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YOUR GUIDE TO THE LOCAL GOOD LIFE

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L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97 YEAR 17 • ISSUE 195 • SEPTEMBER 2013

Frontporchfredericksburg.com

A Harvest of Art 3, 8, 26, 28, 31

Criminal Cat

Is Misbehavin’ 7

Whelan & Sanborn

Inn-sync 9

Roots of Success

Emma Cheyefsky 10

Hal Bell 3-2-1 Pop! 14

Tuffy’s Traders

Colonial VA 18

A Day in the Life

Of Fredericksburg, VA 19, 24, 30

Baseball Backers 25

SRMC

Hospital-ity 27

Swift Current

At Mott’s Run 29


contents

closeups 9

.14

29

22,000 Bricks ...Ed & Anna’s Success Hal Bell ...rocket scientist launches into winemaking He Is.... ....Mark Newton

14

porch talk 3

Art Attack! local artists spread their passion

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

7

Quiet Moment: the criminal

10 11

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: traders

20

companion care: .punishment predicament

21

autoknown better: it’s over when it’s over

22

Senior Care: you can make a difference

23

Wellness: can’t avoid the thyroid improving veterans health

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

artrageous weekend in the burg poetryman

27

community link: Michael porrazzo, MD

28

my own path: a desire for the difficult

29

porchlight: swift currents

31

“let’s stitch”: weavers & spinners pay forward

12

Vino: the eastern europeans Cooking with kyle

13

season’s bounty: recipes for memorable events

15

On the house: faq’s

16-17

Calendar of Events

9

Local Artists Embrace a Military Mindset to Spread their Passion

30

By ryan davis

...And more!

retired on the back porch: the live-wire nod off Emma Cheyefsky: roots of success ragbrai: let’s bicycle

ART ATTACK!

5

Full & Fullfilled: Bringing your “A” game

8

Beauty behind the bark: tim eggers offers endless inspiration

19, 24, 30 day in the life of fredericksburg,VA photo story

Cover Photo by Sue Henderson

Hey, 19!

Recruits ambushing downtown Fxbg may signal a familiar past for a city rich in Civil War history, but this is not for soldiers, it is a “call to arms” for local artists to participate in a live art demonstration on the city streets. This

event called “Art Attack” is a one-day grassroots event organized by local artisans to encourage the exposure and celebration of local artwork scheduled for Saturday, September 14, 2013 from 10-4 p.m. on the sidewalks of Caroline and

Bill Harris

William Streets. It began as a hometown movement organized in 2012 by local artists to encourage and celebrate the region’s vibrant art community; its aim to bring the studio outside for an audience to see: “This event was birthed out of a desire to get the artists out there and to meet each other. We wanted a forum for artists to support one another and our larger community,” said Bill Harris, painter, LibertyTown Arts Studio. “We decided to bring it to the public on William and Caroline streets because it’s so difficult to accommodate a lot of artists in a gallery” said Gabriel Pons, PONSHOP Art Studio & Gallery. The responses from artists proved encouraging in the event’s inaugural year. They were able to band together for a common cause, which had them both participating in, and supporting their passion: “They really enjoyed being able to perform their craft. There was a real comfort level in having the freedom to do what you wanted to do without parameters or restrictions, to essentially come and go as you pleased,” said Pons. “The artist making the work is the art, the performance; the goal is not necessarily the finished product,” stated Pons, who explained that this event gave the artist a reason to start a work. In addition, Art Attack had to consider its impact on the whole downtown area, keeping in mind what would be beneficial for local businesses: “We didn’t want to hinder or disrupt the normal operations of the downtown businesses. In conjunction with celebrating our art, we’d hoped to build relationships and ultimately increase business for restaurants and shops. I think we did that,” Harris said.

Not only did the creators want it to be a free event, they wanted those visiting downtown to feel connected to the artists. Having the performance right there on the streets gave onlookers the opportunity to stop and meet the artist: “One of the ways this positively impacts the community is the audience sees the process, gets to know the artist, and make a deeper connection to the art,” Harris said. By connecting with art, the artists hope their example re-ignites the community’s passion to work at their own artistic endeavors, no matter what age or stage they’re at: “We’re looking to attract the artist who didn’t initially jump in with both feet or who are on the fringes,” Pons said. Harris said, “I want to encourage young people to pursue art. They can do it. Art often has the power to fill a void.” The Fredericksburg Area Museum is also supporting this cause and will be participating in Art Attack to offer painting opportunities for children as well. Fredericksburg has been an ideal location to support Art Attack because this community has accepted a blend numerous people groups, cultures, and ideas. This city has become a home for transplants, and in so doing, has become a place of inclusion for the artists: “You have everything here: painters, sketchartists, jewelers, sculptors & potters; many others. In my opinion, the quality of art here is so rich it is on par or even better that what you’d find in metropolitan hubs such as Washington D.C. or Richmond.” Ryan Davis currently resides in Fredericksburg. A graduate of the University of Mary Washington, he majored in English with a focus in creative writing and future aspirations of becoming a published author.

540.656.2215

712 Caroline St

LibertTown Arts Workshop

Celebrating Our 19th Anniversary!

916 Liberty St. Fredericksburg, VA 540.424.8157 wcharris.com

2

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

3


contents

closeups 9

.14

29

22,000 Bricks ...Ed & Anna’s Success Hal Bell ...rocket scientist launches into winemaking He Is.... ....Mark Newton

14

porch talk 3

Art Attack! local artists spread their passion

4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

7

Quiet Moment: the criminal

10 11

18

Our Heritage... the crhc collection history’s stories.: traders

20

companion care: .punishment predicament

21

autoknown better: it’s over when it’s over

22

Senior Care: you can make a difference

23

Wellness: can’t avoid the thyroid improving veterans health

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

artrageous weekend in the burg poetryman

27

community link: Michael porrazzo, MD

28

my own path: a desire for the difficult

29

porchlight: swift currents

31

“let’s stitch”: weavers & spinners pay forward

12

Vino: the eastern europeans Cooking with kyle

13

season’s bounty: recipes for memorable events

15

On the house: faq’s

16-17

Calendar of Events

9

Local Artists Embrace a Military Mindset to Spread their Passion

30

By ryan davis

...And more!

retired on the back porch: the live-wire nod off Emma Cheyefsky: roots of success ragbrai: let’s bicycle

ART ATTACK!

5

Full & Fullfilled: Bringing your “A” game

8

Beauty behind the bark: tim eggers offers endless inspiration

19, 24, 30 day in the life of fredericksburg,VA photo story

Cover Photo by Sue Henderson

Hey, 19!

Recruits ambushing downtown Fxbg may signal a familiar past for a city rich in Civil War history, but this is not for soldiers, it is a “call to arms” for local artists to participate in a live art demonstration on the city streets. This

event called “Art Attack” is a one-day grassroots event organized by local artisans to encourage the exposure and celebration of local artwork scheduled for Saturday, September 14, 2013 from 10-4 p.m. on the sidewalks of Caroline and

Bill Harris

William Streets. It began as a hometown movement organized in 2012 by local artists to encourage and celebrate the region’s vibrant art community; its aim to bring the studio outside for an audience to see: “This event was birthed out of a desire to get the artists out there and to meet each other. We wanted a forum for artists to support one another and our larger community,” said Bill Harris, painter, LibertyTown Arts Studio. “We decided to bring it to the public on William and Caroline streets because it’s so difficult to accommodate a lot of artists in a gallery” said Gabriel Pons, PONSHOP Art Studio & Gallery. The responses from artists proved encouraging in the event’s inaugural year. They were able to band together for a common cause, which had them both participating in, and supporting their passion: “They really enjoyed being able to perform their craft. There was a real comfort level in having the freedom to do what you wanted to do without parameters or restrictions, to essentially come and go as you pleased,” said Pons. “The artist making the work is the art, the performance; the goal is not necessarily the finished product,” stated Pons, who explained that this event gave the artist a reason to start a work. In addition, Art Attack had to consider its impact on the whole downtown area, keeping in mind what would be beneficial for local businesses: “We didn’t want to hinder or disrupt the normal operations of the downtown businesses. In conjunction with celebrating our art, we’d hoped to build relationships and ultimately increase business for restaurants and shops. I think we did that,” Harris said.

Not only did the creators want it to be a free event, they wanted those visiting downtown to feel connected to the artists. Having the performance right there on the streets gave onlookers the opportunity to stop and meet the artist: “One of the ways this positively impacts the community is the audience sees the process, gets to know the artist, and make a deeper connection to the art,” Harris said. By connecting with art, the artists hope their example re-ignites the community’s passion to work at their own artistic endeavors, no matter what age or stage they’re at: “We’re looking to attract the artist who didn’t initially jump in with both feet or who are on the fringes,” Pons said. Harris said, “I want to encourage young people to pursue art. They can do it. Art often has the power to fill a void.” The Fredericksburg Area Museum is also supporting this cause and will be participating in Art Attack to offer painting opportunities for children as well. Fredericksburg has been an ideal location to support Art Attack because this community has accepted a blend numerous people groups, cultures, and ideas. This city has become a home for transplants, and in so doing, has become a place of inclusion for the artists: “You have everything here: painters, sketchartists, jewelers, sculptors & potters; many others. In my opinion, the quality of art here is so rich it is on par or even better that what you’d find in metropolitan hubs such as Washington D.C. or Richmond.” Ryan Davis currently resides in Fredericksburg. A graduate of the University of Mary Washington, he majored in English with a focus in creative writing and future aspirations of becoming a published author.

540.656.2215

712 Caroline St

LibertTown Arts Workshop

Celebrating Our 19th Anniversary!

916 Liberty St. Fredericksburg, VA 540.424.8157 wcharris.com

2

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

3


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Myles Bigenwald

Editor Associate Editor

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Stephanie Bell Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Ashleigh Chevalier Kathleen Cracknell Ryan Davis Arch Di Peppe Fran k Fratoe William Garnett Sue Henderson Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Dave Honacker Rob Huffman Katie Hornung Karl Karch Jo Middleton Amy Millis Amy Pearce Beverly Payne M.L.Powers Vanessa Moncure Lynette Reed Scott Richards Wendy Schmitz Norm Shafer James Kyle Snyder John Sovitsky Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Rim Vining Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

September 2013

Full & Fulfilled bringing your “a” game

catching up Late last month, feeling greater than in a long while, I met up with Chris Ippolito at La Petite Auberge. Chris, known around here since the midseventies as an exceptional guitar player with Doctor Jazz, and with The Live Canadian Night Crawlers (You had to have seen their bumper stickers everywhere!), was in town from Hanover County. Friends were stopping by La Petite to see Chris, whose esophageal cancer and lung scarring are taking its toll on this spirited, positive, and talented gentle soul. Chris is on oxygen. His absorption rate is descending. How many more times will he be catching up with friends? The question haunted me, that is until I sat with him and we talked. I left there knowing that he is in the right place, and no matter what happens, he is prepared. Chris is staying with his mom, not so well herself, but they make each other laugh and enjoy each other’s company. Catching up with his mom has given Chris a wonderful chapter in his life. The once in-demand musician played his final gig at La Petite over a year ago, when he announced right there that that was that. There would be no more. At last month’s gathering, old friends flocked in to be at his side and relive memories and laugh together. I barely knew Chris up until that day. I of course knew of him and had heard him play, but I wasn’t a Phil Harding, an Al Green, or a David Jennings in standing simply because we had never had the opportunity to spend time together. We became “friends” on facebook

about a year ago, which lead to me knowing he was at La Petite that day last month, and our meeting there changed our “friendship” to an almost kinship for me… It’s never too late until it’s too late… We talked of the situation we have in common and discovered some cool shared philosophies, many of which we have gleaned from our cancer experiences. I cannot complain. Chris’ ordeal has been chaos compared to mine, and mine, at times, has been a nightmare. But we both parted in good spirits and with each other’s cell number. I hope to be in closer touch with Chris the rest of the way. It’s never too late — until it’s too late. So why wait? Catch up with someone. An old friend, an estranged sibling, a former teacher or others of influence in your life. Maybe, catching up means slowing down to spend more time with your partner or grown child. Maybe it means catching up with yourself for an honest to goodness introspection, after which you press the reset button and live forward. I also saw Christian Etienne Renault, the renowned chef who founded La Petite Auberge 32 years ago. Chef and his beautiful wife, Deborah, were there to see Chris and visit with their son, Chef Raymond, and his wife, Jessica, and their precious Giselle. Seeing this happy family all together at their place on a Monday

messages

Dear Front Porch, Just wanted to say great article on the Sunken Well Trivia Night in the Aug. issue (“Dig Into Trivia at the Well”). Natalie Wilson has a good sense of voice and pace, and inserts all the key info into the piece in a soft, warm manner. Well done putting the reader at the scene, too, hope she continues to contribute. Thanks as always for producing the single most valuable resource for news and culture in downtown. Jeremy Sutton, Kysela Pere et Fils

Thank you, Front Porch Rob, Virginia, Alexis, volunteers and everyone involved in making possible to have this wonderful magazine in our homes! You are so supportive and give artists this incredible honor - opportunity of being on your pages; all my gratitude to you! And thank you, Amy (Millis), thank you my love (Writer Amy is Anna’s daughter. She wrote “Ana Rendich: Nice Work Mom” in Aug.).Love to all! Ana Rendich Hi Rob, I just read the FP article, “The Gabler Beneath The Gables.” What can I say? Such a wonderful surprise! I can’t thank you enough. You know how much that place is my heart; I’m very touched by the article. Many hugs, Andi Gabler, The Schooler House B&B

Front porch fredericksburg

Thank you very much for the article! (Dig Into Trivia Night At The Well). Working on questions for tomorrow... Much love and light ~ have a good day! Josh Cameli, Trivia Master, The Sunken Well Tavern Rob, Your On The Porch essay in Aug. (“Loosen Your Grip”) tells me you totally get Bob Sima and his music. Love this! Lori Izykowski

By john sovitsky

afternoon affirmed my quest to do some catching up this month and on into the fall season. Christian and I talked about our families and our work. He commented on yet another new publication, then smiled as he said, “Like restaurants, they come and they go. But you are still here and so am I.” It is a privilege to still be here, bringing you stories of Fredericksburg life from our rare jewel of a community to your front porch. As with La Petite Auberge, it takes hard, consistent work, but it also takes you, and for that we are grateful... Now it’s time to turn the pages and do some catching up on life in the Burg, cover-to-cover.

What a wonderful tribute, old friend. I will never forget it. (August “Quiet Moments – A Funny Thing Happened On A Visit To Mom’s”). Arch Di Peppe

sketch and the serendipitous story of its origin at the event. When the artist responded, “If you want my pie at auction, I can donate an actual piece of artwork rather than just a doodle I scribbled at work.” Harrigan was floored. She related the story to me and we both realized that this was certainly a case of bringing your “AGame”. The extra effort Ms. Cracknell made was remarkable in and of itself, and got even better by their next exchange… Next, Harrigan was amazed, and humbled, when a digital image of a lovely painting arrived with the following note: “My apologies for taking so long to get this set up. I’m working two jobs at the moment (saving up for school! Exciting stuff) and just couldn’t find too many hours in a row during daylight to get this done.” The artist also described the work, writing: “The painting is decorated with pears, apples, leaves, and cinnamon sticks and of course, an apple pie. The colours were chosen to represent the warmth of a Earlier this summer, Kathy Harrigan was calling and emailing local artists and cooks, seeking donations for the second ‘Night of A Thousand Pies’ fundraiser. This event began last year to Empowerhouse. support This organization provides a shelter as well as a transition house (the property is a magnanimous donation by the Sunshine Lady Foundation last year), 24-hour crisis services, support groups, preventionoriented educational programs for youth, and much more for survivors of domestic violence and their children in our area. Supporters donate pies and items and services to be auctioned. Local artists Trista Chapman, Bruce Day, Neal Reed, Steven Summerville, and Irene Utlee, to name but a few, have all donated before,

but this year saw a new donor, due to a slight slip-up. An email Harrigan thought she addressed to Kathleen Walsh (a local artist and repeat donor), found its way to another artist, Kathleen Cracknell, in Calgary, Alberta (that’s Canada, for the geographically challenged), over 2300 miles away! The recipient read the request and responded that, “I think you have the wrong email address - I am Kathleen Cracknell from Calgary, Canada, and I am very certain you don’t want me making pies - I am an artist but am terrible with pastry. but I have attached a photo if that helps.” Harrigan loved the pencil sketch of “a warm pie, still steaming from the oven,” and sent a thank you note telling the artist that she would be sharing the

home-baked apple pie.” I find the real warmth from Cracknell’s gift in the heartfelt gesture in support of the mission of an organization so far away. Empowerhouse volunteers do this every day as they step up to the plate and provide their time as well as the materials and money that allow this organization to continue to do its vital work. Keep on bringing that “A-Game”! Empowerhouse would like to thank everyone who made the ‘Night of 1,000 Pies’ a success again this year. Contact them at 540-373-9372 or via email at: office@empowerhouseva.org for more info or to donate.

John Sovitsky (who is married to Kathy Harrigan, Empowerhouse Board President) can’t help hearing Bobby Vee every time this event is mentioned.

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

Thanks, Rob A helping of love and strength to you, thanks for getting the Porch out again. My 94-year old friend Vera clipped the bit about me and my truck (Aug. “Scene & Heard”) and sent them to me here in Fla. Laura Shepherd About the Cover: Sue Henderson captures the scarecrow, a harbinger of summer’s end and September’s onset of autumn. Sue’s photography is just one of her many artistic endeavors. Her work can be seen at http://www.suehendersoncreates.com/

What was it like on Main Street (Caroline) looking south when it rained really hard? The streets had to have become a muddy mess. At least parking did not seem to be a problem way back when.

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

5


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan Myles Bigenwald

Editor Associate Editor

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists A.E.Bayne Stephanie Bell Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Ashleigh Chevalier Kathleen Cracknell Ryan Davis Arch Di Peppe Fran k Fratoe William Garnett Sue Henderson Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Dave Honacker Rob Huffman Katie Hornung Karl Karch Jo Middleton Amy Millis Amy Pearce Beverly Payne M.L.Powers Vanessa Moncure Lynette Reed Scott Richards Wendy Schmitz Norm Shafer James Kyle Snyder John Sovitsky Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Rim Vining Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

September 2013

Full & Fulfilled bringing your “a” game

catching up Late last month, feeling greater than in a long while, I met up with Chris Ippolito at La Petite Auberge. Chris, known around here since the midseventies as an exceptional guitar player with Doctor Jazz, and with The Live Canadian Night Crawlers (You had to have seen their bumper stickers everywhere!), was in town from Hanover County. Friends were stopping by La Petite to see Chris, whose esophageal cancer and lung scarring are taking its toll on this spirited, positive, and talented gentle soul. Chris is on oxygen. His absorption rate is descending. How many more times will he be catching up with friends? The question haunted me, that is until I sat with him and we talked. I left there knowing that he is in the right place, and no matter what happens, he is prepared. Chris is staying with his mom, not so well herself, but they make each other laugh and enjoy each other’s company. Catching up with his mom has given Chris a wonderful chapter in his life. The once in-demand musician played his final gig at La Petite over a year ago, when he announced right there that that was that. There would be no more. At last month’s gathering, old friends flocked in to be at his side and relive memories and laugh together. I barely knew Chris up until that day. I of course knew of him and had heard him play, but I wasn’t a Phil Harding, an Al Green, or a David Jennings in standing simply because we had never had the opportunity to spend time together. We became “friends” on facebook

about a year ago, which lead to me knowing he was at La Petite that day last month, and our meeting there changed our “friendship” to an almost kinship for me… It’s never too late until it’s too late… We talked of the situation we have in common and discovered some cool shared philosophies, many of which we have gleaned from our cancer experiences. I cannot complain. Chris’ ordeal has been chaos compared to mine, and mine, at times, has been a nightmare. But we both parted in good spirits and with each other’s cell number. I hope to be in closer touch with Chris the rest of the way. It’s never too late — until it’s too late. So why wait? Catch up with someone. An old friend, an estranged sibling, a former teacher or others of influence in your life. Maybe, catching up means slowing down to spend more time with your partner or grown child. Maybe it means catching up with yourself for an honest to goodness introspection, after which you press the reset button and live forward. I also saw Christian Etienne Renault, the renowned chef who founded La Petite Auberge 32 years ago. Chef and his beautiful wife, Deborah, were there to see Chris and visit with their son, Chef Raymond, and his wife, Jessica, and their precious Giselle. Seeing this happy family all together at their place on a Monday

messages

Dear Front Porch, Just wanted to say great article on the Sunken Well Trivia Night in the Aug. issue (“Dig Into Trivia at the Well”). Natalie Wilson has a good sense of voice and pace, and inserts all the key info into the piece in a soft, warm manner. Well done putting the reader at the scene, too, hope she continues to contribute. Thanks as always for producing the single most valuable resource for news and culture in downtown. Jeremy Sutton, Kysela Pere et Fils

Thank you, Front Porch Rob, Virginia, Alexis, volunteers and everyone involved in making possible to have this wonderful magazine in our homes! You are so supportive and give artists this incredible honor - opportunity of being on your pages; all my gratitude to you! And thank you, Amy (Millis), thank you my love (Writer Amy is Anna’s daughter. She wrote “Ana Rendich: Nice Work Mom” in Aug.).Love to all! Ana Rendich Hi Rob, I just read the FP article, “The Gabler Beneath The Gables.” What can I say? Such a wonderful surprise! I can’t thank you enough. You know how much that place is my heart; I’m very touched by the article. Many hugs, Andi Gabler, The Schooler House B&B

Front porch fredericksburg

Thank you very much for the article! (Dig Into Trivia Night At The Well). Working on questions for tomorrow... Much love and light ~ have a good day! Josh Cameli, Trivia Master, The Sunken Well Tavern Rob, Your On The Porch essay in Aug. (“Loosen Your Grip”) tells me you totally get Bob Sima and his music. Love this! Lori Izykowski

By john sovitsky

afternoon affirmed my quest to do some catching up this month and on into the fall season. Christian and I talked about our families and our work. He commented on yet another new publication, then smiled as he said, “Like restaurants, they come and they go. But you are still here and so am I.” It is a privilege to still be here, bringing you stories of Fredericksburg life from our rare jewel of a community to your front porch. As with La Petite Auberge, it takes hard, consistent work, but it also takes you, and for that we are grateful... Now it’s time to turn the pages and do some catching up on life in the Burg, cover-to-cover.

What a wonderful tribute, old friend. I will never forget it. (August “Quiet Moments – A Funny Thing Happened On A Visit To Mom’s”). Arch Di Peppe

sketch and the serendipitous story of its origin at the event. When the artist responded, “If you want my pie at auction, I can donate an actual piece of artwork rather than just a doodle I scribbled at work.” Harrigan was floored. She related the story to me and we both realized that this was certainly a case of bringing your “AGame”. The extra effort Ms. Cracknell made was remarkable in and of itself, and got even better by their next exchange… Next, Harrigan was amazed, and humbled, when a digital image of a lovely painting arrived with the following note: “My apologies for taking so long to get this set up. I’m working two jobs at the moment (saving up for school! Exciting stuff) and just couldn’t find too many hours in a row during daylight to get this done.” The artist also described the work, writing: “The painting is decorated with pears, apples, leaves, and cinnamon sticks and of course, an apple pie. The colours were chosen to represent the warmth of a Earlier this summer, Kathy Harrigan was calling and emailing local artists and cooks, seeking donations for the second ‘Night of A Thousand Pies’ fundraiser. This event began last year to Empowerhouse. support This organization provides a shelter as well as a transition house (the property is a magnanimous donation by the Sunshine Lady Foundation last year), 24-hour crisis services, support groups, preventionoriented educational programs for youth, and much more for survivors of domestic violence and their children in our area. Supporters donate pies and items and services to be auctioned. Local artists Trista Chapman, Bruce Day, Neal Reed, Steven Summerville, and Irene Utlee, to name but a few, have all donated before,

but this year saw a new donor, due to a slight slip-up. An email Harrigan thought she addressed to Kathleen Walsh (a local artist and repeat donor), found its way to another artist, Kathleen Cracknell, in Calgary, Alberta (that’s Canada, for the geographically challenged), over 2300 miles away! The recipient read the request and responded that, “I think you have the wrong email address - I am Kathleen Cracknell from Calgary, Canada, and I am very certain you don’t want me making pies - I am an artist but am terrible with pastry. but I have attached a photo if that helps.” Harrigan loved the pencil sketch of “a warm pie, still steaming from the oven,” and sent a thank you note telling the artist that she would be sharing the

home-baked apple pie.” I find the real warmth from Cracknell’s gift in the heartfelt gesture in support of the mission of an organization so far away. Empowerhouse volunteers do this every day as they step up to the plate and provide their time as well as the materials and money that allow this organization to continue to do its vital work. Keep on bringing that “A-Game”! Empowerhouse would like to thank everyone who made the ‘Night of 1,000 Pies’ a success again this year. Contact them at 540-373-9372 or via email at: office@empowerhouseva.org for more info or to donate.

John Sovitsky (who is married to Kathy Harrigan, Empowerhouse Board President) can’t help hearing Bobby Vee every time this event is mentioned.

