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L o c a l G o o d N e w s S i n c e 1 9 97 YEAR 17 • ISSUE 197 • NOVEMBER 2013

Frontporchfredericksburg.com

Dottie Meyers

Delightful 3

Teach the Children Well 7

Slice of FXBG Life

Larry, Keller & Jake 8

The Intimacy of Miniatures 11

H2 O Integrative Medicine 23

Stafford 350

Celebrate History 27

Steve Watkins:

Prolific Writer 26

Rally for Rights

An Immigrant’s Story 28

Protocols

Etiquette Lessons 31


contents

closeups 8

7

14

18

Our Heritage...society of cincinnati history’s stories.: 1955 JMHS yellow jackets

20

companion care: .puppy joy! made safe

21

autoknown better: archive

Slice of FXBG Life ... larry, keller & jake

22

Senior Care: spirituality & successful aging

23

h2 o: 21st century integrative medical practices

One Teacher ... autumn dalton

24

Art in the ‘burg: it sparkles, you shine

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

from an author’s world view

27

community link: stafford 350

28

In Memorium: Josephine Vining poetryman

29

porchlight: what man?

30

Salute to our veterans

31

protocols...be a great guest

Roast of the town ... sean & keely ricks

8

porch talk 4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

..5

26

giving thanks: traditions

6

Gift Giving? shop merry market

...And more!

retired on the back porch: there’s always sushi

10

what’s it worth?: miniatures

11 12

Vino: you gotta believe Cooking with kyle

13

season’s bounty: giving thanks

15

On the house: all mixed up

16-17

Calendar of Events

3

24

Frame Designs @27: keepsakes, passion & family

10

Bill Carroll: abuzz @ the B

19

men of goodwill: michael rollins & derek knight

28

An Immigrant’s story Cover Photo by Sue Henderson

Frame Designs at 27: Keepsakes, Passion & Family ~ All Edged Into One Business By Ryan Davis Dottie Meyers couldn’t have imagined that a daily “returning to the past” by framing and preserving other people’s histories would have provided her the fresh start she needed, but that’s exactly what happened in the mid-1980s when she left Western Pennsylvania, moved to Fredericksburg and became the owner of Frame Designs Custom Frame Shop and Art Gallery. Meyers and her daughter, Cheryl Bosch, found the business for sale in the local paper, purchased it in 1986, and have successfully made it into a family affair. As Meyers recounts on the early days of operation, “I was never an artist, had no experience with framing, but thankfully my daughter did. She had studied art so she knew how to do the frame cutting, designing and matting; I stuck with the business end of things— handling the financial numbers and dealing with the customers.” Having come from an educational background as a teacher, Meyers never thought that being a business owner was the direction her life would’ve taken. For her and her daughter it became both a passion and a blessing. So much so, that on November 10, 2013 they will celebrate

27 years of owning and operating Frame Designs. According to Meyers, their success and longevity can be attributed to two things: offering a unique service and providing excellent customer service. “We are able to help people who are looking for individualized framing you simply can’t get anywhere else,” she said. Their goal has always been to adhere to a standard of excellence in every facet of the business. This translates into offering hundreds of different frames, meeting deadlines, focusing on conservation methods like sewing items down to the frame backing instead of gluing them. In the event an item ever needs to be removed from the frame it won’t get damaged. The owner says they’ve wanted to be adaptable to their customers and this has led to framing unique personal mementos: everything from football jerseys, certificates, medals, and even a full firefighter uniform, boots and all. “We love getting to see the faces of the customers when we have beautifully framed and preserved a possession that means a great deal to them,” Meyers said. Their business goals have never wavered from desiring to meet and exceed

customer’s expectation. This has been a major reason the family venture has continued all these years. Frame Designs isn’t just limited to individual projects either. The company has had corporate relationships with doctor’s offices, hospitals, and will even be helping with the interior of the new Eagle Village Hyatt Hotel. At the end of the day though, for this mother and daughter team, it’s always about helping the person directly in front of them and celebrating the community they live in. “I love Fredericksburg: the downtown area, the art culture and even the unique way this place offers me the opportunity to learn something new, which I did recently in taking a pottery class at LibertyTown Arts Workshop,” Meyers said. It has always been about the people that have supported them, and in likewise fashion, they’ve wanted to give back too. Frame Designs offers Do It Yourself (DIY) framing opportunities at a minimal cost for their customers, art lessons, and they even hold an annual art expose in their front showroom. Frame Designs is located at 2010 College Avenue next to The General Store restaurant and across from the University

Dot with "Granny", a doll that was there when they took over the shop, and has been there with them ever since. of Mary framedesignsgallery.com, 0567.

Washington. (540) 371-

Ryan Davis currently resides in Fredericksburg, is a graduate of UMW with a major in English, focus in creative writing, and has aspirations of becoming a published author.

Be Thankful What’s in the Holiday Windows at

Pumpkin Spice Lattes, Apple Cider & Hot Cocoa

Unveiling Thanksgiving Day at Noon! 1021 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA

2

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

(540) 374-0443 WWW.SHOPWHITTINGHAM.COM

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

3


contents

closeups 8

7

14

18

Our Heritage...society of cincinnati history’s stories.: 1955 JMHS yellow jackets

20

companion care: .puppy joy! made safe

21

autoknown better: archive

Slice of FXBG Life ... larry, keller & jake

22

Senior Care: spirituality & successful aging

23

h2 o: 21st century integrative medical practices

One Teacher ... autumn dalton

24

Art in the ‘burg: it sparkles, you shine

25

scene & heard...in the ‘burg!

26

from an author’s world view

27

community link: stafford 350

28

In Memorium: Josephine Vining poetryman

29

porchlight: what man?

30

Salute to our veterans

31

protocols...be a great guest

Roast of the town ... sean & keely ricks

8

porch talk 4

on the porch...life in fredericksburg Messages

..5

26

giving thanks: traditions

6

Gift Giving? shop merry market

...And more!

retired on the back porch: there’s always sushi

10

what’s it worth?: miniatures

11 12

Vino: you gotta believe Cooking with kyle

13

season’s bounty: giving thanks

15

On the house: all mixed up

16-17

Calendar of Events

3

24

Frame Designs @27: keepsakes, passion & family

10

Bill Carroll: abuzz @ the B

19

men of goodwill: michael rollins & derek knight

28

An Immigrant’s story Cover Photo by Sue Henderson

Frame Designs at 27: Keepsakes, Passion & Family ~ All Edged Into One Business By Ryan Davis Dottie Meyers couldn’t have imagined that a daily “returning to the past” by framing and preserving other people’s histories would have provided her the fresh start she needed, but that’s exactly what happened in the mid-1980s when she left Western Pennsylvania, moved to Fredericksburg and became the owner of Frame Designs Custom Frame Shop and Art Gallery. Meyers and her daughter, Cheryl Bosch, found the business for sale in the local paper, purchased it in 1986, and have successfully made it into a family affair. As Meyers recounts on the early days of operation, “I was never an artist, had no experience with framing, but thankfully my daughter did. She had studied art so she knew how to do the frame cutting, designing and matting; I stuck with the business end of things— handling the financial numbers and dealing with the customers.” Having come from an educational background as a teacher, Meyers never thought that being a business owner was the direction her life would’ve taken. For her and her daughter it became both a passion and a blessing. So much so, that on November 10, 2013 they will celebrate

27 years of owning and operating Frame Designs. According to Meyers, their success and longevity can be attributed to two things: offering a unique service and providing excellent customer service. “We are able to help people who are looking for individualized framing you simply can’t get anywhere else,” she said. Their goal has always been to adhere to a standard of excellence in every facet of the business. This translates into offering hundreds of different frames, meeting deadlines, focusing on conservation methods like sewing items down to the frame backing instead of gluing them. In the event an item ever needs to be removed from the frame it won’t get damaged. The owner says they’ve wanted to be adaptable to their customers and this has led to framing unique personal mementos: everything from football jerseys, certificates, medals, and even a full firefighter uniform, boots and all. “We love getting to see the faces of the customers when we have beautifully framed and preserved a possession that means a great deal to them,” Meyers said. Their business goals have never wavered from desiring to meet and exceed

customer’s expectation. This has been a major reason the family venture has continued all these years. Frame Designs isn’t just limited to individual projects either. The company has had corporate relationships with doctor’s offices, hospitals, and will even be helping with the interior of the new Eagle Village Hyatt Hotel. At the end of the day though, for this mother and daughter team, it’s always about helping the person directly in front of them and celebrating the community they live in. “I love Fredericksburg: the downtown area, the art culture and even the unique way this place offers me the opportunity to learn something new, which I did recently in taking a pottery class at LibertyTown Arts Workshop,” Meyers said. It has always been about the people that have supported them, and in likewise fashion, they’ve wanted to give back too. Frame Designs offers Do It Yourself (DIY) framing opportunities at a minimal cost for their customers, art lessons, and they even hold an annual art expose in their front showroom. Frame Designs is located at 2010 College Avenue next to The General Store restaurant and across from the University

Dot with "Granny", a doll that was there when they took over the shop, and has been there with them ever since. of Mary framedesignsgallery.com, 0567.

Washington. (540) 371-

Ryan Davis currently resides in Fredericksburg, is a graduate of UMW with a major in English, focus in creative writing, and has aspirations of becoming a published author.

Be Thankful What’s in the Holiday Windows at

Pumpkin Spice Lattes, Apple Cider & Hot Cocoa

Unveiling Thanksgiving Day at Noon! 1021 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA

2

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

(540) 374-0443 WWW.SHOPWHITTINGHAM.COM

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

3


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan

Editor

thankful for...

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists Alicia Antezano A.E.Bayne Aby Bethem Alea Bryer Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Pamela Coopwood Ryan Davis Arch Di Peppe Arlene Evans Rob Fergusson Fran k Fratoe William Garnett Sue Henderson Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Katie Hornung Rob Huffman Karl Karch David S. Kerr Jo Middleton Susan Carroll Morgan Stuart Perkins M.L.Powers Vanessa Moncure Scott Richards James Kyle Snyder Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Rim Vining

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. It has a lot to do with the why of it and how it got started; with the beauty of the autumn season as it cusps toward winter; with the bounty of colorful and comforting food; with the traditions; and, of course most of all, with the people we share it with – every year a slice of our extended family. This year is a special Thanksgiving for me and for Virginia. It’s our 25th one wedded and 26th or 27th

one overall at the same table together. It is also one I am grateful to be here for in the midst of my journey fighting carcinoid cancer. I am very thankful… I am thankful for life and liberty; For family and friends; For nature’s bounty;

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

Our Thanksgiving

November 2013

For the farmers and community that embrace organic, healthy and sustainable food, locally sourced; For the colors of autumn and the promise of winter’s serenity; For the means to stay in touch with so many people, instantly, and with loved ones and friends far away; For our troops and first responders, our law enforcement, our peace workers and social workers, our integrative medicine practitioners and medical doctors; For our community’s proud history and

messages Hi Rob, Thank you so so much for our article (FCCA: 50 Years And Beyond, by Paula Rose). We all owe you. Please let me know if I can do anything to help you anytime. What a great way to spread the word! Cheryl Bosch, Fredericksburg Hey, Rob Keep up the good work and the good fight. Tracey Grady, Stafford Dear Rob The October issue of Front Porch is a testimony to fortitude. How you and your publisher wife, Virginia B. Grogan, could produce such a work of art after all you went through in September smacks of strength! My prayers continue for your health and well-being. We readers are blessed by what you do and how you manage to get it done month after month regardless of your personal situation as chronicled on facebook and

Front porch fredericksburg

Maybe like yours, maybe different, all with great thanks!

rich culture;

For the people of Fredericksburg’s compassion and generosity; For every moment and every free choice we are given to seize; For music and art and the amazing people who make it, and for athletes who achieve their potential; For our advertisers and readers who allow us to earn a living doing what we love where we love;

For humanity, compassion, and those individuals who always do the right thing for the right reasons;

For all of the children in our life, and those to come;

For men of goodwill and women of wisdom;

For the birds I love to watch and listen to as they sing and call on one another – from the tiny hummingbirds and working woodpeckers, to the mighty falcons roosting in our yard;

For My Two Mary’s — my wife (Virginia Mary) and our daughter (Alexis Mary);

For crepe myrtles and plum trees and that old sassafras that is first to turn leaves each fall; For modern conveniences and the right perspective on them; For the lives of those we have lost in 2013;

For the mysteries of life and universe, the unanswered questions and the rigorous pursuit of answers; For justice – not just for some but for all; And, for you, whoever you are, as promising of goodness as a sunrise over the bay…

Sensory satisfaction Thanksgiving isn’t so much a tradition in my family; it can’t be. With my family’s need to share time between inlaws and with each other, we rarely are able to carry out any sort of tradition together on the holiday. That being said, Thanksgiving is, for me, a time where I can count on the sensory details that come along with the holiday. Whether it’s a five hour car-ride up to my mother’s home in New Jersey or a 15-minute car ride up to my mother-inlaw’s home in Stafford, the crispness of an

early frost waifs its way through the car vents and it sends me back to my childhood Thanksgivings. Brown, fragile leaves strewn about like the brown sugar topping on my nana’s Entennmann’s breakfast coffee cake, the air warmly scented with the promise of the best chocolate pie that only my grandmother could make, nebulous cloud formations in the grey-skied-calmness like heavy bedding on the coldest of autumn nights. It’s the promise of the welcoming reception as family walks through the door- the smiles and the jovial remarks about how much older we all look. It’s all good. It’s my Thanksgiving sensory tradition. – Katie Hornung, feature writer Until we can’t move Almost without exception my mother, our two children, and three grandchildren all come for Thanksgiving dinner. It is not uncommon for us to have an additional guest or two. Sometimes we have had so many people that we have had to move dinner to tables set up in the living room. It is always the traditional

fare. I look for the biggest turkey I can find. I love the leftovers and we prepare a box of them for each of our children and guests, too. Way too much is just about right. We always have homemade stuffing, mashed potatoes, yams with marshmallows, string bean casserole, two types of cranberry sauce, biscuits (Why do I always want to put a “qu” in that word?), and two pies. One is pumpkin and one is not. I think Robin looks forward to the stuffing the most. That is what she liked best as a kid. I like it all. We all eat until we can’t move and then complain that we can’t move. We swear next year we will be different, but we never are. – Archer Di Peppe, Quiet Moments and What’s It Worth? Tradition? The only thing consistent in the 35 Thanksgivings that Kathy & I have spent together is that they all revolved around sharing a meal with friends; especially those with nowhere to go and no family around. Our house has always been open to whoever needed a spot to be. One year we opened the local bar in Harrisonburg to whoever was out there, pot luck. Some years we have actually

gone to Grandma's house but even then we brought other friends and families. The guests might have been strangers when they got there but they were friends forever after. Then there is "Turkey Jam" a musical weekend tradition that friends in NJ host. Speaks for itself. The menus have been all over the board as well. Turkey is highly over-rated especially when fried. Not to say that a turkey sandwich with butter and cranberry isn't one of life's little pleasures but the fuss over the bird is wasted on me. Stuff it with your favorite stuffing, cook it in the brown paper bag the groceries came in and call it a day. Just follow my mantra: "There is no excuse for bad food and the difference between good food and bad is about two minutes so get it out of the oven!" One thing though…. mincemeat pie is a fitting end to any meal. - Rim Vining, AutoKnown Better

Happy Thanksgiving to all, from all of us at Front Porch Magazine and Web.

Happy Thanksgiving to all. Thank you.

For the strength of the people I know who are suffering from illness, and for the character they live by; the Rob’s Army site that we follow. That is why so many of us turned out for your Toast of The Town in September. Thank you. Be well. Stay strong! All the best, Preston Riley, Fredericksburg

Our Deadline for Advertisements, Calendar submissions (follow the link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/ho w-tto-ssubmit-o online/), and stories is the 20th of the month preceding publication.

About The Cover: What says “November” better than pumpkins and mums? Nothing we know of, and Sue Henderson agrees. She went out and captured the richness of color that November mums and pumpkins provide for our simple pleasure.

Advertising rates are available upon request. Email your request to frntprch@aol.com Dedication: We dedicate this issue to the memory of Primrose Vining, mother of writer Rim Vining.

Coming up in December: Dan Finnegan is back into the woods after selling LibertyTown. What is he up to in Caroline County? We take a walk in the woods with Dan to find his design inspiration (photo). The Economic Development Authority in the City of Fredericksburg has discovered the Arts — Learn why the business community sees the arts as an asset to economic development… Insight from former EDA board member, Christopher Thomas Limbrick.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

5


ON THE PORCH Rob Grogan

Editor

thankful for...

