and can permeate a single area for years and decades. This invisible energy causes health defects in living or unborn humans and animals and it also damages our environment. Radiation spreads over time through the air or ground and it can be hard to find the point where it originated. In our age, there are many cases of radiation leaks and finding the sources of the leak and pockets of radiation is an important process to protect the possible infected people. We propose a system where a team of people can scan a large area with mobile devices. These devices will be connected by a triangulation process using wireless communication in order to identify radiation leak locations. The mobile devices may receive data from radiation detection devices connected to the mobile device, or by a wireless network transmitting data to the phone. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 23. Genetic Algorithm for Optimal Node Distribution in Ubiquitous Applications John McGrew* and Sajid Hussain Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Due to the latest development in electronics and solid state devices, there are several ubiquitous applications, where numerous sensor nodes are deployed in a specific area for continuous monitoring. In this study, we consider mobile nodes, which move in random directions based on the given environment condition. The goal is to determine the minimum density of nodes while maintaining the desired coverage of the monitoring area, even though the nodes are not stationary. A genetic algorithm (GA) is proposed to obtain the near-optimal solution, where the desired density of nodes is obtained, while maintaining the desired coverage. The chromosome represents number of nodes, where the gene index represents the node (ID) and the gene value is the current location (x,y) coordinates. The initial population consists of a give number of random chromosomes. The GA operators such as crossover and mutation are applied to generate chromosomes for the next generation. The future generations are created until the improvement in fitness value is less than the given threshold. The GA fitness function considers several aspects such as weight of the minimum spanning tree, deviation in the degrees of nodes, the overall connectivity and the degree of the graph. Further, while computing fitness value, the mobility is applied based on the given mobility model. The proposed GA is implemented in Java and the simulation results show that the efficient solutions can be obtained from the proposed technique. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 24. Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Atlantic Tropical Cyclones Brandon Williams*1 and Lei Qian2 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Sea Surface Temperature or SST is the temperature of the water closes to the ocean’s surface. Sea surface Temperature plays a key role in the formation of tropical storms and hurricanes. High SST cause Tropical cyclogenesis which basically is a term to describe the formation of a tropical storm. In the case of Hurricanes SST would be low right after it hit because it has drawn that energy. So to look at how SST affects hurricane development we look at SST in that region early in the year to draw our correlations and determine its effect. In order to do this I have downloaded last ten years’ SST and tropical storms and hurricane data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website. I processed and analyzed the SST data for the Atlantic Ocean 28

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area using the MatLab. This is done by translating satellite information into a workable two dimensional matrix over longitude and latitude for a certain day. This information then can be set up in a three-dimensional matrix over a period of days which can be worked out using self-written functions to determine days, temperature, and geological coordinates. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Lei Qian 25. Quantum Mechanical Wave Equations Daniella Howard*1 and W. Eugene Collins 1 Mathematics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 There are several methods of approaching Quantum Mechanical problems and most authors have chosen to solve linear equations. This research focuses on using a non-linear method. Making logical assumptions in the non-linear method yielded results that are consistent with those of the Dirac formalism for the hydrogen atom. The non-linear method yields the same result as the Old Quantum Mechanics for the harmonic oscillator, except that the zero energy is not zero. The results of the non-linear method are derived and compared with different formalisms for the harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom. Faculty Advisor: Dr. W. Eugene Collins 26. A Compartmental Model of HIV/AIDS Epidemic with Stability Analysis Shayla L. Nolen* and Sanjukta Hota Mathematics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN, 37208 HIV/AIDS has become the biggest epidemic since the Black Plague over five hundred years ago. Within about thirty years into the HIV/AIDS epidemic, close to forty million people have been affected worldwide and the number is alarmingly large within the African American population in the United States. My goal for this research is to analyze mathematically the progression and transmission dynamics of this epidemic. A simple compartmental model of HIV/AIDS is developed based on the SIR epidemic model with the assumption that the birth rate is proportional to the size of the susceptible population. The basic reproduction number was computed to study asymptotic stability of equilibrium points. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the analytical results. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sanjukta Hota

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Healthcare & Wellness 27. Your Own Little Miracle: Decreasing Infant Mortality Rates in African Americans Alexis Anderson*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Infant mortality is an epidemic affecting many families in the United States. African Americans represent a disproportionate number of infant deaths. Lack of awareness and poor health are two factors that increase chances of infant death. The objective of this project was to increase awareness of infant mortality and preconception health in African American women. This study sought to educate 50 African American women about infant mortality. Pre- and post-assessments were administered before and after the event. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 28. The Ideal You: Increasing Infant Mortality Awareness Dominique Anthony*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Infant mortality rates in the United States have declined, but rates in the African American community are still two times higher than those in the White and Hispanic communities. Infant mortality rates greatly impact African-Americans because of factors such as stress, unawareness, and an unhealthy lifestyle. The focus of the project is to increase awareness, teach women how to manage stress, and introduce women to a healthier lifestyle. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 29. Reducing Obesity Among African American College Students: Let’s Eat and Live Oghenerukeme Asagba*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll1 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. It can be defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater. The United States of America has experienced an increase in obesity for the last two decades. Tennessee is one of the nine states with a prevalence of obesity equal to or greater than 30 percent. The goal of this project is to instill healthy eating habits in the lifestyle of African American college students through an education program. This project would consist of lectures on obesity and nutrition. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Patricia McCarroll 30. Get Fit and Stay with It! Fighting Against Diseases of Obesity among African American College Students Dana Brooks*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll3 1 Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 This project was designed to inform African- American college students about the potential disease implications of obesity. Increasing knowledge, along with changing attitudes and behaviors, allow students to make healthier decisions. With the assistance of community partners, a health awareness seminar was planned to address obesity. The event featured a health educator, a nutritionist and a meditation session hosted by a certified Tai Chi instructor. Pre- and post-assessments were conducted to determine if the desired educational markers were met. Participants gained an understanding of healthy diets and exercise, as well as of the need to maintain proper weight in reducing or eliminating the onset of obesity related diseases. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Patricia McCarroll 30