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection

Thanks, Rob A helping of love and strength to you, thanks for getting the Porch out again. My 94-year old friend Vera clipped the bit about me and my truck (Aug. “Scene & Heard”) and sent them to me here in Fla. Laura Shepherd About the Cover: Sue Henderson captures the scarecrow, a harbinger of summer’s end and September’s onset of autumn. Sue’s photography is just one of her many artistic endeavors. Her work can be seen at http://www.suehendersoncreates.com/

What was it like on Main Street (Caroline) looking south when it rained really hard? The streets had to have become a muddy mess. At least parking did not seem to be a problem way back when.

Reach William T. Garnett Antiques at 540-424-2448. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

5


Quiet Moments the criminal By archer di peppe

I first met Mayo Carter over fifteen years ago when a band of preservationists united in a prolonged battle to save George Washington’s Boyhood Home from Walmart development. She was there at every public meeting, usually dressed as Betsy Ross and holding a large protest sign. Mayo is a history teacher and a patriot of the highest order, and I consider it a privilege to call her a close friend. About six weeks ago I was over her house, and I noticed her two cats. She held up one and told me she called this one The Criminal. I knew there would be a great story… About five years ago she went to an adoption day at Pet Smart and found two cats kept in the same cage that had bonded as young cats on a farm in Orange County. “Crazy Legs” was a twoyear-old female, and “Grays” was a oneyear-old male. She brought them home. Crazy Legs displayed an amazing talent for opening every closed door in the house, including the refrigerator door.

6

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Mayo would come home to find meat all over her house. She thought maybe there was a flaw in the seal of the door until one day she watched Crazy Legs slip her paw under the door and just pull it open. Mayo put a thirty-five pound portable sewing machine to block the door, but the seven-pound cat found ways to move it out of the way. This wasn’t the only problem. Grays had serious digestive issues and was wasting away. Mayo has spent over $3000 and enormous energy trying to save her cat. Grays can only eat very small amounts at a time, which requires nine feedings a day of special cat food. On the other hand, Crazy Legs has a voracious appetite, and she will literally wolf down her food and then turn a covetous eye on Gray’s food. At first Mayo would catch Crazy Legs and put her in her cage to allow Grays to eat in peace. This turned out to be an unsatisfactory solution because of the number of feedings and because Crazy Legs would

run and hide to thwart capture. Mayo tried to block the entrance to the kitchen from the rest of the house while Grays ate, but Crazy Legs was a master at getting over or through any obstacle. As a last resort Mayo bought an invisible fence collar that you normally associate with dogs. They make a smaller version for cats. The Criminal would not be deterred. Regardless of the shock, she would dash into the kitchen, eat all of Gray’s food, and then dart out of the room and throw it all up on the dining room floor. It wasn’t long before she figured out it was much more efficient to just knock Gray’s bowl out of the kitchen into the dining room. Mayo hated resulting to the electric collar, but she was trying to save Gray’s life. Each time she would try to readjust the collar to a setting that would deter the other cat. The Criminal figured out that if she inched up just outside the range of the shock, she could feel the tingle without the pain. She would just sit

patiently outside the range and this would wear down the battery until she could waltz in and steal the food at liberty. The batteries are supposed to last a long time, but Mayo has found that she must replace them and the collar itself monthly to keep The Criminal at bay. It probably won’t be long before The Criminal makes her next move. It wouldn’t surprise me if the next thing The Criminal did was stick her head in the toilet to short out the collar.

Archer Di Peppe is our longest-running writer and photographer, for which we are proud and grateful.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

7


Quiet Moments the criminal By archer di peppe

I first met Mayo Carter over fifteen years ago when a band of preservationists united in a prolonged battle to save George Washington’s Boyhood Home from Walmart development. She was there at every public meeting, usually dressed as Betsy Ross and holding a large protest sign. Mayo is a history teacher and a patriot of the highest order, and I consider it a privilege to call her a close friend. About six weeks ago I was over her house, and I noticed her two cats. She held up one and told me she called this one The Criminal. I knew there would be a great story… About five years ago she went to an adoption day at Pet Smart and found two cats kept in the same cage that had bonded as young cats on a farm in Orange County. “Crazy Legs” was a twoyear-old female, and “Grays” was a oneyear-old male. She brought them home. Crazy Legs displayed an amazing talent for opening every closed door in the house, including the refrigerator door.

6

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Mayo would come home to find meat all over her house. She thought maybe there was a flaw in the seal of the door until one day she watched Crazy Legs slip her paw under the door and just pull it open. Mayo put a thirty-five pound portable sewing machine to block the door, but the seven-pound cat found ways to move it out of the way. This wasn’t the only problem. Grays had serious digestive issues and was wasting away. Mayo has spent over $3000 and enormous energy trying to save her cat. Grays can only eat very small amounts at a time, which requires nine feedings a day of special cat food. On the other hand, Crazy Legs has a voracious appetite, and she will literally wolf down her food and then turn a covetous eye on Gray’s food. At first Mayo would catch Crazy Legs and put her in her cage to allow Grays to eat in peace. This turned out to be an unsatisfactory solution because of the number of feedings and because Crazy Legs would

run and hide to thwart capture. Mayo tried to block the entrance to the kitchen from the rest of the house while Grays ate, but Crazy Legs was a master at getting over or through any obstacle. As a last resort Mayo bought an invisible fence collar that you normally associate with dogs. They make a smaller version for cats. The Criminal would not be deterred. Regardless of the shock, she would dash into the kitchen, eat all of Gray’s food, and then dart out of the room and throw it all up on the dining room floor. It wasn’t long before she figured out it was much more efficient to just knock Gray’s bowl out of the kitchen into the dining room. Mayo hated resulting to the electric collar, but she was trying to save Gray’s life. Each time she would try to readjust the collar to a setting that would deter the other cat. The Criminal figured out that if she inched up just outside the range of the shock, she could feel the tingle without the pain. She would just sit

patiently outside the range and this would wear down the battery until she could waltz in and steal the food at liberty. The batteries are supposed to last a long time, but Mayo has found that she must replace them and the collar itself monthly to keep The Criminal at bay. It probably won’t be long before The Criminal makes her next move. It wouldn’t surprise me if the next thing The Criminal did was stick her head in the toilet to short out the collar.

Archer Di Peppe is our longest-running writer and photographer, for which we are proud and grateful.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

7


Art in the ‘Burg

Visionaries

beauty behind the bark

22,000 bricks

by lezlie cheryl woodworkers of all levels of experience to get involved with the group. It’s an excellent resource for woodworkers with over 90 members, each bringing valuable experience to the table, sharing new ideas as well as tried and true techniques and sound advice promoting the business aspects of woodworking. If you have an interest in woodworking, whether beginner, intermediate or professional level, you’re invited to attend monthly meetings held the first Saturday of every month, 8:30-10:30 a.m. at J.C. Forest Products in Massaponax. Address is 5244 Lad Land Drive, Fredericksburg. There are no fees to join and no RSVP required. Learn a skill, share a technique, trade some tools, buy some wood, bring a project, and meet some of the area’s best woodworkers.

Nature offers endless inspiration to artists and Fxbg artist Tim Eggers illustrates that exceptionally well in his exquisite woodworks. He describes his work eloquently, saying “(I’m) taking the wood, created by God, and exposing the beauty behind the bark.” He believes there is no such thing as flaw in a piece of wood, only unique features expressing its character. He frames this character to best capture the viewer’s attention by using

8

September 2013

smooth finishes and creating beautiful shapes that simply compel you nearer. His woodworks are currently showing in his studio at Gallery 25 inside LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 916 Liberty Street. With over 18 years working with wood and influences from masters such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Alexander Calder, Eggers’ work engages the visual as well as tactile senses. Working with local hardwoods like maple, walnut and curly maple, he also uses exotic woods imported from South America and Africa such as Bloodwood. Often incorporating complementary elements of metal, glass and stone, Eggers creates stunning yet unusual but almost always functional pieces, from complete dining room sets to accent tables of all sizes to shelves and boxes, clocks and decorative wall hangings. While he works primarily from a private studio in his Spotsylvania home, he maintains a permanent exhibit space shared with three other woodworkers at LibertyTown. All of his pieces are for sale, and he also accepts commissioned projects upon request. View his woodworks on Pinterest at pinterest.com/highwheelwood or contact him at 540-2878575. An active member of the Fredericksburg Area Woodworkers Guild, Eggers is a strong advocate for the organization and encourages

Front porch fredericksburg

Lezlie Cheryl writes about Fxbg arts each month. Contact her at lezliecheryl@gmail.com. Photo by Kenneth Lecky

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

ed & anna’s success 22,000 bricks. That’s how many are in the courtyard connecting The Inn at the Old Silk Mill to the Old Silk Mill itself. Ed Whelan knows. He counted and laid each one by hand. Such is the entrepreneurial spirit of Silk Mill owners Ed Whelan and Anna Sanborn. Ed, from Morris County, NJ, came to Virginia in 1977 and shortly started his own construction and electrical business. Like a native Virginian, Ed’s commitment to Fredericksburg, and to downtown in particular, is as well rooted as it gets – he simply cares about our quality of life and how he, as a businessman, can enhance it. One way is through improvements to the Princess Anne Gateway, a project he believes fiercely in. Anna, who from Baltimore moved to Virginia in ’85, always wanted to live in VA. They met when Ed hired Anna to work at the Inn At The Old Silk Mill (circa 1889) and put her Hospitality/ Event planning background to good use. Ed had purchased the Inn in May 2007. The Inn, in need of renovations at the time, has new carpeting and antique furniture, and rich décor. Ed gave it a fresh look and changed the name from the Fredericksburg Colonial Inn – tying it in with the Old Silk Mill. Soon after renovations, Ed and Anna started working on the Mill for weddings and events. A bricked courtyard was installed between the Inn and Mill for outdoor gatherings. That’s where the 22,00 bricks come in as a metaphor for Ed and Anna’s hands-on, take charge approach: Sweat equity goes hand-in-hand with financial investment and decisionmaking power. Having sat vacant for years, the Mill building was power washed of graffiti

and restoration of brick. Heating/AC, electric, plumbing, bathrooms, and prep kitchen were installed. Additional restrooms to accommodate larger parties (up to 300 guests) were built. Its popularity with weddings, live music, comedy, holiday parties, and gala vendor shows has grown since the very beginning with Ed’s plans to revitalize “The Gateway to the Historic District.” Both Anna and Ed saw its potential for the community. The Inn itself occupies an entire block of Princess Anne between Herndon and Ford. The Silk Mill occupies a block of Caroline. Both have new lighting, signage, landscaping and parking: “I think ours improved the entire area. As part of the Jump Start program, surrounding businesses are improving their properties such as Little Tire and Old Towne Seafood,” said Anna. Of the challenges Ed and Anna have faced with this project, Ed said, “Sometimes the biggest reward is also the greatest challenge.” His vision is to raise the roof on the inn by one or two more stories as the Gateway develops, stories of Old Route 1 stir interest, and locals turn to the Silk Mill as their premier events’ venue. In 1933, the three-story silk mill burned down (it has always had lodging in front). During its reconstruction, lots of factories occupied the mill area. Ed recalls how old New York had passed Fredericksburg by as a bustling, thriving river port, a comparison based on his philosophy of stewardship. He cringes at the reputations of so-called “slumlords,” he likes the new river walk on upper Caroline and appreciates the improvements to the Canal path and Heritage Trail. The Old Silk Mill complex houses

retail shops on street level on Princess Anne: A church office and bookstore, a salon, The Popcorn Bag, The Photography Smiths, and, in the courtyard is The iconic Copper Shop (a beneficiary of the inn’s guests who migrate into Al Green’s artisan shop). It has presented numerous benefits, musical performances, weddings, and other events under the WhelanSanborn ownership. C&W star Shelby Lynn, Devon Allman, Madison Wolf, the up & coming Lone Bello, Elby Brass, and a circus have all performed there. Lynn, so enamored by the room’s acoustics, said, “It sounds like an opera house.” The

Rhondells did a Halloween party there, and monthly comedy nights are underway. The future, and Ed and Anna’s vision, look bright… and it all began with 22,000 bricks, one at a time.

Rob Grogan, editor of Front Porch, thanks Ed and Anna for sponsoring his cancer fundraising event with the in-kind donation of The Old Silk Mill for the evening.

Sizzle this Summer with Sea Glass Jewelry 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

9


Art in the ‘Burg

Visionaries

beauty behind the bark

22,000 bricks

by lezlie cheryl woodworkers of all levels of experience to get involved with the group. It’s an excellent resource for woodworkers with over 90 members, each bringing valuable experience to the table, sharing new ideas as well as tried and true techniques and sound advice promoting the business aspects of woodworking. If you have an interest in woodworking, whether beginner, intermediate or professional level, you’re invited to attend monthly meetings held the first Saturday of every month, 8:30-10:30 a.m. at J.C. Forest Products in Massaponax. Address is 5244 Lad Land Drive, Fredericksburg. There are no fees to join and no RSVP required. Learn a skill, share a technique, trade some tools, buy some wood, bring a project, and meet some of the area’s best woodworkers.

Nature offers endless inspiration to artists and Fxbg artist Tim Eggers illustrates that exceptionally well in his exquisite woodworks. He describes his work eloquently, saying “(I’m) taking the wood, created by God, and exposing the beauty behind the bark.” He believes there is no such thing as flaw in a piece of wood, only unique features expressing its character. He frames this character to best capture the viewer’s attention by using

8

September 2013

smooth finishes and creating beautiful shapes that simply compel you nearer. His woodworks are currently showing in his studio at Gallery 25 inside LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 916 Liberty Street. With over 18 years working with wood and influences from masters such as Frank Lloyd Wright and Alexander Calder, Eggers’ work engages the visual as well as tactile senses. Working with local hardwoods like maple, walnut and curly maple, he also uses exotic woods imported from South America and Africa such as Bloodwood. Often incorporating complementary elements of metal, glass and stone, Eggers creates stunning yet unusual but almost always functional pieces, from complete dining room sets to accent tables of all sizes to shelves and boxes, clocks and decorative wall hangings. While he works primarily from a private studio in his Spotsylvania home, he maintains a permanent exhibit space shared with three other woodworkers at LibertyTown. All of his pieces are for sale, and he also accepts commissioned projects upon request. View his woodworks on Pinterest at pinterest.com/highwheelwood or contact him at 540-2878575. An active member of the Fredericksburg Area Woodworkers Guild, Eggers is a strong advocate for the organization and encourages

Front porch fredericksburg

Lezlie Cheryl writes about Fxbg arts each month. Contact her at lezliecheryl@gmail.com. Photo by Kenneth Lecky

CHUCK HOFFMAN REALTOR, ABR, SFR, MBA I will provide professional help for both home buyers and sellers to accomplish your real estate objectives! TRUSTED & CANDID SERVICE FOR DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG & NEARBY COMMUNITIES Award Winning Service

www.yourFREDrealtor.com 540-370-0695 Direct 540-845-1468 Cell 540-373-0100 Office 540-370-0757 Fax choffman@cbcarriagehouse.com

ed & anna’s success 22,000 bricks. That’s how many are in the courtyard connecting The Inn at the Old Silk Mill to the Old Silk Mill itself. Ed Whelan knows. He counted and laid each one by hand. Such is the entrepreneurial spirit of Silk Mill owners Ed Whelan and Anna Sanborn. Ed, from Morris County, NJ, came to Virginia in 1977 and shortly started his own construction and electrical business. Like a native Virginian, Ed’s commitment to Fredericksburg, and to downtown in particular, is as well rooted as it gets – he simply cares about our quality of life and how he, as a businessman, can enhance it. One way is through improvements to the Princess Anne Gateway, a project he believes fiercely in. Anna, who from Baltimore moved to Virginia in ’85, always wanted to live in VA. They met when Ed hired Anna to work at the Inn At The Old Silk Mill (circa 1889) and put her Hospitality/ Event planning background to good use. Ed had purchased the Inn in May 2007. The Inn, in need of renovations at the time, has new carpeting and antique furniture, and rich décor. Ed gave it a fresh look and changed the name from the Fredericksburg Colonial Inn – tying it in with the Old Silk Mill. Soon after renovations, Ed and Anna started working on the Mill for weddings and events. A bricked courtyard was installed between the Inn and Mill for outdoor gatherings. That’s where the 22,00 bricks come in as a metaphor for Ed and Anna’s hands-on, take charge approach: Sweat equity goes hand-in-hand with financial investment and decisionmaking power. Having sat vacant for years, the Mill building was power washed of graffiti

and restoration of brick. Heating/AC, electric, plumbing, bathrooms, and prep kitchen were installed. Additional restrooms to accommodate larger parties (up to 300 guests) were built. Its popularity with weddings, live music, comedy, holiday parties, and gala vendor shows has grown since the very beginning with Ed’s plans to revitalize “The Gateway to the Historic District.” Both Anna and Ed saw its potential for the community. The Inn itself occupies an entire block of Princess Anne between Herndon and Ford. The Silk Mill occupies a block of Caroline. Both have new lighting, signage, landscaping and parking: “I think ours improved the entire area. As part of the Jump Start program, surrounding businesses are improving their properties such as Little Tire and Old Towne Seafood,” said Anna. Of the challenges Ed and Anna have faced with this project, Ed said, “Sometimes the biggest reward is also the greatest challenge.” His vision is to raise the roof on the inn by one or two more stories as the Gateway develops, stories of Old Route 1 stir interest, and locals turn to the Silk Mill as their premier events’ venue. In 1933, the three-story silk mill burned down (it has always had lodging in front). During its reconstruction, lots of factories occupied the mill area. Ed recalls how old New York had passed Fredericksburg by as a bustling, thriving river port, a comparison based on his philosophy of stewardship. He cringes at the reputations of so-called “slumlords,” he likes the new river walk on upper Caroline and appreciates the improvements to the Canal path and Heritage Trail. The Old Silk Mill complex houses

retail shops on street level on Princess Anne: A church office and bookstore, a salon, The Popcorn Bag, The Photography Smiths, and, in the courtyard is The iconic Copper Shop (a beneficiary of the inn’s guests who migrate into Al Green’s artisan shop). It has presented numerous benefits, musical performances, weddings, and other events under the WhelanSanborn ownership. C&W star Shelby Lynn, Devon Allman, Madison Wolf, the up & coming Lone Bello, Elby Brass, and a circus have all performed there. Lynn, so enamored by the room’s acoustics, said, “It sounds like an opera house.” The

Rhondells did a Halloween party there, and monthly comedy nights are underway. The future, and Ed and Anna’s vision, look bright… and it all began with 22,000 bricks, one at a time.

Rob Grogan, editor of Front Porch, thanks Ed and Anna for sponsoring his cancer fundraising event with the in-kind donation of The Old Silk Mill for the evening.

Sizzle this Summer with Sea Glass Jewelry 606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

520 William Street, Suite A, Fredericksburg, VA 22401 Chuck Hoffman is a licensed salesperson in the Commonwealth of Virginia

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

9


Emma Cheyefsky: roots of success

Retired & Buck Naked

On The Back Porch

By rob grogan

The Live-wire Nod-off by jo middleton

Emma Catching up with Chayefsky last month, I recalled how we had met. It was several years ago and Emma had graduated from the University of Mary Washington in 2009 with a Bachelors in Studio Art while into her second year working at The Sunken Well Tavern. She was a smiling, pleasant server and bartender, whose strong Eastern European name was enchanting to me. Like so many other young people in the downtown district, Emma was one I met in the restaurant community during my bartending days on William Street. Steve Cameli was another, a hometown Jersey Strong boy who grew up in the town in which Virginia and I were married in 1988 — Spring Lake, NJ. From nearby Avon-By-The-Sea came Victoria Scrimer, a Red Bank Catholic High gal, just as my sister had been. The Cameli family and the Grogan family have become big friends over the years. Victoria and I stay in touch on facebook and through the occasional stories she writes for us. Emma, on the other hand, remained rather quiet and shy and we never really got to talking. When Paul Stoddard, co-owner at The Well and a former UMW pitcher, became a “free agent,” Emma and he found each other. It was time to get to know the woman behind the smile and the name. Emma left The Well last year ready to pursue the Arts head-on. “I

10

September 2013

started Revel in Root at the beginning of this year, officially, after years of bouncing different ideas around and trying out different concepts. Ultimately, I fell in love with Crafts, but also having a passion for health, not just personal health but the well being of our natural world, I wanted to create a product that was good for the consumer and for the environment surrounding.” The mission of Revel in Root thus became “to create Eco-Friendly Gifts and Accessories.” Through the development of Revel in Root, Emma taught herself how to sew, make candles and soaps, and become as knowledgeable as possible in terms of materials, where they are sourced from and how they are created. All Revel in Root products aim to use only Organic, Natural, Local, HandMade, or Environmentally friendly materials. “I especially cater to large events and small parties. I hope to expand Revel in Root in to also offering home grown, prepared foods, as my passion for baking and cooking has developed from years of being in the Restaurant business.” www.revelinroot.com After catching up with Emma, I revel in Emma’s successful launch to her emerging business. Rob Grogan revels in the success of the men and women he has watched over the years grow from college students into big-time adults. Seeing Emma succeed is like seeing her smile or hearing her name.

Front porch fredericksburg

It did not just start when I hit my seventies, it just got worse. I cannot sit still for a speech without falling asleep. During high school fear kept me awake. You did not doze when the nuns, black habit, white circular collar, with fluted cap and black veil, lectured. Their outfit alone spoke of eminent danger. Punishment for such an offense was to assign you to a ladder cleaning the huge chandelier in the convent foyer. The convent, an antebellum mansion, was donated to the Order of the Holy Cross. Furnishings were sparse but fixtures were elegant. I was afraid of high places and crystal chandeliers, so I always appeared awake in class by learning to sleep with my eyes wide open. The only give away was not blinking during wideeyed slumber. I heard rumored in the nuns’ galley that my non-blinking might indicate I was possessed, thus the evil wide eyes, by a Satanic Caesar since I was with delight reading (in Latin) his Gallic Wars. Actually I was enamored of the Druids who Mr. Caesar found so appalling, however the stare had naught to do with Druids but all to do with The Land of Nod, as defined by my favorite guy, Robert Louis Stevenson. I seem to have lost my wide-eyed sleep skill through the years and now do the nod-off when overcome by sleep. The nod off is a slow lowering of the head, with a neck jerk upward mid-way into an allergy induced loud snort. My old bear has now accomplished this head action as well, except that he does not thwart the snort. It is what brings him back to consciousness. Together doing the nodoff mambo at a speaker’s do is a sight to behold. I wish I could sleep as well at night as during a time when full attention is required. Starting at about three in the morning, I am a live-wire who could listen to John Boehner, America’s answer to insomnia, with rapt attention. Me and the cat. Sidney the Cat is by genetic disposition a nocturnal creature, who races around the house at full speed starting about midnight and ending after a dish of fish about 7:00 AM. If I had his energy I’d be like the ever-attentive Queen Elizabeth, complete with hat and

pocketbook. I fear my old Bear and I are progressing to the Mr. Bean, “Falling Asleep in Church,” stage of our public sleeping. That’s the one where Mr. Bean, after eye rolling, bent slowly over and then fell cautiously, though unconsciously onto the floor. Head down, tail up. He woke, and jumped up with a leap and a cry. There go my old Bear and I, though our sons will probably, in the not too distant future, do the Don Rickles “to the home” thing. Having said all this, I don’t need a lecturer, exciting or otherwise, to get the drowzies with zzzz’s, out here, happily retired, and buck naked on the back porch!

Jo Middleton’s column can never be accused of inducing snoring.

RAGBRAI: Part 2 happy as a cow in iowa by dave honaker First, I have to start this out with a simple statement: RAGBRAI was an incredible amount of fun! Music, food, physical challenge, good people, great weather —all the ingredients for a soufflé of adventure. Months of anticipation for thousands of riders set the stage for day one of this ride across Iowa with a ceremonial dip of the back tire of our bicycles into the Missouri River. Lines formed as groups of friends, old and new waited to perform the ceremony and get started on day one’s ride. The logistics for the week were published as 406.6 miles. The distance of each day riding varied from 49 to 107mile settings as measured between the 8 Host Towns. Camp sites were scattered around in each town’s schools, open fields and fairgrounds. Camping gear was moved for you as a part of the entry fee. Nothing prepares you for 7 consecutive days of riding. Butt (pun intended) the pain is lessened by the comrade-like atmosphere of the other riders and the excitement within each of the 32 pass-through towns. Each town threw open their doors to the riders with local food, live music and a variety of

imaginative entertainment options. Food ranged from standard fried fare to Shelby’s Ham ball (a ball of basted meat on a stick) and candied bacon. For entertainment, Council Bluffs boasted about Cow Pie Bingo with a live cow walking on a bingo board (you can figure how this game is played); Dallas Center, Iowa offered midget wrestling(!!); while just outside Perry we were invited to challenge our friends in bicycle tossing at the ‘Chuck-A-Huffy’ contest. In between each town, vendors, and enterprising residents offered ice-cream, beer tents, water slides and skinny-dipping ponds. At one point there were ultra-light aircraft dancing above the thousands of cyclists, creating as much of a spectacle as they were witnessing. There were very few miles where the party was not alive and well. Iowa and everyone in it welcomed us. The locals came out in force; at 9 a.m., I spoke to one older woman in Fremont who said that RAGBRAI had never been through her town before. She was amazed at the sheer number of people as she watched the steady flow of cyclists since 5:30 a.m. The stream of people was to continue throughout the afternoon.