Photographer Archer Di Peppe Contributing Writers & Artists Alicia Antezano A.E.Bayne Aby Bethem Alea Bryer Megan Byrnes Collette Caprara C.Ruth Cassell Lezlie Cheryl Pamela Coopwood Ryan Davis Arch Di Peppe Arlene Evans Rob Fergusson Fran k Fratoe William Garnett Sue Henderson Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks Katie Hornung Rob Huffman Karl Karch David S. Kerr Jo Middleton Susan Carroll Morgan Stuart Perkins M.L.Powers Vanessa Moncure Scott Richards James Kyle Snyder Matt Thomas Christine Thompson Rim Vining

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. It has a lot to do with the why of it and how it got started; with the beauty of the autumn season as it cusps toward winter; with the bounty of colorful and comforting food; with the traditions; and, of course most of all, with the people we share it with – every year a slice of our extended family. This year is a special Thanksgiving for me and for Virginia. It’s our 25th one wedded and 26th or 27th

one overall at the same table together. It is also one I am grateful to be here for in the midst of my journey fighting carcinoid cancer. I am very thankful… I am thankful for life and liberty; For family and friends; For nature’s bounty;

Front Porch Fredericksburg is a free circulation magazine published monthly by Olde Towne Publishing Co., Inc. Virginia Bigenwald Grogan, Publisher. The mission of Front Porch Fredericksburg is to connect the diverse citizenry of Fredericksburg with lively features and informative columns of interest to our community’s greatest resource, its people. Messages from our readers are welcome. All submissions must be received by e-mail by the 19th of the month preceding publication. Writers are welcome to request Writer’s Guidelines and query the Editor by e-mail. Front Porch Fredericksburg PO Box 9203 Fredericksburg, VA 22403 Phone: 540-220-1922 E-Mail: frntprch@aol.com Web Site: www.frontporchfredericksburg.com The opinions expressed in Front Porch Fredericksburg are those of the contributing writers and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Front Porch Fredericksburg or its advertisers. Copyright 2013 Olde Towne Publishing Co., LLC All rights reserved.

Robgwrites 4

Our Thanksgiving

November 2013

For the farmers and community that embrace organic, healthy and sustainable food, locally sourced; For the colors of autumn and the promise of winter’s serenity; For the means to stay in touch with so many people, instantly, and with loved ones and friends far away; For our troops and first responders, our law enforcement, our peace workers and social workers, our integrative medicine practitioners and medical doctors; For our community’s proud history and

messages Hi Rob, Thank you so so much for our article (FCCA: 50 Years And Beyond, by Paula Rose). We all owe you. Please let me know if I can do anything to help you anytime. What a great way to spread the word! Cheryl Bosch, Fredericksburg Hey, Rob Keep up the good work and the good fight. Tracey Grady, Stafford Dear Rob The October issue of Front Porch is a testimony to fortitude. How you and your publisher wife, Virginia B. Grogan, could produce such a work of art after all you went through in September smacks of strength! My prayers continue for your health and well-being. We readers are blessed by what you do and how you manage to get it done month after month regardless of your personal situation as chronicled on facebook and

Front porch fredericksburg

Maybe like yours, maybe different, all with great thanks!

rich culture;

For the people of Fredericksburg’s compassion and generosity; For every moment and every free choice we are given to seize; For music and art and the amazing people who make it, and for athletes who achieve their potential; For our advertisers and readers who allow us to earn a living doing what we love where we love;

For humanity, compassion, and those individuals who always do the right thing for the right reasons;

For all of the children in our life, and those to come;

For men of goodwill and women of wisdom;

For the birds I love to watch and listen to as they sing and call on one another – from the tiny hummingbirds and working woodpeckers, to the mighty falcons roosting in our yard;

For My Two Mary’s — my wife (Virginia Mary) and our daughter (Alexis Mary);

For crepe myrtles and plum trees and that old sassafras that is first to turn leaves each fall; For modern conveniences and the right perspective on them; For the lives of those we have lost in 2013;

For the mysteries of life and universe, the unanswered questions and the rigorous pursuit of answers; For justice – not just for some but for all; And, for you, whoever you are, as promising of goodness as a sunrise over the bay…

Sensory satisfaction Thanksgiving isn’t so much a tradition in my family; it can’t be. With my family’s need to share time between inlaws and with each other, we rarely are able to carry out any sort of tradition together on the holiday. That being said, Thanksgiving is, for me, a time where I can count on the sensory details that come along with the holiday. Whether it’s a five hour car-ride up to my mother’s home in New Jersey or a 15-minute car ride up to my mother-inlaw’s home in Stafford, the crispness of an

early frost waifs its way through the car vents and it sends me back to my childhood Thanksgivings. Brown, fragile leaves strewn about like the brown sugar topping on my nana’s Entennmann’s breakfast coffee cake, the air warmly scented with the promise of the best chocolate pie that only my grandmother could make, nebulous cloud formations in the grey-skied-calmness like heavy bedding on the coldest of autumn nights. It’s the promise of the welcoming reception as family walks through the door- the smiles and the jovial remarks about how much older we all look. It’s all good. It’s my Thanksgiving sensory tradition. – Katie Hornung, feature writer Until we can’t move Almost without exception my mother, our two children, and three grandchildren all come for Thanksgiving dinner. It is not uncommon for us to have an additional guest or two. Sometimes we have had so many people that we have had to move dinner to tables set up in the living room. It is always the traditional

fare. I look for the biggest turkey I can find. I love the leftovers and we prepare a box of them for each of our children and guests, too. Way too much is just about right. We always have homemade stuffing, mashed potatoes, yams with marshmallows, string bean casserole, two types of cranberry sauce, biscuits (Why do I always want to put a “qu” in that word?), and two pies. One is pumpkin and one is not. I think Robin looks forward to the stuffing the most. That is what she liked best as a kid. I like it all. We all eat until we can’t move and then complain that we can’t move. We swear next year we will be different, but we never are. – Archer Di Peppe, Quiet Moments and What’s It Worth? Tradition? The only thing consistent in the 35 Thanksgivings that Kathy & I have spent together is that they all revolved around sharing a meal with friends; especially those with nowhere to go and no family around. Our house has always been open to whoever needed a spot to be. One year we opened the local bar in Harrisonburg to whoever was out there, pot luck. Some years we have actually

gone to Grandma's house but even then we brought other friends and families. The guests might have been strangers when they got there but they were friends forever after. Then there is "Turkey Jam" a musical weekend tradition that friends in NJ host. Speaks for itself. The menus have been all over the board as well. Turkey is highly over-rated especially when fried. Not to say that a turkey sandwich with butter and cranberry isn't one of life's little pleasures but the fuss over the bird is wasted on me. Stuff it with your favorite stuffing, cook it in the brown paper bag the groceries came in and call it a day. Just follow my mantra: "There is no excuse for bad food and the difference between good food and bad is about two minutes so get it out of the oven!" One thing though…. mincemeat pie is a fitting end to any meal. - Rim Vining, AutoKnown Better

Happy Thanksgiving to all, from all of us at Front Porch Magazine and Web.

Happy Thanksgiving to all. Thank you.

For the strength of the people I know who are suffering from illness, and for the character they live by; the Rob’s Army site that we follow. That is why so many of us turned out for your Toast of The Town in September. Thank you. Be well. Stay strong! All the best, Preston Riley, Fredericksburg

Our Deadline for Advertisements, Calendar submissions (follow the link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/ho w-tto-ssubmit-o online/), and stories is the 20th of the month preceding publication.

About The Cover: What says “November” better than pumpkins and mums? Nothing we know of, and Sue Henderson agrees. She went out and captured the richness of color that November mums and pumpkins provide for our simple pleasure.

Advertising rates are available upon request. Email your request to frntprch@aol.com Dedication: We dedicate this issue to the memory of Primrose Vining, mother of writer Rim Vining.

Coming up in December: Dan Finnegan is back into the woods after selling LibertyTown. What is he up to in Caroline County? We take a walk in the woods with Dan to find his design inspiration (photo). The Economic Development Authority in the City of Fredericksburg has discovered the Arts — Learn why the business community sees the arts as an asset to economic development… Insight from former EDA board member, Christopher Thomas Limbrick.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

5


One Teacher

Gift-Giving? Shop The Merry Market!

This Autumn Doesn’t Fall By A.E.Bayne

By Alea Bryar

It’s the question that every shopper faces as the holiday season approaches: Where do you find the perfect gift? If you want your Christmas budget to do double duty and not only find the perfect, one-of-a-kind gift but also help children in your community, then this year head over to the Olde Silk Mill at 1707 Princess Anne Street for The Fredericksburg Area Service League’s (FASL) 7 th annual Merry Market. This “Boutique Shopping Experience” is not only a great chance to get everyone crossed off your gift list, but it also supports one of Fredericksburg’s most valuable service organizations, FASL. The women of FASL have been volunteering for more than twenty years with a commitment to serving children of the Fredericksburg area. They have partnered with other local service organizations and charities such as the YMCA and the Thurman/Brisben Homeless Shelter. To date, they have contributed more than $600,000 to the Fredericksburg community. FASL also serves the community through its signature scholarship and educational programs. For example, Books In Hand, a program that distributes 1,000 new books

to underprivileged children of all ages in the Fredericksburg area. This year’s prime fundraising event, Merry Market, will be open to the public from Saturday November 23 (9 am5 pm), through Sunday November 24 (12 pm-4 pm). Admission is $4 at the door, free for children 12 and under. Merry Market brings together over 30 unique artisans and vendors, offering everything from wine-related gifts to children’s clothing and fine art. Artisans include painter Joelle Cathleen (photo of her work above) photographer Christopher Rok, and many more. Shoppers are certain to find unique gifts for friends and family of all ages. All proceeds from the event benefit local children’s charities. If you’re eager to get an even earlier start on your holiday shopping (like Kristie McDowell (L) and Jessica Berringer) you’re looking for a fun night out, then don’t miss the Jingle Bell Cocktail. Though the doors to Merry Market don’t officially open until Saturday, November 23, Jingle Bell Cocktail guests can get a private Merry Market shopping experience from 7 pm to 11 pm on Friday night, November 22. Tickets for this exclusive event are limited to just 250 guests and are $35 in advance

Welcome Fall with Trollbeads the original bead bracelet

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 6

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

and $45 at the door. Jingle Bell Cocktail guests will enjoy catering by Foode, wine tastings from Old House Vineyards and Potomac Point Winery, a complementary cocktail with a commemorative wine glass, and the opportunity to bid on special Silent Auction items. Tickets can be purchased online at www.faserviceleague.com. Events like these are not only fun, but they are essential to the goals of FASL in their quest to serve the children of Fredericksburg. To find out more about this unique holiday event, contact FASL at merrymarketshow@gmail.com. To learn more about how you can join with FASL to serve children in the Fredericksburg area, contact them at faserviceleague@gmail.com.

Tracey Bray is a FASL member.

Recently, in her emboldened speech to the United Nations, Malala Yousafzai passionately proclaimed, “One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” Selflessly, Yousafzai has pressed educational inequalities to the global forefront, braving threats and defying death to bring her message to the world. Yet, here in America, education and teachers are often portrayed in less than flattering light. Here, the concentration is often on what schools are doing wrong, rather than on what committed teachers are doing right. One such teacher is Autumn Dalton, a seven-year veteran of Stafford Senior High School’s English department. Vivacious and vibrant as her fuchsia tipped curls, Dalton says her choice of career was never a question. “I’ve always liked knowing things and teaching people, and I have definitely always admired teachers. I’ve wanted to be a teacher since kindergarten. I went to a very poor elementary school, but there were some extremely dedicated women working there who were very good at what they did.” Inspired, Dalton remembers teachers who were long-suffering, like Mrs. Starner, who read her weird poetry and inspired her to write fiction, and Mrs. Avery, who told her class it was her job to get them to love literature. Dalton remembers, “She was another one of those teachers to whom nothing was ever

too weird or unexpected. Today, not only am I that way as a person, but I’m definitely that way as a teacher. I’ve never forgotten that.” Dalton has a few traits that may remind readers of their own favorite teachers. She says, “Humor is a huge part of how I teach; it’s a part of who I am as a person. Also, I’ve experienced a lot of diversity, both in and out of the classroom. I come from a very small town and have similar experiences to many kids from this county; but, I’ve also branched out and had chances to change my perspective. I’ve taught in different school environments with a wide spectrum of students. That’s extremely important, being able to relate to whoever walks through the door.” If quality of character is not proof, here’s the pudding. Zach Pfau, a junior and former student of Daltons, gushes, “Oh my gosh, she’s awesome! Miss Dalton is the best teacher I’ve ever had. She covered more than just what was necessary, which I really appreciated because she wasn’t just teaching to the test; she was actually teaching. I had freshman English with her, but I’ve probably come into her class for an entire period every day since.” Beyond the classroom, Dalton spends her free time building connections that will enhance her lessons during the school year. This past summer, she completed a study abroad at Exeter College at Oxford as the finishing piece to her MA from George Mason University. She spent her summer studying Shakespeare and Contemporary British Literature, both of which relate directly to what she teaches in her classroom. She beams, “I got a first in both classes, which was exciting; and I got the opportunity to travel, which I am able to bring back to the students.” Dalton shares her students’ sentiments, which tend to say it best, “I’ve heard more than once from students, ‘Will you just teach everything; will you just teach my life?’ I try to pull in a lot of connections to history, science, and politics, and I think that’s really effective for the kids. It pulls on what they are actually interested in knowing, and it helps them understand their world when they can integrate it all together.” In the coming months, I hope to share the names of many exceptional teachers in our area. Send nominations to baynefrontporch@gmail.com.

FREDERICKSBURG

A.E. Bayne is a teacher, writer, and artist from Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

7


One Teacher

Gift-Giving? Shop The Merry Market!

This Autumn Doesn’t Fall By A.E.Bayne

By Alea Bryar

It’s the question that every shopper faces as the holiday season approaches: Where do you find the perfect gift? If you want your Christmas budget to do double duty and not only find the perfect, one-of-a-kind gift but also help children in your community, then this year head over to the Olde Silk Mill at 1707 Princess Anne Street for The Fredericksburg Area Service League’s (FASL) 7 th annual Merry Market. This “Boutique Shopping Experience” is not only a great chance to get everyone crossed off your gift list, but it also supports one of Fredericksburg’s most valuable service organizations, FASL. The women of FASL have been volunteering for more than twenty years with a commitment to serving children of the Fredericksburg area. They have partnered with other local service organizations and charities such as the YMCA and the Thurman/Brisben Homeless Shelter. To date, they have contributed more than $600,000 to the Fredericksburg community. FASL also serves the community through its signature scholarship and educational programs. For example, Books In Hand, a program that distributes 1,000 new books

to underprivileged children of all ages in the Fredericksburg area. This year’s prime fundraising event, Merry Market, will be open to the public from Saturday November 23 (9 am5 pm), through Sunday November 24 (12 pm-4 pm). Admission is $4 at the door, free for children 12 and under. Merry Market brings together over 30 unique artisans and vendors, offering everything from wine-related gifts to children’s clothing and fine art. Artisans include painter Joelle Cathleen (photo of her work above) photographer Christopher Rok, and many more. Shoppers are certain to find unique gifts for friends and family of all ages. All proceeds from the event benefit local children’s charities. If you’re eager to get an even earlier start on your holiday shopping (like Kristie McDowell (L) and Jessica Berringer) you’re looking for a fun night out, then don’t miss the Jingle Bell Cocktail. Though the doors to Merry Market don’t officially open until Saturday, November 23, Jingle Bell Cocktail guests can get a private Merry Market shopping experience from 7 pm to 11 pm on Friday night, November 22. Tickets for this exclusive event are limited to just 250 guests and are $35 in advance

Welcome Fall with Trollbeads the original bead bracelet

606 Caroline Street Old Town Fredericksburg 373-7847 www.gemstonecreations.org Tuesday - Saturday 10-5 Wednesday 10-6:30

Where Fredericksburg Gets Engaged 6

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

and $45 at the door. Jingle Bell Cocktail guests will enjoy catering by Foode, wine tastings from Old House Vineyards and Potomac Point Winery, a complementary cocktail with a commemorative wine glass, and the opportunity to bid on special Silent Auction items. Tickets can be purchased online at www.faserviceleague.com. Events like these are not only fun, but they are essential to the goals of FASL in their quest to serve the children of Fredericksburg. To find out more about this unique holiday event, contact FASL at merrymarketshow@gmail.com. To learn more about how you can join with FASL to serve children in the Fredericksburg area, contact them at faserviceleague@gmail.com.

Tracey Bray is a FASL member.