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31. “A Stroke of Genius,” An Intervention Strategy in Stroke Prevention Contessa Davis*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll1 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Strokes are the fourth leading cause of death in America and this statistic only gets grimmer for African Americans. African American adults are 50 percent more likely to have a stroke than their white adult counterparts. African Americans that suffer with obesity, hypertension and high cholesterol are at higher risk for a stroke. The objectives of this study were to increase the awareness of strokes in lower-income communities; to enable every participant to identify at least three risk factors and warning signs of strokes; and to stress the importance of exercise and heart healthy diets in stroke prevention. The goal of this study was to educate 200 participants about stroke prevention. Pre- and post-assessments were administered before and after a seminar session on stroke prevention and the importance of proper nutrition and exercise. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Patricia McCarroll 32. All for One: Making the Minority the Majority Jacquelyn Favours*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Infant mortality is the death of an infant before age one. In the U.S., infant mortality rates have declined; however, African Americans still have rates nearly four times higher than their white counterparts. The Scholarly Soiree is designed to educate college-aged African Americans on the importance of preconception health and its impact on infant mortality rates. Participants completed a pre- and post-survey assessing demographic information and general reproductive health. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 33. Project Big Bone: Obesity Intervention Amanishakhete James*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll3 1 Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Obesity rates are steadily increasing in the United States. In many states, obesity rates have lowered, but in nine states, the rates are still frighteningly high; Tennessee is among them. Obesity can lead to other health issues, such as, diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension, stroke, and many more. Project Big Bone focused on reducing obesity among young Black women attending Fisk University by offering fitness classes and educational sessions on nutrition. The primary purpose of this intervention was to empower participants to achieve and maintain healthy weights through proper nutrition and exercise. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Patricia McCarroll 34. Men’s Health Matters Candace Jones*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Sociology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 African American men are being diagnosed and are dying from prostate cancer at alarming rates. Unfortunately, many of them are unaware of the signs and symptoms and often fail to seek treatment. Men’s Health Matters is a men’s health symposium. In partnership with local community health organizations, 30 to 50 African American males, ages 18-45, will be educated on the benefits of prevention and early detection. This event will feature an urologist and a cancer health educator to give the participants the tools for a healthy lifestyle. Faculty Advisor: Prof. Patricia McCarroll Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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35. Stroke Prevention and Intervention among African Americans: Power to End Stroke! Joy Obiokoli*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Patricia McCarroll3 1 Business Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 African Americans have twice the risk for first-time stroke when compared to their white counterparts, and those diagnosed with diabetes are at an even higher risk. As individuals age, the risk increases. Data on strokes reveal the greatest disparity among young adults. African Americans, ages 20 to 44, are two times more likely to experience a stroke when compared to their white counterparts and four times more likely to die. According to the Tennessee State Department of Health (Dreyzhner 2008), cardiovascular disease resulted in $448.5 billion in health expenditures and lost productivity in 2008. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain 36. Healthy Minds, Healthy Lives Jackie Ojuka-Onedo*1, Elizabeth Stewart2, and Sajid Hussain3 1 Psychology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Fisk/Meharry HBCU Wellness, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Computer Science Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 The reduction of infant mortality rates has been targeted by the United States as a goal of the Federal Healthy People Act 2010. Depression is one of the many factors influencing infant mortality rates. This study specifically aimed to promote awareness within the African American community about behaviors associated with depression and their impact on pregnancy health and infant vitality. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sajid Hussain