There were 10,000 registered riders each day, but that number would surge depending on the day. One unofficial blog estimated 35,000 riders into Des Moines. I spoke with many day riders on that day that shared with me their pride about what RAGBRAI had become and the positive attention it brings the state. Riding into the state capitol was their way of taking part. The riders themselves came in all shapes and sizes. If you had any preconceived ideas of what type of physical specimen someone who would ride 400+ miles looks like, you would be wrong. Tall, short, fat, really fat, skinny, male, female, young, old were all aptly represented. Also, there were people in costumes. Batman was on an adult-sized trike; both Sasquatch and Elvis, rarely seen individually, took part, too. Many rode with a purpose. In an uncanny turn of events I met local

business owners Tyler and Morgan, former Iowans who now live in Fredericksburg. These two were riding with Team Jess to support the memory of an old friend. Each year the owners of Complete Nutrition return to take part as well. I also met the RAGBride – who, with her BFF’s were throwing a 7-day bachelorette party. I told her I thought it was a good idea except for the long distance of the ride, which she shrugged off telling me that the fact that there was beer at every stop balanced that out. Despite all of the fun, this ride was a real challenge. It was, as I heard it said, “… no joke.” Day 7 ended with 470 mi. behind us, a total climb of 17,410 ft., and our front tires dipped into the Mississippi River. Dave Honaker, our former “The Good Sport” columnist, is an athlete par excellence.

Jewel Box Since 1940 Your Hometown Jeweler On-Premise Jewelry Repair Watch Batteries Gold Buying Engraving 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

11


Emma Cheyefsky: roots of success

Retired & Buck Naked

On The Back Porch

By rob grogan

The Live-wire Nod-off by jo middleton

Emma Catching up with Chayefsky last month, I recalled how we had met. It was several years ago and Emma had graduated from the University of Mary Washington in 2009 with a Bachelors in Studio Art while into her second year working at The Sunken Well Tavern. She was a smiling, pleasant server and bartender, whose strong Eastern European name was enchanting to me. Like so many other young people in the downtown district, Emma was one I met in the restaurant community during my bartending days on William Street. Steve Cameli was another, a hometown Jersey Strong boy who grew up in the town in which Virginia and I were married in 1988 — Spring Lake, NJ. From nearby Avon-By-The-Sea came Victoria Scrimer, a Red Bank Catholic High gal, just as my sister had been. The Cameli family and the Grogan family have become big friends over the years. Victoria and I stay in touch on facebook and through the occasional stories she writes for us. Emma, on the other hand, remained rather quiet and shy and we never really got to talking. When Paul Stoddard, co-owner at The Well and a former UMW pitcher, became a “free agent,” Emma and he found each other. It was time to get to know the woman behind the smile and the name. Emma left The Well last year ready to pursue the Arts head-on. “I

10

September 2013

started Revel in Root at the beginning of this year, officially, after years of bouncing different ideas around and trying out different concepts. Ultimately, I fell in love with Crafts, but also having a passion for health, not just personal health but the well being of our natural world, I wanted to create a product that was good for the consumer and for the environment surrounding.” The mission of Revel in Root thus became “to create Eco-Friendly Gifts and Accessories.” Through the development of Revel in Root, Emma taught herself how to sew, make candles and soaps, and become as knowledgeable as possible in terms of materials, where they are sourced from and how they are created. All Revel in Root products aim to use only Organic, Natural, Local, HandMade, or Environmentally friendly materials. “I especially cater to large events and small parties. I hope to expand Revel in Root in to also offering home grown, prepared foods, as my passion for baking and cooking has developed from years of being in the Restaurant business.” www.revelinroot.com After catching up with Emma, I revel in Emma’s successful launch to her emerging business. Rob Grogan revels in the success of the men and women he has watched over the years grow from college students into big-time adults. Seeing Emma succeed is like seeing her smile or hearing her name.

Front porch fredericksburg

It did not just start when I hit my seventies, it just got worse. I cannot sit still for a speech without falling asleep. During high school fear kept me awake. You did not doze when the nuns, black habit, white circular collar, with fluted cap and black veil, lectured. Their outfit alone spoke of eminent danger. Punishment for such an offense was to assign you to a ladder cleaning the huge chandelier in the convent foyer. The convent, an antebellum mansion, was donated to the Order of the Holy Cross. Furnishings were sparse but fixtures were elegant. I was afraid of high places and crystal chandeliers, so I always appeared awake in class by learning to sleep with my eyes wide open. The only give away was not blinking during wideeyed slumber. I heard rumored in the nuns’ galley that my non-blinking might indicate I was possessed, thus the evil wide eyes, by a Satanic Caesar since I was with delight reading (in Latin) his Gallic Wars. Actually I was enamored of the Druids who Mr. Caesar found so appalling, however the stare had naught to do with Druids but all to do with The Land of Nod, as defined by my favorite guy, Robert Louis Stevenson. I seem to have lost my wide-eyed sleep skill through the years and now do the nod-off when overcome by sleep. The nod off is a slow lowering of the head, with a neck jerk upward mid-way into an allergy induced loud snort. My old bear has now accomplished this head action as well, except that he does not thwart the snort. It is what brings him back to consciousness. Together doing the nodoff mambo at a speaker’s do is a sight to behold. I wish I could sleep as well at night as during a time when full attention is required. Starting at about three in the morning, I am a live-wire who could listen to John Boehner, America’s answer to insomnia, with rapt attention. Me and the cat. Sidney the Cat is by genetic disposition a nocturnal creature, who races around the house at full speed starting about midnight and ending after a dish of fish about 7:00 AM. If I had his energy I’d be like the ever-attentive Queen Elizabeth, complete with hat and

pocketbook. I fear my old Bear and I are progressing to the Mr. Bean, “Falling Asleep in Church,” stage of our public sleeping. That’s the one where Mr. Bean, after eye rolling, bent slowly over and then fell cautiously, though unconsciously onto the floor. Head down, tail up. He woke, and jumped up with a leap and a cry. There go my old Bear and I, though our sons will probably, in the not too distant future, do the Don Rickles “to the home” thing. Having said all this, I don’t need a lecturer, exciting or otherwise, to get the drowzies with zzzz’s, out here, happily retired, and buck naked on the back porch!

Jo Middleton’s column can never be accused of inducing snoring.

RAGBRAI: Part 2 happy as a cow in iowa by dave honaker First, I have to start this out with a simple statement: RAGBRAI was an incredible amount of fun! Music, food, physical challenge, good people, great weather —all the ingredients for a soufflé of adventure. Months of anticipation for thousands of riders set the stage for day one of this ride across Iowa with a ceremonial dip of the back tire of our bicycles into the Missouri River. Lines formed as groups of friends, old and new waited to perform the ceremony and get started on day one’s ride. The logistics for the week were published as 406.6 miles. The distance of each day riding varied from 49 to 107mile settings as measured between the 8 Host Towns. Camp sites were scattered around in each town’s schools, open fields and fairgrounds. Camping gear was moved for you as a part of the entry fee. Nothing prepares you for 7 consecutive days of riding. Butt (pun intended) the pain is lessened by the comrade-like atmosphere of the other riders and the excitement within each of the 32 pass-through towns. Each town threw open their doors to the riders with local food, live music and a variety of

imaginative entertainment options. Food ranged from standard fried fare to Shelby’s Ham ball (a ball of basted meat on a stick) and candied bacon. For entertainment, Council Bluffs boasted about Cow Pie Bingo with a live cow walking on a bingo board (you can figure how this game is played); Dallas Center, Iowa offered midget wrestling(!!); while just outside Perry we were invited to challenge our friends in bicycle tossing at the ‘Chuck-A-Huffy’ contest. In between each town, vendors, and enterprising residents offered ice-cream, beer tents, water slides and skinny-dipping ponds. At one point there were ultra-light aircraft dancing above the thousands of cyclists, creating as much of a spectacle as they were witnessing. There were very few miles where the party was not alive and well. Iowa and everyone in it welcomed us. The locals came out in force; at 9 a.m., I spoke to one older woman in Fremont who said that RAGBRAI had never been through her town before. She was amazed at the sheer number of people as she watched the steady flow of cyclists since 5:30 a.m. The stream of people was to continue throughout the afternoon.

There were 10,000 registered riders each day, but that number would surge depending on the day. One unofficial blog estimated 35,000 riders into Des Moines. I spoke with many day riders on that day that shared with me their pride about what RAGBRAI had become and the positive attention it brings the state. Riding into the state capitol was their way of taking part. The riders themselves came in all shapes and sizes. If you had any preconceived ideas of what type of physical specimen someone who would ride 400+ miles looks like, you would be wrong. Tall, short, fat, really fat, skinny, male, female, young, old were all aptly represented. Also, there were people in costumes. Batman was on an adult-sized trike; both Sasquatch and Elvis, rarely seen individually, took part, too. Many rode with a purpose. In an uncanny turn of events I met local

business owners Tyler and Morgan, former Iowans who now live in Fredericksburg. These two were riding with Team Jess to support the memory of an old friend. Each year the owners of Complete Nutrition return to take part as well. I also met the RAGBride – who, with her BFF’s were throwing a 7-day bachelorette party. I told her I thought it was a good idea except for the long distance of the ride, which she shrugged off telling me that the fact that there was beer at every stop balanced that out. Despite all of the fun, this ride was a real challenge. It was, as I heard it said, “… no joke.” Day 7 ended with 470 mi. behind us, a total climb of 17,410 ft., and our front tires dipped into the Mississippi River. Dave Honaker, our former “The Good Sport” columnist, is an athlete par excellence.

Jewel Box Since 1940 Your Hometown Jeweler On-Premise Jewelry Repair Watch Batteries Gold Buying Engraving 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

11


Cooking With Kyle simple cooking done well

Vino the eastern europeans By matt thomas

by james kyle snyder

HIP POCKET SALMON MEAL School is back in session and the days of leisure and vacation, allowing the children to roam free, eating whatever whenever they want, are over. This is the season of getting back to a routine. Scheduled wake-up, organized class schedule, homework time, dinner time, and eventually, bed time are the time increments that lay in store for most of us until next year, when summer break allows us to slip back into an easier lifestyle. The bus is going to be late, and you are going to get stuck in traffic. I discovered a long time ago the importance of being able to throw together a simple, complete, healthy meal at a moment’s notice. This transition time demands this skill. This is one of the easiest, and a welcome favorite. Being prepared for the monkey wrench that life throws at us is key. First, always keep the supplies for your quick and easy recipes on hand. For example, I always have a salmon frozen, salad greens, and rice noodles. I’ll talk about keeping a well-stocked pantry in a future article. I know you might think a frozen salmon won’t help, so let me teach you how to make it work its magic! Put the frozen salmon in a flat baking dish and place that in the sink. Run cold water over it. It’ll take 5-10 minutes to thaw. Fill a 2-quart pot with water. Season it lightly with Kosher salt, and place it on the stove to boil. Finally, turn on the gas grill. Even though summer is over, the grill masters of the family should rock-on! Learning in what order to do what is a huge time saver. We are 3 minutes into this process so lets get the rest of the meal ready.

12

September 2013

In a small bowl, mix 1/2 cup soy (or gluten free tamari if you prefer) with 2 tablespoons of sesame oil (toasted sesame oil if you have that) and a pinch of your salt and pepper blend (1 cup of kosher salt and 1/4 cup ground black pepper). Stir to combine. Here is where timing gets fast. I like salmon with some pink in the middle and the noodles a little al dente, so the cook time is 2 minutes each side for the salmon and 4 minutes for the noodles. Adjust times to your preferences. If you are quick, you can do it all at once. By the time the salmon is about thawed, the water will be boiling and the grill will be hot. Place the salmon in a large bowl and marinate it with half of the soy mixture. Spread a bed of salad mix on a platter large enough to hold the entire salmon. Place a colander in the sink. Set a 2 minute timer. Go to your boiling water and drop in 3-4 nests of rice noodles. Walk, don’t run - just like at the pool, to the grill, put the salmon on skin side down, and close the lid. We are baking this salmon on the grill. Stir the noodles once. When the timer goes off, reset it and flip the salmon, closing the lid again. When the timer goes off again, pour the noodles in the colander and retrieve your salmon. PHEW! Arrange the noodles on the lettuce and dress with half of the remaining soy mixture. Place the salmon on the noodles and dress with the remaining mixture. In less than 20 minutes, you have a heart healthy meal for the family. Simple, healthy, delicious. Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating.

Front porch fredericksburg

When the subject of European wine is brought up it’s usually about the big three: France, Italy, and Spain. Maybe Germany if you’re a fan of white wines. But it turns out that for many reasons, mainly historical and economic, there is quite a lot of wine made in eastern Europe that we are completely unaware of. History is the biggest reason for this. Most countries that today are referred to as Eastern European were part of the Soviet Union. During that time barely any wine made within that Federation made it out. Americans and Western Europeans weren’t keen to sell their wine to the communists and the communists weren’t keen to buy it anyway, so they kept everything they made for themselves. Even after the Iron Curtain fell it took wine enthusiasts quite a few years to recognize the scale and quality of wine made in Eastern Europe to the point that these wines have been available on the market for only the last few years. When kybecca first started selling wine eight years ago, there were no Eastern European wines available to my knowledge except maybe cheap sweet wines. Then a few years ago an importer brought me some Georgian wines to try and I was instantly intrigued. These wines had no regard for what was trendy. They were traditional, delicious, unique, and made from grape varieties I had never heard of such as Saperavi and Takveri. Some were big and rich, others were lean and light, but all were excellent values since the demand was so low. They still are by the way, so buy them now because in ten years the price will increase much faster than inflation. My importer friend had bought them from another importer who brought them in only to sell to the Russian and Georgian embassies and a few Russian restaurants. Besides Georgia another country to look for is Croatia. The climate is quite temperate (it’s just on the other side of the Adriatic from Italy) and winemaking there goes back about three thousand years. One particular variety I like is called Plavac Mali, grown mainly along the Dalmatian Coast. Although it is genetically identical to Zinfandel the two have been separated long enough that any similarities are hard to tell. It reminds me more of some Cabernet Sauvignons with its rich fruit and herbal notes. I also like

another variety called Babic that produces dark and tannic wines – perfect for a nice piece of steak. In the last couple of years I’ve seen some great wines from Hungary as well. These reds remind me a lot of Austrian reds – medium bodied and spicy. Some, such as Kekfrankos, are just other names for German varieties, in this case Blaufrankisch. I think these will appeal less to the average wine drinker compared to the Georgian or Croatian wines, but they are also more food friendly. While my experience with them is limited, I’ve also heard some great things coming from Slovenia and Romania. I had a Serbian Gamay once that was pretty darn good. If you are looking for something different or a theme for a dinner party, I encourage you to seek out Eastern European wines. The price range would be $15-$40; though, I have found that the quality and distinction drops hugely after that. But be assured that a $25 Georgian or Croatian wine can be as good as a $60 French or California wine. Matt Thomas can be reached at the full bar at kybecca or by email at matt@kybecca.com

SideWalk Sale Sat & Sun Sept 28 & 29

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

Season’s Bounty

recipes for a memorable event By vanessa moncure We, of a certain age, vividly recall WHAT we were doing when President Kennedy was assassinated; WHERE we were when the Twin Towers fell; WHO we were with when the terrors of Y2K never materialized; HOW we felt at personal milestones of marriage/children/career; and WHEN we watched our 401-Ks evaporate during the recent Great Recession. But our newest memory-of-alifetime came on August 23, 2011 — WHY a 5.8 Richter scale roller-coaster earthquake centered just 36 miles from Fredericksburg? Miraculously, we all escaped relatively unscathed, and I found a new use for my lumpen-lead poundcake. A 45second house shimmy reduced its golden dome to a caved-in thick swirl of sugary butter and flour. Now I’ll add to the more prosaic “don’t slam the oven door while baking,” the caveat, “do not attempt to bake during an earthquake”. Same result. QUAKE TRIFLE Cut cooled poundcake into 1” cubes. Line bottom of trifle bowl w/ cake, follow w/ layers of fruit, custard, sweetened whipped cream (2 c. whipping cream beaten w/ ½ c. sugar & dash of vanilla), crumbled amaretti cookies ending w/ whipped cream and sprinkle of crumbled cookies. Chill and serve. Custard: Combine 2 c. each whole milk and heavy cream w/ 1 c. sugar and 4 T. cornstarch in medium saucepan. Bring to simmer, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened. Remove from heat and gradually beat in 6 well-beaten egg yolks, one at a time. Return pan to low heat and heat through, back to a simmer. Stir in 1 T. vanilla extract and ¼ c. dry sherry. Strain through a sieve and refrigerate until chilled. Use fresh-sliced ripe peaches (you’ll need 4-6) and a pint of fresh raspberries as the fruit. Amaretti cookies are available at most large grocery stores or World Market. Purchase the crisp cookie. Poundcake: Combine 1 c. butter w/ 2 c. sugar and beat until light. Add 6 egg yolks, one at a time, until batter is smooth and well-blended. Stir in 1 c.

heavy whipping cream alternately w/ 3 c. cake flour. Fold in 6 egg whites, beaten until they hold soft peaks, then add 1 T. vanilla extract. Spoon batter into two 8x5 greased loaf pans or one greased 10” tube pan. Bake at 325F 75 min. QUAKE CHOPS A gas grill is a meal-saver if utilities are out. Remember the blizzard? Rub one thick center-cut pork chop per person w/ a mixture of kosher salt, black pepper, garlic, whole dried thyme and 1 tsp. olive oil per chop. Grill over mediumhigh heat, brushing several times w/ leftover marinade. Turn once. Serve on large platter w/ grilled tomato and mozzarella salad, grilled asparagus, parmesan crostini. Grilled tomatoes and mozzarella: Cut tops and stem off ripe tomatoes. Sprinkle cut ends w/ olive oil and grill until lightly heated through (peel will begin to split). Slice mozzarella into thick slices, brush w/olive oil, then quickly sear both sides over hot grill. Toss w/fresh torn basil leaves and serve w/grilled tomato - drizzle all w/light vinaigrette, coarse salt and fresh-ground pepper. Asparagus: Coat lightly w/olive oil and grill over indirect heat until crisp-tender. Parmesan crostini: Slice baguette about 1” thick at a deep angle. Brush both sides w/olive oil, then grill till crusty and w/ grill marks. Remove from heat and while still hot, brush w/ cut clove of garlic, top each slice w/ 1 T. freshly grated Parmesan cheese. QUAKE-R R CRISP TOPPING Finish your grill dinner w/ this dessert baked over indirect heat or in oven at 350F approx.45 min. In greased ovenproof 2-qt. pan, place 5 c. peeled and sliced peaches OR apples OR mixed berries OR strawberries and rhubarb (w/extra sugar atop) OR peaches and pear mixture OR pitted cherries. Add ½ c. orange juice, sprinkle w/cinnamon OR nutmeg OR other spices as desired (almond extract, cardamom, etc.). Mix together the following ingredients to make a crumble topping, then bake until browned and fruit is bubbly and cooked through. Crisp topping: 2 c. whole oat oatmeal (not instant), ¾ c. light brown sugar, ½ c. butter, ½ c. flour, 1 ½ tsp. salt, 1 tsp, cinnamon. Mix until all are well combined, then crumble over fruit. I’ll be back as soon as I finish super-gluing some plates and my great-

Olde Towne BUTCHER Tailgate Headquarters Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

grandmother’s sugar bowl! Vanessa Moncure cooks and bakes regardless of natural disasters around her.

(540) 371-2008

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

13


Cooking With Kyle simple cooking done well

Vino the eastern europeans By matt thomas

by james kyle snyder

HIP POCKET SALMON MEAL School is back in session and the days of leisure and vacation, allowing the children to roam free, eating whatever whenever they want, are over. This is the season of getting back to a routine. Scheduled wake-up, organized class schedule, homework time, dinner time, and eventually, bed time are the time increments that lay in store for most of us until next year, when summer break allows us to slip back into an easier lifestyle. The bus is going to be late, and you are going to get stuck in traffic. I discovered a long time ago the importance of being able to throw together a simple, complete, healthy meal at a moment’s notice. This transition time demands this skill. This is one of the easiest, and a welcome favorite. Being prepared for the monkey wrench that life throws at us is key. First, always keep the supplies for your quick and easy recipes on hand. For example, I always have a salmon frozen, salad greens, and rice noodles. I’ll talk about keeping a well-stocked pantry in a future article. I know you might think a frozen salmon won’t help, so let me teach you how to make it work its magic! Put the frozen salmon in a flat baking dish and place that in the sink. Run cold water over it. It’ll take 5-10 minutes to thaw. Fill a 2-quart pot with water. Season it lightly with Kosher salt, and place it on the stove to boil. Finally, turn on the gas grill. Even though summer is over, the grill masters of the family should rock-on! Learning in what order to do what is a huge time saver. We are 3 minutes into this process so lets get the rest of the meal ready.

12

September 2013

In a small bowl, mix 1/2 cup soy (or gluten free tamari if you prefer) with 2 tablespoons of sesame oil (toasted sesame oil if you have that) and a pinch of your salt and pepper blend (1 cup of kosher salt and 1/4 cup ground black pepper). Stir to combine. Here is where timing gets fast. I like salmon with some pink in the middle and the noodles a little al dente, so the cook time is 2 minutes each side for the salmon and 4 minutes for the noodles. Adjust times to your preferences. If you are quick, you can do it all at once. By the time the salmon is about thawed, the water will be boiling and the grill will be hot. Place the salmon in a large bowl and marinate it with half of the soy mixture. Spread a bed of salad mix on a platter large enough to hold the entire salmon. Place a colander in the sink. Set a 2 minute timer. Go to your boiling water and drop in 3-4 nests of rice noodles. Walk, don’t run - just like at the pool, to the grill, put the salmon on skin side down, and close the lid. We are baking this salmon on the grill. Stir the noodles once. When the timer goes off, reset it and flip the salmon, closing the lid again. When the timer goes off again, pour the noodles in the colander and retrieve your salmon. PHEW! Arrange the noodles on the lettuce and dress with half of the remaining soy mixture. Place the salmon on the noodles and dress with the remaining mixture. In less than 20 minutes, you have a heart healthy meal for the family. Simple, healthy, delicious. Kyle Snyder appeals to your palate and your other senses when it comes to good, simple, healthy eating.