Recently, in her emboldened speech to the United Nations, Malala Yousafzai passionately proclaimed, “One child, one teacher, one book, one pen can change the world.” Selflessly, Yousafzai has pressed educational inequalities to the global forefront, braving threats and defying death to bring her message to the world. Yet, here in America, education and teachers are often portrayed in less than flattering light. Here, the concentration is often on what schools are doing wrong, rather than on what committed teachers are doing right. One such teacher is Autumn Dalton, a seven-year veteran of Stafford Senior High School’s English department. Vivacious and vibrant as her fuchsia tipped curls, Dalton says her choice of career was never a question. “I’ve always liked knowing things and teaching people, and I have definitely always admired teachers. I’ve wanted to be a teacher since kindergarten. I went to a very poor elementary school, but there were some extremely dedicated women working there who were very good at what they did.” Inspired, Dalton remembers teachers who were long-suffering, like Mrs. Starner, who read her weird poetry and inspired her to write fiction, and Mrs. Avery, who told her class it was her job to get them to love literature. Dalton remembers, “She was another one of those teachers to whom nothing was ever

too weird or unexpected. Today, not only am I that way as a person, but I’m definitely that way as a teacher. I’ve never forgotten that.” Dalton has a few traits that may remind readers of their own favorite teachers. She says, “Humor is a huge part of how I teach; it’s a part of who I am as a person. Also, I’ve experienced a lot of diversity, both in and out of the classroom. I come from a very small town and have similar experiences to many kids from this county; but, I’ve also branched out and had chances to change my perspective. I’ve taught in different school environments with a wide spectrum of students. That’s extremely important, being able to relate to whoever walks through the door.” If quality of character is not proof, here’s the pudding. Zach Pfau, a junior and former student of Daltons, gushes, “Oh my gosh, she’s awesome! Miss Dalton is the best teacher I’ve ever had. She covered more than just what was necessary, which I really appreciated because she wasn’t just teaching to the test; she was actually teaching. I had freshman English with her, but I’ve probably come into her class for an entire period every day since.” Beyond the classroom, Dalton spends her free time building connections that will enhance her lessons during the school year. This past summer, she completed a study abroad at Exeter College at Oxford as the finishing piece to her MA from George Mason University. She spent her summer studying Shakespeare and Contemporary British Literature, both of which relate directly to what she teaches in her classroom. She beams, “I got a first in both classes, which was exciting; and I got the opportunity to travel, which I am able to bring back to the students.” Dalton shares her students’ sentiments, which tend to say it best, “I’ve heard more than once from students, ‘Will you just teach everything; will you just teach my life?’ I try to pull in a lot of connections to history, science, and politics, and I think that’s really effective for the kids. It pulls on what they are actually interested in knowing, and it helps them understand their world when they can integrate it all together.” In the coming months, I hope to share the names of many exceptional teachers in our area. Send nominations to baynefrontporch@gmail.com.

FREDERICKSBURG

A.E. Bayne is a teacher, writer, and artist from Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

7


Slice

GOT HISTORY ? Follow in the Steps of the Founding Fathers in the Age of Enlightenment and beyond.

of fxbg life "White Plains Farm". Circa 1720. Gentleman's Farm of 38 acres in King George County. A stately Colonial house that speaks to Preservationists and transports you to the era when George was King.

$495,000..

Larry Hinkle (above left) has made something like 66 ukuleles. One of his most recent productions landed in the hands of “The Jimi Hendrix of Ukuleles” – Jake Shimabukuro. On Oct. 25, thanks to Larry thinking ‘what the heck’, Keller Williams presented Jake(above right) with the instrument while on tour with him. From his little wood shop, “the shack” at Ficklin Street and Julian Drive, Larry makes Hinkle Ukuleles, the one for Jake out of Birdseye Maple Wood. “I made two at once in case I messed one up,” said Larry as he cut me some plywood to use as air conditioning surrounds. He’s been playing guitar for years but how he came to play the ukulele is a pisser of a story: While living in California for his apprenticeship in wood, Larry and his family decided to go to Hawaii on vacation. In the Hawaiian spirit, Larry picked up a used ukulele on the cheap. Day after day, he sat shirtless on the Pacific beach teaching himself to play the instrument. He discovered how similar – yet different —its chords were to playing guitar, and he got hooked by it.

By the end of vacation, Larry was sunburn – except for a patch of his stomach and chest in the shape of a ukulele… Meanwhile, the everprolific Keller announced a massive winter tour with his latest musical muse, a 6piece funk band dubbed ‘More Than A Little’. The “What The FUNK Tour” takes Keller and this cast of hard-hitting funk players through major markets throughout the Midwest and West in early 2014. Funk – the blazing and soulful new album by Keller Williams with More Than A Little - drops on Nov. 12. The remainder of the 2013 season finds Keller performing solo and in a variety of creative collaborations; among them, December 26’s return home to Fredericksburg for his highly anticipated holiday tradition - the 13 th annual SPCA Holiday Benefit concert. This year, the festivity moves to downtown’s intimate Old Silk Mill, where Keller will perform an always-favorite solo looping set before being joined for second set with Keller on bass by Steve Kimock on guitar and Kimock’s son John Morgan on drums. 100% of profits from the concert will go to the local branch of the SPCA…

Upscale Painted Furniture ~ Interior Design ~ Home Accessories ~ Custom Repurposing/Refinishing ~ Local Artisans

VISIT EW OUR N ! SPACE SHOP

PLEASE

211 Caroline Street "The Goolrick-Caldwell House". Circa 1787. always a fashionable address over the centuries. Freedom rings out from this three-story Federal house that is spacious yet comfortable and intimate. Two of our city mayors, Peter Goolrick and John Caldwell, have resided here and enjoyed the river view.

And, Jake can (among other great things he’ll be doing this winter) be seen playing George Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” in this YouTube video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXeEZJzuHLU

$895,000.

-RG

1107 Princess Anne Street "The Charles Dick House". Circa 1750. A Patriotic Salute to this residence steeped in the early history of Fredericksburg. Spacious 5bedroom house with carriage house apartment and garage. Dine where President George Washington "supped" in 1771.

2010 Fall Hill Avenue "Elmhurst". Circa 1871. Reconstruction of the Good Life by Washington Elms of Saratoga Springs, New York. This lovely Italianate house with its own tower was completely rehabbed in 2006 and placed on the National Register. It boasts the biggest FRONT PORCH in town.

$1,099,999.

$1,250,000. owner/broker 709 Caroline Street One of John Tayloe's "Seven Sisters" buildings in the heart of the Downtown Historic business district. Circa 1782. Revolutionary Idea - Stop commuting. Live upstairs and work downstairs in this stylish building located across from the Visitors Center.

$650,000.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE AND OTHER PROPERTIES, PLEASE CONTACT THE MOTHER-DAUGHTER TEAM, SUSAN AND ANNE MORGAN PATES SUSAN, 540.809.9443, susanpates@aol.com ANNE MORGAN, 540.836.5700; ampates88@aol.com

915 Sophia Street ~ 540-373-7625 ~ www.rockingthechair.com 8

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

9


Slice

GOT HISTORY ? Follow in the Steps of the Founding Fathers in the Age of Enlightenment and beyond.

of fxbg life "White Plains Farm". Circa 1720. Gentleman's Farm of 38 acres in King George County. A stately Colonial house that speaks to Preservationists and transports you to the era when George was King.

$495,000..

Larry Hinkle (above left) has made something like 66 ukuleles. One of his most recent productions landed in the hands of “The Jimi Hendrix of Ukuleles” – Jake Shimabukuro. On Oct. 25, thanks to Larry thinking ‘what the heck’, Keller Williams presented Jake(above right) with the instrument while on tour with him. From his little wood shop, “the shack” at Ficklin Street and Julian Drive, Larry makes Hinkle Ukuleles, the one for Jake out of Birdseye Maple Wood. “I made two at once in case I messed one up,” said Larry as he cut me some plywood to use as air conditioning surrounds. He’s been playing guitar for years but how he came to play the ukulele is a pisser of a story: While living in California for his apprenticeship in wood, Larry and his family decided to go to Hawaii on vacation. In the Hawaiian spirit, Larry picked up a used ukulele on the cheap. Day after day, he sat shirtless on the Pacific beach teaching himself to play the instrument. He discovered how similar – yet different —its chords were to playing guitar, and he got hooked by it.

By the end of vacation, Larry was sunburn – except for a patch of his stomach and chest in the shape of a ukulele… Meanwhile, the everprolific Keller announced a massive winter tour with his latest musical muse, a 6piece funk band dubbed ‘More Than A Little’. The “What The FUNK Tour” takes Keller and this cast of hard-hitting funk players through major markets throughout the Midwest and West in early 2014. Funk – the blazing and soulful new album by Keller Williams with More Than A Little - drops on Nov. 12. The remainder of the 2013 season finds Keller performing solo and in a variety of creative collaborations; among them, December 26’s return home to Fredericksburg for his highly anticipated holiday tradition - the 13 th annual SPCA Holiday Benefit concert. This year, the festivity moves to downtown’s intimate Old Silk Mill, where Keller will perform an always-favorite solo looping set before being joined for second set with Keller on bass by Steve Kimock on guitar and Kimock’s son John Morgan on drums. 100% of profits from the concert will go to the local branch of the SPCA…

Upscale Painted Furniture ~ Interior Design ~ Home Accessories ~ Custom Repurposing/Refinishing ~ Local Artisans

VISIT EW OUR N ! SPACE SHOP

PLEASE

211 Caroline Street "The Goolrick-Caldwell House". Circa 1787. always a fashionable address over the centuries. Freedom rings out from this three-story Federal house that is spacious yet comfortable and intimate. Two of our city mayors, Peter Goolrick and John Caldwell, have resided here and enjoyed the river view.

And, Jake can (among other great things he’ll be doing this winter) be seen playing George Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” in this YouTube video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXeEZJzuHLU

$895,000.

-RG

1107 Princess Anne Street "The Charles Dick House". Circa 1750. A Patriotic Salute to this residence steeped in the early history of Fredericksburg. Spacious 5bedroom house with carriage house apartment and garage. Dine where President George Washington "supped" in 1771.

2010 Fall Hill Avenue "Elmhurst". Circa 1871. Reconstruction of the Good Life by Washington Elms of Saratoga Springs, New York. This lovely Italianate house with its own tower was completely rehabbed in 2006 and placed on the National Register. It boasts the biggest FRONT PORCH in town.

$1,099,999.

$1,250,000. owner/broker 709 Caroline Street One of John Tayloe's "Seven Sisters" buildings in the heart of the Downtown Historic business district. Circa 1782. Revolutionary Idea - Stop commuting. Live upstairs and work downstairs in this stylish building located across from the Visitors Center.

$650,000.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THESE AND OTHER PROPERTIES, PLEASE CONTACT THE MOTHER-DAUGHTER TEAM, SUSAN AND ANNE MORGAN PATES SUSAN, 540.809.9443, susanpates@aol.com ANNE MORGAN, 540.836.5700; ampates88@aol.com

915 Sophia Street ~ 540-373-7625 ~ www.rockingthechair.com 8

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

9


Retired & Buck Naked

Bill Carroll:

On The Back Porch

abuzz at the b By rob grogan

Radio is all about personality. Sure, you have to be articulate, have some technical skills, and good timing, but the essence of broadcast success is Bill Carroll’s got it and personality. regional radio gets it – weeknights from 7 to Midnight on B101.5. Also known as “DJ Bill,” Carroll can be found moonlighting around town at various local hot spots, spinning records and bringing dance crowds to their feet. Add in the various benefits and events he mikes up at and Fredericksburg has its consummate radio pro, and a nicer guy is hard to find on either side of the microphone. No wonder – Bill Carroll is from Upstate New York – the land of wineries, apple farms and tons of mountains. Something in the air or water makes for a good personality tonic that apparently becomes infused in any child who grows up there, regardless of where they end up. Born April 4 – which year he did not say, Bill is a straight forward and down-to-earth guy. His favorite beverage is chocolate milk; his favorite food (judging by what’s in his refrigerator) is cheese: “Lots and lots of cheese!” he says. You can also bribe him with bottled water, milk, leftover homemade lasagna, juices, and all kinds of fruits and vegetables.

10

November 2013

He’s a mob movie an, his favorites being the Godfather series, A Bronx Tale, and Goodfellas. He’s not ashamed to admit he also loves Disney movies, and comedies. If Hollywood were to make a movie about Bill, he would be played by Jim Caviezel (The Count of Monte Cristo): “His determination, his passion for life and his sensitivity to others would make a perfect fit for someone to play me… and a little bit of goofiness, too, heh, heh, heh.” As a superhero, or were he one, Bill’s greatest power would be invisibility. “I’d love to catch bad people in the act and then smack ‘em in the back of the head for doing it.” And if Bill were a car, he’d be a classy Italian vehicle, for sure. A diverse cuisine lover, Bill will gladly dine on Italian, Mexican, Asian, Peruvian, American… and his single favorite dish would be lasagna. “Mmm!” he says offmike. “Man, I love food!” Made for radio, Bill has always been drawn to music. As a child he thought the radio was where the music came from. “The DJ’s, the excitement they caused with the music they were playing – I was amazed by it.” At age seven, he created his own radio show by recording the local station and then transcribing what the DJ said. “I’d re-record it in my own voice and insert it where I would talk around the music. I timed it out pretty well. It was a hoot!” Years later, when the older sister of a then 15-year-old Bill dated a DJ from a nearby station that Bill listened to incessantly, Bill says he begged, begged, and begged her to introduce them at the station. “From that day when it finally happened, I was obsessed!” You can become obsessed with Bill Carroll – or, just enjoy listening to his radio program – and his personality by tuning into WBQB FM – B101.5 – the award-winning B and the seat of personality. Rob Grogan was a radio DJ in Bowie, Texas from 1978 to 1979, and still loves catching the airwaves.

Front porch fredericksburg

the perfect thanksgiving or else there’s sushi by jo middleton My all-time favorite greeting card artist is Mary Englebreit. Here comes Thanksgiving and in the mail are my Happy cards with Englebreit’s picture of a disgruntled cook and the caption, “Turkey Schmurkey!” Amen Sister, Amen, I say, oh yes. When I lived in the Southland and went to the woods, I saw real turkeys wandering around with their women and chicks. I was stunned. They are absolutely beautiful, quite unlike the packagedturkey- farm, or “free range” Toms frozen deathly white and badly-bruised blue, about what you’d expect to see as the end product of those turkeys, which were stuffed into the chopper, legs frantically waving, while Sarah Palin in the foreground delivered her Veep campaign at Thanksgiving speech. When the Southern Boys pass their game onto their great reward, they die happy, usually by bow and arrow, one shot and it’s off to heaven, rather than trying head first with horrific terror to dodge the executioner’s blade. But arrow or blade come Turkey Day, I’m having none of those birds, deep fried, baked, boiled, or souped. Oyster dressing, that’s another story. I scarf that down like bonbons with champagne. Mashed potatoes with butter and cream (none of that blue skim milk), magnificent. `Serve me that bowl of roasted Brussels sprouts, then pass the Parker House Rolls (and more butter), and you have given me a true-to-be thankful for Thanksgiving dinner. Each recipe for Parker House Rolls directs the cook at certain intervals to let the dough rest. No wonder all that pushing, kneading, and shoving would quite exhaust even the most strenuous allpurpose flour, as most certainly it exhausts me. Personally, I am of the beautiful Elizabeth David, English cookery writer’s opinion. Said she, in her 1977 book, English Bread and Yeast Cookery, “I have only limited tolerance for all the rolling, folding, and turning.” Well said, Elizabeth, as only you English can do with your elegant vocabulary. I will happily eat a breadbasket full of those rolls, but have no intention of making them. Rolling, folding, and turning aside, let us not forget the easily constructed, real pumpkin pie, made with Libby’s canned pumpkin (the recipe for which has been on the label since 1950) and poured into a hand-made pie crust, thank you very much. This meal of

gratitude on this Pilgrim and Indian day should, of course, begin with Her Majesty’s Dubonnet Rouge and Gin. This old commoner prefers the Dubonnet Blanc instead. Of course, I will dine on this sumptuous meal if I am invited to another’s table. I make a real mess of multicourse menus, all of which must be completed simultaneously. Given my age, most of my culinary friends have fallen off the perch. Since the possibility of being invited by people who feast on cholesterol and fat is limited, I will probably go to Miso and have sushi and plum wine, only after first going out here, retired and buck naked on the back porch for a well deserved nap. Jo Middleton is on our list of great people to be thankful for. Her wit, compassion, and charm and consistently wonderful and reliable writing is an asset to this publication and the root of our friendship.