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Graduate Studies and General Education 37. The Characterization of the T419A SNP in the 5-HT2CR Melanie Brady *1,2, Hugh Fentress3, and Lee E. Limbird3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Neuroscience, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; 2Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) mediates many neural responses in the central nervous system. There are 14 subtypes of serotonin receptors, many of which manifest single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in humans. These polymorphic receptors represent structures that can be successfully expressed, revealing structure-function relationships in the receptor molecule. We will explore the impact of the threonine-419-alanine (T419A) SNP in the C-terminus of the 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR). The 5-HT2CR, a seven-transmembrane G protein coupled receptor, activates signaling pathways downstream of the Gαq/11 protein, but can also interact with other intracellular proteins that activate G-protein-independent pathways, most of which involve the Cterminus. Recently, a close relative of the 5-HT2CR, the 5-HT2AR, has been shown to activate the JAK/STAT pathway independent of G-protein signaling in response to the antagonist, olanzapine. The proposed studies address two linked hypotheses: first, that the 5-HT2CR is able to activate the JAK/STAT pathway similar to its relative, the 5-HT2AR, and second, that a mutant 5-HT2CR expressing the human T419A SNP, has altered binding and/or coupling properties to this novel JAK/STAT signaling pathway when compared to Gαq/11-mediated signaling. The first series of experiments will involve making stable cell lines expressing the 5-HT2C wild type (WT) receptor, and Western blots will be subsequently performed for JAK2, STAT3 and phospho-STAT3 JAK/STAT proteins on untreated cells. Cells will then be incubated with various antipsychotics, and Western blots performed against the same target proteins will be analyzed in comparison to untreated cell data. The second series of experiments will be conducted identically to the first, however utilizing the polymorphic T419A SNP-encoded 5-HT2CR. We expect to see increased JAK/STAT protein levels with antipsychotic-treatment of WT cells; we also expect to see alterations in the JAK/STAT protein levels of the polymorphic receptor when treated with the same antipsychotics. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Hugh Fentress 38. Investigating the Role of FKH-8 in Regulating Expression of Dopaminergic Neuron Target Genes in C. Elegans Bobby Jones* and Brian L. Nelms Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Dopaminergic neurons are important for a wide array of functions such as motor control, behavior, cognition, and mood. Defects of DA neuron function can lead to serious neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, ADHD, and drug addiction. An important factor in dopaminergic neuron function is proper fate specification and maintenance through transcriptional control of dopaminergic neuron-specific genes. Finding transcription factors that are involved in regulating dopaminergic neuron gene expression could help us understand how dopaminergic neurons are made, leading to better potential therapies. The C. elegans forkhead family transcription factor, FKH-8, is expressed in dopaminergic neurons, and other work in our lab has shown a dopamine-dependent phenotype in fkh-8 deletion mutants. We hypothesize that FKH-8 may regulate the expression of the dopamine transporter gene, dat-1. I am examining regulation and expression of potential FKH-8 target genes, including dat-1, and attempting to identify FKH-8-specific DNA binding sites. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Brian L. Nelms 39. Characterization of EpitopeTagged Serotonin 2C Receptors and the ERK 1/2 Signaling Pathway Renita King*1, Ronald B. Emeson2 and Hugh Fentress3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center (VICC), Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232; 2Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Serotonin (5HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter synthesized from the amino acid tryptophan and is produced in the rostral and caudal raphe nuclei in the brainstem. Serotonin is involved in psychological and physiological Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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events such as sleep, arousal, mood, aggression, appetite and motor control. There are seven different subfamilies of 5HT receptors, all of which are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) except for the 5HT3 receptor, which is a ligand-gated ion channel. We are interested in generating genetically-modified animals, in which an epitope tag will be introduced into the endogenous 5HT2C genomic locus to facilitate receptor purification from native mouse tissue. Several different modified expression vectors, encoding 5HT2C receptors with a streptactin II/hexahistidine tag introduced into unique positions near the amino- and carboxyl-termini of the receptor, have already been developed. To determine whether introduce-tion of the epitope tag will interfere with 5HT2C receptor expression, ligand affinity or intra¬cel-lular signaling, we will employ a heterolo¬gous expression system to assess the modified recep-tors. Specifically, the proposed studies will examine possible alterations in the MAP kinase signaling pathway with antisera directed against phosphorylated and total ERK 1/2 proteins using a Western blotting strategy. Previous studies have shown that stimulation of the 5HT2C receptor with serotonin in transfected NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblasts results in maximal ERK 1/2 phosphorylation after 10 minutes with an EC50 value of 2.4 x 10-7 M. It is anticipated that these studies will identify an epitope-tagged receptor with pharmacological and signaling properties that are identical to the native 5HT2C receptor for subsequent introduction into the mouse gen¬ome. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Hugh Fentress 40. P-modes in Hα – A Comparative Study of Active Flaring Regions Along with Their Quiescent Counterparts Teresa Monsue*1, Frank Hill2, Keivan Stassun3 , and Nathan De Lee3 1 Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208, 2National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719; 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 P-mode oscillations are studied in the Hα region to obtain information regarding the chromospheric structure on the Sun. It has been accepted that around magnetically concentrated active regions, such as sunspots, p-mode power is suppressed (Braun et. al. 1987). However, solar flares commonly occur in active regions. Flares are known to induce power to certain frequency oscillation bands (Kumar & Ravinda 2006). This study aims to take a survey of NSO’s GONG Hα data of various M and X-Class flares and study how active regions compare to quiet regions around the flares by analyzing frequency distributions of p-mode oscillations. To obtain information on the frequency distribution, power spectra of individual pixels around the flare region are taken utilizing the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) with the time series data. We can then study how the frequency distribution evolves with time by constructing a power map movie of that region. We will then be able to study how the acoustic power in the active regions varies with flare intensity at different frequencies of p-mode oscillations. Studying power spectra in active regions in Hα such as sunspots on the verge of flaring, and investigating if there are any frequencies that peak in power for certain frequency p-modes, could answer some questions on magnetic flux emergence where acoustic energy from the surface could feed into the corona – one of the biggest mysteries of the Sun. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Frank Hill 41. Characterization of fkh-8 as a Critical Regulator of Dopaminergic Neuron Function in C. Elegans Erica M. Tross* and Brian L. Nelms Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Dopaminergic neurons are specialized cells in the brain that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. This neurotransmitter is important for many functions in humans and other animals, including sleep, mood, learning and movement. In order for dopaminergic neurons to function properly, they must commit to a cell fate and express precise levels of genes encoding signaling molecules and receptors for their response to stimuli. The choices neurons make to become specific neuron type and express certain molecules is thought to be largely controlled by transcription factors, but only a handful of the factors are known. We have recently identified a likely role for a member of the conserved and developmentally important forkhead transcription factor family, fkh-8, in regulating the function of dopaminergic neurons. We have preliminary data that deletion mutants of fkh-8, which is expressed in dopaminergic neurons, exhibit a swimming-induced paralysis phenotype indicative of altered levels of dopamine transport or production. To test our hypothesis that fkh-8 regulates critical aspects of DA neuron function, I am carrying out pharmacological, genetic, and phenotypic analyses. This is significant because it may be possible to use fkh-8 to help generate a program for dopamine neuron development, which 34