Front porch fredericksburg

When the subject of European wine is brought up it’s usually about the big three: France, Italy, and Spain. Maybe Germany if you’re a fan of white wines. But it turns out that for many reasons, mainly historical and economic, there is quite a lot of wine made in eastern Europe that we are completely unaware of. History is the biggest reason for this. Most countries that today are referred to as Eastern European were part of the Soviet Union. During that time barely any wine made within that Federation made it out. Americans and Western Europeans weren’t keen to sell their wine to the communists and the communists weren’t keen to buy it anyway, so they kept everything they made for themselves. Even after the Iron Curtain fell it took wine enthusiasts quite a few years to recognize the scale and quality of wine made in Eastern Europe to the point that these wines have been available on the market for only the last few years. When kybecca first started selling wine eight years ago, there were no Eastern European wines available to my knowledge except maybe cheap sweet wines. Then a few years ago an importer brought me some Georgian wines to try and I was instantly intrigued. These wines had no regard for what was trendy. They were traditional, delicious, unique, and made from grape varieties I had never heard of such as Saperavi and Takveri. Some were big and rich, others were lean and light, but all were excellent values since the demand was so low. They still are by the way, so buy them now because in ten years the price will increase much faster than inflation. My importer friend had bought them from another importer who brought them in only to sell to the Russian and Georgian embassies and a few Russian restaurants. Besides Georgia another country to look for is Croatia. The climate is quite temperate (it’s just on the other side of the Adriatic from Italy) and winemaking there goes back about three thousand years. One particular variety I like is called Plavac Mali, grown mainly along the Dalmatian Coast. Although it is genetically identical to Zinfandel the two have been separated long enough that any similarities are hard to tell. It reminds me more of some Cabernet Sauvignons with its rich fruit and herbal notes. I also like

another variety called Babic that produces dark and tannic wines – perfect for a nice piece of steak. In the last couple of years I’ve seen some great wines from Hungary as well. These reds remind me a lot of Austrian reds – medium bodied and spicy. Some, such as Kekfrankos, are just other names for German varieties, in this case Blaufrankisch. I think these will appeal less to the average wine drinker compared to the Georgian or Croatian wines, but they are also more food friendly. While my experience with them is limited, I’ve also heard some great things coming from Slovenia and Romania. I had a Serbian Gamay once that was pretty darn good. If you are looking for something different or a theme for a dinner party, I encourage you to seek out Eastern European wines. The price range would be $15-$40; though, I have found that the quality and distinction drops hugely after that. But be assured that a $25 Georgian or Croatian wine can be as good as a $60 French or California wine. Matt Thomas can be reached at the full bar at kybecca or by email at matt@kybecca.com

SideWalk Sale Sat & Sun Sept 28 & 29

374-0443 www.shopwhittingham.com 1021 Caroline Street

Season’s Bounty

recipes for a memorable event By vanessa moncure We, of a certain age, vividly recall WHAT we were doing when President Kennedy was assassinated; WHERE we were when the Twin Towers fell; WHO we were with when the terrors of Y2K never materialized; HOW we felt at personal milestones of marriage/children/career; and WHEN we watched our 401-Ks evaporate during the recent Great Recession. But our newest memory-of-alifetime came on August 23, 2011 — WHY a 5.8 Richter scale roller-coaster earthquake centered just 36 miles from Fredericksburg? Miraculously, we all escaped relatively unscathed, and I found a new use for my lumpen-lead poundcake. A 45second house shimmy reduced its golden dome to a caved-in thick swirl of sugary butter and flour. Now I’ll add to the more prosaic “don’t slam the oven door while baking,” the caveat, “do not attempt to bake during an earthquake”. Same result. QUAKE TRIFLE Cut cooled poundcake into 1” cubes. Line bottom of trifle bowl w/ cake, follow w/ layers of fruit, custard, sweetened whipped cream (2 c. whipping cream beaten w/ ½ c. sugar & dash of vanilla), crumbled amaretti cookies ending w/ whipped cream and sprinkle of crumbled cookies. Chill and serve. Custard: Combine 2 c. each whole milk and heavy cream w/ 1 c. sugar and 4 T. cornstarch in medium saucepan. Bring to simmer, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened. Remove from heat and gradually beat in 6 well-beaten egg yolks, one at a time. Return pan to low heat and heat through, back to a simmer. Stir in 1 T. vanilla extract and ¼ c. dry sherry. Strain through a sieve and refrigerate until chilled. Use fresh-sliced ripe peaches (you’ll need 4-6) and a pint of fresh raspberries as the fruit. Amaretti cookies are available at most large grocery stores or World Market. Purchase the crisp cookie. Poundcake: Combine 1 c. butter w/ 2 c. sugar and beat until light. Add 6 egg yolks, one at a time, until batter is smooth and well-blended. Stir in 1 c.

heavy whipping cream alternately w/ 3 c. cake flour. Fold in 6 egg whites, beaten until they hold soft peaks, then add 1 T. vanilla extract. Spoon batter into two 8x5 greased loaf pans or one greased 10” tube pan. Bake at 325F 75 min. QUAKE CHOPS A gas grill is a meal-saver if utilities are out. Remember the blizzard? Rub one thick center-cut pork chop per person w/ a mixture of kosher salt, black pepper, garlic, whole dried thyme and 1 tsp. olive oil per chop. Grill over mediumhigh heat, brushing several times w/ leftover marinade. Turn once. Serve on large platter w/ grilled tomato and mozzarella salad, grilled asparagus, parmesan crostini. Grilled tomatoes and mozzarella: Cut tops and stem off ripe tomatoes. Sprinkle cut ends w/ olive oil and grill until lightly heated through (peel will begin to split). Slice mozzarella into thick slices, brush w/olive oil, then quickly sear both sides over hot grill. Toss w/fresh torn basil leaves and serve w/grilled tomato - drizzle all w/light vinaigrette, coarse salt and fresh-ground pepper. Asparagus: Coat lightly w/olive oil and grill over indirect heat until crisp-tender. Parmesan crostini: Slice baguette about 1” thick at a deep angle. Brush both sides w/olive oil, then grill till crusty and w/ grill marks. Remove from heat and while still hot, brush w/ cut clove of garlic, top each slice w/ 1 T. freshly grated Parmesan cheese. QUAKE-R R CRISP TOPPING Finish your grill dinner w/ this dessert baked over indirect heat or in oven at 350F approx.45 min. In greased ovenproof 2-qt. pan, place 5 c. peeled and sliced peaches OR apples OR mixed berries OR strawberries and rhubarb (w/extra sugar atop) OR peaches and pear mixture OR pitted cherries. Add ½ c. orange juice, sprinkle w/cinnamon OR nutmeg OR other spices as desired (almond extract, cardamom, etc.). Mix together the following ingredients to make a crumble topping, then bake until browned and fruit is bubbly and cooked through. Crisp topping: 2 c. whole oat oatmeal (not instant), ¾ c. light brown sugar, ½ c. butter, ½ c. flour, 1 ½ tsp. salt, 1 tsp, cinnamon. Mix until all are well combined, then crumble over fruit. I’ll be back as soon as I finish super-gluing some plates and my great-

Olde Towne BUTCHER Tailgate Headquarters Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

Old Town’s Greatest Tour 35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings

grandmother’s sugar bowl! Vanessa Moncure cooks and bakes regardless of natural disasters around her.

(540) 371-2008

Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

13


Hal Bell: rocket scientist launches into winemaking

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

By scott richards

Although making wine is not simple, it does not take a rocket scientist. However, when a NASA engineer tries his hand at it, you can be sure it will be interesting. Fredericksburg’s own Hal Bell, Deputy Chief Engineer for NASA has thrown his hat into the ring of winemakers in the area and is producing an excellent product. Hal commented that it all started as a middle school student where, as a fan of outdoorsman Ewell Gibbons, he used Gibbons’ wine recipe using wild grapes. His father allowed him to make the wine; he was not allowed to taste it. Thus ended his experimenting with wine until several years ago when he talked to several people he worked with about making wine using wine kits. Unbeknownst to him, Hal’s colleagues took to it right away and he found himself behind the curve due to a slow start. Since then he has made up for lost time and in the last three years has used approximately 23 kits. In the basement of his house in Stafford is a room that was constructed quite by circumstance that, while still under construction, serves as his wine room. Against one wall are racks filled with numbered bottles of several varietals of wines that Hal has made. True to his background in science and engineering, Hall did extensive research into what varietals would be the most advantageous to start. Going online, Hall chose a chardonnay kit and added oak chips during the fermentation process. His copious notes concerning the entire process are kept on a computer, including all kit information (properties such as taste and appearance), as well as chemical

14

September 2013

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

On the House faq’s

813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

properties, which include acidity, PH and specific gravity. One would think that would be plenty, but Hal includes other factors such as cost to track efficiency and notes on changes in the wine over time concerning the peak and decline of the taste of the wine. Although he started out on line, his desire to support the local economy has Hal purchasing his supplies from Andy Lynn of Roxbury Farm and Garden Center, where he stated, “If Andy Lynn doesn’t have it, he can order it for you.” After several years, he has progressed past the normal wine kits stages and gone on to more complex kits that present a challenge even for the most experienced wine maker. He pointed out a French oak keg he now uses instead of chips, which according to Hal, must be monitored a little more closely as the wine ages to make sure there is not too much of the oak taste in the wine. One draw back was the keg cannot sit idle, so that when one wine is finished aging in the barrel, there must be another batch ready to put in as soon as the former is removed. “It’s a question of scheduling,” remarked Hal, “That is why I use kits, so that I can have a continual flow in and out of the French oak keg.” In addition to using kits, Hal this spring planted some grapes to play with while making wine. Building the trellis, he used bamboo grown on his property to support the young vines. Hal Bell is not one to hold things he has learned to himself. As a member of the newly formed “Rob’s Army,” he has plans to participate in the auction coming up September 22 to raise money for medical expenses incurred in the past months. Hal’s contribution will be a winemaking class using a Viognier Home Winemaking Kit and a Dry Riesling Winemaking Kit. Andy Lynn of Roxbury is donating kits as well as wine bottles for this benefit. Each team of two people will receive four classes over a 30-day period which will total 12 hours of class involving hands-on wine making with Hal’s expertise in a very comfortable home and basement wine cellar environment. Each team will end up with 30 bottles of wine as well as the experience of wine tasting and wine and food pairing. Scott Richards owns Loch Haven Vineyards. He is a member of VA Vineyards Association, blogs at fromthevine.wordpress.com, and is a wine columnist for Front Porch and sports writer for The Caroline Progress. Photo by Stephanie Bell.

Front porch fredericksburg

by matt thomas

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

This month’s column is not really for the beer enthusiast, there probably aren’t enough of them out there to justify writing about beer in these pages anyway. This month I’d like to address some frequently asked questions about beer; questions that usually come from people who are new to craft beer or curious about it, or maybe things you have wondered to yourself but never asked about. Either way I hope this helps. What’s an ale? Is that different from beer? Depends on what time period we’re talking about as the definitions have changed, but in the year 2013 the answer is no, it’s a type of beer. The other type of beer is a lager. A lager is what most people think about when they think of beer. Every major brand except Guinness is a lager. Lagers are usually pale, yellow, and easy drinking. Most craft beers are ales of some sort. Pale Ales and IPAs (India Pale Ales) are the most common. The technical difference is in the type of yeast: ales are made with a top fermenting yeast and lagers with a bottom fermenting yeast. The yeast used in lagers consume more sugars so lagers tend to have a less fruity, “cleaner” flavor. That’s why most mass-produced beers are lagers. How can I tell if a beer has gone bad? There are two ways a beer can turn: either it’s too old or it’s “skunked”. When a beer is past its shelf life it will take on a sour flavor. At first it’s subtle and then it’s very noticeable. For average beers that aren’t meant to age, it happens after about six months from bottling. Beer that’s been exposed to ultraviolet light will become “skunked”, meaning the sunlight reacts with a chemical in the hops and transforms into another chemical similar to the one skunks release. This chemical reaction doesn’t take long – try

sipping a beer very slowly outdoors on a sunny day and you may find the beer tastes different at the end than at the beginning. Brewers package their beer in brown bottles to prevent this problem. What’s a wheat beer? The primary grain that goes into beer is barley; in some cases wheat is used in addition, and these are known as wheat beers. Thee many different types include German hefeweizens, Belgian White Ales, and American wheat beers. Using wheat will sometimes make particular flavors in the beer – common descriptors are banana and cloves. But wheat beers are different enough from one another so it’s hard to generalize. They do not taste “wheaty,” that’s just your imagination. What is craft beer? What’s the difference between a craft brewery and a microbrewery? A craft brewery is one that concentrates on making the best beer they can rather than what will sell on a massive scale. That’s about it. Also, a brewery is considered not to be craft if their production is too high. Sam Adams could be considered a craft brewery but barely. The term microbrewery is used to mean a very small brewery. So all microbreweries are craft breweries but not all craft breweries are microbreweries. Why do beer companies merge so much? Molson buys Coors. Inbev buys Anheiser-Busch. Even the famously independent Fosters finally sold to SABMiller. Big breweries have seen their sales decline as craft breweries rise. They still dominate, but not like they used to. Mergers expand distribution into new countries and territories to keep sales level, a topic I will discuss in more detail in a future column. Matt Thomas pours at kybecca on William Street.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

15


Hal Bell: rocket scientist launches into winemaking

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

By scott richards

Although making wine is not simple, it does not take a rocket scientist. However, when a NASA engineer tries his hand at it, you can be sure it will be interesting. Fredericksburg’s own Hal Bell, Deputy Chief Engineer for NASA has thrown his hat into the ring of winemakers in the area and is producing an excellent product. Hal commented that it all started as a middle school student where, as a fan of outdoorsman Ewell Gibbons, he used Gibbons’ wine recipe using wild grapes. His father allowed him to make the wine; he was not allowed to taste it. Thus ended his experimenting with wine until several years ago when he talked to several people he worked with about making wine using wine kits. Unbeknownst to him, Hal’s colleagues took to it right away and he found himself behind the curve due to a slow start. Since then he has made up for lost time and in the last three years has used approximately 23 kits. In the basement of his house in Stafford is a room that was constructed quite by circumstance that, while still under construction, serves as his wine room. Against one wall are racks filled with numbered bottles of several varietals of wines that Hal has made. True to his background in science and engineering, Hall did extensive research into what varietals would be the most advantageous to start. Going online, Hall chose a chardonnay kit and added oak chips during the fermentation process. His copious notes concerning the entire process are kept on a computer, including all kit information (properties such as taste and appearance), as well as chemical

14

September 2013

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

On the House faq’s

813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

properties, which include acidity, PH and specific gravity. One would think that would be plenty, but Hal includes other factors such as cost to track efficiency and notes on changes in the wine over time concerning the peak and decline of the taste of the wine. Although he started out on line, his desire to support the local economy has Hal purchasing his supplies from Andy Lynn of Roxbury Farm and Garden Center, where he stated, “If Andy Lynn doesn’t have it, he can order it for you.” After several years, he has progressed past the normal wine kits stages and gone on to more complex kits that present a challenge even for the most experienced wine maker. He pointed out a French oak keg he now uses instead of chips, which according to Hal, must be monitored a little more closely as the wine ages to make sure there is not too much of the oak taste in the wine. One draw back was the keg cannot sit idle, so that when one wine is finished aging in the barrel, there must be another batch ready to put in as soon as the former is removed. “It’s a question of scheduling,” remarked Hal, “That is why I use kits, so that I can have a continual flow in and out of the French oak keg.” In addition to using kits, Hal this spring planted some grapes to play with while making wine. Building the trellis, he used bamboo grown on his property to support the young vines. Hal Bell is not one to hold things he has learned to himself. As a member of the newly formed “Rob’s Army,” he has plans to participate in the auction coming up September 22 to raise money for medical expenses incurred in the past months. Hal’s contribution will be a winemaking class using a Viognier Home Winemaking Kit and a Dry Riesling Winemaking Kit. Andy Lynn of Roxbury is donating kits as well as wine bottles for this benefit. Each team of two people will receive four classes over a 30-day period which will total 12 hours of class involving hands-on wine making with Hal’s expertise in a very comfortable home and basement wine cellar environment. Each team will end up with 30 bottles of wine as well as the experience of wine tasting and wine and food pairing. Scott Richards owns Loch Haven Vineyards. He is a member of VA Vineyards Association, blogs at fromthevine.wordpress.com, and is a wine columnist for Front Porch and sports writer for The Caroline Progress. Photo by Stephanie Bell.

Front porch fredericksburg

by matt thomas

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

This month’s column is not really for the beer enthusiast, there probably aren’t enough of them out there to justify writing about beer in these pages anyway. This month I’d like to address some frequently asked questions about beer; questions that usually come from people who are new to craft beer or curious about it, or maybe things you have wondered to yourself but never asked about. Either way I hope this helps. What’s an ale? Is that different from beer? Depends on what time period we’re talking about as the definitions have changed, but in the year 2013 the answer is no, it’s a type of beer. The other type of beer is a lager. A lager is what most people think about when they think of beer. Every major brand except Guinness is a lager. Lagers are usually pale, yellow, and easy drinking. Most craft beers are ales of some sort. Pale Ales and IPAs (India Pale Ales) are the most common. The technical difference is in the type of yeast: ales are made with a top fermenting yeast and lagers with a bottom fermenting yeast. The yeast used in lagers consume more sugars so lagers tend to have a less fruity, “cleaner” flavor. That’s why most mass-produced beers are lagers. How can I tell if a beer has gone bad? There are two ways a beer can turn: either it’s too old or it’s “skunked”. When a beer is past its shelf life it will take on a sour flavor. At first it’s subtle and then it’s very noticeable. For average beers that aren’t meant to age, it happens after about six months from bottling. Beer that’s been exposed to ultraviolet light will become “skunked”, meaning the sunlight reacts with a chemical in the hops and transforms into another chemical similar to the one skunks release. This chemical reaction doesn’t take long – try

sipping a beer very slowly outdoors on a sunny day and you may find the beer tastes different at the end than at the beginning. Brewers package their beer in brown bottles to prevent this problem. What’s a wheat beer? The primary grain that goes into beer is barley; in some cases wheat is used in addition, and these are known as wheat beers. Thee many different types include German hefeweizens, Belgian White Ales, and American wheat beers. Using wheat will sometimes make particular flavors in the beer – common descriptors are banana and cloves. But wheat beers are different enough from one another so it’s hard to generalize. They do not taste “wheaty,” that’s just your imagination. What is craft beer? What’s the difference between a craft brewery and a microbrewery? A craft brewery is one that concentrates on making the best beer they can rather than what will sell on a massive scale. That’s about it. Also, a brewery is considered not to be craft if their production is too high. Sam Adams could be considered a craft brewery but barely. The term microbrewery is used to mean a very small brewery. So all microbreweries are craft breweries but not all craft breweries are microbreweries. Why do beer companies merge so much? Molson buys Coors. Inbev buys Anheiser-Busch. Even the famously independent Fosters finally sold to SABMiller. Big breweries have seen their sales decline as craft breweries rise. They still dominate, but not like they used to. Mergers expand distribution into new countries and territories to keep sales level, a topic I will discuss in more detail in a future column. Matt Thomas pours at kybecca on William Street.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

15


september 2013… Catch up with the Arts! *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

sunday, september 1

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Art Attack! With Bill Harris, Jenna Anderson, Rob Grogan; Spotsylvania Sheriff’s Office on school safety. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Art First Gallery’s September Exhibition featuring works of Original artwork from 33 member artists also on display thru Oct 2 daily, 11-5P *Brush Strokes Gallery: “Artfully Arranged” by Beverley Coates. This show and the September All-Member show run from Sep 2 - Sep 29

tuesday, september 3

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P PFLAG meets: Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays - 1st Tue Monthly, 1-hr Support Group, 1-hr Education. Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church *Live Music at Bistro Bethem every Tue; $3 drink specials. Tonight: The Skiffle Lounge Sound. 8P. 309 William

wednesday, september 4

*Spotsylvania Farmers Market: Spotsy Regional Medical Ctr. 3-7P, 4600 Spotsy Pkwy. Every Wed thru early fall *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

thursday, september 5

*Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 730-11P. Tonight: The Kenmore Inn presents acoustic folk trio Joshua Road

first friday, september 6

Art Opening: Hsi-Mei Yates “The Relationship of Elements” Please join us in the Main Gallery on First Friday for the O p e n i n g Reception featuring long-

CALENDAR of events

time Chinese Watercolor artist, Hsi-Mei Yates. She has taught for many years here and other places in the country. Includes paintings she has done on pottery made by Dan Finnegan, Bruce Ciske and her daughter, Tiffany Yates. Show runs Sept. 6- Sept. 29 @ LibertyTown on Liberty Street

First Friday Group Show - PONSHOP Studio and Gallery opening reception featuring latest works by our artists including Crystal and Kevin Rodrigue, Nicholas Candela, Jeremy Gann, Adam DeSio and Gabriel Pons. Photographs by Stephen Graham, ceramics by Scarlett Pons as well as the latest plush creations from Ashleigh Burbidge and mixed media assemblages by Leslie Brier

sunday, september 8

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Gwen Braswell on teen violence; Art Attack! (repeated from Sep 1) Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, september 10

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P *Karen Jonas: Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P

wednesday, september 11 Always Remember

First Friday With Jon Wiley & Friends! Bistro Bethem. Join us for live music and drinks into the morning! We will be offering late night snacks too! 309 William

*Opening reception: Brush Strokes Gallery: “Artfully Arranged” by Beverley Coates. This AllMember show run Sep 2-Sep 29

Vintage Route 1 Tour & Downtown Community Day - Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. (HFFI) annual downtown celebration of Fxbg’s 20th-century history. All-day includes ticketed Streetcar Tours of Lafayette Blvd.; Walking Tours of Princess Anne (both part of original Route 1), free activities for family: Vintage Fashion Show, Classic Cars at Riverfront Park, Vintage Photo/Artifact Exhibits at Masonic Lodge #4 (803 P-Anne), variety of Children’s Activities in Riverfront. Come dressed for your favorite decade and join the fun! 10A-5P. Tix: Visitors Center (706 Caroline) and the Lewis Store (1200 Caroline)

Don’t cross paths with a black cat! M-Law & the Modern Prophets of Jazz - FAMCC summer-long concert series, Sounds of Summer. This 4-5 piece ensemble performs music encompassing jazz and jazz influenced genres such as R&B and funk. This is a show you won’t want to miss! Market Square – enter through either alley on Caroline or William

saturday, september 14

Second Saturdays at the Museum: 1-3P. Art Attack!, an event that brings artists and their studios to the street so that the community can see their work Free. See article

sunday, september 15

Chef Christian Etienne Renault sits in on Wednesday nights at 8 for live music at La Petite Auberge.

saturday, september 7

FXBG Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William @ Prince Edward, with Art in the Park 7A-2P. Every First Sat in Sept. & Oct

friday, september 13

Beach Music benefit — Beach Legend Jackie Gore (of Legends of Beach) and his talented daughter Terri Gore -First Fredericksburg appearance for a night of GREAT Beach Music. Tickets: $10.00 / $12.00 day of event. Proceeds benefit the TAKE A WARRIOR FISHING program. Beer, wine and setups available. Call 540-834-7124 or visit the Fredericksburg Elks Lodge for tickets and details

*Opening reception: Art First Gallery’s September Exhibition featuring works of Original artwork from 33 member artists also on display thru Oct 2 daily, 11-5P

Soggy Doggie swim - Dogs rule the pool this evening as we bring the dog days of summer to a close. Admission: $5 for up to two dogs. T-shirts available for puppies and human friends, so bring a little extra cash. Registration forms at Dorothy Hart Community Center and Dixon Pool

*The Transmitters play live at The Kenmore Inn, 730P-1030P. 1200 Princess Anne

*La Petite Auberge - Live Music in the Lounge every Wednesday night the month of September except the first Wednesday. 9/11, 9/18, 9/25: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music tonight in the Lounge 8P featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No Cover Charge

thursday, september 12

Happy 25th Anniversary to my Virginia Mary. Best decision I ever made… *North Stafford MOPS Moms CLub - 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month (Sept-May). We are open to all moms of children birth - Kindergarten. Please join us for fellowship, food, friendship, and encouragement from other moms, mentors, and local speakers. We offer childcare during the meetings

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center Skin-to-Skin newborn program; Toast of the Town fundraiser. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Victorian Tea Ladies of Fredericksburg will model their beautiful period dresses, tea and crudités will be served, prizes awarded. Ladies and Gentlemen are invited. Tickets are $35/person, In Advance only. Please call 540-373-4496. Benefits the Rappahannock POPS Orchestra. Fxbg Country Club. 2P

tuesday, september 17

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Donny Holcombe Solo Acoustic, Classic Rock, Pop, and Folk songs from the 1960’s to today Picnic in the Park — Free and open to the public. Live music, children’s activities, moon bounce, Touch-A-Truck, local food vendors, and more. Sponsored by B101.5, Cox Communications and Fredericksburg Academy. Bring your lunch or buy it in the park!