What’s It Worth? close to the heart by archer dipeppe I have to admit that for many years I have been fascinated by antique miniature portraits. The two types most often seen are the late 18th Century to early 19th Century examples and then the later revival of the style in the Victorian Era. I guess the allure for me is in the exquisite detail on such a small medium. Then again, I am amazed that the majority of them are watercolors. You can fix an error in oil or acrylic, but watercolor is so unforgiving. It is not true that they were painted with a brush with a single hair. Miniature portraits began as additions to manuscripts from the Middle Ages. The decoration often had an oval miniature of the patron of the work praying or giving the book to a saint. In fact, the word miniature comes from a Latin word “minium” that described the red ink used to decorate the pages rather than any reference to size. These miniature portraits begin to show up in 16th Century France and then during the rein of Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I in England. They became the rage across the European continent. At first, only the royalty and

the very wealthy could afford them. Later as economics improved, they became symbols of the upwardly moving merchant class. They were first painted on vellum, but before too long, thin wafers of ivory were used most often. Miniatures are about intimacy. They were painted for and given to loved ones. They were often used to mark important family transitions, such as engagements, marriages, births, and deaths. Miniatures allowed a person to carry a likeness of someone they loved with them. A man would often carry his beloved’s portrait in a small leather or wooden case in his breast pocket. A woman was more likely to wear one openly as a piece of jewelry. It was not uncommon for lockets of hair from both individuals to be intertwined in glass on the back of the portrait. Each one is a love story. It is a different world today where people search for the shadow of intimacy on websites. I think we have lost something there. There are those who collect period miniatures of famous people. Many miniatures were painted of luminaries,

such as George Washington, Napoleon, and Catherine the Great. These can vary in value from a few hundred dollars to several thousand depending on the quality and if they are signed by a wellknown artist. Most miniatures are not signed. One way in which you can tell the early miniatures from the later Victorian ones is that most of the Victorian ones are watercolors on porcelain rather than ivory. Beware of Internet listings that describe the item as “period style.” These are modern reproductions and can be purchased for just a few dollars. You will find some original miniatures made into the 1930’s, but the advent of photography in the mid 19th Century slowly reduced the demand for hand painted miniatures. You can find a variety of genuine miniatures on eBay. Many common early

19th Century ones are readily available from $150-$250, but the nicer ones can bring over $1000. The common Victorian ones start at $75.00 and go up to a couple of hundred dollars. The Victorian ones shown in this column are from Beck’s Antiques and Books, 708 Caroline Street. They range from the low to mid hundreddollar range. Bill Beck was very helpful in the research for this column. A wonderful book on the topic is Love and Loss by Robin Jaffee Frank. Archer Di Peppe is a certified appraiser. Call him at 540-373-9636.

Jewel Box Since 1940 Your Hometown Jeweler On-Premise Jewelry Repair Watch Batteries Gold Buying Engraving 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

11


Retired & Buck Naked

Bill Carroll:

On The Back Porch

abuzz at the b By rob grogan

Radio is all about personality. Sure, you have to be articulate, have some technical skills, and good timing, but the essence of broadcast success is Bill Carroll’s got it and personality. regional radio gets it – weeknights from 7 to Midnight on B101.5. Also known as “DJ Bill,” Carroll can be found moonlighting around town at various local hot spots, spinning records and bringing dance crowds to their feet. Add in the various benefits and events he mikes up at and Fredericksburg has its consummate radio pro, and a nicer guy is hard to find on either side of the microphone. No wonder – Bill Carroll is from Upstate New York – the land of wineries, apple farms and tons of mountains. Something in the air or water makes for a good personality tonic that apparently becomes infused in any child who grows up there, regardless of where they end up. Born April 4 – which year he did not say, Bill is a straight forward and down-to-earth guy. His favorite beverage is chocolate milk; his favorite food (judging by what’s in his refrigerator) is cheese: “Lots and lots of cheese!” he says. You can also bribe him with bottled water, milk, leftover homemade lasagna, juices, and all kinds of fruits and vegetables.

10

November 2013

He’s a mob movie an, his favorites being the Godfather series, A Bronx Tale, and Goodfellas. He’s not ashamed to admit he also loves Disney movies, and comedies. If Hollywood were to make a movie about Bill, he would be played by Jim Caviezel (The Count of Monte Cristo): “His determination, his passion for life and his sensitivity to others would make a perfect fit for someone to play me… and a little bit of goofiness, too, heh, heh, heh.” As a superhero, or were he one, Bill’s greatest power would be invisibility. “I’d love to catch bad people in the act and then smack ‘em in the back of the head for doing it.” And if Bill were a car, he’d be a classy Italian vehicle, for sure. A diverse cuisine lover, Bill will gladly dine on Italian, Mexican, Asian, Peruvian, American… and his single favorite dish would be lasagna. “Mmm!” he says offmike. “Man, I love food!” Made for radio, Bill has always been drawn to music. As a child he thought the radio was where the music came from. “The DJ’s, the excitement they caused with the music they were playing – I was amazed by it.” At age seven, he created his own radio show by recording the local station and then transcribing what the DJ said. “I’d re-record it in my own voice and insert it where I would talk around the music. I timed it out pretty well. It was a hoot!” Years later, when the older sister of a then 15-year-old Bill dated a DJ from a nearby station that Bill listened to incessantly, Bill says he begged, begged, and begged her to introduce them at the station. “From that day when it finally happened, I was obsessed!” You can become obsessed with Bill Carroll – or, just enjoy listening to his radio program – and his personality by tuning into WBQB FM – B101.5 – the award-winning B and the seat of personality. Rob Grogan was a radio DJ in Bowie, Texas from 1978 to 1979, and still loves catching the airwaves.

Front porch fredericksburg

the perfect thanksgiving or else there’s sushi by jo middleton My all-time favorite greeting card artist is Mary Englebreit. Here comes Thanksgiving and in the mail are my Happy cards with Englebreit’s picture of a disgruntled cook and the caption, “Turkey Schmurkey!” Amen Sister, Amen, I say, oh yes. When I lived in the Southland and went to the woods, I saw real turkeys wandering around with their women and chicks. I was stunned. They are absolutely beautiful, quite unlike the packagedturkey- farm, or “free range” Toms frozen deathly white and badly-bruised blue, about what you’d expect to see as the end product of those turkeys, which were stuffed into the chopper, legs frantically waving, while Sarah Palin in the foreground delivered her Veep campaign at Thanksgiving speech. When the Southern Boys pass their game onto their great reward, they die happy, usually by bow and arrow, one shot and it’s off to heaven, rather than trying head first with horrific terror to dodge the executioner’s blade. But arrow or blade come Turkey Day, I’m having none of those birds, deep fried, baked, boiled, or souped. Oyster dressing, that’s another story. I scarf that down like bonbons with champagne. Mashed potatoes with butter and cream (none of that blue skim milk), magnificent. `Serve me that bowl of roasted Brussels sprouts, then pass the Parker House Rolls (and more butter), and you have given me a true-to-be thankful for Thanksgiving dinner. Each recipe for Parker House Rolls directs the cook at certain intervals to let the dough rest. No wonder all that pushing, kneading, and shoving would quite exhaust even the most strenuous allpurpose flour, as most certainly it exhausts me. Personally, I am of the beautiful Elizabeth David, English cookery writer’s opinion. Said she, in her 1977 book, English Bread and Yeast Cookery, “I have only limited tolerance for all the rolling, folding, and turning.” Well said, Elizabeth, as only you English can do with your elegant vocabulary. I will happily eat a breadbasket full of those rolls, but have no intention of making them. Rolling, folding, and turning aside, let us not forget the easily constructed, real pumpkin pie, made with Libby’s canned pumpkin (the recipe for which has been on the label since 1950) and poured into a hand-made pie crust, thank you very much. This meal of

gratitude on this Pilgrim and Indian day should, of course, begin with Her Majesty’s Dubonnet Rouge and Gin. This old commoner prefers the Dubonnet Blanc instead. Of course, I will dine on this sumptuous meal if I am invited to another’s table. I make a real mess of multicourse menus, all of which must be completed simultaneously. Given my age, most of my culinary friends have fallen off the perch. Since the possibility of being invited by people who feast on cholesterol and fat is limited, I will probably go to Miso and have sushi and plum wine, only after first going out here, retired and buck naked on the back porch for a well deserved nap. Jo Middleton is on our list of great people to be thankful for. Her wit, compassion, and charm and consistently wonderful and reliable writing is an asset to this publication and the root of our friendship.

What’s It Worth? close to the heart by archer dipeppe I have to admit that for many years I have been fascinated by antique miniature portraits. The two types most often seen are the late 18th Century to early 19th Century examples and then the later revival of the style in the Victorian Era. I guess the allure for me is in the exquisite detail on such a small medium. Then again, I am amazed that the majority of them are watercolors. You can fix an error in oil or acrylic, but watercolor is so unforgiving. It is not true that they were painted with a brush with a single hair. Miniature portraits began as additions to manuscripts from the Middle Ages. The decoration often had an oval miniature of the patron of the work praying or giving the book to a saint. In fact, the word miniature comes from a Latin word “minium” that described the red ink used to decorate the pages rather than any reference to size. These miniature portraits begin to show up in 16th Century France and then during the rein of Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I in England. They became the rage across the European continent. At first, only the royalty and

the very wealthy could afford them. Later as economics improved, they became symbols of the upwardly moving merchant class. They were first painted on vellum, but before too long, thin wafers of ivory were used most often. Miniatures are about intimacy. They were painted for and given to loved ones. They were often used to mark important family transitions, such as engagements, marriages, births, and deaths. Miniatures allowed a person to carry a likeness of someone they loved with them. A man would often carry his beloved’s portrait in a small leather or wooden case in his breast pocket. A woman was more likely to wear one openly as a piece of jewelry. It was not uncommon for lockets of hair from both individuals to be intertwined in glass on the back of the portrait. Each one is a love story. It is a different world today where people search for the shadow of intimacy on websites. I think we have lost something there. There are those who collect period miniatures of famous people. Many miniatures were painted of luminaries,

such as George Washington, Napoleon, and Catherine the Great. These can vary in value from a few hundred dollars to several thousand depending on the quality and if they are signed by a wellknown artist. Most miniatures are not signed. One way in which you can tell the early miniatures from the later Victorian ones is that most of the Victorian ones are watercolors on porcelain rather than ivory. Beware of Internet listings that describe the item as “period style.” These are modern reproductions and can be purchased for just a few dollars. You will find some original miniatures made into the 1930’s, but the advent of photography in the mid 19th Century slowly reduced the demand for hand painted miniatures. You can find a variety of genuine miniatures on eBay. Many common early

19th Century ones are readily available from $150-$250, but the nicer ones can bring over $1000. The common Victorian ones start at $75.00 and go up to a couple of hundred dollars. The Victorian ones shown in this column are from Beck’s Antiques and Books, 708 Caroline Street. They range from the low to mid hundreddollar range. Bill Beck was very helpful in the research for this column. A wonderful book on the topic is Love and Loss by Robin Jaffee Frank. Archer Di Peppe is a certified appraiser. Call him at 540-373-9636.

Jewel Box Since 1940 Your Hometown Jeweler On-Premise Jewelry Repair Watch Batteries Gold Buying Engraving 212 William Street,Fredericksburg 540-373-5513 Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 9-5 front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

11


Cooking With Kyle Simple, easy, delicious

Vino you gotta believe By aby bethem

by james kyle snyder

This time of year is awash with changes. The leaves are turning vibrant colors, eventually yielding to the cold chill of winter’s grip. The days are shorter, preparing us for what is to come. As the air chills, we move too. The wine moves from light and crisp to fuller and more robust, to take off the chill of a more barren winter. But, winter doesn’t start until December 21st, and we are not there yet! The plentiful harvest of lighter, sweeter, vegetables yields to the hardier, more stable root vegetables, which are still available, so let’s use them. As the seasons turn, it is important to use what is fresh and available. For this time of year, we have more apples, gourds, large squash, pumpkins, and mature root vegetables available (not from the grocery store) like beets, potatoes, carrots, leeks, parsnips, turnips, and a host of others, to combine with a small amount of our cupboard staples to stretch the proteins long into winter. I had a hard time deciding which recipe to present for November. Hubbard squash are ready to pick this season (and have been, by now, for quite some time). They hold well through the winter in the root cellar but so do ROOTS! But squash

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg 12

November 2013

hold longer. I cooked both meals and decided for the transition, beef stew is more appropriate. I will long for the fresh robust flavors of a Hubbard squash soup more in January, when all the vegetables are almost dormant, than I will for a beef stew, which incorporates most of the available winter flavors. Hubbard later. Beef stew and mid-season football are now. Cooking is about community coming together. As we move into winter, Mitzi and I have more of our friends over to sup, eat, and relax. Sundays turn into “cooking day” and friends come and go as they please, although most stay for the meal. Beef stew is a definite hook. First, make a loaf of bread 3 hours before the stew. I love fresh bread and stew! Mitzi does this as her bread is better than mine. Next, take about 2 pounds of 1 x 1 cubed beef and dredge it in 1 cup of flour seasoned with S&P. (for S&P recipe, see previous Front Porch articles). Heat 1/8 cup oil and 1/8 cup bacon grease (all oil if you are not schweinegrippe freundlich) in a pressure cooker and brown the beef, turning every 2 mins. While the meat is browning, mince 2 stalks of celery and dice a large yellow onion and add it to the brown. Add 2 Tbs chopped garlic. Rough chop root vegetables to 1.5 x 1.5in and hold. Run to the garden (herb gardens / planters are easy, next year) and get 2 Tbs thyme, 1 Tbs Rosemary, and 1 Tbs oregano (what ever herbs you like). Strip and fine chop herbs and then add them to the browning. Once the meat is brown, add 1/2 bottle of red wine. Throw the root vegetables in at an equal portion until the fill level of the pressure cooker is reached. Stir to combine all ingredients. Top-up with chicken stock and set the pressure cooker for 30 mins on high pressure. Drink remaining wine, laugh and enjoy middle fall while everything is cooking and our world is learning to slow down. When the timer goes off, remember this stew is pressurized. Cover the relief valve with a towel to localize the mess. Once the pressure is bled off, open a hearty red and enjoy. Simple, easy, delicious. Be well. Kyle Snyder is a chef for all seasons.

Front porch fredericksburg

Virginia wine month was October and got me thinking about the history of winemaking in our state and some of the delicious wines we enjoy today. Autumn weather is my favorite in Virginia with crisp nights and cool sunny days. A road trip to one of Virginia’s wineries is like a near perfect afternoon event. Here’s some background before we take a winery tour: Virginia’s wine history began in 1619 with the Jamestown settlement, but it wasn’t until the past 35 years or so that the commercial wine business has really developed and continued to grow because of the true believers in the state’s ability to produce quality juice. Beginning in 1619 in fact, the new world wanted so much to have a flourishing grape crop that Jamestown had a law requirement that each male was required to plant and tend at least 10 vines, but because of the new environment and new pests, the European vines failed. Thomas Jefferson was a true believer in Virginia’s wine growing potential. He experimented with and cultivated European varietals for 30 years but never succeeded in bottling any. George Washington did the same for 11 years at Mount Vernon. In the 1950’s there was a lot of promise with experimental plantings, the early 70’s hosted six new wineries, 1973 European

chardonnay succeeded, and in 1976 the true ‘modern’ Virginia wine believer, Gianni Zonin, an Italian pioneer, started to grow and harvest at Barboursville near Charlottesville. His belief in Virginia as a viable winery state helped support other fellow wineries develop in the state. This led to today’s top five varietals of Virginia: Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Vidal Blanc and Viognier. As recently as 1995 there were only 46 wineries; today we have over 200. Pearmund Cellars in Eastern Fauquier was founded in 1976 with their first vintage released in 2002. They have been an active farm since the mid-1700’s and it is at their estate that the oldest Chardonnay vines in Virginia are planted. Their current 2010 Old Vines ‘Meriwether Vineyard’ Chardonnay is a warm, buttery flavor with a hint of pear & apple with a lush palette from 9 months in Glen Manor Vineyards is French oak. located 70 miles west of Washington on a western flank of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The surrounding elevations range between 1400 and 3400 feet to form a “Glen” that gives the vineyards a unique environment, a world of its own, producing “wines with a sense of place.” Their most coveted juice comes from the Hodder Hills Vineyard. Barboursville has a long presence in Virginia’s history, beginning long before the winery was founded in the 1970’s eight miles south of James Madison’s Montpelier, 20 miles north of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Gov. James Barbour was a strong friend with the former Presidents, all three sharing the title ‘President of the Albemarle Agricultural Society’. Through Gianni’s work, he has made Barboursville a productive and progressive winery producing world class wines, right down the road. Aby Bethem gets on the winery road when she’s not on location at Bistro Bethem or Vivify.