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could help with future studies to direct stem cells to a dopaminergic fate. This could potentially prevent or reverse diseases like Parkinson’s. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Brian L. Nelms 42. The polymerization of Sulfonated Poly (aryl ether sulfone) copolymers with applications in Hydrogen Fuel Cells James Poland*, Natalie Arnett, and Emanuel Zlibut Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Sulfones and sulfonated polysulfones can be used to synthesize polymers that have high proton conducting potentials. These polymers demonstrate high proton conductivity as well as flexibility and strength when cast as membranes. A series of sulfonated random copolymers with increasing sulfonation degree were synthesized from the 4,4’-dichlorodiphenyl sulfone and sulfonated 4,4’dichlorodiphenyl sulfone reacted with 3-aminophenyl by direct poly- condensation. Thin films of the sulfonated copolymers are prepared by the solution-evaporation method. The structure of the resulting sulfonated copolyamides will be confirmed by FTIR and 1H NMR. Thermal Stability will be determined using DSC techniques. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Natalie Arnett 43. Synthesis and Characterization of Bisphenol A based Precursors of Hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene for Poly(arylene) ether sulfone Hybrid Copolymers Tiffany Thompson*, Natalie Arnett, and Jasmine Robertson Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 The purpose of this research was to synthesize bisphenol-A (BA) based tetrachlorocyclotriphosphazene (BATCCP) hybrid monomers and to evaluate the effect of solvent purity on the BATCCP production. The BATCCP monomer prepared will serve as precursors in the synthesis of disulfonated cyclophosphazene poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) proton exchange membrane for fuel cells. BATCCP monomers in this research were prepared by an interfacial procedure in a water/toluene system with the assistance of a phase transfer catalyst, tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOABr). The rate of formation of BATCCP was dependent on the amount of time the reaction was allowed to proceed; reaction times investigated were 15mins, 120mins, 240mins, and 1440mins. The products of each reaction were characterized using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HNMR), phosphorous NMR (31P NMR), and Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI). 1HNMR analysis confirmed the successful addition of Bis A to HCCP based on the appearance of a chemical shift peak at 7.16 ppm. The production of the BATCCP monomer was illustrated by chemical shifts at 23.7 and 14.1 ppm relative to the unsymmetrical BATCCP in 31P NMR. Distillation effectively removed residual water present in the reaction solvent resulting in a 92.98 fractional % yield at 1440mins as confirmed by MALDI. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Natalie Arnett 44. Determining if a Bulge-less Galaxy Has a Supermassive Black Hole Nased on the Broad H-alpha Line Bryan Demapan*1,2, Kelly Holley-Bockelmann1,3, and Jillian Bellovary3 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544; 3Department of Physics & Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 We are determining the the presence of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at the centers of bulge-less galaxies using the method from Greene & Ho (2005) that relies on the AGN optical continuum luminosity and the width of the broad H-alpha emission line. Based on their method in noting the full width half maximum (FWHM) of the H-alpha line, a virial mass formula can be derived in order to estimate the mass of the SMBH. Analysis of galactic sample sets consists of collaborating with SDSS data release 9 and GalaxyZoo’s AGN host galaxy samples by Schawinski et al., 2010. For this project, we will first determine known bulge-less galaxies from the GalaxyZoo samples. We will then look at spectra of those galaxies looking mainly at the FWHM of the H-alpha line from the SDSS data . Finally we will determine if the galaxies have SMBHs by calculated the mass from the information of the H-alpha line width. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Kelly Holley-Bockelmann Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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45. Investigation of Structural Properties of Ferroelectric Polymer Films Using Second Harmonic Generation Jennifer Jones*1,2, Lei Zhu3, Norman Tolk2, and Richard Mu1 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Department of Physics & Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; 3Department of Macromolecular Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 Electrical energy storage plays a key role in mobile electronic devices, stationary power systems, and hybrid electrical vehicles. High energy density capacitors based on dielectric polymers are a focus of increasing research effort motivated by the possibility to realize compact and flexible energy storage devices, taking advantage of light weight and facile processability of organic materials. In addition, dielectric polymers enjoy inherent advantages of self-healing mechanism and high breakdown strength, leading to capacitors with great reliability and high energy density. It is the focus of this group to develop a multilayered ferroelectric PVDF system for improved energy storage efficiency. These systems are fabricated using enabling technology in co-extrusion which allows more cost effective and large area device production as opposed to more conventional layer-bylayer techniques. Many efforts have been made by the team to fabricate these micro- and nano-layered systems resulting in much improved device performance. A three-time improvement of capacitive electrical energy density has been demonstrated. The focus of this research is to understand the physics of why these multilayered systems perform better than a single layer by developing a characterization technique using both confocal second harmonic generation (SHG) and electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) laser spectroscopy. Our results have shown that SHG is a very sensitive, non-destructive and versatile technique that can be used to study the ferroelectric and structural properties of layered systems. When combined with EFISH this technique allows the interrogation of structural and dielectric properties within the individual layers and at the interfaces between the layers. Further, the proposed techniques can be readily employed in-situ which can provide information in real time during sample processing with static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Richard Mu 46. CdTe Functionalized ZnO Nanowires for Solar Cells Anthony Mayo* and Richard Mu Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 With the growing need for renewable energy resources, a great effort is being dedicated to develop solar energy conversion systems. Due to the fact that ZnO has high electron mobility and is easy to grow into 1-dimensional nanostructure forms, zinc oxide nanowires have been used in solar cells as conducting electrodes. ZnO has a wide bandgap (3.37 eV) and can only absorb in the ultraviolet portion of the solar spectrum. Thus it is not the best candidate for photon energy absorption. To address this issue, cadmium telluride (1.44 eV) can be used to functionalize ZnO nanowires to absorb in the visible region thereby to enhance the solar energy absorption efficiency. A vertical furnace was used to grow the NWs using a modified vapor-solid method. Electron-beam evaporation was used with glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to functionalize the sides of the nanowires with CdTe. Scanning electron microscopy was used to image the morphology of the functionalized nanowires while the nanowires were characterized optically using photoluminescence, UV-vis spectrophotometry, and Raman spectrometry. By examining the effect of the ZnO-CdTe interface, this research can be used to improve the efficiency of solar cells due to the absorption of more of the solar spectrum. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Richard Mu 47. An Investigation of Surface-Plasmon Mediated Emission from Functionalized Zinc Oxide Nanowires Daniel Mayo*1, Richard Mu2 and Richard Haglund3 1 Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235; 2Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 The exciton-plasmon coupling mechanisms responsible for enhancing photoluminescence in a threedimensional, metal-coated ZnO nanowire architecture are examined using an insulating MgO interlayer.