Spotsylvania County Neighborhood Watch Meeting, 7-8P. 3rd Tue monthly. All County Residents welcome. Stay informed of trends/law enforcement activity. Sheriff’s Sub-Station, Spotsy Towne Centre *Jon Wiley Trio plays live @ Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 811P

wednesday, september 18

Bee Keeping Talk — Kim Frazier will talk about bee keeping in the Fredericksburg area and the importance of bees to our environment. Free. CRRL HQ, 1201 Caroline

thursday, september 19

*FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org *Back in the ‘burg by popular demand, MD based Pretty Gritty bring their soulful Americana sound to the Kenmore Inn. Featuring Andre Eglevsky on upright bass. The Kenmore Inn. 730P

friday, september 20

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS.” Ellen Baptist, 548-0652 The Women on the Move Luncheon supports the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s mission to raise funds for local programs and services to help those living with MS in Central Virginia; and for crucial research needed to find a cure. Silent auction, lunch and special performance from guest star, David Osmond, nephew of singers Donny and Marie Osmond *Fxbg Area Museum & Cultural Center- 4th annual Via Colori Fredericksburg. Sat, Sep 21st and Sun, Sep 22nd, it’s art to the streets for over 100 artists showcasing their talents in street art along Sophia and Charlotte and the Riverfront Park. Music, food, entertainment. ViaColori.com. See article *Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park — Sep 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22, 29 at 2P. Central Rappahannock Regional Library, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

monday, September 23

Happy Seventh Anniversary, Jessica & Jeremy

saturday, september 21

tuesday, september 24

*Via Colori

*Fxbg Art Festival - Two-Day outdoor Art Festival in Historic Downtown! Artists from all over the region fill Riverfront Park in amazing display of their works for sale. Great opportunity to update the decor in your house, get head start on holiday shopping w/ unique gifts. Held alongside Via Colori on Sophia One-day Pastel Workshop with Lynn Goldstein at LibertyTown Arts Workshop — Most artists work from photographs some of the time, a challenge to keep from becoming merely a copy of the photo. Workshop helps develop ability to work from photographs, explore key issues of sound composition, color use, values, pastel supplies explored. Appropriate for all levels of experience. 1030-430P *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library

sunday, september 22

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Toast of the Town fundraiser (repeated from Sep 15); Spotsylvania Supervisor David Ross. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net A County Fair by the Washington Heritage Museums — A fun family event with live music, BBQ dinner, games, cake walk, beer/wine, demonstrations and more. Advance ticket sales only: $20 per individual or $40 per family at www.WashingtonHeritageMuseums.org. Sponsored by Stellar One *Via Colori *Fxbg Art Festival *Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park – Sep 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. Central Rappahannock Regional Library, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org Toast Of The Town - Benefit Auction for Rob Grogan’s Cancer Support Fund. 6-10P. Old Silk Mill. Tix: Becks Antiques & Books on Caroline: $30/single; $50/couple

Master gardener/tree steward, Chuck Heath on fun trees for landscape. Free. Salem Church Library. 7P

wednesday, september 25

Recycled Paper Flower Crafts - Craft newspaper or brawn packing paper into a decorative flower for your door or dorm! Please RSVP to 540-479-3090 for this free event. Ten Thousand Villages, Spotsylvania Towne Centre. 10A-11A

thursday, september 26

*North Stafford MOPS Moms Club - 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month (Sept-May) Ashleigh Chevalier at The Kenmore Inn — Local roots rock and blues singer Ashleigh Chevalier is back at The Kenmore Inn, featuring guitarist Bruce Middle. 730P-1030P

friday, september 27

*Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park – Sep 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. Central Rappahannock Regional Library, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

saturday, september 28

*Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park — Sep 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. CRRL, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

sunday, september 29

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Guests: John Hennessey and Beth Parnicza, National Park Service. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park — Sep 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. CRRL, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

If you are reading this 195th issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate autumn! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for October’s issue is Sep. 20 . To submit events, follow link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/how-tt osubmit-o online/

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

16

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Peggy Wickham Art at Brush Strokes Contact Peggy at 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

1906 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on

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September 2013

17


september 2013… Catch up with the Arts! *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

sunday, september 1

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Art Attack! With Bill Harris, Jenna Anderson, Rob Grogan; Spotsylvania Sheriff’s Office on school safety. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Art First Gallery’s September Exhibition featuring works of Original artwork from 33 member artists also on display thru Oct 2 daily, 11-5P *Brush Strokes Gallery: “Artfully Arranged” by Beverley Coates. This show and the September All-Member show run from Sep 2 - Sep 29

tuesday, september 3

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P PFLAG meets: Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays - 1st Tue Monthly, 1-hr Support Group, 1-hr Education. Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church *Live Music at Bistro Bethem every Tue; $3 drink specials. Tonight: The Skiffle Lounge Sound. 8P. 309 William

wednesday, september 4

*Spotsylvania Farmers Market: Spotsy Regional Medical Ctr. 3-7P, 4600 Spotsy Pkwy. Every Wed thru early fall *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

thursday, september 5

*Music every Thurs live at Kenmore Inn 730-11P. Tonight: The Kenmore Inn presents acoustic folk trio Joshua Road

first friday, september 6

Art Opening: Hsi-Mei Yates “The Relationship of Elements” Please join us in the Main Gallery on First Friday for the O p e n i n g Reception featuring long-

CALENDAR of events

time Chinese Watercolor artist, Hsi-Mei Yates. She has taught for many years here and other places in the country. Includes paintings she has done on pottery made by Dan Finnegan, Bruce Ciske and her daughter, Tiffany Yates. Show runs Sept. 6- Sept. 29 @ LibertyTown on Liberty Street

First Friday Group Show - PONSHOP Studio and Gallery opening reception featuring latest works by our artists including Crystal and Kevin Rodrigue, Nicholas Candela, Jeremy Gann, Adam DeSio and Gabriel Pons. Photographs by Stephen Graham, ceramics by Scarlett Pons as well as the latest plush creations from Ashleigh Burbidge and mixed media assemblages by Leslie Brier

sunday, september 8

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Gwen Braswell on teen violence; Art Attack! (repeated from Sep 1) Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, september 10

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P *Karen Jonas: Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P

wednesday, september 11 Always Remember

First Friday With Jon Wiley & Friends! Bistro Bethem. Join us for live music and drinks into the morning! We will be offering late night snacks too! 309 William

*Opening reception: Brush Strokes Gallery: “Artfully Arranged” by Beverley Coates. This AllMember show run Sep 2-Sep 29

Vintage Route 1 Tour & Downtown Community Day - Historic Fredericksburg Foundation, Inc. (HFFI) annual downtown celebration of Fxbg’s 20th-century history. All-day includes ticketed Streetcar Tours of Lafayette Blvd.; Walking Tours of Princess Anne (both part of original Route 1), free activities for family: Vintage Fashion Show, Classic Cars at Riverfront Park, Vintage Photo/Artifact Exhibits at Masonic Lodge #4 (803 P-Anne), variety of Children’s Activities in Riverfront. Come dressed for your favorite decade and join the fun! 10A-5P. Tix: Visitors Center (706 Caroline) and the Lewis Store (1200 Caroline)

Don’t cross paths with a black cat! M-Law & the Modern Prophets of Jazz - FAMCC summer-long concert series, Sounds of Summer. This 4-5 piece ensemble performs music encompassing jazz and jazz influenced genres such as R&B and funk. This is a show you won’t want to miss! Market Square – enter through either alley on Caroline or William

saturday, september 14

Second Saturdays at the Museum: 1-3P. Art Attack!, an event that brings artists and their studios to the street so that the community can see their work Free. See article

sunday, september 15

Chef Christian Etienne Renault sits in on Wednesday nights at 8 for live music at La Petite Auberge.

saturday, september 7

FXBG Farmer’s Market at Hurkamp Park, William @ Prince Edward, with Art in the Park 7A-2P. Every First Sat in Sept. & Oct

friday, september 13

Beach Music benefit — Beach Legend Jackie Gore (of Legends of Beach) and his talented daughter Terri Gore -First Fredericksburg appearance for a night of GREAT Beach Music. Tickets: $10.00 / $12.00 day of event. Proceeds benefit the TAKE A WARRIOR FISHING program. Beer, wine and setups available. Call 540-834-7124 or visit the Fredericksburg Elks Lodge for tickets and details

*Opening reception: Art First Gallery’s September Exhibition featuring works of Original artwork from 33 member artists also on display thru Oct 2 daily, 11-5P

Soggy Doggie swim - Dogs rule the pool this evening as we bring the dog days of summer to a close. Admission: $5 for up to two dogs. T-shirts available for puppies and human friends, so bring a little extra cash. Registration forms at Dorothy Hart Community Center and Dixon Pool

*The Transmitters play live at The Kenmore Inn, 730P-1030P. 1200 Princess Anne

*La Petite Auberge - Live Music in the Lounge every Wednesday night the month of September except the first Wednesday. 9/11, 9/18, 9/25: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music tonight in the Lounge 8P featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No Cover Charge

thursday, september 12

Happy 25th Anniversary to my Virginia Mary. Best decision I ever made… *North Stafford MOPS Moms CLub - 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month (Sept-May). We are open to all moms of children birth - Kindergarten. Please join us for fellowship, food, friendship, and encouragement from other moms, mentors, and local speakers. We offer childcare during the meetings

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center Skin-to-Skin newborn program; Toast of the Town fundraiser. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Victorian Tea Ladies of Fredericksburg will model their beautiful period dresses, tea and crudités will be served, prizes awarded. Ladies and Gentlemen are invited. Tickets are $35/person, In Advance only. Please call 540-373-4496. Benefits the Rappahannock POPS Orchestra. Fxbg Country Club. 2P

tuesday, september 17

*Picnic in the Park Every Tuesday @ Hurkamp Park, 1130A-130P. Donny Holcombe Solo Acoustic, Classic Rock, Pop, and Folk songs from the 1960’s to today Picnic in the Park — Free and open to the public. Live music, children’s activities, moon bounce, Touch-A-Truck, local food vendors, and more. Sponsored by B101.5, Cox Communications and Fredericksburg Academy. Bring your lunch or buy it in the park!

Spotsylvania County Neighborhood Watch Meeting, 7-8P. 3rd Tue monthly. All County Residents welcome. Stay informed of trends/law enforcement activity. Sheriff’s Sub-Station, Spotsy Towne Centre *Jon Wiley Trio plays live @ Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 811P

wednesday, september 18

Bee Keeping Talk — Kim Frazier will talk about bee keeping in the Fredericksburg area and the importance of bees to our environment. Free. CRRL HQ, 1201 Caroline

thursday, september 19

*FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org *Back in the ‘burg by popular demand, MD based Pretty Gritty bring their soulful Americana sound to the Kenmore Inn. Featuring Andre Eglevsky on upright bass. The Kenmore Inn. 730P

friday, september 20

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS.” Ellen Baptist, 548-0652 The Women on the Move Luncheon supports the National Multiple Sclerosis Society’s mission to raise funds for local programs and services to help those living with MS in Central Virginia; and for crucial research needed to find a cure. Silent auction, lunch and special performance from guest star, David Osmond, nephew of singers Donny and Marie Osmond *Fxbg Area Museum & Cultural Center- 4th annual Via Colori Fredericksburg. Sat, Sep 21st and Sun, Sep 22nd, it’s art to the streets for over 100 artists showcasing their talents in street art along Sophia and Charlotte and the Riverfront Park. Music, food, entertainment. ViaColori.com. See article *Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park — Sep 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22, 29 at 2P. Central Rappahannock Regional Library, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

monday, September 23

Happy Seventh Anniversary, Jessica & Jeremy

saturday, september 21

tuesday, september 24

*Via Colori

*Fxbg Art Festival - Two-Day outdoor Art Festival in Historic Downtown! Artists from all over the region fill Riverfront Park in amazing display of their works for sale. Great opportunity to update the decor in your house, get head start on holiday shopping w/ unique gifts. Held alongside Via Colori on Sophia One-day Pastel Workshop with Lynn Goldstein at LibertyTown Arts Workshop — Most artists work from photographs some of the time, a challenge to keep from becoming merely a copy of the photo. Workshop helps develop ability to work from photographs, explore key issues of sound composition, color use, values, pastel supplies explored. Appropriate for all levels of experience. 1030-430P *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library

sunday, september 22

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Topics: Toast of the Town fundraiser (repeated from Sep 15); Spotsylvania Supervisor David Ross. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net A County Fair by the Washington Heritage Museums — A fun family event with live music, BBQ dinner, games, cake walk, beer/wine, demonstrations and more. Advance ticket sales only: $20 per individual or $40 per family at www.WashingtonHeritageMuseums.org. Sponsored by Stellar One *Via Colori *Fxbg Art Festival *Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park – Sep 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. Central Rappahannock Regional Library, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org Toast Of The Town - Benefit Auction for Rob Grogan’s Cancer Support Fund. 6-10P. Old Silk Mill. Tix: Becks Antiques & Books on Caroline: $30/single; $50/couple

Master gardener/tree steward, Chuck Heath on fun trees for landscape. Free. Salem Church Library. 7P

wednesday, september 25

Recycled Paper Flower Crafts - Craft newspaper or brawn packing paper into a decorative flower for your door or dorm! Please RSVP to 540-479-3090 for this free event. Ten Thousand Villages, Spotsylvania Towne Centre. 10A-11A

thursday, september 26

*North Stafford MOPS Moms Club - 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month (Sept-May) Ashleigh Chevalier at The Kenmore Inn — Local roots rock and blues singer Ashleigh Chevalier is back at The Kenmore Inn, featuring guitarist Bruce Middle. 730P-1030P

friday, september 27

*Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park – Sep 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. Central Rappahannock Regional Library, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

saturday, september 28

*Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park — Sep 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. CRRL, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

sunday, september 29

*AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Guests: John Hennessey and Beth Parnicza, National Park Service. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net *Stage Door Productions Presents: Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park — Sep 20, 21, 27, 28 at 8P; Sep 22 and 29 at 2P. CRRL, 1201 Caroline. $15/door. stagedoorproductions.org

If you are reading this 195th issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate autumn! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for October’s issue is Sep. 20 . To submit events, follow link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/how-tt osubmit-o online/

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

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September 2013

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Peggy Wickham Art at Brush Strokes Contact Peggy at 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

1906 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

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homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

17


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Traders By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

schooled on schools

A Day In The Life of fredericksburg va By Natalie Wilson

"Woke up, got out of bed, dragged a comb across my head… went downstairs and had a cup, looking up I noticed I was late…" - Paul McCartney, A Day in The Life (Abbey Road)

The fur and deerskin trade was important in colonial Virginia. Beaver and other pelts were the first items desired by the traders to produce income from the Virginia colony, however, Virginians developed a substantial deerskin trade that extended about 1,500 miles as the traders went around the Appalachians and traveled northward. As you can imagine there are very few records that have survived as of any written proof of the activities. Most traders were hired or were indentured servants who did not get the profits from their hard work. There were only a few that derived a profit from the trade with the Indians, and one such individual was Cadwallader Jones, of whose escapades there are records. Cadwallader, a Commander of the Virginia Regiment, worked out of the Fort (Lease land or Smith) on the Rappahannock at New Post. He conducted trade four hundred miles southwestward from that location and into the northeast base of the Blue Ridge searching for a pass towards the Great Lakes. One of his early hand drawn maps shows that he made the long trip over the Appalachians. We must understand just how tough it was to conduct just one of these adventures into the wilderness inhabited by hostile Indian Tribes who had never encountered these Virginia traders. A pack train would consist of one hundred horses and sixteen men with enough supplies to feed the horses and men for several months. The train also carried trading items (glass beads, blankets hatchets, trinkets, guns etc.) in packs of two hundred pounds per horse. The caravan would normally leave around the first of March and return near the end of May before the summer heat. The only “roads” were trails made by the Indians, however, the traders would normally go 20 miles per day, or until they came to an Indian village where they conducted trade negotiations with the Indians for their pelts. Exactly how far the Virginia traders went will never be known, but we do know that way beyond the southern mountains all white Americans were called “Virginians.” (I wish to thank Wayne Morris for the use of his research material.) Dedicated to the memory of Reggie Bache, who passed away at age 93. Tuffy Hicks is our dedicated historian. Enjoy his escapades here every month.

Long before Fredericksburg became a university town, it would have been accurate to dub it the “city of schools.” I stopped counting at 26. And that’s without the kindergartens… In 1892, the Presbyterian Church established the Assembly’s Home & School to “care for widows and orphans of ministers and missionaries” and worthy laymen. Absorbing the Female Orphan Asylum and going public, it satisfied the well-to-do’s quest for “a high grade school.” With an act of the state’s General Assembly to incorporate it, the school added a collegiate department. By 1894, with 174 students from many towns and several states, it was newly chartered as Fredericksburg College. More than 40 orphans and children of missionaries were enrolled in the home and school department and its Bible & Training School. In exchange for 10 scholarships to “free school” children, the City aided FC. This controversial deal was not longstanding. With the college in debt, the General Assembly severed all connections in 1897. Perhaps it was the excessive competition [schools for boys, girls, or co-

ed] that popped up with prominent citizens or reverends, in buildings and private homes; or the oft-confusing additions and name changes, that led to their demises. One that lasted – the State Normal & Industrial School for Women [1908] — became Mary Washington College and, subsequently, the University of Mary Washington. From church schools to segregated schools, we’ve had dozens since the 1700s. To learn more, turn to the History of Fredericksburg by S.J. Quinn [published 1908], or the History of the Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg 1808-1976, by Edward Alvey, Jr. Today, according to schooldigger.com, within a five-mile radius of 22401, there are at least 32 different schools serving children from Pre-K through 12. —RG Photo by Norm Shafer

I lived at home all summer this year to participate in several internships, explore downtown Fredericksburg, and spend more time with friends. I usually spend several weeks of my summer on a college campus taking a class. When first meeting a roommate or classmate at one of these camps, some of the small talk is about our hometowns. Some name cities everyone knows: Baltimore, Richmond, Pittsburgh, D.C; when I said I was from Fredericksburg, the few that knew it had only heard of it in history class or driven through on Route 3 traveling to somewhere else. I found it difficult to explain where I lived to them. The majority of my zip code is suburban Spotsylvania, but rural Caroline is also a part. We have the convenience of large shopping centers filled with chains we recognize but are on the banks of rivers and surrounded by forests and trails. Our area is made up of battlefields, the homes of the first president, and talented artists, and archeological digs. Even knowing all this, I didn't have any special feelings for the place I've always lived. I looked forward to going off every summer, so I didn't know how to share the spirit of Fredericksburg with classmates from cities that my family planned to visit. It took my first summer in three years spent entirely at home to show me all of the quality this city has to offer. Join me on just one of the many exciting days a resident can have here…

Although I, like any teenager, really love to sleep in, I had to get up and out early to do everything. I left from the front porch of my colonial-style home and set out for my first destination.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

September 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

We first drove to the Virginia Outdoor Center for a canoeing trip. After we watched a safety video, we moved our car to Mott's Run. A bus took us to our starting site, and we were off. We had plenty of time to relax and swim along our journey. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

19


history’s stories

OUR HERITAGE

Traders By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

schooled on schools

A Day In The Life of fredericksburg va By Natalie Wilson

"Woke up, got out of bed, dragged a comb across my head… went downstairs and had a cup, looking up I noticed I was late…" - Paul McCartney, A Day in The Life (Abbey Road)

The fur and deerskin trade was important in colonial Virginia. Beaver and other pelts were the first items desired by the traders to produce income from the Virginia colony, however, Virginians developed a substantial deerskin trade that extended about 1,500 miles as the traders went around the Appalachians and traveled northward. As you can imagine there are very few records that have survived as of any written proof of the activities. Most traders were hired or were indentured servants who did not get the profits from their hard work. There were only a few that derived a profit from the trade with the Indians, and one such individual was Cadwallader Jones, of whose escapades there are records. Cadwallader, a Commander of the Virginia Regiment, worked out of the Fort (Lease land or Smith) on the Rappahannock at New Post. He conducted trade four hundred miles southwestward from that location and into the northeast base of the Blue Ridge searching for a pass towards the Great Lakes. One of his early hand drawn maps shows that he made the long trip over the Appalachians. We must understand just how tough it was to conduct just one of these adventures into the wilderness inhabited by hostile Indian Tribes who had never encountered these Virginia traders. A pack train would consist of one hundred horses and sixteen men with enough supplies to feed the horses and men for several months. The train also carried trading items (glass beads, blankets hatchets, trinkets, guns etc.) in packs of two hundred pounds per horse. The caravan would normally leave around the first of March and return near the end of May before the summer heat. The only “roads” were trails made by the Indians, however, the traders would normally go 20 miles per day, or until they came to an Indian village where they conducted trade negotiations with the Indians for their pelts. Exactly how far the Virginia traders went will never be known, but we do know that way beyond the southern mountains all white Americans were called “Virginians.” (I wish to thank Wayne Morris for the use of his research material.) Dedicated to the memory of Reggie Bache, who passed away at age 93. Tuffy Hicks is our dedicated historian. Enjoy his escapades here every month.

Long before Fredericksburg became a university town, it would have been accurate to dub it the “city of schools.” I stopped counting at 26. And that’s without the kindergartens… In 1892, the Presbyterian Church established the Assembly’s Home & School to “care for widows and orphans of ministers and missionaries” and worthy laymen. Absorbing the Female Orphan Asylum and going public, it satisfied the well-to-do’s quest for “a high grade school.” With an act of the state’s General Assembly to incorporate it, the school added a collegiate department. By 1894, with 174 students from many towns and several states, it was newly chartered as Fredericksburg College. More than 40 orphans and children of missionaries were enrolled in the home and school department and its Bible & Training School. In exchange for 10 scholarships to “free school” children, the City aided FC. This controversial deal was not longstanding. With the college in debt, the General Assembly severed all connections in 1897. Perhaps it was the excessive competition [schools for boys, girls, or co-

ed] that popped up with prominent citizens or reverends, in buildings and private homes; or the oft-confusing additions and name changes, that led to their demises. One that lasted – the State Normal & Industrial School for Women [1908] — became Mary Washington College and, subsequently, the University of Mary Washington. From church schools to segregated schools, we’ve had dozens since the 1700s. To learn more, turn to the History of Fredericksburg by S.J. Quinn [published 1908], or the History of the Presbyterian Church of Fredericksburg 1808-1976, by Edward Alvey, Jr. Today, according to schooldigger.com, within a five-mile radius of 22401, there are at least 32 different schools serving children from Pre-K through 12. —RG Photo by Norm Shafer

I lived at home all summer this year to participate in several internships, explore downtown Fredericksburg, and spend more time with friends. I usually spend several weeks of my summer on a college campus taking a class. When first meeting a roommate or classmate at one of these camps, some of the small talk is about our hometowns. Some name cities everyone knows: Baltimore, Richmond, Pittsburgh, D.C; when I said I was from Fredericksburg, the few that knew it had only heard of it in history class or driven through on Route 3 traveling to somewhere else. I found it difficult to explain where I lived to them. The majority of my zip code is suburban Spotsylvania, but rural Caroline is also a part. We have the convenience of large shopping centers filled with chains we recognize but are on the banks of rivers and surrounded by forests and trails. Our area is made up of battlefields, the homes of the first president, and talented artists, and archeological digs. Even knowing all this, I didn't have any special feelings for the place I've always lived. I looked forward to going off every summer, so I didn't know how to share the spirit of Fredericksburg with classmates from cities that my family planned to visit. It took my first summer in three years spent entirely at home to show me all of the quality this city has to offer. Join me on just one of the many exciting days a resident can have here…

Although I, like any teenager, really love to sleep in, I had to get up and out early to do everything. I left from the front porch of my colonial-style home and set out for my first destination.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

September 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg

We first drove to the Virginia Outdoor Center for a canoeing trip. After we watched a safety video, we moved our car to Mott's Run. A bus took us to our starting site, and we were off. We had plenty of time to relax and swim along our journey. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

19


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring:

punishment predicament

Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

by wendy schmitz

In a world full of positive reinforcement and gentle training techniques you may be wondering what do I do when my dog does something wrong? Just not giving a treat couldn’t possibly teach them anything, and what if the behavior is so self-satisfying that the reward is built right in to being bad? What then? There are no easy answers to this question. In the current training age there is no room for hitting dog (thankfully), or physical punishment of any kind (and with good reason, beyond being cruel it rarely, if ever, works), so what can you do to change the behaviors you don’t like into behaviors you do? Some of these bad behaviors are easy to fix; puppy chews on shoe, you startle the pup, once they stop you tell them “Good dog”, then offer an appropriate chew item or activity, and finally once they start the approved activity you praise them and reward. This method works well and quickly; pups figure out fast which behaviors yield rewards and they continue those behaviors while the naughty behaviors go extinct. Another option is to excessively reward ALL good behaviors. Everything your dog does right yields a reward, like a rat hitting a food bar, hit bar get food, good behavior gets treat. Dogs tend to repeat behaviors that yield food and extinguish behaviors that don’t. Over time you get a well-behaved dog in a very scientific manner. Downside: it can take awhile, and I don’t have that kind of time. I usually do a combination of both, distracting and redirecting, as well as rewarding what I love. I have found this combination to be a nice balance when helping your pup navigate all our

20

September 2013

confusing counter-intuitive-to-adog human rules. But this doesn’t solve everything; you are still left with the elusive problem behaviors that are either self-rewarding or are done out of a misplaced belief that it is necessary to survive. There is no amount of redirecting or rewarding the opposite behavior that will stop these kinds of problems within a reasonable amount of time. So now what? Detective work is now necessary. It is important to consider what motivation is driving the behavior. Does your dog attack his dog brother because he is fighting over resources or because he is bored? Is your dog eating poop out of hunger or hiding evidence to avoid punishment? Knowing why is almost more important than knowing how to stop it. Why he does something GIVES you the how-to-stop-it. Here is an example: My youngest dog started attacking my oldest dog. Why? Is he vying for attention? Trying to be leader? Well, let’s investigate. My oldest dog has always been submissive, so a leader issue doesn’t fit. Both dogs are fine when they are outside where space and water are ample. Problems only arise when the water bowls inside are empty or there are crumbs on the floor. So upon investigation he isn’t being a jerk all the time, he may want to be leader but he isn’t picking on the leader, and it only happens when a limited resource like food or water is involved. Solution? Make sure there are more water bowls available in different locations that are always full and let in the bully first to “clean” the area before letting the other dog in. Now the problem solves itself. If you consider all the factors you can see he wasn’t being a “bad” dog, he was being misunderstood making a bad choice over what was real to him. You are never going to be able to teach your dog that his problems aren’t real. A much easier solution is to solve his problem for him so he can move on. The next time he is doing something you don’t like, look at the situation critically to determine WHY he does it, so you can find a solution on HOW to help him.

Dog whisperer and FXBG expatriate Wendy Schmitz loves and trains her dogs in Colorado.