Season’s Bounty giving thanks

By vanessa moncure

Olde Towne BUTCHER Kelly Bronze, Amish & Free Range Turkeys Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 In my private life, I try to give thanks daily - if only for a beautiful day, great neighbors, a wish for good health, enjoyment of a good book, the fact that a grandchild slept through the night; ergo, that I ALSO had a good night’s sleep. Blessings, we have many and may not realize them as such until we have been tested. I’ve been reading an old colonial cookery book that, along with old receipts and medicaments, gives traditions and history of our early nation. Most gradeschool children know the story of Jamestown, VA, the suffering and hardships, 1609-10 “the starving time,” then colonization of Tidewater Virginia and later frontier settlements as settlers moved west. Indian food culture became the basis for our early foods - corn, nut and acorn flours, bear meat and fat, venison, game birds and fish. The idea of community harvest festivals have been known and celebrated since at least the middle ages - our American mythologized Thanksgiving was of the Pilgrims sitting with the Indians and sharing harvest bounty. Thanksgiving became a federal holiday by presidential proclamation in 1863 and legislation in 1941. We traditionally share our bounty amongst each other, and take time to give thanks for what we have and what we have worked for - with a traditionally roasted turkey as our bounteous centerpiece. Had it been up to Benjamin Franklin, the wild turkey would have become America’s National Bird, and perhaps the Bald Eagle our Thanksgiving roast! HERBED TURKEY Clean inside and out one fresh turkey. Loosen the skin on both sides from the bottom toward the neck, careful not to make any tears. Butter the raw bird with 2 Tble. on each side, then take an assortment of fresh herbs and arrange

decoratively under the skin. Use cooking twine to tie the wings and legs close to the body of the bird, place remaining herbs in the bird’s interior along with a chopped onion and some chopped celery. Spread turkey with vegetable oil, then sprinkle with salt, pepper and thyme. Place in deep turkey pan along with 1 qt. of water, some onion, carrots, garlic, and celery and bake 350F, uncovered, until deep part of breast and leg register 165F. If turkey begins to brown too quickly, cover loosely with aluminum foil and reduce heat to 325F. AND GRAVY Remove turkey from roasting pan and strain juices into a large saucepan. Strain again until juices run clear, then thicken with a mixture of cornstarch and cold water. Add S&P as needed.

540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt WITH STUFFING

Every year on Thanksgiving, Butterball has a 1-800 “Turkey Line” for firsttime turkey-ettes, or for advice and suggestions. I have always been an “outside” stuffer, rather than and “inside” stuffer - it’s recommended if you want to have “inside” stuffing that you stuff loosely and immediately before cooking, then remove and serve separately immediately when the turkey is done. I soften one medium onion and 1 c. chopped celery in 4 T. butter, stir in 1 c. each pecan pieces, fresh cranberries, and ¼ c. chopped fresh parsley. Stir in 8 oz. cornbread stuffing mix and enough chicken broth (or turkey broth if you have extra before making gravy), then bake at

open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

The Sunken Well Tavern

375F until browned and bubbly. Vanessa Moncure is thankful and thanked for.

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 Eat Well Drink Well Live Well front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

13


Cooking With Kyle Simple, easy, delicious

Vino you gotta believe By aby bethem

by james kyle snyder

This time of year is awash with changes. The leaves are turning vibrant colors, eventually yielding to the cold chill of winter’s grip. The days are shorter, preparing us for what is to come. As the air chills, we move too. The wine moves from light and crisp to fuller and more robust, to take off the chill of a more barren winter. But, winter doesn’t start until December 21st, and we are not there yet! The plentiful harvest of lighter, sweeter, vegetables yields to the hardier, more stable root vegetables, which are still available, so let’s use them. As the seasons turn, it is important to use what is fresh and available. For this time of year, we have more apples, gourds, large squash, pumpkins, and mature root vegetables available (not from the grocery store) like beets, potatoes, carrots, leeks, parsnips, turnips, and a host of others, to combine with a small amount of our cupboard staples to stretch the proteins long into winter. I had a hard time deciding which recipe to present for November. Hubbard squash are ready to pick this season (and have been, by now, for quite some time). They hold well through the winter in the root cellar but so do ROOTS! But squash

Serving Up Local “Good” News Since 1997

Front Porch Fredericksburg 12

November 2013

hold longer. I cooked both meals and decided for the transition, beef stew is more appropriate. I will long for the fresh robust flavors of a Hubbard squash soup more in January, when all the vegetables are almost dormant, than I will for a beef stew, which incorporates most of the available winter flavors. Hubbard later. Beef stew and mid-season football are now. Cooking is about community coming together. As we move into winter, Mitzi and I have more of our friends over to sup, eat, and relax. Sundays turn into “cooking day” and friends come and go as they please, although most stay for the meal. Beef stew is a definite hook. First, make a loaf of bread 3 hours before the stew. I love fresh bread and stew! Mitzi does this as her bread is better than mine. Next, take about 2 pounds of 1 x 1 cubed beef and dredge it in 1 cup of flour seasoned with S&P. (for S&P recipe, see previous Front Porch articles). Heat 1/8 cup oil and 1/8 cup bacon grease (all oil if you are not schweinegrippe freundlich) in a pressure cooker and brown the beef, turning every 2 mins. While the meat is browning, mince 2 stalks of celery and dice a large yellow onion and add it to the brown. Add 2 Tbs chopped garlic. Rough chop root vegetables to 1.5 x 1.5in and hold. Run to the garden (herb gardens / planters are easy, next year) and get 2 Tbs thyme, 1 Tbs Rosemary, and 1 Tbs oregano (what ever herbs you like). Strip and fine chop herbs and then add them to the browning. Once the meat is brown, add 1/2 bottle of red wine. Throw the root vegetables in at an equal portion until the fill level of the pressure cooker is reached. Stir to combine all ingredients. Top-up with chicken stock and set the pressure cooker for 30 mins on high pressure. Drink remaining wine, laugh and enjoy middle fall while everything is cooking and our world is learning to slow down. When the timer goes off, remember this stew is pressurized. Cover the relief valve with a towel to localize the mess. Once the pressure is bled off, open a hearty red and enjoy. Simple, easy, delicious. Be well. Kyle Snyder is a chef for all seasons.

Front porch fredericksburg

Virginia wine month was October and got me thinking about the history of winemaking in our state and some of the delicious wines we enjoy today. Autumn weather is my favorite in Virginia with crisp nights and cool sunny days. A road trip to one of Virginia’s wineries is like a near perfect afternoon event. Here’s some background before we take a winery tour: Virginia’s wine history began in 1619 with the Jamestown settlement, but it wasn’t until the past 35 years or so that the commercial wine business has really developed and continued to grow because of the true believers in the state’s ability to produce quality juice. Beginning in 1619 in fact, the new world wanted so much to have a flourishing grape crop that Jamestown had a law requirement that each male was required to plant and tend at least 10 vines, but because of the new environment and new pests, the European vines failed. Thomas Jefferson was a true believer in Virginia’s wine growing potential. He experimented with and cultivated European varietals for 30 years but never succeeded in bottling any. George Washington did the same for 11 years at Mount Vernon. In the 1950’s there was a lot of promise with experimental plantings, the early 70’s hosted six new wineries, 1973 European

chardonnay succeeded, and in 1976 the true ‘modern’ Virginia wine believer, Gianni Zonin, an Italian pioneer, started to grow and harvest at Barboursville near Charlottesville. His belief in Virginia as a viable winery state helped support other fellow wineries develop in the state. This led to today’s top five varietals of Virginia: Chardonnay, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Vidal Blanc and Viognier. As recently as 1995 there were only 46 wineries; today we have over 200. Pearmund Cellars in Eastern Fauquier was founded in 1976 with their first vintage released in 2002. They have been an active farm since the mid-1700’s and it is at their estate that the oldest Chardonnay vines in Virginia are planted. Their current 2010 Old Vines ‘Meriwether Vineyard’ Chardonnay is a warm, buttery flavor with a hint of pear & apple with a lush palette from 9 months in Glen Manor Vineyards is French oak. located 70 miles west of Washington on a western flank of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The surrounding elevations range between 1400 and 3400 feet to form a “Glen” that gives the vineyards a unique environment, a world of its own, producing “wines with a sense of place.” Their most coveted juice comes from the Hodder Hills Vineyard. Barboursville has a long presence in Virginia’s history, beginning long before the winery was founded in the 1970’s eight miles south of James Madison’s Montpelier, 20 miles north of Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Gov. James Barbour was a strong friend with the former Presidents, all three sharing the title ‘President of the Albemarle Agricultural Society’. Through Gianni’s work, he has made Barboursville a productive and progressive winery producing world class wines, right down the road. Aby Bethem gets on the winery road when she’s not on location at Bistro Bethem or Vivify.

Season’s Bounty giving thanks

By vanessa moncure

Olde Towne BUTCHER Kelly Bronze, Amish & Free Range Turkeys Corner of William & Charles Street Fredericksburg, VA 22401 In my private life, I try to give thanks daily - if only for a beautiful day, great neighbors, a wish for good health, enjoyment of a good book, the fact that a grandchild slept through the night; ergo, that I ALSO had a good night’s sleep. Blessings, we have many and may not realize them as such until we have been tested. I’ve been reading an old colonial cookery book that, along with old receipts and medicaments, gives traditions and history of our early nation. Most gradeschool children know the story of Jamestown, VA, the suffering and hardships, 1609-10 “the starving time,” then colonization of Tidewater Virginia and later frontier settlements as settlers moved west. Indian food culture became the basis for our early foods - corn, nut and acorn flours, bear meat and fat, venison, game birds and fish. The idea of community harvest festivals have been known and celebrated since at least the middle ages - our American mythologized Thanksgiving was of the Pilgrims sitting with the Indians and sharing harvest bounty. Thanksgiving became a federal holiday by presidential proclamation in 1863 and legislation in 1941. We traditionally share our bounty amongst each other, and take time to give thanks for what we have and what we have worked for - with a traditionally roasted turkey as our bounteous centerpiece. Had it been up to Benjamin Franklin, the wild turkey would have become America’s National Bird, and perhaps the Bald Eagle our Thanksgiving roast! HERBED TURKEY Clean inside and out one fresh turkey. Loosen the skin on both sides from the bottom toward the neck, careful not to make any tears. Butter the raw bird with 2 Tble. on each side, then take an assortment of fresh herbs and arrange

decoratively under the skin. Use cooking twine to tie the wings and legs close to the body of the bird, place remaining herbs in the bird’s interior along with a chopped onion and some chopped celery. Spread turkey with vegetable oil, then sprinkle with salt, pepper and thyme. Place in deep turkey pan along with 1 qt. of water, some onion, carrots, garlic, and celery and bake 350F, uncovered, until deep part of breast and leg register 165F. If turkey begins to brown too quickly, cover loosely with aluminum foil and reduce heat to 325F. AND GRAVY Remove turkey from roasting pan and strain juices into a large saucepan. Strain again until juices run clear, then thicken with a mixture of cornstarch and cold water. Add S&P as needed.

540.370.4105 www.oldetownebutcher.com

Open: 9am - 9pm Monday through Saturday 11am - 6pm Sunday Lee Russell Proprietor

S ammy T’ s DOWNTOWN FREDERICKSBURG’S

Serving Great Food Since 1981

Home of the “Camper Special” & the Best Burger in Town 801 Caroline Street

(540) 371-2008

Try Our Self-Serve Yogurt WITH STUFFING

Every year on Thanksgiving, Butterball has a 1-800 “Turkey Line” for firsttime turkey-ettes, or for advice and suggestions. I have always been an “outside” stuffer, rather than and “inside” stuffer - it’s recommended if you want to have “inside” stuffing that you stuff loosely and immediately before cooking, then remove and serve separately immediately when the turkey is done. I soften one medium onion and 1 c. chopped celery in 4 T. butter, stir in 1 c. each pecan pieces, fresh cranberries, and ¼ c. chopped fresh parsley. Stir in 8 oz. cornbread stuffing mix and enough chicken broth (or turkey broth if you have extra before making gravy), then bake at

open 11:30 am Daily Still Owned by the Emory Family

The Sunken Well Tavern

375F until browned and bubbly. Vanessa Moncure is thankful and thanked for.

720 Littlepage sunkenwelltavern.com 540-370-0911 Eat Well Drink Well Live Well front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

13


Roast of the Town “it’s all about the bean” By mary lynn powers

Roasting one’s own coffee beans seems like quite an undertaking. Not for the Ricks family, though. Sean and Keely Ricks founded Ricks Roasters Coffee Company as a business they could work together, and to search for an Indonesian Coffee blend that Sean had tasted in Singapore. Along the way, they realized that they could roast their own beans, and sell them in small quantities at local markets, enabling them to make the blends, and extra cash, they enjoyed. Their newly combined family has five children, two who attend out-of-state colleges. Both Sean and Keely have full time jobs. Sean is still active duty in the Navy and Keely works for the Stafford County Schools as a social worker. Where do they find the time and energy for this workload? Sean says it’s divine intervention. Sometimes, things happen for a reason. Their story is as interesting as the coffee business story. They had known each other since middle school, both brought up in Hanover County, and ran track together. Sean was a little older, and went off to the Merchant Marine Academy, but they kept in touch. In Keely’s senior year, she broke up with the boy who was supposed to take her to the prom, and Sean volunteered to be her date, jumping through the hurdles of taking leave from the Academy. Then Keely reconciled with her boyfriend and resorted to her original date plans. They spent a good part of that weekend together anyway, but didn’t reconnect until 23 years later. Keely went off to college, and Sean went from the Navy Reserves to the Merchant Marines to a civilian position in Singapore. When he moved stateside again, he rejoined the Navy Reserves and was called back to active duty with the Navy (where he still is today). Communicating on Facebook while Sean was traveling back and forth in the I-95 shuffle from DC, he contacted

14

November 2013

Keely and asked her to meet for a cup of coffee. Keely said that when he walked up her front steps, she had that feeling you have when you’re 15, and your stomach does little cartwheels! They were married in July, combining their households, including two sons named Jake (both 13). They have a roasting room set off of their kitchen. Sean does most of that part, and Keely works on the packaging and labeling. They just upgraded their machine so more beans can be roasted at a time. Their original goal of 1000 pounds in the first year had been surpassed, and they actually did 1500 pounds in four months. In May, they started at the local Stafford markets and since then have acquired four retail outlets that want to sell their beans, including the Olde Virginia Gourmet shop in North Stafford. In September, they opened a shop at the VRE station in Quantico. Talk about gangbusters! I asked them about the organic and fair trade principles involved in importing coffee. Sean said they strive to buy from small farms, but these sellers, though they omit the middle man, can not necessarily afford the exorbitant price it costs to get the certified organic or fair trade stamp. He thinks these practices will become a reality, but like all things it takes time. My interest in the coffee business was fueled by my love of a good cup of joe! In talking to a young student who worked for them, I found they give 10% to two foundations working with veterans Wounded Warrior Project and the Streetlight Community Outreach in Woodbridge. Sean also volunteers for the outreach for veterans trying to find their place in society. I am also a proponent of the small business people’s endeavors to exist in a corporate world. If you like good coffee, try their special blends from the far reaches of the world roasted right here in our backyard. They have the usual Colombia Supremo and beans that come from Kenya, Ethiopia, Brazil, New Guinea, etc. – and they found the Indonesian coffee Sean remembered from Singapore! Look for the Celtic symbol with the initials “rrcc” (ricks roasters coffee co.) in the inner circle as their logo at local markets, or go to ricksroasters.com to order online. Don’t forget the card that gives a free pound after you buy 10! Mary Lynn Powers is a fine roast of a writer who covers new businesses for Front Porch.

Front porch fredericksburg

COME JOIN US FOR

Thanksgiving Dinner Show

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

On the House

all mixed up

813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

FEATURING THE ABBE BUCK TRIO & SPECIAL HOLIDAY THANKSGIVING DINNER MENU.