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Vertically-oriented ZnO nanowires are grown by a modified vapor-solid method inside a vertical furnace. The sides of the nanowires are then coated with MgO and functionalized with Ag nanoparticles via electron-beam evaporation using a glancing-angle deposition apparatus. By varying the thickness of the MgO spacer layer, it is possible to examine the exciton-plasmon coupling mechanisms that mediate ZnO photoluminescence. For the visible emission, strong quenching occurs independent of the MgO thickness. In contrast, the band-edge emission displayed an enhancement factor of 20 as the nominal thickness of the MgO spacer was increased from 10 to 60 nm. My research involves examining the exciton-plasmon coupling mechanisms responsible for enhancing ZnO photoluminescence in a three-dimensional, metal-coated nanowire architecture. ZnO is one of the most promising optoelectronic materials due to its wide direct bandgap of 3.3 eV and high exciton binding energy of 60 meV. By elucidating the plasmonic interactions responsible for enhancing ZnO nanowire emission for both the near UV and visible, it will be possible to tune the emission for specific optoelectronic applications including high-efficiency LEDs and nano-lasers. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Richard Mu 48. Testing and Characterization of SrI2(Eu2+): A Novel Material for Implementation as a Gamma-Ray Detector in the PING Experiment Rose S. Perea*1, Arnold Burger1,3, Ann Parsons2 and Keivan Stassun1,3 1 Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208; 2Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544; 3Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 For future planetary exploration, improved observational capabilities are needed for better understanding of planetary formation and dynamics through measurements of the spatial distribution of elemental and mineral abundances. Such improved in situ measurements require the development of sensitive tools. The Planetary Geochemistry Flight Instrumentation Group in the Astrochemistry Laboratory at the GSFC is currently developing instrumentation for that specific purpose. The Probing In-situ with Neutron and Gamma rays (PING) instrument will determine complete bulk soil elemental composition, density, water content and layering configuration down to within 10 - 50 cm below the planetary surface without the need for drilling [Parsons 2011]. The instrument combines a Pulsed Neutron Generator (previously used for oil well logging), Gamma-Ray spectrometer, and Neutron detector technologies. However, unlike missions in the past, this is the first proposal of utilizing all three in one instrument [Parsons 2010]. Gamma ray spectrometer detectors tested so far include the semi-conductors: HPGe, and CZT [Bodnarik 2010] while the scintillators are LaBr3(Ce3+) and LaCl3(Ce3+) [Parsons 2011]. In the summer of 2012, we tested another scintillator provided to us by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, strontium iodide doped with europium (SrI2(Eu2+)). This scintillator, developed at Fisk University has the potential to supersede the performance of LaBr3(Ce3+). The SrI2(Eu2+) scintillator was optimized with the Multiscan code (Lynx, previously developed by Julia Bodnarik and Dan Burger), evaluated for its energy resolution and tested for self-activity (compared with LaBr3(Ce3+) in the indoor lab at Goddard. We then proceeded to the test site to demonstrate the merits of SrI2(Eu2+) with a monoenergetic 6 MeV source [Nowicki 2012] (at the same time with the LaBr3(Ce3+) detector). Results of the field-testing demonstrate the importance of controlling the source peak so that more conclusive measurements of the 6 MeV source may be obtained in the future. Further temperature studies of both SrI2(Eu2+) and LaBr3(Ce3+) at Fisk University will provide the understanding of the underlying physics of how energy resolution, and peak drift affect the performance of these crystals. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Arnold Burger 49. Stellar Forensics: Typing the Dead Bodies of Stars (Supernova Remnants Charee Peters*, Laura Lopez, Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz and Keivan Stassun Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Supernovae (SNe) are the energetic and explosive deaths of massive of stars and are extremely bright even compared to entire galaxies. SNe are classified into one of two main groups: core-collapse (the implosions of massive stars) or thermonuclear supernovae (explosions of white dwarfs, compact stars about the mass of our