Front porch fredericksburg

AutoKnown Better it’s over when it’s over By Rim Vining

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Wild Bird Feeders/ Bird Baths Organic Gardening Products Home Brewer & Vintner Supplies American Made Tools

Serving you & your companion animals for 16 years Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

540/374-0462 www.woahvets.com

Keyboard Classes Ages 3 - Adult Free Introductory Lesson Schedule at: ymsfred.com 371-4526

Classes Start in September

YAMAHA MUSIC SCHOOL OF FREDERICKBURG

207 William Street

10 Walsh Lane

Remember the Five Americans and their ’67 hit Western Union… da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da ? Yes folks, you have to be this old to ride the ride. You know those things that drive the next generation crazy like having a song for every phrase… “Hey son, get out the egg pan… I am the walrus goo goo g’joob….” Well I have these same issues with cars. Silly stories, rituals, and ditties that I have to go through when certain stimuli are applied. If I don’t finish the process there could be serious repercussions with lasting psychological effects. Which might explain a lot. I also gave you all a brief glimpse of my formative years in last month’s column about working at the family Inn at the beach. I learned a lot those summers and even more over the winters when I was older, but I digress. Believe it or not the hospitality industry used to have seasons. Remember when you couldn’t get fruit because it was “out of season?” Now it comes from around the world. In the resort biz it was much the same. Seasons were clearly defined and when it was over it was over. Hence the introduction of what should be described as migrant restaurant workers. There was work on the northern beaches from Memorial Day to Labor Day and not one day more. In New England they loaded up the station wagons in Brooklyn and went to the Catskills or Adirondacks, but when the season was over it was done. Think Dirty Dancing. Resort houses did not have heat and cars in Michigan did not have air conditioning. Not required.

Anyway, most of the staff at the Inn came from Florida. Every spring they would come north to work the resorts and head back down in the fall to get ready for the snowbirds in Florida. Fifty and sixty years ago this was an annual migration on two-lane blacktop running re-tread tires through a segregated South. Without cell phones, credit cards or much of anything else, entire families migrated. Their only communication was a note or a short phone call in the spring asking how many were needed and when should they arrive. Now in order to make sense of this meander as I was driving up Route 20 the other day (a two-lane blacktop) out in front of me pulls a’54 Hudson two-door. Black on black with that angled Hornet logo on the trunk. Couldn’t tell from a few cars back if it had Twin-H Power but it is a Hudson… so where does my mind go? Western Union. If anything happened traveling on the road in the 40’s and 50’s it was sometimes easier and cheaper to send a telegram rather than call. And as the story goes the following telegram arrived at the Inn for my grandfather:

Front Porch Fredericksburg

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Mr. Gundry ; STOP Please send $400.00 STOP Motor flew out the Hudson car: STOP Western Union da da da da da… money was sent, engine was repaired, help arrived, Inn opened on time and closed promptly on Labor Day! autoknown@aol.com. Rim Vining migrates around the classic car motor world to give us delightfully funny stories. He is a past Virginia Press Association Humor Columnist Award-Winner. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

21


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring:

punishment predicament

Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

by wendy schmitz

In a world full of positive reinforcement and gentle training techniques you may be wondering what do I do when my dog does something wrong? Just not giving a treat couldn’t possibly teach them anything, and what if the behavior is so self-satisfying that the reward is built right in to being bad? What then? There are no easy answers to this question. In the current training age there is no room for hitting dog (thankfully), or physical punishment of any kind (and with good reason, beyond being cruel it rarely, if ever, works), so what can you do to change the behaviors you don’t like into behaviors you do? Some of these bad behaviors are easy to fix; puppy chews on shoe, you startle the pup, once they stop you tell them “Good dog”, then offer an appropriate chew item or activity, and finally once they start the approved activity you praise them and reward. This method works well and quickly; pups figure out fast which behaviors yield rewards and they continue those behaviors while the naughty behaviors go extinct. Another option is to excessively reward ALL good behaviors. Everything your dog does right yields a reward, like a rat hitting a food bar, hit bar get food, good behavior gets treat. Dogs tend to repeat behaviors that yield food and extinguish behaviors that don’t. Over time you get a well-behaved dog in a very scientific manner. Downside: it can take awhile, and I don’t have that kind of time. I usually do a combination of both, distracting and redirecting, as well as rewarding what I love. I have found this combination to be a nice balance when helping your pup navigate all our

20

September 2013

confusing counter-intuitive-to-adog human rules. But this doesn’t solve everything; you are still left with the elusive problem behaviors that are either self-rewarding or are done out of a misplaced belief that it is necessary to survive. There is no amount of redirecting or rewarding the opposite behavior that will stop these kinds of problems within a reasonable amount of time. So now what? Detective work is now necessary. It is important to consider what motivation is driving the behavior. Does your dog attack his dog brother because he is fighting over resources or because he is bored? Is your dog eating poop out of hunger or hiding evidence to avoid punishment? Knowing why is almost more important than knowing how to stop it. Why he does something GIVES you the how-to-stop-it. Here is an example: My youngest dog started attacking my oldest dog. Why? Is he vying for attention? Trying to be leader? Well, let’s investigate. My oldest dog has always been submissive, so a leader issue doesn’t fit. Both dogs are fine when they are outside where space and water are ample. Problems only arise when the water bowls inside are empty or there are crumbs on the floor. So upon investigation he isn’t being a jerk all the time, he may want to be leader but he isn’t picking on the leader, and it only happens when a limited resource like food or water is involved. Solution? Make sure there are more water bowls available in different locations that are always full and let in the bully first to “clean” the area before letting the other dog in. Now the problem solves itself. If you consider all the factors you can see he wasn’t being a “bad” dog, he was being misunderstood making a bad choice over what was real to him. You are never going to be able to teach your dog that his problems aren’t real. A much easier solution is to solve his problem for him so he can move on. The next time he is doing something you don’t like, look at the situation critically to determine WHY he does it, so you can find a solution on HOW to help him.

Dog whisperer and FXBG expatriate Wendy Schmitz loves and trains her dogs in Colorado.

Front porch fredericksburg

AutoKnown Better it’s over when it’s over By Rim Vining

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Wild Bird Feeders/ Bird Baths Organic Gardening Products Home Brewer & Vintner Supplies American Made Tools

Serving you & your companion animals for 16 years Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

540/374-0462 www.woahvets.com

Keyboard Classes Ages 3 - Adult Free Introductory Lesson Schedule at: ymsfred.com 371-4526

Classes Start in September

YAMAHA MUSIC SCHOOL OF FREDERICKBURG

207 William Street

10 Walsh Lane

Remember the Five Americans and their ’67 hit Western Union… da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da da ? Yes folks, you have to be this old to ride the ride. You know those things that drive the next generation crazy like having a song for every phrase… “Hey son, get out the egg pan… I am the walrus goo goo g’joob….” Well I have these same issues with cars. Silly stories, rituals, and ditties that I have to go through when certain stimuli are applied. If I don’t finish the process there could be serious repercussions with lasting psychological effects. Which might explain a lot. I also gave you all a brief glimpse of my formative years in last month’s column about working at the family Inn at the beach. I learned a lot those summers and even more over the winters when I was older, but I digress. Believe it or not the hospitality industry used to have seasons. Remember when you couldn’t get fruit because it was “out of season?” Now it comes from around the world. In the resort biz it was much the same. Seasons were clearly defined and when it was over it was over. Hence the introduction of what should be described as migrant restaurant workers. There was work on the northern beaches from Memorial Day to Labor Day and not one day more. In New England they loaded up the station wagons in Brooklyn and went to the Catskills or Adirondacks, but when the season was over it was done. Think Dirty Dancing. Resort houses did not have heat and cars in Michigan did not have air conditioning. Not required.

Anyway, most of the staff at the Inn came from Florida. Every spring they would come north to work the resorts and head back down in the fall to get ready for the snowbirds in Florida. Fifty and sixty years ago this was an annual migration on two-lane blacktop running re-tread tires through a segregated South. Without cell phones, credit cards or much of anything else, entire families migrated. Their only communication was a note or a short phone call in the spring asking how many were needed and when should they arrive. Now in order to make sense of this meander as I was driving up Route 20 the other day (a two-lane blacktop) out in front of me pulls a’54 Hudson two-door. Black on black with that angled Hornet logo on the trunk. Couldn’t tell from a few cars back if it had Twin-H Power but it is a Hudson… so where does my mind go? Western Union. If anything happened traveling on the road in the 40’s and 50’s it was sometimes easier and cheaper to send a telegram rather than call. And as the story goes the following telegram arrived at the Inn for my grandfather:

Front Porch Fredericksburg

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Mr. Gundry ; STOP Please send $400.00 STOP Motor flew out the Hudson car: STOP Western Union da da da da da… money was sent, engine was repaired, help arrived, Inn opened on time and closed promptly on Labor Day! autoknown@aol.com. Rim Vining migrates around the classic car motor world to give us delightfully funny stories. He is a past Virginia Press Association Humor Columnist Award-Winner. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

21


Senior Care you can make a difference By Karl Karch

For an individual with Alzheimer’s, the disease eventually affects every part of their life, and will significantly impact the lives of those closest to them. For example, a woman who was stubbornly independent now requires 24-hour supervision just to ensure her basic safety. Or an articulate, highly educated man doesn’t recognize his children, or becomes overwhelmed when choosing which shirt to wear. Or the exhausted, anxious family members struggling to cope with the responsibilities of Alzheimer’s care desperately need the support of respite services. Many of you are already well acquainted with Alzheimer’s disease, a disease that respects no boundaries. Alzheimer’s can strike anyone, anywhere, from a former President to the average resident in Fredericksburg. In fact, today over five million Americans are living with the disease. Maybe you’ve even struggled with the hopelessness and despair of Alzheimer’s in your own family. Anyone touched by the disease knows that those with Alzheimer’s always get worse and always end up needing full-time assistance with daily living. It is the only cause of death among the top 10 in America without a way to prevent it, cure it, or slow its progression. Experts estimate that Alzheimer’s will someday impact an estimated one-third of families with 70 percent caring for their loved ones at home. The 2013 costs of Alzheimer’s are estimated to be $203 billion. By 2025 an estimated 160,000 Virginians will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Unless something is done, Alzheimer’s will cost an estimated $1.2 trillion (in today’s dollars) in 2050. As a primary family caregiver, it is particularly stressful to see the changes your loved one is going through as the

22

September 2013

disease progresses. And, someone diagnosed with the disease is stressed and angered as they see life as they knew it slipping away. Lori Myers, Fredericksburg Regional Director of the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter, is ready to help by conducting family caregiver support groups as well as group meetings for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Contact her at 540-370-0835 for dates and locations as well as any other information. September is World Alzheimer’s Month, an international campaign to raise awareness to this global epidemic. Home Instead Senior Care’s nationwide network is offering free resources to help local families deal with the anxiety and fears related to the disease. Family caregiver workshops will be offered focusing on techniques for handling challenging behaviors, capturing life’s stories and memories, and activities to encourage engagement. We have available a free ata-glance collection of information tips, and resources. After September 16 we are excited to make available a free smartphone app designed to help families manage issues as they arise. Call our office for more details (540.899.1422). In the U.S., the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is held annually in more than 600 communities September through October, and is the association’s largest fundraiser. The greater Fredericksburg area annual Walk To End Alzheimer’s will be held September 28 th from 9–11 a.m. at UMW. You can make a difference in the effort to find a cure for Alzheimer’s by attending the walk and/or making a donation. The probability is high that you know (or will know) someone with the disease. So, please consider joining us in supporting this effort.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. Please go to www.homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Front porch fredericksburg

Wellness

Improving Veterans Health Seminar for Professionals

can’t avoid the thyroid!

By Amy Pearce Veterans who are facing grief and loss, or who are dying, have special care needs that their professional caregivers need to be aware of. Now, a free video program and panel discussion for community professionals will inform them. Slated for Thursday, Sept. 12 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., this free program will examine the impact that the military experience can have on veterans who are dying or facing grief and loss; special issues in treating veterans at the end of life, including tangible concerns such as pain management, forgiveness, and other emotional issues, and grief and loss for both veterans and military survivors. The venue is the John F. Fick 1301 Sam Perry Boulevard.

Conference Center,

This presentation, featuring a panel of regional experts, will benefit a range of professionals who counsel and provide care for the dying and bereaved veteran, including psychologists, counselors, clergy, social workers, nurses, physicians and other health care workers, as well as educators, funeral directors and nursing home administrators. Call Health Link at 540-7411404 or 800-722-2788.

Amy Pearce is our versatile writer/reporter and assistant to the editor.

By christine h. thompson, D.C. The thyroid is a small gland situated over the trachea. It is part of the endocrine system, which is the hormonal system that runs many processes of the body and has an effect on the health of every cell. The endocrine system is mainly comprised of the thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, adrenal glands (which sit atop the kidneys), gonads (ovaries and testes) and within the cranium, the pituitary gland, and hypothalamus. When it comes to the function of the body, each gland of the endocrine system is intimately intertwined with the others and powerfully affects your general well being. I am seeing an increasing number of women who are either diagnosed with or exhibiting signs of low thyroid function or hypothyroid. The symptoms of hypothyroid include fatigue, hair loss, dry skin, weight gain, sensitivity to cold, poor memory, depression, and constipation. Whether their blood tests are coming back normal or the thyroid hormones are measurably low, it is obvious that they have signs of hypothyroid. In my opinion, finding out the cause is essential to correcting the problem. There can be many causes of low thyroid function: iodine deficiency (iodine is needed in the production of thyroid hormones), iodine displacement by bromine or fluorine, autoimmune disorders or other endocrine disorders. The cause of hypothyroid function that interests me a great deal is adrenal fatigue. If we treat the hypothyroid condition with thyroid hormones, the patient may feel much better… for a while.

Holistic Health Center

We Carry Home Brewing Supplies !

from chronic stress. If you were to increase the idle RPM’s in a worn-out engine and then need to hit the accelerator in an emergency, you may blow the engine. Better to keep the RPM’s low just in case extra energy is needed for an emergency. Stress is always your body’s priority because it is perceived as life threatening. The adrenal glands produce adrenaline to rev up the body for fight or flight and, in extended times of stress, the

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

Dr. Christine Thompson, DC, owns Whole Health Chiropractic on Bridgewater Street (899-9421) and is a member of the Integrative Cancer Team directed by Dr. Jim Daniel, MD.

SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

online: www.save7lives.org

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

adrenal glands produce cortisol to combat inflammation and ensure enough blood sugar to enable the body to respond. When stress becomes a part of daily life, the adrenal glands become weakened from the constant demands of producing stress hormones and lose the ability to regenerate. (This is much different than a diseased adrenal gland, and will not show up on any lab tests.) In order to conserve energy and be prepared for an emergency, the body will purposely lower thyroid function. If we use prescriptive thyroid hormones to combat this, we are fighting against the body’s own self-preservation. Hormones are extremely powerful substances. I can’t emphasize that enough. They are produced by the body in amounts measured in billionths and trillionths of a gram and yet they have a tremendous impact on every cell of the body. I believe we must respect the body’s wisdom and honor the intricate nature of its physiology. I believe in supporting the body by giving it the nutrients it needs to heal and stay healthy, adopting habits that restore balance and interfering only when other choices have been exhausted or the situation is critical.

Healthcare For the Whole Person

The Natural Path ~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox

If the cause is actually adrenal fatigue, the symptoms will return. Dr. Janet Lang, who teaches functional endocrinology, compares the function of the body to the function of a car. In her analogy, the thyroid can be thought of as regulating the RPM of the engine (or the metabolism of the body). However, under stress, the adrenal glands take over this role; so you could say the thyroid regulates RPM’s while idling and the adrenal glands regulate RPM’s while in gear. Following this line of thought, suppose that the adrenals are weakened

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

23


Senior Care you can make a difference By Karl Karch

For an individual with Alzheimer’s, the disease eventually affects every part of their life, and will significantly impact the lives of those closest to them. For example, a woman who was stubbornly independent now requires 24-hour supervision just to ensure her basic safety. Or an articulate, highly educated man doesn’t recognize his children, or becomes overwhelmed when choosing which shirt to wear. Or the exhausted, anxious family members struggling to cope with the responsibilities of Alzheimer’s care desperately need the support of respite services. Many of you are already well acquainted with Alzheimer’s disease, a disease that respects no boundaries. Alzheimer’s can strike anyone, anywhere, from a former President to the average resident in Fredericksburg. In fact, today over five million Americans are living with the disease. Maybe you’ve even struggled with the hopelessness and despair of Alzheimer’s in your own family. Anyone touched by the disease knows that those with Alzheimer’s always get worse and always end up needing full-time assistance with daily living. It is the only cause of death among the top 10 in America without a way to prevent it, cure it, or slow its progression. Experts estimate that Alzheimer’s will someday impact an estimated one-third of families with 70 percent caring for their loved ones at home. The 2013 costs of Alzheimer’s are estimated to be $203 billion. By 2025 an estimated 160,000 Virginians will be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Unless something is done, Alzheimer’s will cost an estimated $1.2 trillion (in today’s dollars) in 2050. As a primary family caregiver, it is particularly stressful to see the changes your loved one is going through as the

22

September 2013

disease progresses. And, someone diagnosed with the disease is stressed and angered as they see life as they knew it slipping away. Lori Myers, Fredericksburg Regional Director of the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Richmond Chapter, is ready to help by conducting family caregiver support groups as well as group meetings for those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Contact her at 540-370-0835 for dates and locations as well as any other information. September is World Alzheimer’s Month, an international campaign to raise awareness to this global epidemic. Home Instead Senior Care’s nationwide network is offering free resources to help local families deal with the anxiety and fears related to the disease. Family caregiver workshops will be offered focusing on techniques for handling challenging behaviors, capturing life’s stories and memories, and activities to encourage engagement. We have available a free ata-glance collection of information tips, and resources. After September 16 we are excited to make available a free smartphone app designed to help families manage issues as they arise. Call our office for more details (540.899.1422). In the U.S., the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is held annually in more than 600 communities September through October, and is the association’s largest fundraiser. The greater Fredericksburg area annual Walk To End Alzheimer’s will be held September 28 th from 9–11 a.m. at UMW. You can make a difference in the effort to find a cure for Alzheimer’s by attending the walk and/or making a donation. The probability is high that you know (or will know) someone with the disease. So, please consider joining us in supporting this effort.

Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. Please go to www.homeinstead.com/FredericksburgVA

Front porch fredericksburg

Wellness

Improving Veterans Health Seminar for Professionals

can’t avoid the thyroid!

By Amy Pearce Veterans who are facing grief and loss, or who are dying, have special care needs that their professional caregivers need to be aware of. Now, a free video program and panel discussion for community professionals will inform them. Slated for Thursday, Sept. 12 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., this free program will examine the impact that the military experience can have on veterans who are dying or facing grief and loss; special issues in treating veterans at the end of life, including tangible concerns such as pain management, forgiveness, and other emotional issues, and grief and loss for both veterans and military survivors. The venue is the John F. Fick 1301 Sam Perry Boulevard.

Conference Center,

This presentation, featuring a panel of regional experts, will benefit a range of professionals who counsel and provide care for the dying and bereaved veteran, including psychologists, counselors, clergy, social workers, nurses, physicians and other health care workers, as well as educators, funeral directors and nursing home administrators. Call Health Link at 540-7411404 or 800-722-2788.

Amy Pearce is our versatile writer/reporter and assistant to the editor.

By christine h. thompson, D.C. The thyroid is a small gland situated over the trachea. It is part of the endocrine system, which is the hormonal system that runs many processes of the body and has an effect on the health of every cell. The endocrine system is mainly comprised of the thyroid gland, parathyroid glands, adrenal glands (which sit atop the kidneys), gonads (ovaries and testes) and within the cranium, the pituitary gland, and hypothalamus. When it comes to the function of the body, each gland of the endocrine system is intimately intertwined with the others and powerfully affects your general well being. I am seeing an increasing number of women who are either diagnosed with or exhibiting signs of low thyroid function or hypothyroid. The symptoms of hypothyroid include fatigue, hair loss, dry skin, weight gain, sensitivity to cold, poor memory, depression, and constipation. Whether their blood tests are coming back normal or the thyroid hormones are measurably low, it is obvious that they have signs of hypothyroid. In my opinion, finding out the cause is essential to correcting the problem. There can be many causes of low thyroid function: iodine deficiency (iodine is needed in the production of thyroid hormones), iodine displacement by bromine or fluorine, autoimmune disorders or other endocrine disorders. The cause of hypothyroid function that interests me a great deal is adrenal fatigue. If we treat the hypothyroid condition with thyroid hormones, the patient may feel much better… for a while.

Holistic Health Center

We Carry Home Brewing Supplies !

from chronic stress. If you were to increase the idle RPM’s in a worn-out engine and then need to hit the accelerator in an emergency, you may blow the engine. Better to keep the RPM’s low just in case extra energy is needed for an emergency. Stress is always your body’s priority because it is perceived as life threatening. The adrenal glands produce adrenaline to rev up the body for fight or flight and, in extended times of stress, the

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

Dr. Christine Thompson, DC, owns Whole Health Chiropractic on Bridgewater Street (899-9421) and is a member of the Integrative Cancer Team directed by Dr. Jim Daniel, MD.

SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro

online: www.save7lives.org

Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Your Hot Yoga Studio 540-659-0777 staffordhouseofyoga.com

Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

adrenal glands produce cortisol to combat inflammation and ensure enough blood sugar to enable the body to respond. When stress becomes a part of daily life, the adrenal glands become weakened from the constant demands of producing stress hormones and lose the ability to regenerate. (This is much different than a diseased adrenal gland, and will not show up on any lab tests.) In order to conserve energy and be prepared for an emergency, the body will purposely lower thyroid function. If we use prescriptive thyroid hormones to combat this, we are fighting against the body’s own self-preservation. Hormones are extremely powerful substances. I can’t emphasize that enough. They are produced by the body in amounts measured in billionths and trillionths of a gram and yet they have a tremendous impact on every cell of the body. I believe we must respect the body’s wisdom and honor the intricate nature of its physiology. I believe in supporting the body by giving it the nutrients it needs to heal and stay healthy, adopting habits that restore balance and interfering only when other choices have been exhausted or the situation is critical.

Healthcare For the Whole Person

The Natural Path ~Nature’s Sunshine Products ~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox

If the cause is actually adrenal fatigue, the symptoms will return. Dr. Janet Lang, who teaches functional endocrinology, compares the function of the body to the function of a car. In her analogy, the thyroid can be thought of as regulating the RPM of the engine (or the metabolism of the body). However, under stress, the adrenal glands take over this role; so you could say the thyroid regulates RPM’s while idling and the adrenal glands regulate RPM’s while in gear. Following this line of thought, suppose that the adrenals are weakened

Dr. Christine Thompson

971 Garrisonville Rd Stafford

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

23


Day in the life

(Continued from page 19)

Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing) won the top prize of Best in Show, UMW President Richard Hurley received Best Posture and Virginia Partners Bank CEO William B. Young won for Best Costume.

Beverly Coates

“Artfully Arranged”

By natalie wilson

Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline St. Downtown Fredericksburg 368-0560

Next, my sister and I visited the Downtown Salon for our scheduled haircut appointment. Although we were just having stylist Cija Kenyon trim our split ends, the salon's facebook page also showcases her work with highlights, short haircuts, and extensions. Before I left, assistant Allie Brooks curled and styled my hair with a new curling iron, the MiraCurl. It was fun to test the new product and walk away with healthy, curly hair and a goody bag of samples.

Since I was downtown, I decided to visit the brightly colored strip of buildings dated 1840-1848 called The Shops at Jones Row. One store front is Hope Co., the retail shop of Connie Hope Parody. The other two belong to her daughter Cameron Parody and her own shop, Cameo. To navigate Cameo, one enters the second door from the street to the antique store section, exits through the back onto the patio where more merchandise waits, and enters the first storefront, the vintage clothing and accessory section, from the rear. I found the one-of-a-kind, perfectly-fitting dress for prom this year in perfect condition here for a fraction of mall prices.

In “who knew this was a thing?” news, the Love of the Beard competition was held at the Spotsylvania Town Centre last month. If you’ve never been to a beard competition (what? who are you?), these guys all grow some beards and then people give them awards for the most beard-y. This particular beard competition was for a good (better?) cause, too: the event was held to raise money for the Rappahannock YMCA and the Children’s Miracle Network. Here, we have the 3rd place winner for best “natural goatee,” Will Doughty, with Redskins Super Bowl Champion Mike Nelms (because, why not, right?).(below) If you look closely, you can see Will is wearing Mike’s championship rings.

and additional works by

Beverly Coates at

810 Weekend Gallery

(below) at a farewell dinner with friends at Miso before heading off to CNU for her first year as a college student.

I’m sure this is news to exactly no one, since we’ve all been counting down the minutes, BUT! The Orion opened last month! DJ and Fredericksburg Pirate Radio owner Eric Kluxen spun fresh Top 40 hits (I requested lots of Rihanna) for the opening and local peeps like Cristy Reeder, Drew Fristoe, Chris Lobmeyr von Hohenleiten, Jacquie Damm and Danielle Payne ultra-feted the lounge all night long.

Scene: Home Team Grill hosted

810 Caroline St. Downtown 371-4099

Happy birthday to Jack Hyland, Marty Johnson, Rob Alling, Special B, Amanda Miller, Deborah Booth, Esther Servais, Lexi Grogan (the big 21 !), and Morgan Forrest!

Seen:

Several blocks down and across is River Run antique mall, a large building with two floors of booths belonging to different collectors. I loved going through prints, clothing and accessories, room furnishings, and a booth almost entirely filled with different rubber ducks. I found a pair of blue drop earrings that perfectly matches the prom dress I'd just bought

Seen:

by megan byrnes

a baseball in the ‘burg social last month (in hopes to put the “home” in a baseball team for us!). Jake and Alicia Morgan, Eddie and Kim Crosslin (yay beach fries!), Tim Brown, Bobby Duke, Anthony Campbell, Cissy Nelson, Kadeana Langford, Bob Coffin, Kyle Snyder and Mitzi Osterhout all turned out to show their support.