SAT., NOV. 23RD, 8 PM - 11 PM $10 SHOW ONLY (INDIVIDUAL) $35 DINNER AND SHOW (INDIVIDUAL) $60 DINNER AND SHOW (COUPLE) ONLINE TICKET SALES: WWW.ABBESINGS.COM

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm

620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA FOR INFORMATION CALL: 1-800-380-2825

Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

by matt thomas I feel the need to state right from the beginning that some beer enthusiasts may not like the nature of this column. Instead of doing what I usually do – write about beer styles or how to enjoy the complexities of beer – I’m going to talk about how to use beer in mixed drinks. Some might consider this close to blasphemy. The amount of labor, tasting, and complexity that go into making fine ales is staggering, what would be the point of diluting it or mixing it? Mixing beer or using it as a cocktail ingredient is no different than using fine liquors, which are also complex on their own. In fact, mixing or spicing ales has a long history going back to colonial times when it was used in Bishops, a catch-all term for spiced wine or ale. Now that I have satisfied my own desire to defend myself, here are a few beer cocktails that can be replicated at home. The first and one of the most simple is called the French Monaco. (pictured) To make it, simply mix half a bottle of pale lager, such as Stella Artois or Eggenberg, with 2 oz lemon soda (I recommend Fentimans). Then add 1.5 oz grenadine and stir gently to mix. It’s basically a shandy with a fruity twist. It’s so easy to like even people who don’t love beer will love this, and it’s good year round. It’s important here to use good grenadine. Absolutely do not use Rose’s or any other brand with artificial color or flavor. You can make your own easily by mixing equal parts pomegranate juice and sugar. I use the Lakewood pomegranate juice, which you can find in the organic section of Wegmans. You can create your own fruit-based beer cocktails by mixing and matching syrups, juices, and ales to your tastes. If you want to get really fancy you can use good beer in place of sparkling wine in classic cocktails. For a twist on the famous Champagne Cocktail, take a cube of sugar and add two or three dashes of angostura bitters to it. Place at the bottom of a glass and add 8 oz of a Belgian Saison, such as Dupont. Or take an ounce of absinthe and add it to a glass of Saison for a beery Death In The Afternoon. Or simply mix ale and sparkling wine, such as a 50/50 blend of Guinness and Prosecco to make a Black Velvet. Since the holidays are approaching you can also do a pretty easy Mulled Ale. Unlike with mulled wine I don’t recommend heating up the entire batch with spices. Instead,

pick an ale you think would work well. Founders Porter is an excellent and widely available ale that lends itself well to mulling. For a six pack, empty one of the bottles into a pot and add several cloves, two star anise pods, a cinnamon stick (try to get Ceylon cinnamon), and a couple cardamom pods. Heat to a simmer and add a half cup of sugar, stirring to dissolve. Once the sugar is dissolved turn off the heat, cover, and let steep for 30 minutes. Then empty the rest of the six pack into a bowl and add the spice mixture. Obviously you can adjust spices and sweetness level to your preference, but doing it this way will preserve the flavors of the ale better and you have the option of serving it cold or hot. It makes a nice offering at Christmas parties and Thanksgiving. Matt Thomas is a partner with kybecca, LLC.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

15


Roast of the Town “it’s all about the bean” By mary lynn powers

Roasting one’s own coffee beans seems like quite an undertaking. Not for the Ricks family, though. Sean and Keely Ricks founded Ricks Roasters Coffee Company as a business they could work together, and to search for an Indonesian Coffee blend that Sean had tasted in Singapore. Along the way, they realized that they could roast their own beans, and sell them in small quantities at local markets, enabling them to make the blends, and extra cash, they enjoyed. Their newly combined family has five children, two who attend out-of-state colleges. Both Sean and Keely have full time jobs. Sean is still active duty in the Navy and Keely works for the Stafford County Schools as a social worker. Where do they find the time and energy for this workload? Sean says it’s divine intervention. Sometimes, things happen for a reason. Their story is as interesting as the coffee business story. They had known each other since middle school, both brought up in Hanover County, and ran track together. Sean was a little older, and went off to the Merchant Marine Academy, but they kept in touch. In Keely’s senior year, she broke up with the boy who was supposed to take her to the prom, and Sean volunteered to be her date, jumping through the hurdles of taking leave from the Academy. Then Keely reconciled with her boyfriend and resorted to her original date plans. They spent a good part of that weekend together anyway, but didn’t reconnect until 23 years later. Keely went off to college, and Sean went from the Navy Reserves to the Merchant Marines to a civilian position in Singapore. When he moved stateside again, he rejoined the Navy Reserves and was called back to active duty with the Navy (where he still is today). Communicating on Facebook while Sean was traveling back and forth in the I-95 shuffle from DC, he contacted

14

November 2013

Keely and asked her to meet for a cup of coffee. Keely said that when he walked up her front steps, she had that feeling you have when you’re 15, and your stomach does little cartwheels! They were married in July, combining their households, including two sons named Jake (both 13). They have a roasting room set off of their kitchen. Sean does most of that part, and Keely works on the packaging and labeling. They just upgraded their machine so more beans can be roasted at a time. Their original goal of 1000 pounds in the first year had been surpassed, and they actually did 1500 pounds in four months. In May, they started at the local Stafford markets and since then have acquired four retail outlets that want to sell their beans, including the Olde Virginia Gourmet shop in North Stafford. In September, they opened a shop at the VRE station in Quantico. Talk about gangbusters! I asked them about the organic and fair trade principles involved in importing coffee. Sean said they strive to buy from small farms, but these sellers, though they omit the middle man, can not necessarily afford the exorbitant price it costs to get the certified organic or fair trade stamp. He thinks these practices will become a reality, but like all things it takes time. My interest in the coffee business was fueled by my love of a good cup of joe! In talking to a young student who worked for them, I found they give 10% to two foundations working with veterans Wounded Warrior Project and the Streetlight Community Outreach in Woodbridge. Sean also volunteers for the outreach for veterans trying to find their place in society. I am also a proponent of the small business people’s endeavors to exist in a corporate world. If you like good coffee, try their special blends from the far reaches of the world roasted right here in our backyard. They have the usual Colombia Supremo and beans that come from Kenya, Ethiopia, Brazil, New Guinea, etc. – and they found the Indonesian coffee Sean remembered from Singapore! Look for the Celtic symbol with the initials “rrcc” (ricks roasters coffee co.) in the inner circle as their logo at local markets, or go to ricksroasters.com to order online. Don’t forget the card that gives a free pound after you buy 10! Mary Lynn Powers is a fine roast of a writer who covers new businesses for Front Porch.

Front porch fredericksburg

COME JOIN US FOR

Thanksgiving Dinner Show

WELCOME TO OUR GREAT OUTDOORS It’s Beautiful ~ Night and Day!

The Soup & Taco, Etc.

On the House

all mixed up

813 Caroline St. Fredericksburg, VA

FEATURING THE ABBE BUCK TRIO & SPECIAL HOLIDAY THANKSGIVING DINNER MENU.

SAT., NOV. 23RD, 8 PM - 11 PM $10 SHOW ONLY (INDIVIDUAL) $35 DINNER AND SHOW (INDIVIDUAL) $60 DINNER AND SHOW (COUPLE) ONLINE TICKET SALES: WWW.ABBESINGS.COM

Serving Traditional Mexican, Tex-Mex Food and Something More!! Tuesday to Saturday 11am-9pm

620 CAROLINE STREET FREDERICKSBURG, VA FOR INFORMATION CALL: 1-800-380-2825

Sunday 11am-6pm

Phone: 540-899-0969 E-mail: soupntaco@yahoo.com

Home of great Food & great Art! 720 Littlepage Sunkenwelltavern.com

EAT WELL DRINK WELL LIVE WELL

The General Store

Restaurant

The Natural Path Holistic Health Center

~Nature’s Sunshine Products Since 1978

Italian/American Food Monday-Saturday 11 am-10 pm

371-4075 2018 College Ave. Fredericksburg

~ Biological Terrain Assessment ~VoiceBio Analysis ~Aura Photography ~Body Cleanse Foot Detox We Carry Home Brewing Supplies ! Barbara Bergquist, CTN Board Certified Traditional Naturopath

891-6200

www.thenaturalpath.us

4413 Lafayette Blvd. Fredericksburg

by matt thomas I feel the need to state right from the beginning that some beer enthusiasts may not like the nature of this column. Instead of doing what I usually do – write about beer styles or how to enjoy the complexities of beer – I’m going to talk about how to use beer in mixed drinks. Some might consider this close to blasphemy. The amount of labor, tasting, and complexity that go into making fine ales is staggering, what would be the point of diluting it or mixing it? Mixing beer or using it as a cocktail ingredient is no different than using fine liquors, which are also complex on their own. In fact, mixing or spicing ales has a long history going back to colonial times when it was used in Bishops, a catch-all term for spiced wine or ale. Now that I have satisfied my own desire to defend myself, here are a few beer cocktails that can be replicated at home. The first and one of the most simple is called the French Monaco. (pictured) To make it, simply mix half a bottle of pale lager, such as Stella Artois or Eggenberg, with 2 oz lemon soda (I recommend Fentimans). Then add 1.5 oz grenadine and stir gently to mix. It’s basically a shandy with a fruity twist. It’s so easy to like even people who don’t love beer will love this, and it’s good year round. It’s important here to use good grenadine. Absolutely do not use Rose’s or any other brand with artificial color or flavor. You can make your own easily by mixing equal parts pomegranate juice and sugar. I use the Lakewood pomegranate juice, which you can find in the organic section of Wegmans. You can create your own fruit-based beer cocktails by mixing and matching syrups, juices, and ales to your tastes. If you want to get really fancy you can use good beer in place of sparkling wine in classic cocktails. For a twist on the famous Champagne Cocktail, take a cube of sugar and add two or three dashes of angostura bitters to it. Place at the bottom of a glass and add 8 oz of a Belgian Saison, such as Dupont. Or take an ounce of absinthe and add it to a glass of Saison for a beery Death In The Afternoon. Or simply mix ale and sparkling wine, such as a 50/50 blend of Guinness and Prosecco to make a Black Velvet. Since the holidays are approaching you can also do a pretty easy Mulled Ale. Unlike with mulled wine I don’t recommend heating up the entire batch with spices. Instead,

pick an ale you think would work well. Founders Porter is an excellent and widely available ale that lends itself well to mulling. For a six pack, empty one of the bottles into a pot and add several cloves, two star anise pods, a cinnamon stick (try to get Ceylon cinnamon), and a couple cardamom pods. Heat to a simmer and add a half cup of sugar, stirring to dissolve. Once the sugar is dissolved turn off the heat, cover, and let steep for 30 minutes. Then empty the rest of the six pack into a bowl and add the spice mixture. Obviously you can adjust spices and sweetness level to your preference, but doing it this way will preserve the flavors of the ale better and you have the option of serving it cold or hot. It makes a nice offering at Christmas parties and Thanksgiving. Matt Thomas is a partner with kybecca, LLC.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

15


november 2013… Much to be thankful for… *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

first friday, november 1 Opening Reception for our popular juried show: 6x6x6 An Exhibit of Artwork not exceeding 6 inches in any direction. Includes 2-D and 3-D work. Show runs Nov. 1 - Dec. 1. LibertyTown Arts Workshop Dee McCleskey’s 40 years of work at Art First Gallery shout Color. Featured show at Art First Gallery through Nov 29. Opening celebration 69P. 824 Caroline, daily 11A-5P PONSHOP Studio & Gallery: Pleased to announce the third annual jewelry show. All jewelry works on exhibition are original pieces handmade by local artists including: Leslie Brier, Terresa Buelow, Matthew Cirello/Jasmine Lee as AMORDIVIN, Jodi Habel, Lisa Latendress, Trish Schornagel, Erica Voss, Sylvia White *The Rude Mechanicals and The FXBG Festival for the Performing Arts present The Woman In Black. Central Rappahannock Regional Library theatre, 1201 Caroline. Show dates/times: Nov 1st/730; Nov 2nd/730;Nov 3rd/6P.`Admission:`$10/adult; $5/Student at door

saturday, november 2 Happy birthday, Virginia Mary, on this “Member 2nd” *Meet Me At The Log Cabin Market! We’re an indoor/outdoor Thrift Shop/ Garage Sale/ Yard Sale/ Rummage Shop / Flea Market all wrapped up in one. 35058 Germanna Heights Drive, Locust Grove. Nov 2-3; Nov 9-10; Nov 16-17; Nov 30-Dec 1; 9A-5P. ¼ Mile past Lake Of The Woods on right 3rd Annual Patawomeck Heritage Craft Show: All Handcrafted Items by local artisans: Native American items including Jewelry; Knitted and Crocheted Items; Quilted and Sewn Items; Hot food for sale; Baked goods for sale; Raffle for handmade item. Bring 1 canned food item for donation to FXBG Food Bank. 9-3P. Bethel Baptist Church. 1193 White Oak Rd *Take A Bite Out of Canine Cancer: Fredericksburg Hospitality House, 2801 Plank Road: A weekend

CALENDAR of events

gathering to support the Ohio State University’s Health and Wellness Program. This year’s activities will include: Saturday evening dessert party and keynote speaker; Silent and live Auctions; Sunday morning breakfast buffet and keynote speaker; Educational Seminars; Vendor shopping Saturday and Sunday (open to the public); Exhibitors; Door prizes and Raffles; Costume Contest; Blessing of the Hounds

10th Annual Roastin’ at the Rivah Oyster Roast: We celebrate our 10th anniversary and the Lloyd F. Moss Free Clinic celebrates 20 years of providing healthcare services for uninsured and medically underserved individuals in our community! Enjoy all-you-can-eat roasted, fried, raw and stewed oysters, bbq w/ all the fixin’s, and unlimited beverages. Live music; Silent Auction! 5P-10P, FXBG Fairgrounds

sunday, november 3 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Terry McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli, candidates for governor. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, november 5 Election Day – Be sure to vote in your statewide and local races… It is your duty! PFLAG meets: Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays - 1st Tue Monthly, 1-hr Support Group, 1-hr Education. 630P-830P. Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church *The Vreelands: Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P

wednesday, november 6 *La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William Let’s Sew For Women & Children - Pillowcases of Love Ministry. FXBG Chapter looking for volunteers to help sew, cut, iron, pack pillowcases. 10A-1P Easltand UMC. 540-226-9937. pillowcasesofloveministry.com

Handmade Earrings Workshop at LibertyTown on Liberty Street downtown: 7-9P. $45 (class fee is $30 + supplies $15) w/ Trish Schornagel. Three beautiful pairs of earrings to wear or to give as special gifts for family and friends. Supplies used: aluminum wire, copper wire, copper sheet and copper washers, sterling wire. Techniques learned: cutting metal sheet, texturizing metal, forming and filing, and making earring hooks with the sterling. libertytownarts.com. Reservations: 371-7255, info@libertytownarts.com

thursday, november 7 *Music every Thurs Live at Kenmore Inn 730-11P. Tonight: . 1200 Princess Anne

Home Builders is curating an art show in Amelia Square downtown. “Live in Art” includes selection of artwork intended for the home. Participating artists: Daniel Christie, Ashleigh Dueker, Adam Desio, Bill Harris, Betsy Glassie, Rob Landeck, Kaleo Kala, Ana Rendich, James Walker, Leslie Brier, Carol Phifer, Patte Ormsby, Scarlett Pons, Gabriel Pons, Crystal Rodrigue, Kevin Rodrigue. 5-9P

sunday, november 10 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Lt. Jacob Granados, Cheryl Howard, Zena Hemp of Fredericksburg Salvation Army. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

Concert, Electro Acoustic Barn Dance, festival of electronic music/art featuring composers, artists, scholars from across the world; Pollard Hall, Rm. 304; times of performances Thurs, Fri, Sat vary; free; 654-1012

tuesday, november 12

saturday, november 9

Create Recycled Holiday Tags at Ten Thousand Villages, 1 Towne Centre Boulevard #5750 in Spotsylvania Towne Centre: Create your own gift tags for your holiday gifts out of recycled materials. Please RSVP to 540-479-3090 to sign up for this free craft presentation. 10A-11A

Second Saturdays at the Museum! 1-3P. jkennedy@famcc.org, 540-371-3037, ext. 142 2013 Mary’s Shelter Arts and Crafts Benefit: For women facing crisis pregnancies. Donated items include refurbished furniture, fiber crafts, jewelry, rosaries, professional photography, wood crafts, bees wax candles, and baked goods. Come on out and shop, knowing that your money will benefit those in need right here in FXBG. 9A-2P. 309 Hawke St Soldiering on with Confidence and Independence: conference for veterans w/ hearing loss. The John Fick Conference Center, 1301 Sam Perry Blvd, 9A4P. Presentations from physicians/audiologists, info on latest technology. Service dog demo, resources on service dogs. Share tips, coping skills w/ each other; touch/try new assistive communication devices/technology. Register: $20: apriola@cildrc.org

*Acoustic Onion live @ Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P

wednesday, november 13

*La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

thursday, november 14 *North Stafford MOPS Moms CLub - 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month (Sept-May). Open to all moms of children birth - Kindergarten. Please join us for fellowship, food, friendship, and encouragement from other moms, mentors, and local speakers. We offer childcare during the meetings

Take your music career to the next level: Workshop featuring Gaye Adegbalola. 9:30 am to 11:00 at Pickers Supply Concert Hall. Gaye was a member of the nationally acclaimed Sapphire the Uppity Blues Women and a WC Handy Award recipient

FJC Open Jazz Jam at The Colonial Tavern: Join us on the 2nd Thursday of every month for live bebop, swing, and Latin standards. Musicians, bring your axes! Event is free and open to the public