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Sun). The types of SNe are distinguished using the light we observe from them days to months after the explosion. If astronomers do not observe the explosions within this time, it is very difficult to discern the type. Supernova remnants (SNRs) are the ejected material of SNe and can be observed for thousands of years after a SN occurred. Recently, we have found that the symmetry of an SNR can reveal whether an explosion was corecollapse or thermonuclear. In particular, the X-ray emission from thermonuclear SNe is more circular and symmetric than that of core-collapse. We tested whether this result would also be true for infrared emission of SNRs. We find that the two types of SNe separate according to their infrared morphologies as well: the thermonuclear SNRs are statistically more mirror-symmetric than the core collapse SNRs. This means that we can say how a star died, what kind of supernova occurred, by looking at its dead body, its SNR. In the future, we will test whether the symmetry of SNRs is different at other wavelengths and try to determine at what age an SNR can no longer â&#x20AC;&#x153;rememberâ&#x20AC;? its parent explosion. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Keivan Stassun 50. A Novel Method for Fabricating Ultra-Thin ZnO Nanowires Andrew Trenchard*, Anthony Mayo, Paula Hemphill and Richard Mu Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208. Zinc oxide nanowires have many applications due to its wide direct band gap ( 3.37 eV) , large exciton binding energy (~60 meV at room temperature), piezoelectric properties and high electron mobility. These applications include sensors, transistors and solar cells. Many of these applications could be further enhanced and optimized through the use of thinner wires and good wire density control, which is the focus of this project. For instance, thinner wires could be used to further increase the surface area of the solar cells and to assist in decreasing the size of transistors. ZnO nanowires were grown by first depositing a 5nm layer of Au on top of fused silica substrates, and then depositing a layer of ZnO on top of the Au layer. Several different depositions of ZnO were made on different samples, including 0, 20, 30 and 40 nm depositions. These samples were then annealed at different temperatures to study the effects. The samples have been characterized with UV-Vis spectrophotometry, photoluminescence (PL) and RAMAN spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study the morphology of the nanowires. In this poster, we will summarize the obtained results and provide a concrete assessment for future direction and potential. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Richard Mu 51. The Growth and Characterization of Ternary Lithium Compound (LiInSe2) for the Application of Neutron Detection Brenden Wiggins*, Arnold Burger, Liviu Matei, Micheal Groza, Emmanuel Rowe, Pijush Bhattacharya and Eugene Tupitsyn Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 This study reports the growth analysis and characterization of lithium indium diselenide for the application of neutron detection. The crystals are grown by the Vertical Bridgman technique. All source materials were handled and loaded in a glove box with moisture and O2 levels at <0.1 ppm and <2 ppm respectively in an argon environment. Samples were characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy, FTIR Transmission, macroscopic electrical measurements, and alpha particle response by pulse height spectra analysis. Faculty Advisor: Dr. Arnold Burger