Clay and Gail Huber at

Bistro Bethem for dinner, après family vacation; Cynthia Ricther at Jimmy John’s sandwich shop in Central Park; Lisa Olsen out with a girlfriend at Firebirds; Ashleigh Chevalier at the Rt 3 Starbucks with her bebe and friend; Stephen Whitesides and family dining al fresco at Bravo Italian Kitchen; Brandon Newton at the Spotsylvania Town Centre post office, sending off some canvases to some lucky so-and-sos in far off lands; Rebecca Klopp

Heard:

LA

transplant

and

former Fredericksburger Chris Park playing with his new band, KG Bird in LA with yet two other LA transplants and former Fredericksburgers, Chad Foreman

Bruce Day Fine Art 12 years in Market Square alley Original Oils Giclee Print City Scenes

and Joanna Krenich in the audience. And speaking of talented Fredericksburg musicians: Fredericksburg’s own Chris Eldridge was a feature performer in the Wilson Center Guitar Competition and Festival in Wisconsin last month. Ok, one more Fredericksburg/music connection. The Head and the Heart played a new song off their upcoming new album, Let’s Be Still, on Jimmy Fallon last month. The band’s drummer, Tyler Williams, is Bistro Bethem alum. Cool, yeah?

Scene:

Horseshoes and Hand

Grenades hosted Tell Fredericksburg last month. The theme of August’s stories was: “The Sea was Angry that Day: True Zach Santuilli, Stories about Water”. Michael Lewis, Tom Sellars and even Tom’s young daughter, Skylar, all told stories of their own experiences with aqua. Tell’s Maura Schneider turned the mic over to the audience at the end of the night, resulting in the, and I quote, “greatest vomit story ever told” by JoEllen Lesher.

Scene: Patte Ormsby has a solo exhibition at the Left Bank Gallery in Wellfleet, MA as the gallery’s last solo show of the summer. Between her in Wellfleet and Brandon Newton in Martha’s Vineyard, Fredericksburg is really representing in the Bay state. Hey, y’all! Let’s send some good vibes to Megan Mason who broke her foot (!) last month, had to have surgery and generally endure a ton of pain and badness. At least she’s got a cute cast. Stephen sends his best, Megan. UMW hosted the first ever Dancing with the Fredericksburg Stars competition last month, to an audience of 500! The event raised more than $65,000 to endow a scholarship for students who excel in music, theatre or dance. Fredericksburg mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw (right) received the People’s Choice Award, Ellen Killough (CEO of

Jay Bigenwald, (above) father of Katie Dunn, completed his goal of bicycling the 360-mile long Erie Canal, from Buffalo, NY to Albany, NY... and back, for a total of 720 miles over many years. He finished on August 19th. Jay is 74 years young and cross-country skis an average of 55 days per winter in his native Rochester, NY area. Go ahead and read all those numbers again, just in case your eyes glazed over like mine did the first time because, wow...

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

BETSYGLASSIE.COM BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

brucedaystudio.com

540-899-6556

540 376-1676 24

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Nia Vardalos (you know,

My Big Fat Greek Wedding) was in town for a meet-and-greet book signing at the Nativity of the Theotokos Greek Orthodox Church. Forage regular Nicole Gebhart spotted the actress walking down William Street while coming into the shop and said, “That lady looks just like Nia Vardalos!” Later we learned that’s because it was Nia Vardalos!

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

25


Day in the life

(Continued from page 19)

Project Healing Waters Fly Fishing) won the top prize of Best in Show, UMW President Richard Hurley received Best Posture and Virginia Partners Bank CEO William B. Young won for Best Costume.

Beverly Coates

“Artfully Arranged”

By natalie wilson

Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline St. Downtown Fredericksburg 368-0560

Next, my sister and I visited the Downtown Salon for our scheduled haircut appointment. Although we were just having stylist Cija Kenyon trim our split ends, the salon's facebook page also showcases her work with highlights, short haircuts, and extensions. Before I left, assistant Allie Brooks curled and styled my hair with a new curling iron, the MiraCurl. It was fun to test the new product and walk away with healthy, curly hair and a goody bag of samples.

Since I was downtown, I decided to visit the brightly colored strip of buildings dated 1840-1848 called The Shops at Jones Row. One store front is Hope Co., the retail shop of Connie Hope Parody. The other two belong to her daughter Cameron Parody and her own shop, Cameo. To navigate Cameo, one enters the second door from the street to the antique store section, exits through the back onto the patio where more merchandise waits, and enters the first storefront, the vintage clothing and accessory section, from the rear. I found the one-of-a-kind, perfectly-fitting dress for prom this year in perfect condition here for a fraction of mall prices.

In “who knew this was a thing?” news, the Love of the Beard competition was held at the Spotsylvania Town Centre last month. If you’ve never been to a beard competition (what? who are you?), these guys all grow some beards and then people give them awards for the most beard-y. This particular beard competition was for a good (better?) cause, too: the event was held to raise money for the Rappahannock YMCA and the Children’s Miracle Network. Here, we have the 3rd place winner for best “natural goatee,” Will Doughty, with Redskins Super Bowl Champion Mike Nelms (because, why not, right?).(below) If you look closely, you can see Will is wearing Mike’s championship rings.

and additional works by

Beverly Coates at

810 Weekend Gallery

(below) at a farewell dinner with friends at Miso before heading off to CNU for her first year as a college student.

I’m sure this is news to exactly no one, since we’ve all been counting down the minutes, BUT! The Orion opened last month! DJ and Fredericksburg Pirate Radio owner Eric Kluxen spun fresh Top 40 hits (I requested lots of Rihanna) for the opening and local peeps like Cristy Reeder, Drew Fristoe, Chris Lobmeyr von Hohenleiten, Jacquie Damm and Danielle Payne ultra-feted the lounge all night long.

Scene: Home Team Grill hosted

810 Caroline St. Downtown 371-4099

Happy birthday to Jack Hyland, Marty Johnson, Rob Alling, Special B, Amanda Miller, Deborah Booth, Esther Servais, Lexi Grogan (the big 21 !), and Morgan Forrest!

Seen:

Several blocks down and across is River Run antique mall, a large building with two floors of booths belonging to different collectors. I loved going through prints, clothing and accessories, room furnishings, and a booth almost entirely filled with different rubber ducks. I found a pair of blue drop earrings that perfectly matches the prom dress I'd just bought

Seen:

by megan byrnes

a baseball in the ‘burg social last month (in hopes to put the “home” in a baseball team for us!). Jake and Alicia Morgan, Eddie and Kim Crosslin (yay beach fries!), Tim Brown, Bobby Duke, Anthony Campbell, Cissy Nelson, Kadeana Langford, Bob Coffin, Kyle Snyder and Mitzi Osterhout all turned out to show their support.

Clay and Gail Huber at

Bistro Bethem for dinner, après family vacation; Cynthia Ricther at Jimmy John’s sandwich shop in Central Park; Lisa Olsen out with a girlfriend at Firebirds; Ashleigh Chevalier at the Rt 3 Starbucks with her bebe and friend; Stephen Whitesides and family dining al fresco at Bravo Italian Kitchen; Brandon Newton at the Spotsylvania Town Centre post office, sending off some canvases to some lucky so-and-sos in far off lands; Rebecca Klopp

Heard:

LA

transplant

and

former Fredericksburger Chris Park playing with his new band, KG Bird in LA with yet two other LA transplants and former Fredericksburgers, Chad Foreman

Bruce Day Fine Art 12 years in Market Square alley Original Oils Giclee Print City Scenes

and Joanna Krenich in the audience. And speaking of talented Fredericksburg musicians: Fredericksburg’s own Chris Eldridge was a feature performer in the Wilson Center Guitar Competition and Festival in Wisconsin last month. Ok, one more Fredericksburg/music connection. The Head and the Heart played a new song off their upcoming new album, Let’s Be Still, on Jimmy Fallon last month. The band’s drummer, Tyler Williams, is Bistro Bethem alum. Cool, yeah?

Scene:

Horseshoes and Hand

Grenades hosted Tell Fredericksburg last month. The theme of August’s stories was: “The Sea was Angry that Day: True Zach Santuilli, Stories about Water”. Michael Lewis, Tom Sellars and even Tom’s young daughter, Skylar, all told stories of their own experiences with aqua. Tell’s Maura Schneider turned the mic over to the audience at the end of the night, resulting in the, and I quote, “greatest vomit story ever told” by JoEllen Lesher.

Scene: Patte Ormsby has a solo exhibition at the Left Bank Gallery in Wellfleet, MA as the gallery’s last solo show of the summer. Between her in Wellfleet and Brandon Newton in Martha’s Vineyard, Fredericksburg is really representing in the Bay state. Hey, y’all! Let’s send some good vibes to Megan Mason who broke her foot (!) last month, had to have surgery and generally endure a ton of pain and badness. At least she’s got a cute cast. Stephen sends his best, Megan. UMW hosted the first ever Dancing with the Fredericksburg Stars competition last month, to an audience of 500! The event raised more than $65,000 to endow a scholarship for students who excel in music, theatre or dance. Fredericksburg mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw (right) received the People’s Choice Award, Ellen Killough (CEO of

Jay Bigenwald, (above) father of Katie Dunn, completed his goal of bicycling the 360-mile long Erie Canal, from Buffalo, NY to Albany, NY... and back, for a total of 720 miles over many years. He finished on August 19th. Jay is 74 years young and cross-country skis an average of 55 days per winter in his native Rochester, NY area. Go ahead and read all those numbers again, just in case your eyes glazed over like mine did the first time because, wow...

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

BETSYGLASSIE.COM BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

brucedaystudio.com

540-899-6556

540 376-1676 24

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Nia Vardalos (you know,

My Big Fat Greek Wedding) was in town for a meet-and-greet book signing at the Nativity of the Theotokos Greek Orthodox Church. Forage regular Nicole Gebhart spotted the actress walking down William Street while coming into the shop and said, “That lady looks just like Nia Vardalos!” Later we learned that’s because it was Nia Vardalos!

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

25


ARTRAGEOUS WEEKEND

COMMUNITY LINK Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

In the burg sept.20-22 ‘

Medical Center’s Programs Keep On Rolling Out

by lezlie cheryl The Fxbg art scene is stronger than ever this month thanks in large to the Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center, a non-profit organization celebrating its 25th year supporting local arts, history, and culture. FAMCC presents its annual Art Comes Alive! Fundraising event the same weekend it takes ownership of the annual Via Colori® Fredericksburg street art festival, formerly organized by the City of Fredericksburg. Festivities take place September 20-22. (Rain date: 10/5-6.) Art Comes Alive! kicks off at 6 pm Fri. 9/20 at the FAMCC with local artists painting live in the gallery, their works to be auctioned off at evening’s end, 1001 Princess Anne St. Participating artists: Ed King, Ellen Killough, Nicole Hamilton, Willie Porter, Kenneth Moore, Larry Southworth, and Collette Caprara. Tickets to attend are $30 for FAMCC members, $35 nonmembers, and include a delectable array of food & drink. Via Colori® Fredericksburg is Sat. & Sun. 9/21 & 9/22 from 10 am-5 pm, and is free for artists and the public thanks to sponsorship by local businesses. The festival features 100+ artists in a modern day version of the centuries-old tradition of creating large chalk paintings on the pavement of city’s streets, along Sophia and Charlotte Streets and

Riverfront Park. Enjoy food and entertainment including a children’s area sponsored by Minnieland, and free concert at the Park Saturday 6 pm-8 pm with luminaries lining the streets for viewing the artworks. V i a Colori Signature Artist is Nicholas Candela, Fxbg artist and art teacher at Stafford Senior High School who was first drawn to Via Colori for its rich historic tradition. “Nick is not only a valued educator in the classroom, but a well-respected instructor and spokesperson for Via Colori. We’re thrilled to have him represent the community with this event,” says FAMCC Vice President, Christa Stabler. - BY FRANK FRATOE Also featured is Chris Carlson of Denver, CO, renowned 3D chalk artist whose chalk art time-lapse 8-7-13 videos on YouTube have been viewed by over one I know there is doubt in the world million people worldwide. for it has touched my uneasy soul, Artists and volunteers I know there is sadness in the world can sign up to participate for I have lost the one who mattered most, in Via Colori by 9/13 at I know there is sickness in the world famcc.org or contact for it claimed a part of my life, Christa Stabler, I know there is hate and anger in the world cstabler@famcc.org. for they tempt me at vulnerable times, Sponsorships are available I know there is discontent in the world through 9/13, starting at for its poison has entered my heart. Dan $200; contact Goldstein at But I choose not to let despair succeed dgoldstein@famcc.org. because something grants us so much more, Sponsors include: The Free Lance-Star Media like winter hushing the cities with snow Companies; Cooper and the sunset burst of an April afternoon, Financial; Quarles like lovers who whisper vows through air Petroleum; M&T Bank; and sailboats gliding across a harbor, Fredericksburg Savings like the sound crickets make on August nights Charitable Foundation; and a harvest-moon levitating in autumn, Goodloe Asphalt; Giant; like the enchantment of children by laughter Abby Construction; and the human futures waiting to be reborn. Fredericksburg Parent Frank Fratoe lives and writes in the city Magazine; and

THE POETRY MAN Choices

26

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

By Sara Mattingly

Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center. All funds go directly toward FAMCC outreach programs and support its mission to collect, interpret and present the history and culture of the Fredericksburg area. Programs include several temporary exhibitions annually and educational programs for individuals, families, schools and numerous group tours. Toast of the Town live & silent art auction cocktail party happens Sunday eve 6 pm-9 pm at the Inn at the Old Silk Mill, 1707 Princess Anne St. This fundraiser event is for Front Porch’s own Rob Grogan as he undergoes lengthy, expensive cancer treatments (upwards of $10k/month out of pocket). Sponsors include: Bistro Bethem; Betsy Glassie; Hinkle Ukelele; Ponshop Studio; Schooler House B&B; and the Old Silk Mill. Tickets available at robstoastofthetown.eventbrite.com or Beck’s Antiques, 708 Caroline St. ($30, couples $50). Learn more at facebook.com/RobsArmy.

Lezlie Cheryl is FCCA publicity director and all-around art enthusiast. Contact lezliecheryl@gmail.com. [Photo: Via Colori 2012 by Nick Candela] Photo by Sue Henderson.

P. Rose Gallery

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

$79

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

371-8 8499

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 10/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 10/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

www.prosegallery.com

partial breast irradiation, prone breast treatment and respiratory gating. Michael Porrazzo, M.D., (pictured above) of Massey serves as the director of radiation oncology at Spotsylvania Regional Cancer Center (SRCC). Boardcertified in radiation oncology with more than 20 years of experience in delivering leading-edge radiation treatments, Porrazzo will lead the SRCC radiation oncology team to provide multidisciplinary evaluation, treatment planning and care for all types of adult cancer in collaboration with local oncologists and other physicians specializing in cancer-related care who provide medical and surgical oncology services at SRCC. He said, “I’m delighted to lead radiation oncology care at SRMC on behalf of and with the support of Massey. I am pleased to be part of the Fredericksburg community and I look forward to serving the cancer needs here.” Community Link, hosted by Ted Schubel, broadcasts on WFVA and at newstalk1230.net every Sunday at 8

$650

Hours By Appointment 709 Caroline Street

Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center’s (SRMC) new cancer center – Spotsylvania Regional Cancer Center – is now open and features state-of-the-art radiation oncology services jointly delivered by Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center (Massey). It is one of many new programs that have rolled out on the medical center campus this year, a very active 2013. Ted Schubel will talk about one of them on Community Link September 15 at 8 a.m. on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA and NewsTalk1230.net “We are proud to be offering radiation therapy services in partnership with VCU Massey Cancer Center, whose reputation and experience, combined with our clinical and operational expertise, will provide an exceptional experience for our patients,” said the retiring Tim Tobin, FACHE, CEO of SRMC. Paul Wesolowski, vice president of professional services at VCU Medical Center, which provides Massey’s clinical oncology care: “The addition of Massey-led radiation oncology services at SRMC’s new cancer center offers more treatment options and expands access to researchbacked therapies for area cancer patients. Massey is pleased to partner with SRMC to jointly enhance cancer care in the region.” The Spotsylvania Regional Cancer Center, located in the Pogonia Medical Arts Building at Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, encompasses 7,000 square feet and features a Varian TrueBeam high energy linear accelerator and 4-D General Electric Optima Simulator that offer innovative radiation treatments, including image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), high dose rate after loading,

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

27


ARTRAGEOUS WEEKEND

COMMUNITY LINK Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

In the burg sept.20-22 ‘

Medical Center’s Programs Keep On Rolling Out

by lezlie cheryl The Fxbg art scene is stronger than ever this month thanks in large to the Fredericksburg Area Museum & Cultural Center, a non-profit organization celebrating its 25th year supporting local arts, history, and culture. FAMCC presents its annual Art Comes Alive! Fundraising event the same weekend it takes ownership of the annual Via Colori® Fredericksburg street art festival, formerly organized by the City of Fredericksburg. Festivities take place September 20-22. (Rain date: 10/5-6.) Art Comes Alive! kicks off at 6 pm Fri. 9/20 at the FAMCC with local artists painting live in the gallery, their works to be auctioned off at evening’s end, 1001 Princess Anne St. Participating artists: Ed King, Ellen Killough, Nicole Hamilton, Willie Porter, Kenneth Moore, Larry Southworth, and Collette Caprara. Tickets to attend are $30 for FAMCC members, $35 nonmembers, and include a delectable array of food & drink. Via Colori® Fredericksburg is Sat. & Sun. 9/21 & 9/22 from 10 am-5 pm, and is free for artists and the public thanks to sponsorship by local businesses. The festival features 100+ artists in a modern day version of the centuries-old tradition of creating large chalk paintings on the pavement of city’s streets, along Sophia and Charlotte Streets and

Riverfront Park. Enjoy food and entertainment including a children’s area sponsored by Minnieland, and free concert at the Park Saturday 6 pm-8 pm with luminaries lining the streets for viewing the artworks. V i a Colori Signature Artist is Nicholas Candela, Fxbg artist and art teacher at Stafford Senior High School who was first drawn to Via Colori for its rich historic tradition. “Nick is not only a valued educator in the classroom, but a well-respected instructor and spokesperson for Via Colori. We’re thrilled to have him represent the community with this event,” says FAMCC Vice President, Christa Stabler. - BY FRANK FRATOE Also featured is Chris Carlson of Denver, CO, renowned 3D chalk artist whose chalk art time-lapse 8-7-13 videos on YouTube have been viewed by over one I know there is doubt in the world million people worldwide. for it has touched my uneasy soul, Artists and volunteers I know there is sadness in the world can sign up to participate for I have lost the one who mattered most, in Via Colori by 9/13 at I know there is sickness in the world famcc.org or contact for it claimed a part of my life, Christa Stabler, I know there is hate and anger in the world cstabler@famcc.org. for they tempt me at vulnerable times, Sponsorships are available I know there is discontent in the world through 9/13, starting at for its poison has entered my heart. Dan $200; contact Goldstein at But I choose not to let despair succeed dgoldstein@famcc.org. because something grants us so much more, Sponsors include: The Free Lance-Star Media like winter hushing the cities with snow Companies; Cooper and the sunset burst of an April afternoon, Financial; Quarles like lovers who whisper vows through air Petroleum; M&T Bank; and sailboats gliding across a harbor, Fredericksburg Savings like the sound crickets make on August nights Charitable Foundation; and a harvest-moon levitating in autumn, Goodloe Asphalt; Giant; like the enchantment of children by laughter Abby Construction; and the human futures waiting to be reborn. Fredericksburg Parent Frank Fratoe lives and writes in the city Magazine; and

THE POETRY MAN Choices

26

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

By Sara Mattingly

Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center. All funds go directly toward FAMCC outreach programs and support its mission to collect, interpret and present the history and culture of the Fredericksburg area. Programs include several temporary exhibitions annually and educational programs for individuals, families, schools and numerous group tours. Toast of the Town live & silent art auction cocktail party happens Sunday eve 6 pm-9 pm at the Inn at the Old Silk Mill, 1707 Princess Anne St. This fundraiser event is for Front Porch’s own Rob Grogan as he undergoes lengthy, expensive cancer treatments (upwards of $10k/month out of pocket). Sponsors include: Bistro Bethem; Betsy Glassie; Hinkle Ukelele; Ponshop Studio; Schooler House B&B; and the Old Silk Mill. Tickets available at robstoastofthetown.eventbrite.com or Beck’s Antiques, 708 Caroline St. ($30, couples $50). Learn more at facebook.com/RobsArmy.

Lezlie Cheryl is FCCA publicity director and all-around art enthusiast. Contact lezliecheryl@gmail.com. [Photo: Via Colori 2012 by Nick Candela] Photo by Sue Henderson.

P. Rose Gallery

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

$79

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

371-8 8499

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 10/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 10/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

www.prosegallery.com

partial breast irradiation, prone breast treatment and respiratory gating. Michael Porrazzo, M.D., (pictured above) of Massey serves as the director of radiation oncology at Spotsylvania Regional Cancer Center (SRCC). Boardcertified in radiation oncology with more than 20 years of experience in delivering leading-edge radiation treatments, Porrazzo will lead the SRCC radiation oncology team to provide multidisciplinary evaluation, treatment planning and care for all types of adult cancer in collaboration with local oncologists and other physicians specializing in cancer-related care who provide medical and surgical oncology services at SRCC. He said, “I’m delighted to lead radiation oncology care at SRMC on behalf of and with the support of Massey. I am pleased to be part of the Fredericksburg community and I look forward to serving the cancer needs here.” Community Link, hosted by Ted Schubel, broadcasts on WFVA and at newstalk1230.net every Sunday at 8

$650

Hours By Appointment 709 Caroline Street

Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center’s (SRMC) new cancer center – Spotsylvania Regional Cancer Center – is now open and features state-of-the-art radiation oncology services jointly delivered by Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center (Massey). It is one of many new programs that have rolled out on the medical center campus this year, a very active 2013. Ted Schubel will talk about one of them on Community Link September 15 at 8 a.m. on NewsTalk 1230 WFVA and NewsTalk1230.net “We are proud to be offering radiation therapy services in partnership with VCU Massey Cancer Center, whose reputation and experience, combined with our clinical and operational expertise, will provide an exceptional experience for our patients,” said the retiring Tim Tobin, FACHE, CEO of SRMC. Paul Wesolowski, vice president of professional services at VCU Medical Center, which provides Massey’s clinical oncology care: “The addition of Massey-led radiation oncology services at SRMC’s new cancer center offers more treatment options and expands access to researchbacked therapies for area cancer patients. Massey is pleased to partner with SRMC to jointly enhance cancer care in the region.” The Spotsylvania Regional Cancer Center, located in the Pogonia Medical Arts Building at Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center, encompasses 7,000 square feet and features a Varian TrueBeam high energy linear accelerator and 4-D General Electric Optima Simulator that offer innovative radiation treatments, including image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), high dose rate after loading,

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

27


FXBG Music Scene

My Own Path

he is mark newton

a desire for the difficult

by ashleigh chevalier

By c. ruth cassell

He is Mark Newton, folks: born in Kentucky and raised in Fredericksburg, “Vee Aye” since the age of three, White Oak to be specific. He grew up when playing bluegrass with the family on the weekend was a way of life. “Everyone would work all week in their trade, and play music on the weekends,” he said thoughtfully. Now he travels the world playing music! Newton’s musical interests are varied. As a teenager, Rolling Stones and Hendrix posters were on the wall and Flat and Scruggs played on his radio. That is the mark of a true musical soul. Like most, Mark just LOVES GOOD MUSIC; it doesn’t matter the genre. Newton’s latest album, REBORN, is a product of his latest project with Steve Thomas. The duo has landed two number one hits on Bluegrass Today’s Top 20. See the video “Old MacDonald Sold the Farm” on YouTube. It is a hoot, and apropos for our time. REBORN brings Mark Newton’s traditional bluegrass roots and Steve

Thomas’ new county experience together. Some of the tunes Mark recorded early on in his career with one of his first bands, Knoxville Grass. REBORN is a solid album that makes you feel like Virginia and the Blue Ridge, and long for Tennessee. Mark Newton and Steve Thomas played Fredericksburg earlier in the season to a sold out crowd at Colonial Tavern. They will return to perform at Pickin’ in the Park, Fredericksburg’s First Annual Bluegrass Music & Arts Festival, held at Celebrate Virginia Live, Saturday, September 14. Gates open at 3 p.m. General Admission Tickets are only $15. Love Canon, a jam-grass band hailing from Charlottesville with our town’s favorite Jay Starling, The Blue Dogs (newgrass from South Carolina), The Jackass Flats (party grass from Richmond), and The Brokedown Boys (Fredericksburg’s favorite Grateful Dead- grass tribute group), will round out the evening. A few of these bands have rocked Fredericksburg before. Now they are back on the biggest stage in our area. There will be craft brews for the tastin’, art for the lookin’, and, of course, grass of blue for the footstompin’. To learn more about his show, check CelebrateVirginiaLive.com or on Facebook. Mark Newtons’ & Steve Thomas’ album, REBORN is available at MarkNewtonMusic.com. Check the latest video on YouTube! Ashleigh Chevalier, with a 4-month old in her lap, can now read and write at the same time!