“Live in Art” Opening Reception: PONSHOP Studio and Gallery w/ Coldwell Banker Elite and Simply

*Live Music at the Kenmore Inn. Anne. 730P

1200 Princess

friday, november 15

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS.” Ellen Baptist, 548-0652 The Spotsylvania Lions will hold the 15th annual Art & Wine Show. 15 different wines to sample. Local artists w/ items for display and purchase. Silent auction, door prizes, raffle. Tickets: advance or door, include food, up to 4 glasses wine. FXBG Country Club, 11031 Tidewater Trail. 5-8P. $45/ 2 for $80

American history’s most poignant moments. Historian James M. McPherson, Gov. Tom Corbett, Lincoln portrayer Jim Getty recite the Gettysburg Address *Jon Wiley plays Bistro Bethem 8-11P, 309 William. No cover. All ages. Spotsylvania County Neighborhood Watch Meeting, 7-8P. 3rd Tue monthly. All County Residents welcome. Stay informed of trends/law enforcement activity. Sheriff’s Sub-Station, Spotsy Towne Centre

Performance, Jewish Cultural Celebration, featuring Alexandria Kleztet, mid-Atlantic’s premier klezmer (Jewish folk music from Eastern Europe) band; Lee Hall, The Underground; 7P; free; 654-1044

wednesday, november 20

Concert, UMW Concert Band and UMW Jazz Ensemble Fall Concert; George Washington Hall, Dodd Auditorium; 730P; free; 654-1012

*Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

saturday, november 16 *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library Holiday Spirits Festival - Sip, Shop, Be Merry! Enjoy wine, whiskey, beer from area’s wineries, distillery, brewery. Spirits for purchase by glass/bottle or taken home to enjoy! Live music, gourmet food vendors, craft vendors, tours of distillery! Enter to win Christmas Tree! 10A-5P. Presale: $12; Door: $15. On sale at: A. Smith Bowman Distillery, Blue & Grey Brewery, Hartwood Winery, Lake Anna Winery, Mattaponi Winery, Potomac Point Winery, FXBG Visitor Center, Spotsy Visitor Center

sunday, november 17 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Sue Henderson, Stafford 350th Celebration (See Page 23). Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Concert, UMW Holiday Choir Concert; George Washington Hall, Dodd Auditorium; 730P; free; 654-1012

tuesday, november 19 Dedication Day: The 150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. Gettysburg National Military Park in Gettysburg, Pa. The anniversary of one of

*La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27

Lecture, Native American Cultural Keynote, by Dr. Mario Garza, an elder of the Meakan/Garzas Band of the Coahuiltecan people indigenous to Texas and northeastern Mexico; Lee Hall, Rm 411; 7P; free; 654-1044

thursday, november 21 *FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org *Live Music at the Kenmore Inn. Anne. 730P

1200 Princess

Lecture, American Indians in the American Popular Imagination, by Philip J. Deloria, Carroll SmithRosenberg Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan and Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar; sponsored by the Kappa Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa; a Native American Cultural Celebration event; Monroe Hall, Rm 116; 730P; free; 654-2365

friday, november 22 Karma Yoga Class: Guest Teacher: Kiersten Young 530-630P. Bodyworks Downtown, Caroline St., graciously provides space for this class at no cost to us so we are pleased to be able to offer 100% of any donations collected to this month’s charity. No previous yoga training required to take part

sunday, november 24 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Rebecca Thomas, Hosting holiday parties, and the exercise routines to get through the holidays! Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, november 26 *Dangerous Kitchen plays Bistro Bethem 8-11P. No cover. $3 drink specials. All ages. 309 William

wednesday , november 27 *La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

thursday, november 28 Thanksgiving Day

friday, november 29 Songwriters’ Showcase Concert features two great duos on the night after Thanksgiving. Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy will split the show w/ the old-fashioned rock-n-roll of The Taters from Richmond. Picker’s Supply Concert Hall above 902 Caroline, 8P. Adults $10. Students $5. webliminal.com/songwrite or 898-0611

saturday, november 30 Children’s Christmas Tree Lighting: 4p-6P at Hurkamp Park. Sing carols with Santa, enjoy hot cocoa, decorate cookies, and make holiday crafts

If you are reading this 197th issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate Thanksgiving! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for December’s issue is Nov. 20. To submit events, follow link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/how-ttosubmit-o online/

~ Peggy Wickham Art ~ Companionship Meal Preparation Medication Reminders Laundry

Light Housekeeping Shopping/Errands Personal Care Flexible Hours

540.899.1422 Each HomeInstead Franchise Office is Independently Owned & Operated

16

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

Peggy Wickham Art at Brush Strokes Contact Peggy at 2191 Sebastian Road Fredericksburg, VA 22405 540-446-5639

Call for a free, no-obligation appointment

1982 Fans (& Growing) Want You to Join

Front Porch on

homeinstead.com front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

17


november 2013… Much to be thankful for… *Some events run same day weekly or more than one day.

first friday, november 1 Opening Reception for our popular juried show: 6x6x6 An Exhibit of Artwork not exceeding 6 inches in any direction. Includes 2-D and 3-D work. Show runs Nov. 1 - Dec. 1. LibertyTown Arts Workshop Dee McCleskey’s 40 years of work at Art First Gallery shout Color. Featured show at Art First Gallery through Nov 29. Opening celebration 69P. 824 Caroline, daily 11A-5P PONSHOP Studio & Gallery: Pleased to announce the third annual jewelry show. All jewelry works on exhibition are original pieces handmade by local artists including: Leslie Brier, Terresa Buelow, Matthew Cirello/Jasmine Lee as AMORDIVIN, Jodi Habel, Lisa Latendress, Trish Schornagel, Erica Voss, Sylvia White *The Rude Mechanicals and The FXBG Festival for the Performing Arts present The Woman In Black. Central Rappahannock Regional Library theatre, 1201 Caroline. Show dates/times: Nov 1st/730; Nov 2nd/730;Nov 3rd/6P.`Admission:`$10/adult; $5/Student at door

saturday, november 2 Happy birthday, Virginia Mary, on this “Member 2nd” *Meet Me At The Log Cabin Market! We’re an indoor/outdoor Thrift Shop/ Garage Sale/ Yard Sale/ Rummage Shop / Flea Market all wrapped up in one. 35058 Germanna Heights Drive, Locust Grove. Nov 2-3; Nov 9-10; Nov 16-17; Nov 30-Dec 1; 9A-5P. ¼ Mile past Lake Of The Woods on right 3rd Annual Patawomeck Heritage Craft Show: All Handcrafted Items by local artisans: Native American items including Jewelry; Knitted and Crocheted Items; Quilted and Sewn Items; Hot food for sale; Baked goods for sale; Raffle for handmade item. Bring 1 canned food item for donation to FXBG Food Bank. 9-3P. Bethel Baptist Church. 1193 White Oak Rd *Take A Bite Out of Canine Cancer: Fredericksburg Hospitality House, 2801 Plank Road: A weekend

CALENDAR of events

gathering to support the Ohio State University’s Health and Wellness Program. This year’s activities will include: Saturday evening dessert party and keynote speaker; Silent and live Auctions; Sunday morning breakfast buffet and keynote speaker; Educational Seminars; Vendor shopping Saturday and Sunday (open to the public); Exhibitors; Door prizes and Raffles; Costume Contest; Blessing of the Hounds

10th Annual Roastin’ at the Rivah Oyster Roast: We celebrate our 10th anniversary and the Lloyd F. Moss Free Clinic celebrates 20 years of providing healthcare services for uninsured and medically underserved individuals in our community! Enjoy all-you-can-eat roasted, fried, raw and stewed oysters, bbq w/ all the fixin’s, and unlimited beverages. Live music; Silent Auction! 5P-10P, FXBG Fairgrounds

sunday, november 3 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Terry McAuliffe and Ken Cuccinelli, candidates for governor. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, november 5 Election Day – Be sure to vote in your statewide and local races… It is your duty! PFLAG meets: Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays - 1st Tue Monthly, 1-hr Support Group, 1-hr Education. 630P-830P. Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church *The Vreelands: Live at Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P

wednesday, november 6 *La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William Let’s Sew For Women & Children - Pillowcases of Love Ministry. FXBG Chapter looking for volunteers to help sew, cut, iron, pack pillowcases. 10A-1P Easltand UMC. 540-226-9937. pillowcasesofloveministry.com

Handmade Earrings Workshop at LibertyTown on Liberty Street downtown: 7-9P. $45 (class fee is $30 + supplies $15) w/ Trish Schornagel. Three beautiful pairs of earrings to wear or to give as special gifts for family and friends. Supplies used: aluminum wire, copper wire, copper sheet and copper washers, sterling wire. Techniques learned: cutting metal sheet, texturizing metal, forming and filing, and making earring hooks with the sterling. libertytownarts.com. Reservations: 371-7255, info@libertytownarts.com

thursday, november 7 *Music every Thurs Live at Kenmore Inn 730-11P. Tonight: . 1200 Princess Anne

Home Builders is curating an art show in Amelia Square downtown. “Live in Art” includes selection of artwork intended for the home. Participating artists: Daniel Christie, Ashleigh Dueker, Adam Desio, Bill Harris, Betsy Glassie, Rob Landeck, Kaleo Kala, Ana Rendich, James Walker, Leslie Brier, Carol Phifer, Patte Ormsby, Scarlett Pons, Gabriel Pons, Crystal Rodrigue, Kevin Rodrigue. 5-9P

sunday, november 10 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Lt. Jacob Granados, Cheryl Howard, Zena Hemp of Fredericksburg Salvation Army. Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

Concert, Electro Acoustic Barn Dance, festival of electronic music/art featuring composers, artists, scholars from across the world; Pollard Hall, Rm. 304; times of performances Thurs, Fri, Sat vary; free; 654-1012

tuesday, november 12

saturday, november 9

Create Recycled Holiday Tags at Ten Thousand Villages, 1 Towne Centre Boulevard #5750 in Spotsylvania Towne Centre: Create your own gift tags for your holiday gifts out of recycled materials. Please RSVP to 540-479-3090 to sign up for this free craft presentation. 10A-11A

Second Saturdays at the Museum! 1-3P. jkennedy@famcc.org, 540-371-3037, ext. 142 2013 Mary’s Shelter Arts and Crafts Benefit: For women facing crisis pregnancies. Donated items include refurbished furniture, fiber crafts, jewelry, rosaries, professional photography, wood crafts, bees wax candles, and baked goods. Come on out and shop, knowing that your money will benefit those in need right here in FXBG. 9A-2P. 309 Hawke St Soldiering on with Confidence and Independence: conference for veterans w/ hearing loss. The John Fick Conference Center, 1301 Sam Perry Blvd, 9A4P. Presentations from physicians/audiologists, info on latest technology. Service dog demo, resources on service dogs. Share tips, coping skills w/ each other; touch/try new assistive communication devices/technology. Register: $20: apriola@cildrc.org

*Acoustic Onion live @ Bistro Bethem. $3 beer, wine, cocktail specials. All ages. No cover. 8-11P

wednesday, november 13

*La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

thursday, november 14 *North Stafford MOPS Moms CLub - 2nd and 4th Thursdays of each month (Sept-May). Open to all moms of children birth - Kindergarten. Please join us for fellowship, food, friendship, and encouragement from other moms, mentors, and local speakers. We offer childcare during the meetings

Take your music career to the next level: Workshop featuring Gaye Adegbalola. 9:30 am to 11:00 at Pickers Supply Concert Hall. Gaye was a member of the nationally acclaimed Sapphire the Uppity Blues Women and a WC Handy Award recipient

FJC Open Jazz Jam at The Colonial Tavern: Join us on the 2nd Thursday of every month for live bebop, swing, and Latin standards. Musicians, bring your axes! Event is free and open to the public

“Live in Art” Opening Reception: PONSHOP Studio and Gallery w/ Coldwell Banker Elite and Simply

*Live Music at the Kenmore Inn. Anne. 730P

1200 Princess

friday, november 15

3rd Fri, 830A business ladies’ free networking “TIPS.” Ellen Baptist, 548-0652 The Spotsylvania Lions will hold the 15th annual Art & Wine Show. 15 different wines to sample. Local artists w/ items for display and purchase. Silent auction, door prizes, raffle. Tickets: advance or door, include food, up to 4 glasses wine. FXBG Country Club, 11031 Tidewater Trail. 5-8P. $45/ 2 for $80

American history’s most poignant moments. Historian James M. McPherson, Gov. Tom Corbett, Lincoln portrayer Jim Getty recite the Gettysburg Address *Jon Wiley plays Bistro Bethem 8-11P, 309 William. No cover. All ages. Spotsylvania County Neighborhood Watch Meeting, 7-8P. 3rd Tue monthly. All County Residents welcome. Stay informed of trends/law enforcement activity. Sheriff’s Sub-Station, Spotsy Towne Centre

Performance, Jewish Cultural Celebration, featuring Alexandria Kleztet, mid-Atlantic’s premier klezmer (Jewish folk music from Eastern Europe) band; Lee Hall, The Underground; 7P; free; 654-1044

wednesday, november 20

Concert, UMW Concert Band and UMW Jazz Ensemble Fall Concert; George Washington Hall, Dodd Auditorium; 730P; free; 654-1012

*Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

saturday, november 16 *Free Vegetarian Cooking class every 3rd Sat. 2330P. Meditation 4-5P. Porter Library Holiday Spirits Festival - Sip, Shop, Be Merry! Enjoy wine, whiskey, beer from area’s wineries, distillery, brewery. Spirits for purchase by glass/bottle or taken home to enjoy! Live music, gourmet food vendors, craft vendors, tours of distillery! Enter to win Christmas Tree! 10A-5P. Presale: $12; Door: $15. On sale at: A. Smith Bowman Distillery, Blue & Grey Brewery, Hartwood Winery, Lake Anna Winery, Mattaponi Winery, Potomac Point Winery, FXBG Visitor Center, Spotsy Visitor Center

sunday, november 17 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Sue Henderson, Stafford 350th Celebration (See Page 23). Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net Concert, UMW Holiday Choir Concert; George Washington Hall, Dodd Auditorium; 730P; free; 654-1012

tuesday, november 19 Dedication Day: The 150th Anniversary of the Gettysburg Address. Gettysburg National Military Park in Gettysburg, Pa. The anniversary of one of

*La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27

Lecture, Native American Cultural Keynote, by Dr. Mario Garza, an elder of the Meakan/Garzas Band of the Coahuiltecan people indigenous to Texas and northeastern Mexico; Lee Hall, Rm 411; 7P; free; 654-1044

thursday, november 21 *FXBG Jazz Collective’s open jazz jam twice monthly: 1st & 3rd Thurs. Live bebop, Latin jazz, fine cocktails. Musicians, bring instruments (no large amps). fredericksburgjazzcollective.org *Live Music at the Kenmore Inn. Anne. 730P

1200 Princess

Lecture, American Indians in the American Popular Imagination, by Philip J. Deloria, Carroll SmithRosenberg Collegiate Professor at the University of Michigan and Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar; sponsored by the Kappa Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa; a Native American Cultural Celebration event; Monroe Hall, Rm 116; 730P; free; 654-2365

friday, november 22 Karma Yoga Class: Guest Teacher: Kiersten Young 530-630P. Bodyworks Downtown, Caroline St., graciously provides space for this class at no cost to us so we are pleased to be able to offer 100% of any donations collected to this month’s charity. No previous yoga training required to take part

sunday, november 24 *AM1230 WFVA Community link 8-830A. Rebecca Thomas, Hosting holiday parties, and the exercise routines to get through the holidays! Host Ted Schubel. Listen at newstalk1230.net

tuesday, november 26 *Dangerous Kitchen plays Bistro Bethem 8-11P. No cover. $3 drink specials. All ages. 309 William

wednesday , november 27 *La Petite Auberge Live Music Wednesdays: Live Guitar Accordion Jazz Music in the Lounge at 8P. Featuring Chris, Phil, Andy & Harry. No cover charge. Dates: 11/6, 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 *Miss Lady & Mr. Man’s Open Mic Jam 8-11P every Wed. The Rec Center, 213 William

thursday, november 28 Thanksgiving Day

friday, november 29 Songwriters’ Showcase Concert features two great duos on the night after Thanksgiving. Laurie Rose Griffith & Peter Mealy will split the show w/ the old-fashioned rock-n-roll of The Taters from Richmond. Picker’s Supply Concert Hall above 902 Caroline, 8P. Adults $10. Students $5. webliminal.com/songwrite or 898-0611

saturday, november 30 Children’s Christmas Tree Lighting: 4p-6P at Hurkamp Park. Sing carols with Santa, enjoy hot cocoa, decorate cookies, and make holiday crafts

If you are reading this 197th issue of FP, thank an advertiser as we celebrate Thanksgiving! If you are an advertiser, list your event. Deadline for December’s issue is Nov. 20. To submit events, follow link: http://frontporchfredericksburg.com/how-ttosubmit-o online/

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November 2013

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November 2013

17


history’s stories

Society of Cincinnati By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

OUR HERITAGE

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

1955 JMHS “Yellow Jackets”

In 1783 The Rising Sun Tavern was the site of the first meeting of the Virginia Chapter of the Society of Cincinnati. The Society was started by Major General Henry Knox earlier that year at a dinner in New York. Membership was to be limited to American and French officers who had served in the Continental Navy or Army.