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FACULTY PRESENTATIONS 52. Regulation of Dopaminergic Neurons by the Transcription Factor FKH-8 Brian L. Nelms* Biology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Understanding the genes needed for dopamine neuron function is critical for better therapies for dopamine-related neurological disorders such as Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease, schizophrenia, ADHD, drug addiction, and many more. My lab is using the nematode C. elegans as an experimental model for studying regulation of dopaminergic neuron cell fate and function. C. elegans has a simple, readily observed nervous system with a total of 302 neurons, only 8 of which are dopaminergic neurons. Despite the limited size and complexity of the dopaminergic circuit in C. elegans, both worm and human dopaminergic neurons express similar versions of the same essential molecules. We have discovered that worms lacking FKH-8, a member of the conserved Forkhead domain transcription factor family, have a dopamine-related movement defect similar to a defect seen in worms missing the dopamine transporter protein. Our hypothesis is that FKH-8 controls dopamine signaling by controlling how much of some important dopamine neuron-defining genes, including the dopamine transporter, are expressed. We are currently trying to test the regulation of dopamine transporter and dopamine neuron function by FKH-8 and identify other genes that may be activated or repressed by FKH-8. 53. Functional Consequences of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Human Serotonin (5-HT) 2C Receptor Hugh Fentress* Chemistry Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 My research investigates the role of serotonin (5-HT)receptors in psychiatric diseases such as depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. To this end, we are focusing on a 7 transmembrane-spanning (7TM) G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), the serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) receptor, that plays a role in hypolocomotion, hyperphagia, anxiety, Cultivating Scholars and Leaders One by One

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penile erection, hyperthermia, neuronal excitability, and spatial learning. My laboratory is studying how naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and mutations in the human 5-HT2C receptor may lead to psychiatric disease or endophenotypes within the disease. SNPs and mutations, which can lead to changes in protein sequence and, in some case, altered activities, can provide insights into critical structure-function relationships of a protein. Though over 2,000 SNPs have been identified in the human 5-HT2C receptor gene, little characterization of structural and functional consequences of those SNPs has occurred, and no studies have explored whether or not such changes modify the preferential signaling via G protein-coupled or arrestinmediated pathways. The objectives of our research are to: 1) introduce into heterologous cells, cDNAs encoding various polymorphic 5-HT2C receptors whose sequence modifications are in regions previously identified as critical for coupling to signaling pathways and ligand binding; 2) characterize the functional consequences of these SNP-encoded sequence modifications by examining receptor selectivity for receptor activators, G-protein dependent and independent signaling, and receptor trafficking; and 3) examine associations of functional SNPs with endophenotypes within depressed patients. 54. Nanostructures for Energy Harvesting, Conversion, Transport and Storage Richard Mu* Physics Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Understanding the physics of energy absorption, transfer and conversion is the foundation to effectively address the grand challenge of energy issues facing the world. Innovative, controlled and clever design with rather simple nanostructures can be critical to provide clear demonstrations, valuable clues and even answers how energy flows through materials. The learned knowledge will, in turn, allow us to tailor the energy pathways in order to effectively utilize the energy available to us, especially renewable energy. To achieve the objective, we have investigated four major systems: 1) Nanostructure designs and justifications for solar and mechanical energy harvesting; 2) Intelligent combination of novel nanostructures as building blocks for high energy conversion by control the energy flow at local nano-environment; 3) The explore the potential use of carbon based nanocomposite materials (nanotube/graphene) thermal transport through the investigation of individual nanostructures and their contacts at individual nanostructure level, which will lead to in-depth understanding of the underlying mechanisms governing thermal transport in CNT/graphene-based composites; 4) Development of high energy density, high current and cost effective energy storage with multilayer polymer and nanodielectric structures acquiring the knowledge on what the basic roles of dielectric response of each individual layers at micro- or nanometer scales and interfacial polarization in trapping space charges under a strong electric field and thus enhancing the dielectric breakdown strength. To conclude the talk, I would like to 1) highlight our future research opportunities at Fisk and our research partners at other universities and acknowledge the heavy lifters in my group and collaborators at other research institutions 55. Revealing Privilege: Examining how Race, Class and Gender Dynamics Manifest in Health and Human Service Organizations Leslie Collins* Psychology Discipline, Fisk University, Nashville, TN 37208 Race, class, and gender dynamics can result in power differentials and discrimination in organizations. Such deleterious effects are particularly troubling for non-profit agencies with diverse employee and community bases and that endeavor to redress social inequality. Foucault (1975, 1980) and Andersen and Collinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (2007) theories provide a means to conceptualize race, class, and gender as power processes that contribute to the production and maintenance of organizational privilege (unearned benefits and advantages). This presentation illuminates the effects of race, class, and gender on mechanisms that foster or undermine privilege (i.e., unearned benefits and advantages) in organizations. Using case study design, qualitative and quantitative data are examined to assess employee perceptions of workspaces and how these dynamics are related to inequalities such as privilege.