The Sunken Well Tavern 720 Littlepage, a musket shot from the old Sunken Road sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 Eat Well 28

Drink Well

September 2013

Live Well

Front porch fredericksburg

“Grab him and w e’ll go to the Well.”

Six years ago, on August 19, my baby boy came along in no particular hurry. He’s carried that pace through life, wanting to do things his way with no motivation to hasten through a task or do more than one thing at a time. He does things the hard way. The day before his birth, standing in the basement of my Fredericksburg home sorting laundry, I called my mom and suggested she start the drive from Roanoke. She and I spent the evening and night timing contractions and doing what we do best, “piddling” around the house. A cherished time together, I will always remember those hours of preparation and anticipation as exciting but soothing. With 18 hours of labor behind me, we trekked to the hospital only to learn the baby had his own agenda. I mentally and physically prepared for labor and delivery as much as I’ve prepared for any race I’ve ever run. Opting out of anesthesia, I wanted to bring him into the world naturally and calmly. I was fortunate to have the experience go as planned, with little intervention. At 5 p.m. my pride and joy made his moderately dramatic but relatively calm first appearance. I spent most of that time silent and meditative, but during those last two hours of full-on pushing, I questioned every decision I had made. I cried. I begged for it to be over. Who did I think I was? Any exertion or struggle I felt vanished immediately. The hard work paid off. I felt whole. Fast forward six years — that’s how it feels, fast. No matter how many people have told me to cherish the time— which is every parent and grandparent I’ve ever met—I have yet to find life’s pause button. At 5 p.m. on August 19 this year, I sat attentively at my desk, getting through some emails and preparing for a busy week. Always the multitasker, I want to finish one project and move onto the next. I do not share my son’s more leisurely approach to life. The birthday boy was spending time with his dad, so I couldn’t celebrate that day, but I had to reflect on the difference between the days. I’ve always seen life as a frenzied affair to be managed and organized. Self-reflection and task-reduction are as difficult for me as those 30 hours of labor. Relaxing is a chore. I’m distracted during meditation. I struggle to let go. When I do tune out, like this summer when my son and I spent a week together

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

swift current at mott’s By beverly payne

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan near the beach, it takes me days to sink into the zone of living in the moment. Six-years-old strikes me as a major milestone. The first five were his “formative” years, and they are gone. Years are like that. They pass and they don’t come back. I don’t have a formula for this one, just a wish. A desire for the difficult. A need to slow down. An understanding that the hard way is often the best way.

Ruth Cassell was married at BendingForest, the home of Rob and Virginia Grogan, in August 2002. A lot of hard work and love were put into making it an extremely special day. Not all things last in life, but the friendship forged between Ruth and the Grogans continues through many challenges and changes.

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Front Porch Fredericksburg

I took my boat (really an inflatable 2-person raft), to Mott’s Run, where I had never put in there before. It had a nice wooden step ramp to launch canoes and small watercraft. Wearing my life jacket and cool shades, I felt empowered and shoved off. The water was a little high, but didn’t look bad. But, it was deceiving. There was a swift under current. If you look, you could see little eddies and ripples. I paddled downstream for about ten minutes, before turning back. I didn’t want to get too far out of site of the ramp. But, no matter how hard I paddled, I never moved upstream more than inches. I was afraid of getting swept downstream. I made the decision to paddle across to the shoreline. I could see branches intermittently hanging low. My theory was I could hang onto the branches when I was tired. The water near the bank should be more shallow and I could walk.

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

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My legs were stronger than my arms. Maybe even use my paddle as a marker for the river bottom. I knew of holes that I could step into over my head. I did some marking of the river depth. It was about waist deep. So, I got out of the raft, and used the paddle as a walking stick. It was a short-lived joy. Soon the water got chest high and there were rocks and fallen pieces of tree branches. Then came big rocks. I thought, good - the rocks will raise me up above the chest deep water. But no, the rocks were slippery and it was difficult to climb up on my bare feet. Oh, I lost my flip-flops a long time ago. I never wear flipflops when I go into the water, but I left my water shoes at home and didn’t want to go back for them. Besides, I never truly needed them before, wearing them by habit on sandy Falmouth beach or the smooth pebble Lake Anna where I normally go. My overhead branches resided. Up ahead I could see some type of green plants jutting out the water. I figured they must be on higher ground. As I slowly trudged along, leaning against the water as if walking against the wind, thoughts were rolling around in my head. The paddle by now was in the raft, the water kept pushing it backwards. I knew that if all else failed, I could cling to the raft and end up somewhere downriver. The one thing I didn’t want to happen was to be rescued. It was the reason I abandoned the raft to walk. It would have been embarrassing to me for the squad of fire guys to save me. Another thought was this was the first and last time I was getting in at Mott’s Run. Not that it was the river’s fault; I was just out of my comfort zone. I made it to the reeds and got thru. Somewhere, I came across unseen trees under the water. Their bark was combination of rough and slippery. My bare feet were getting sore. Then the river bottom gave way to silt that I sank in, but was able to keep going. Finally, sandy bottom, I could see the steps not far ahead and was hopeful. Guess I was correct that my legs were stronger than my arms. I made it to the steps, pulling my raft behind me. An older couple I had seen

upstream canoeing, were going up the wooden steps as I approached, the man saying to the woman, “The currents are rough.” I noticed the woman had trouble pulling the canoe onto the path. The man came back and tugged it up to the ground. As, I approached the woman, she said, “Hi, how are you?” I smiled, “Tired. The water felt good. It is hot.” She replied, “Me too. The current was strong.” “Yes, very strong.” Then, hopping bare-foot across the hot asphalt, my feet turned black. I stored my gear and looked at my cell phone. It had taken at least an hour to maneuver back up stream. I realized that I was lucky. I also wondered: is $50 a good price to ask for a fairly new 2-person inflatable boat, life jacket, and paddle?

Beverly Payne is the author of Before Tea Tyme (Greenleaf Tea Publication), and numerous magazine and newspaper articles. She lives in Spotsylvania with her husband, Mike and their dog, Ozzy.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

29


FXBG Music Scene

My Own Path

he is mark newton

a desire for the difficult

by ashleigh chevalier

By c. ruth cassell

He is Mark Newton, folks: born in Kentucky and raised in Fredericksburg, “Vee Aye” since the age of three, White Oak to be specific. He grew up when playing bluegrass with the family on the weekend was a way of life. “Everyone would work all week in their trade, and play music on the weekends,” he said thoughtfully. Now he travels the world playing music! Newton’s musical interests are varied. As a teenager, Rolling Stones and Hendrix posters were on the wall and Flat and Scruggs played on his radio. That is the mark of a true musical soul. Like most, Mark just LOVES GOOD MUSIC; it doesn’t matter the genre. Newton’s latest album, REBORN, is a product of his latest project with Steve Thomas. The duo has landed two number one hits on Bluegrass Today’s Top 20. See the video “Old MacDonald Sold the Farm” on YouTube. It is a hoot, and apropos for our time. REBORN brings Mark Newton’s traditional bluegrass roots and Steve

Thomas’ new county experience together. Some of the tunes Mark recorded early on in his career with one of his first bands, Knoxville Grass. REBORN is a solid album that makes you feel like Virginia and the Blue Ridge, and long for Tennessee. Mark Newton and Steve Thomas played Fredericksburg earlier in the season to a sold out crowd at Colonial Tavern. They will return to perform at Pickin’ in the Park, Fredericksburg’s First Annual Bluegrass Music & Arts Festival, held at Celebrate Virginia Live, Saturday, September 14. Gates open at 3 p.m. General Admission Tickets are only $15. Love Canon, a jam-grass band hailing from Charlottesville with our town’s favorite Jay Starling, The Blue Dogs (newgrass from South Carolina), The Jackass Flats (party grass from Richmond), and The Brokedown Boys (Fredericksburg’s favorite Grateful Dead- grass tribute group), will round out the evening. A few of these bands have rocked Fredericksburg before. Now they are back on the biggest stage in our area. There will be craft brews for the tastin’, art for the lookin’, and, of course, grass of blue for the footstompin’. To learn more about his show, check CelebrateVirginiaLive.com or on Facebook. Mark Newtons’ & Steve Thomas’ album, REBORN is available at MarkNewtonMusic.com. Check the latest video on YouTube! Ashleigh Chevalier, with a 4-month old in her lap, can now read and write at the same time!

The Sunken Well Tavern 720 Littlepage, a musket shot from the old Sunken Road sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 Eat Well 28

Drink Well

September 2013

Live Well

Front porch fredericksburg

“Grab him and w e’ll go to the Well.”

Six years ago, on August 19, my baby boy came along in no particular hurry. He’s carried that pace through life, wanting to do things his way with no motivation to hasten through a task or do more than one thing at a time. He does things the hard way. The day before his birth, standing in the basement of my Fredericksburg home sorting laundry, I called my mom and suggested she start the drive from Roanoke. She and I spent the evening and night timing contractions and doing what we do best, “piddling” around the house. A cherished time together, I will always remember those hours of preparation and anticipation as exciting but soothing. With 18 hours of labor behind me, we trekked to the hospital only to learn the baby had his own agenda. I mentally and physically prepared for labor and delivery as much as I’ve prepared for any race I’ve ever run. Opting out of anesthesia, I wanted to bring him into the world naturally and calmly. I was fortunate to have the experience go as planned, with little intervention. At 5 p.m. my pride and joy made his moderately dramatic but relatively calm first appearance. I spent most of that time silent and meditative, but during those last two hours of full-on pushing, I questioned every decision I had made. I cried. I begged for it to be over. Who did I think I was? Any exertion or struggle I felt vanished immediately. The hard work paid off. I felt whole. Fast forward six years — that’s how it feels, fast. No matter how many people have told me to cherish the time— which is every parent and grandparent I’ve ever met—I have yet to find life’s pause button. At 5 p.m. on August 19 this year, I sat attentively at my desk, getting through some emails and preparing for a busy week. Always the multitasker, I want to finish one project and move onto the next. I do not share my son’s more leisurely approach to life. The birthday boy was spending time with his dad, so I couldn’t celebrate that day, but I had to reflect on the difference between the days. I’ve always seen life as a frenzied affair to be managed and organized. Self-reflection and task-reduction are as difficult for me as those 30 hours of labor. Relaxing is a chore. I’m distracted during meditation. I struggle to let go. When I do tune out, like this summer when my son and I spent a week together

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swift current at mott’s By beverly payne

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan near the beach, it takes me days to sink into the zone of living in the moment. Six-years-old strikes me as a major milestone. The first five were his “formative” years, and they are gone. Years are like that. They pass and they don’t come back. I don’t have a formula for this one, just a wish. A desire for the difficult. A need to slow down. An understanding that the hard way is often the best way.

Ruth Cassell was married at BendingForest, the home of Rob and Virginia Grogan, in August 2002. A lot of hard work and love were put into making it an extremely special day. Not all things last in life, but the friendship forged between Ruth and the Grogans continues through many challenges and changes.

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I took my boat (really an inflatable 2-person raft), to Mott’s Run, where I had never put in there before. It had a nice wooden step ramp to launch canoes and small watercraft. Wearing my life jacket and cool shades, I felt empowered and shoved off. The water was a little high, but didn’t look bad. But, it was deceiving. There was a swift under current. If you look, you could see little eddies and ripples. I paddled downstream for about ten minutes, before turning back. I didn’t want to get too far out of site of the ramp. But, no matter how hard I paddled, I never moved upstream more than inches. I was afraid of getting swept downstream. I made the decision to paddle across to the shoreline. I could see branches intermittently hanging low. My theory was I could hang onto the branches when I was tired. The water near the bank should be more shallow and I could walk.

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My legs were stronger than my arms. Maybe even use my paddle as a marker for the river bottom. I knew of holes that I could step into over my head. I did some marking of the river depth. It was about waist deep. So, I got out of the raft, and used the paddle as a walking stick. It was a short-lived joy. Soon the water got chest high and there were rocks and fallen pieces of tree branches. Then came big rocks. I thought, good - the rocks will raise me up above the chest deep water. But no, the rocks were slippery and it was difficult to climb up on my bare feet. Oh, I lost my flip-flops a long time ago. I never wear flipflops when I go into the water, but I left my water shoes at home and didn’t want to go back for them. Besides, I never truly needed them before, wearing them by habit on sandy Falmouth beach or the smooth pebble Lake Anna where I normally go. My overhead branches resided. Up ahead I could see some type of green plants jutting out the water. I figured they must be on higher ground. As I slowly trudged along, leaning against the water as if walking against the wind, thoughts were rolling around in my head. The paddle by now was in the raft, the water kept pushing it backwards. I knew that if all else failed, I could cling to the raft and end up somewhere downriver. The one thing I didn’t want to happen was to be rescued. It was the reason I abandoned the raft to walk. It would have been embarrassing to me for the squad of fire guys to save me. Another thought was this was the first and last time I was getting in at Mott’s Run. Not that it was the river’s fault; I was just out of my comfort zone. I made it to the reeds and got thru. Somewhere, I came across unseen trees under the water. Their bark was combination of rough and slippery. My bare feet were getting sore. Then the river bottom gave way to silt that I sank in, but was able to keep going. Finally, sandy bottom, I could see the steps not far ahead and was hopeful. Guess I was correct that my legs were stronger than my arms. I made it to the steps, pulling my raft behind me. An older couple I had seen

upstream canoeing, were going up the wooden steps as I approached, the man saying to the woman, “The currents are rough.” I noticed the woman had trouble pulling the canoe onto the path. The man came back and tugged it up to the ground. As, I approached the woman, she said, “Hi, how are you?” I smiled, “Tired. The water felt good. It is hot.” She replied, “Me too. The current was strong.” “Yes, very strong.” Then, hopping bare-foot across the hot asphalt, my feet turned black. I stored my gear and looked at my cell phone. It had taken at least an hour to maneuver back up stream. I realized that I was lucky. I also wondered: is $50 a good price to ask for a fairly new 2-person inflatable boat, life jacket, and paddle?

Beverly Payne is the author of Before Tea Tyme (Greenleaf Tea Publication), and numerous magazine and newspaper articles. She lives in Spotsylvania with her husband, Mike and their dog, Ozzy.

front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

29


Day in the Life (continued from page 24) By natalie wilson

“Let’s Stitch” spinners & weavers pay forward

After stopping at Taste and Riverby Books, our last stop in "Olde Towne" was the bright green and purple Horseshoes and Hand Grenades. I'd been following their account on Instagram for a long time for fashion ideas before realizing it was located just around the corner! This hip and college student-oriented vintage boutique has lots of fun music, video games, cameras, and clothing and accessories. All items have been specially selected as more trendy and wearable. Shopping here was just plain fun!

By lynette reed

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate

My family and I then went to see the Rappahannock Summer Music Camp concert held at the conclusion of the week long camp. Three talented levels of bands and orchestras performed and my sister played the double bass in the Jazz Ensemble and several other groups. She spent the week learning jazz techniques, playing fun music, and making new friends; I enjoyed seeing and hearing the culmination of all of her and the other students' hard work

AhearnEstateLaw.com

Later, I went dining and shopping at the mall with friends who were anchors with me on Chancellor High School's morning news broadcasts. We went to Spotsylvania Towne Centre's Cheeburger Cheeburger, a diner-style restaurant, to invent our own meal, from over 1,285,000 milkshake combinations to customized fries, sandwiches, salads, platters, and burgers. There are tons of free toppings, five burger sizes, including the "famous pounder." Finish that and you get your picture taken with the giant plush burger - the restaurant's mascot -- and autographs added to the Wall of Fame. Be sure and look out for my face on the wall!

Enter the word “knitting” in the YouTube, Facebook or Pinterest search box, and you will see proof of the popularity of this age-old craft. On October 12 the Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild will once again give area knitters and crocheters a chance to ply their craft at “Let’s Stitch,” held at LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 916 Liberty Street, from 10-4 P.M. Guild members, in conjunction with the non-profit group From the Heart of Richmond, host this benefit as a way to do what they love while serving those in need in the community. The Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild was founded in 1982 with the purpose of providing a place for persons interested in weaving, spinning, and other fiber disciplines to gather, share, teach and promote the knowledge and use of fiber arts. Guild members meet monthly with additional opportunities for workshops, classes, and special events such as this, the third annual “Let’s Stitch.” “After our first event in 2011 we delivered hats, scarves, blankets and more to 8 different organizations. Last year we delivered to over 20 groups and in the last

To end the day, my dad and I went to Celebrate Virginia to see Sheryl Crow in concert, where she performed amazingly live, alternating country songs off of her most recent album and crowd favorites, among them the poppy "Soak Up the Sun," "All I Wanna Do," and karaoke hit, "If It Makes You Happy." Now when I go to camps or go off to college, I'll know exactly what to talk about when I tell the people I meet about where I'm from and where I grew up. It's a unique place with a variety of things to do and experience that even a regular day is filled with fun new things. Without visiting any museums, I've learned a lot more about FXBG, just by slowing down and spending time catching up with my hometown.

Editor's note: Natalie Wilson is a rising junior and Chancellor High School Charger. She spent two months with the magazine for her Mentorship Program with the Regional Governor's School as our photojournalist. In last month's issue, Natalie covered Trivia Night at The Sunken Well Tavern (see Messages, page 4). Natalie spends A Day in the Life of Fredericksburg (pages 19, 24, 30), taking us from morning into the evening of her day. Natalie is the daughter of Valerie and Chris Wilson. The photographs were taken with a Canon SL1 and a Sony A65.

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A completely self-sufficient mobile unit! I come to your home or place of business Your dog and I spend one-on-one time (about 45-60 min.) Then right back to you! No kennels! Very Reasonable One-Price Services: Bathing, Grooming, Eyes, Ears, Nails, Drying, Cologne Call Lorri Parrott/ Owner @ 540-842-6647. 7 days a week. Large Breeds Welcome! Servicing Spotsylvania & Fredericksburg

30

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

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Cradle of Hope Adoption Center

12 months we have added to that number,” said Keren Pritchett, Guild President. “We have been lucky to have such a great organization like From the Heart Stitchers help guide us in reaching out to the local groups that need help.” The local rep for From the Heart, Pam Greswolde, has attended each event and has been instrumental in setting up groups that meet weekly or monthly to continue knitting/crocheting all year round. “I have been amazed at the response of the knitters and crocheters in the Fredericksburg area,” said Greswolde, “and we are always welcoming new stitchers as they find us at various locations.” Items are collected or delivered to LibertyTown and then delivered to groups as requested. A running inventory of items delivered in Fredericksburg is then merged with the inventory count in Richmond for a grand total. To date that number is over 160,000. Yes, more than 160,000 ! During the day of the event, attendees will find various demonstrations from cast-on’s to crocheted buttons running hourly. Ongoing instruction will be offered to those young and old who want to learn or to those who just need a refresher. No experience is required, and there is no age restriction or gender requirement – ALL are welcome. “It was important that we keep this as a free event,” said Pritchett, “but we could not do it without the support of LibertyTown providing the facility and local merchants that have donated door prizes.” Currently the Guild is asking for donations of yarn and needles which may be dropped off at LibertyTown Arts Workshop. For more information contact me, Lynette Reed, at: yarnlyn@aol.com or the Guild at www.fswguild.org

540/371-9890

FREDERICKSBURGCOLLABORATIVE

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

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(540) 373-9636

Lynette Reed is a spinner and a weaver. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

31


Day in the Life (continued from page 24) By natalie wilson

“Let’s Stitch” spinners & weavers pay forward

After stopping at Taste and Riverby Books, our last stop in "Olde Towne" was the bright green and purple Horseshoes and Hand Grenades. I'd been following their account on Instagram for a long time for fashion ideas before realizing it was located just around the corner! This hip and college student-oriented vintage boutique has lots of fun music, video games, cameras, and clothing and accessories. All items have been specially selected as more trendy and wearable. Shopping here was just plain fun!

By lynette reed

Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate

My family and I then went to see the Rappahannock Summer Music Camp concert held at the conclusion of the week long camp. Three talented levels of bands and orchestras performed and my sister played the double bass in the Jazz Ensemble and several other groups. She spent the week learning jazz techniques, playing fun music, and making new friends; I enjoyed seeing and hearing the culmination of all of her and the other students' hard work

AhearnEstateLaw.com

Later, I went dining and shopping at the mall with friends who were anchors with me on Chancellor High School's morning news broadcasts. We went to Spotsylvania Towne Centre's Cheeburger Cheeburger, a diner-style restaurant, to invent our own meal, from over 1,285,000 milkshake combinations to customized fries, sandwiches, salads, platters, and burgers. There are tons of free toppings, five burger sizes, including the "famous pounder." Finish that and you get your picture taken with the giant plush burger - the restaurant's mascot -- and autographs added to the Wall of Fame. Be sure and look out for my face on the wall!

Enter the word “knitting” in the YouTube, Facebook or Pinterest search box, and you will see proof of the popularity of this age-old craft. On October 12 the Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild will once again give area knitters and crocheters a chance to ply their craft at “Let’s Stitch,” held at LibertyTown Arts Workshop, 916 Liberty Street, from 10-4 P.M. Guild members, in conjunction with the non-profit group From the Heart of Richmond, host this benefit as a way to do what they love while serving those in need in the community. The Fredericksburg Spinners and Weavers Guild was founded in 1982 with the purpose of providing a place for persons interested in weaving, spinning, and other fiber disciplines to gather, share, teach and promote the knowledge and use of fiber arts. Guild members meet monthly with additional opportunities for workshops, classes, and special events such as this, the third annual “Let’s Stitch.” “After our first event in 2011 we delivered hats, scarves, blankets and more to 8 different organizations. Last year we delivered to over 20 groups and in the last

To end the day, my dad and I went to Celebrate Virginia to see Sheryl Crow in concert, where she performed amazingly live, alternating country songs off of her most recent album and crowd favorites, among them the poppy "Soak Up the Sun," "All I Wanna Do," and karaoke hit, "If It Makes You Happy." Now when I go to camps or go off to college, I'll know exactly what to talk about when I tell the people I meet about where I'm from and where I grew up. It's a unique place with a variety of things to do and experience that even a regular day is filled with fun new things. Without visiting any museums, I've learned a lot more about FXBG, just by slowing down and spending time catching up with my hometown.

Editor's note: Natalie Wilson is a rising junior and Chancellor High School Charger. She spent two months with the magazine for her Mentorship Program with the Regional Governor's School as our photojournalist. In last month's issue, Natalie covered Trivia Night at The Sunken Well Tavern (see Messages, page 4). Natalie spends A Day in the Life of Fredericksburg (pages 19, 24, 30), taking us from morning into the evening of her day. Natalie is the daughter of Valerie and Chris Wilson. The photographs were taken with a Canon SL1 and a Sony A65.

WAGGIN TAILS MOBILE

Every Child Deserves A Family

A completely self-sufficient mobile unit! I come to your home or place of business Your dog and I spend one-on-one time (about 45-60 min.) Then right back to you! No kennels! Very Reasonable One-Price Services: Bathing, Grooming, Eyes, Ears, Nails, Drying, Cologne Call Lorri Parrott/ Owner @ 540-842-6647. 7 days a week. Large Breeds Welcome! Servicing Spotsylvania & Fredericksburg

30

September 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Learn about our adoption opportunities in Russia, China and Guatemala

301-587-4400

Cradle of Hope Adoption Center

12 months we have added to that number,” said Keren Pritchett, Guild President. “We have been lucky to have such a great organization like From the Heart Stitchers help guide us in reaching out to the local groups that need help.” The local rep for From the Heart, Pam Greswolde, has attended each event and has been instrumental in setting up groups that meet weekly or monthly to continue knitting/crocheting all year round. “I have been amazed at the response of the knitters and crocheters in the Fredericksburg area,” said Greswolde, “and we are always welcoming new stitchers as they find us at various locations.” Items are collected or delivered to LibertyTown and then delivered to groups as requested. A running inventory of items delivered in Fredericksburg is then merged with the inventory count in Richmond for a grand total. To date that number is over 160,000. Yes, more than 160,000 ! During the day of the event, attendees will find various demonstrations from cast-on’s to crocheted buttons running hourly. Ongoing instruction will be offered to those young and old who want to learn or to those who just need a refresher. No experience is required, and there is no age restriction or gender requirement – ALL are welcome. “It was important that we keep this as a free event,” said Pritchett, “but we could not do it without the support of LibertyTown providing the facility and local merchants that have donated door prizes.” Currently the Guild is asking for donations of yarn and needles which may be dropped off at LibertyTown Arts Workshop. For more information contact me, Lynette Reed, at: yarnlyn@aol.com or the Guild at www.fswguild.org

540/371-9890

FREDERICKSBURGCOLLABORATIVE

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Lynette Reed is a spinner and a weaver. front porch fredericksburg

September 2013

31



September 2013 - Front Porch Fredericksburg