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15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


INDEX

(BY NAME/PAGE) Adenike Davidson, 12 Alexis Anderson, 31 Alexis Harper, 17 Alfredo Cambronero, 12 Alicia Henry, 12 Amanishakhete James, 33 Andrew Trenchard, 42 Ann Parsons, 41 Anthony Mayo, 40, 42 Anthony Williams, 12 Arnold Burger, 11, 41, 42 Azaria Robinson, 20 Bella Umontuen, 22 Blanchie Dobson, 11 Bobby Jones, 36 Brandon Williams, 29 Brenden Wiggins, 42 Brian L. Nelms, 12, 23, 36, 37, 43 Bright Dotu, 26 Bryan Demapan, 39 Bryan Wallace, 12 Candace Jones, 33 Cathy Martin, 11, 12 Charee Peters, 41 Charity J. Fonkeng, 18 Cheryl Hamberg, 12 Chinwike Obiokoli, 21 Christina Lee, 21 Christopher Lee, 27 Clementina Ojie, 21 Contessa Davis, 32 Dana Brooks, 32 Dani A. Smith, 11, 18, 19 Daniel Mayo, 40 Daniella Howard, 29 Darica Shine, 22 Demetrius Short, 12 Deverter Woods, 22 Diane Stofko, 12 Dominique Anthony, 31 Elizabeth Stewart, 31, 32, 33, 34 Emanuel Zlibut, 25, 38 Emmanuel Rowe, 42

Enectali Figueroa-Feliciano, 41 Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz, 41 Erica M. Tross, 37 Eugene Tupitsyn, 42 Frank Hill, 37 Gary Nash, 12 Gladys Truss, 11 H. James Williams, 3 Holly Hamby, 12 Hugh Fentress, 12, 35, 36, 44 JaCenda Davidson, 12 Jackie Ojuka-Onedo, 34 Jacquelyn Favours, 33 Jade Hendricks, 20 Jade Hooker, 20 Jameison Rolle, 24 James Poland, 25, 38 Jasmine Robertson, 24, 38 Jennifer Adebanjo, 12 Jennifer Jones, 39 Jill Powers, 12 Jillian Bellovary, 39 John McGrew, 28 Joy Obiokoli, 21, 34 Justus Ike, 12 Keivan Stassun, 37, 41 Kelly Holley-Bockelmann, 39 Laura Lopez, 41 Leanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tin Bracks, 11 Leanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tin Bracks, 17 Lee E. Limbird, 11, 35 Lei Qian, 11, 12, 29 Lei Zhu, 39 Leslie Collins, 45 Linda Wynn, 12 Liviu Matei, 42 Marian Burns, 11 Maurice Gayle, 24 Mehmet Koyuturk, 26 Melanie Brady, 35 Melissa Garcia, 19 Michael Saarah, 26 Michael Watson, 11, 12

Micheal Groza, 42 Nancy Rasico, 12 Natalie Arnett, 12, 24, 25, 38 Nathan De Lee, 37 Nicholas Umontuen, 12, 20, 21, 22 Norman Tolk, 39 Oghenerukeme Asagba, 23, 32 Olamide Adegbesote, 26 Olatomiwa Lasebikan, 27 Patricia McCarroll, 12, 23, 32, 33, 34 Paula Hemphill, 42 Philip Autry, 12 Phyllis Freeman, 12 Pijush Bhattacharya, 42 Prince Addai, 26 Princilla Evans Morris, 11, 12 Reavis Mitchell, 11, 12 Renita King, 36 Richard Bowers, 12 Richard Haglund, 40 Richard Mu, 25, 39, 40, 42, 44 Richard. Akrobetu, 25 Robert Wingfield, 12 Rolanda Johnson, 12 Ronald B. Emeson, 36 Rose S. Perea, 41 Sajid Hussain, 11, 22, 26, 27, 28, 31, 33, 34 Sanjukta Hota, 12, 30 Sarah Kayode, 23 Selena M. Crowley, 18 Shayla L. Nolen, 30 Sheila Peters, 13 Stafford Cargill, 13 Steve Morgan, 13 Steven Morgan, 11, 25 Teresa Monsue, 37 Tiffany Thompson, 24, 38 Travas Lenard, 28 W. Eugene Collins, 11, 13, 29 Yue Zhang, 23 Zhengda Pan, 25 41


NOTES ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________ 42

15TH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS For support of the 15th Annual Research Symposium, we thank

We acknowledge the financial support of the Fisk Center for Physics and Chemistry of Materials (CPCoM), Award# NSF 0932038, a Center for Research Excellence in Science and Technology (CREST) at Fisk University, which graciously provided the support, as done in the past, to cover the costs of printing the symposium booklet. CPCoM also covered the expenses of the printing supplies (special poster paper and plotter ink cartridges) for students and faculty opting to use the CPCoM printing room in Dubois Hall.

We acknowledge the financial support of Title VII Funds, Award# DoEd P382G090004, Department of Education, in organizing Fisk Annual Research Symposium.

We appreciate the support of Phi Beta Kappa, Fisk Chapter, in providing funds for the reception of Fisk Research Symposium.


“Cultivating Scholars & Leaders One by One”

Award Winners of 14th Annual Fisk Research Symposium, 2012 LEFT PHOTO (from left): Former President Hazel O’Leary, Fabian Okeke, Brandon Williams, Herman White, Ph.D. (Keynote Speaker), Provost Princilla Evans Morris, Ph.D. RIGHT PHOTO (from left): Former President Hazel O’Leary, Contessa Davis, Dr. Herman White, Ph.D. (Keynote Speaker), Provost Princilla Evans Morris, Ph.D.

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Fisk Research Symposium