Men of Goodwill character & compassion By rob grogan

The Society is named Lucius Quinctius after Cincinnatus, who accepted a term as Roman Consul, which is same as a dictator. He assumed control of Rome as an emergency measure for war; however, when the battle was over and won, he gave the power back to the Senate and went back to being a farmer in the fields. The motto of the Society: Omnia reliquit servare rempulicam (He relinquished everything to save the Republic). The Society of Cincinnati’s goal was to preserve the rights so dearly won, and promoted the union of the states while assisting members, their widows, and orphans. The city of Cincinnati, Ohio, which was a small village during the Revolution, was named after the Society. A year after it was formed, the Society had groups in 13 states and France, which King Louis XVI named the French Society of the Cincinnati. George Washington was the first President General of the Society of Cincinnati and served from 1783 until his death in 1799. Alexander Hamilton was elected as the next President and served until he was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr. The insignia of the Society is the Bald Eagle with Cincinnatus, with a sword on the reverse with a plow. The medal worn by George Washington, which was given to General Lafayette in 1824, was sold by a member of the Lafayette family at auction in 2007 for 5.3 million dollars. The medal is now on permanent display at Chateau La Grange, the former home of General Lafayette near Paris. Present day hereditary members of the Society generally must be descended from an officer who served in the Continental Navy or Army for three years. Each officer may be represented by only one descendant at any time or as ruled by individual Societies. The Society’s national headquarters, museum and library or located at 2118 Massachusetts Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C., the Embassy Row section. Tuffy Hicks serves unlimited terms as our house historian.

Think November. Think football. Think football on Thanksgiving Day... I know, I know, the holiday means so much more than pigskins, or even turkeys, but at the risk of running a fowl [sic], my theme is sticking to JayEm football —Thanksgiving tradition style… There was a time when high schools celebrated Thanksgiving and Homecoming on the same day — Thanksgiving. And even though the schools were closed that day, everyone, I mean everyone, showed up for the Big Game before settling down at the family table for the traditional feast. It wasn’t as though the Pilgrims had tossed around a ball with the Native Americans while waiting for the birds to be roasted and the corn to be shucked and boiled in a kettle on an open fire. No, we of modern culture invented the pigskin pastime and served it on a platter along with the meal. And while today’s pro players play on short rest in Detroit and Dallas on Thanksgiving Day, just so their league can capture TV ratings, it all started with the high schools and the homecomings — that included James Monroe, and Falmouth High, too.

Starting in the mid to late 1930s, JM would play its homecoming games at Maury Stadium on Thanksgiving afternoon. The opponent would vary until around 1948 or ’49, when JM began playing Falmouth, which around 1951 became Stafford High School. Thanksgiving 1955 was the last time JM held its homecoming on the last Thursday in November. That year the two teams went together in the morning to services at St. George’s Episcopal Church; the football game was played that afternoon; that night JM held its homecoming dance at the high school gym. The photo shows a bunch of the JayEm Yellow Jackets’ seniors, taken after the 1955 homecoming game. The senior players that year were: Donnie Foster, Ivan Harding, Billy Gayle, Tommy Fines, Earl Hollibaugh, Chip Houston, Jimmy Jones, Charles McDaniel, Billy Timberlake, and Billy Clift… … Just another slice of Fredericksburg life you can search and find at the Central Rappahannock Heritage center on Barton Street, a few hundred feet from Maury Stadium. - RG

“How are you feeling?” Michael Rollins asked me the first time we met. My puzzled look brought him to say, “You’ve got cancer.” More puzzled now, I asked, “We’ve never met. How do you know I have cancer?” “I can tell by looking at you. I lost my brother and my dad to cancer.” I stood there in my yard wondering how this conversation had happened. Michael, and Derek Knight, of American Chimney Sweeps, was there to re-attach, seal, and inspect our fireplace chimney that had been severely damaged by the earthquake of 2011. What they found, and what they did about it, is a testimony to two companies opposite in character, integrity, and compassion. The previous contractor, in 2011, had done such a poor – and unethical job – that there was more to the task ahead than met the eye of the homeowner. But could I trust the new guy? Michael and Derek outlined and explained everything that was wrong – and

why —what they would do about it, and the costs —which they itemized and justified, and then they modified: “I won’t charge you for this, this, and this,” Michael said as he pointed out aspects of the job he would donate. “I want to help you out. I know what you are going through,” he said. Three weeks later and we are burning wood in our fireplace again, at peace in knowing it is safe to do so, and that the chimney’s integrity – inside and out, top-to-bottom – is no longer compromised. True to their word, these two men of goodwill – Michael Rollins and Derek Knight – did the job right, and then some. “We just want to help you out,” they had said. And they did, in more ways than one, they truly did. For excellent, courteous, and professional chimney services, contact Rose Arnold at (571) 501-1607. American Chimney Sweeps is located at 3417 Castle Hill Drive, Woodbridge, VA 22193 Rob Grogan is roasting chestnuts on an open fire.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

November 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

19


history’s stories

Society of Cincinnati By Ralph “Tuffy” Hicks

OUR HERITAGE

A monthly look at the Central Rappahannock Heritage Center collection

1955 JMHS “Yellow Jackets”

In 1783 The Rising Sun Tavern was the site of the first meeting of the Virginia Chapter of the Society of Cincinnati. The Society was started by Major General Henry Knox earlier that year at a dinner in New York. Membership was to be limited to American and French officers who had served in the Continental Navy or Army.

Men of Goodwill character & compassion By rob grogan

The Society is named Lucius Quinctius after Cincinnatus, who accepted a term as Roman Consul, which is same as a dictator. He assumed control of Rome as an emergency measure for war; however, when the battle was over and won, he gave the power back to the Senate and went back to being a farmer in the fields. The motto of the Society: Omnia reliquit servare rempulicam (He relinquished everything to save the Republic). The Society of Cincinnati’s goal was to preserve the rights so dearly won, and promoted the union of the states while assisting members, their widows, and orphans. The city of Cincinnati, Ohio, which was a small village during the Revolution, was named after the Society. A year after it was formed, the Society had groups in 13 states and France, which King Louis XVI named the French Society of the Cincinnati. George Washington was the first President General of the Society of Cincinnati and served from 1783 until his death in 1799. Alexander Hamilton was elected as the next President and served until he was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr. The insignia of the Society is the Bald Eagle with Cincinnatus, with a sword on the reverse with a plow. The medal worn by George Washington, which was given to General Lafayette in 1824, was sold by a member of the Lafayette family at auction in 2007 for 5.3 million dollars. The medal is now on permanent display at Chateau La Grange, the former home of General Lafayette near Paris. Present day hereditary members of the Society generally must be descended from an officer who served in the Continental Navy or Army for three years. Each officer may be represented by only one descendant at any time or as ruled by individual Societies. The Society’s national headquarters, museum and library or located at 2118 Massachusetts Avenue, NW in Washington, D.C., the Embassy Row section. Tuffy Hicks serves unlimited terms as our house historian.

Think November. Think football. Think football on Thanksgiving Day... I know, I know, the holiday means so much more than pigskins, or even turkeys, but at the risk of running a fowl [sic], my theme is sticking to JayEm football —Thanksgiving tradition style… There was a time when high schools celebrated Thanksgiving and Homecoming on the same day — Thanksgiving. And even though the schools were closed that day, everyone, I mean everyone, showed up for the Big Game before settling down at the family table for the traditional feast. It wasn’t as though the Pilgrims had tossed around a ball with the Native Americans while waiting for the birds to be roasted and the corn to be shucked and boiled in a kettle on an open fire. No, we of modern culture invented the pigskin pastime and served it on a platter along with the meal. And while today’s pro players play on short rest in Detroit and Dallas on Thanksgiving Day, just so their league can capture TV ratings, it all started with the high schools and the homecomings — that included James Monroe, and Falmouth High, too.

Starting in the mid to late 1930s, JM would play its homecoming games at Maury Stadium on Thanksgiving afternoon. The opponent would vary until around 1948 or ’49, when JM began playing Falmouth, which around 1951 became Stafford High School. Thanksgiving 1955 was the last time JM held its homecoming on the last Thursday in November. That year the two teams went together in the morning to services at St. George’s Episcopal Church; the football game was played that afternoon; that night JM held its homecoming dance at the high school gym. The photo shows a bunch of the JayEm Yellow Jackets’ seniors, taken after the 1955 homecoming game. The senior players that year were: Donnie Foster, Ivan Harding, Billy Gayle, Tommy Fines, Earl Hollibaugh, Chip Houston, Jimmy Jones, Charles McDaniel, Billy Timberlake, and Billy Clift… … Just another slice of Fredericksburg life you can search and find at the Central Rappahannock Heritage center on Barton Street, a few hundred feet from Maury Stadium. - RG

“How are you feeling?” Michael Rollins asked me the first time we met. My puzzled look brought him to say, “You’ve got cancer.” More puzzled now, I asked, “We’ve never met. How do you know I have cancer?” “I can tell by looking at you. I lost my brother and my dad to cancer.” I stood there in my yard wondering how this conversation had happened. Michael, and Derek Knight, of American Chimney Sweeps, was there to re-attach, seal, and inspect our fireplace chimney that had been severely damaged by the earthquake of 2011. What they found, and what they did about it, is a testimony to two companies opposite in character, integrity, and compassion. The previous contractor, in 2011, had done such a poor – and unethical job – that there was more to the task ahead than met the eye of the homeowner. But could I trust the new guy? Michael and Derek outlined and explained everything that was wrong – and

why —what they would do about it, and the costs —which they itemized and justified, and then they modified: “I won’t charge you for this, this, and this,” Michael said as he pointed out aspects of the job he would donate. “I want to help you out. I know what you are going through,” he said. Three weeks later and we are burning wood in our fireplace again, at peace in knowing it is safe to do so, and that the chimney’s integrity – inside and out, top-to-bottom – is no longer compromised. True to their word, these two men of goodwill – Michael Rollins and Derek Knight – did the job right, and then some. “We just want to help you out,” they had said. And they did, in more ways than one, they truly did. For excellent, courteous, and professional chimney services, contact Rose Arnold at (571) 501-1607. American Chimney Sweeps is located at 3417 Castle Hill Drive, Woodbridge, VA 22193 Rob Grogan is roasting chestnuts on an open fire.

Central Rappahannock

HERITAGE CENTER Volunteers needed to process historical documents and aid researchers. Training provided. Phone 540-373-3704 or email crhc@verizon.net Open to the public for scholarly research

The Heritage Center 18

November 2013

Maury Commons

900 Barton St

Front porch fredericksburg

Fredericksburg front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

19


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring:

puppy joy! made safe

Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

by arlene evans, DVM

One of the very best parts about being a veterinarian is getting to enjoy our clients’ new puppies. These delightful babies greet us with wiggles, wet kisses, and wagging tails, and their smiling owners are just as excited about the new adventures they will have with this new bundle of furry joy! A thorough physical exam is the first order of business with the new puppy. Careful attention to the diet is needed. “Baby-proofing” the house and yard is also important. During the transition from the breeder to their new home, lots of changes are occurring for your puppy. He misses his mama and littermates, the activity and attention he receives in your home could be greater than he is used to, and there is a whole new environment to find his way around in. Schedule his first thorough physical exam as soon as possible. Bring a fresh fecal sample to be checked for intestinal parasites. Vaccines will be needed and ears and skin checked for fleas and mites. Rarely, we might find an inherited problem that needs attention. These stresses can sometimes lead to soft stools that will typically firm up after 1 to 2 days in the new home. Try to continue feeding the same diet that the breeder was using for the first week or two. Then gradually over the next 7 to 10 days, you can transition to a different food if you wish. Feeding excessive treats, rawhides or table food can also trigger a digestive upset. If diarrhea develops, dehydration can be a serious health problem. Call your vet if your puppy’s bowel movements change. Puppy-proofing the house is ideally done before he sets a paw in your home. If you remove any objects that a human toddler might have problems with, you will avoid most of the hazards for your puppy. Hide electric cords and keep

20

November 2013

small childrens’ toys out of reach. We have surgically removed rubber duckies, squeak toys, and the feet of dolls. Throw away any mouse/rat poison or insect bait; also, household cleaning products (including Brillo pads and fabric softener sheets). Bleach, bathroom cleansers, toilet bowl disinfectants, and soap cause irritation to the digestive tract. Holiday foods and decorations are also dangerous to puppies - they have eaten Christmas tree ornaments, turkey carcasses, and chocolates. Some have chewed into prescription medication bottles and ingested drugs. Rubber bands and clothcovered hair ties are favorite targets (for cats, too). Shoes, yarn, sewing needles and thread, straight pins, dental floss, staples, jewelry, and money, old pennies made of zinc, even paper money . A bouncing Labrador retriever ate nearly 10 feet of stereo system wiring. You might have seen photos of dogs that swallowed knives, or – as shown in this Xray image – an 8” ratchet wrench! Socks, underwear and other cloth objects can be more difficult to diagnose because they do not show clearly on X- rays. Bathroom wastebaskets are a real treat in a dog’s view but some hygiene products require surgical removal. Kitchen waste is probably the most common source of digestive issues. Most worrisome are cooked chicken/ pork/ fish and beef bones because cooking allows the bones to splinter into sharp needles. The most spectacular ingestion results from eating crayons - the bowel movements are shockingly colorful! Outdoor objects — ornamental plants, mushroom or fungus, mulch, and grass (when they are sick as well as healthy); gravel and large rocks (from the stomach and intestines); baited hooks, acorns (toxic if swallowed), and, of course, antifreeze. The one surgery I did personally that I will never forget was on a very large Rottweiler dog. The owner was practicing his golf swings and had his dog with him. His Rottweiler chased after every golf ball he hit, but when the owner went to collect the balls, he couldn’t find them but I did! 12 golf balls were in the dog’s stomach! The Rottweiler recovered, and the owner leaves his pet indoors now when he golfs. Thankfully, the vast majority of puppies makes it safely through the chewing stage and goes on to live long and happy lives without requiring surgery to remove something they swallowed! Dr. Arlene Evans practices veterinary medicine at White Oak Animal Hospital.

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By Rim Vining

Serving you & your companion animals for 16 years Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

540/374-0462 www.woahvets.com

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Keyboard Classes Ages 3 - Adult Free Introductory Lesson Schedule at: ymsfred.com 371-4526 Classes now in Session

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“Transmission Hump” Now there is a lost term. Ever do 500 miles before they built the interstate as the youngest offspring straddling the transmission hump? It actually wasn’t a ‘straddle’ it was ‘sidesaddle’ because you weren’t allowed to put your foot on the driver’s side floorboard as it might interfere with the driver. Those nice deep coil springs that felt so good on the driver’s behind? They didn’t extend over the transmission hump. Nope, just a little horsehair stuffing and some vinyl. Just to make it more of an adventure the car might have had a split bench seat so there was this nice hard seam of vinyl cording running down your back and right through your derriere! Permanent wedgie... lovely memory. That hint of fall in the air has sparked these wonderful memories. Anyone who grew up on the East coast was treated to weekend drives just to see the leaves change color. Now be real! Those leaves might be different colors but I never actually saw one change. In fact, I mostly saw wet, brownish, reddish mounds on the side of the road and a few trees that had some lingering leaves that hinted of their former majesty. Some folks must actually love that annual fall foliage drive in the Smokies or Catskills or even down our very own Skyline Drive in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, and for those brave souls I do have some questions? Observations? Comments? Suggestions? Do you drive a “Motor Home?” Let me get this straight. Four miles to the gallon with three or four generations crammed inside and still only four windows? As you drive this beast up the mountain at roughly 18 mph does the

bathroom door flap open and shut like the ones on a Trailways bus? Perhaps you have a station wagon? Volvo and Mercedes have some nice offerings these days that have offroad capabilities, sunroofs, turbo-charging and even those wonderful rear facing third row seats. So tell me? Do the kids that are facing backwards still throw-up after the fourth turn? And was the Kompressor really worth the extra kost when you are only doing 18 mph following a motor home? Want some free advice? Need a leg up on those other sightseeing suburbanites? While most of the DC metro area sightseeing public sits in an endless stream of traffic driving out 66 West and then down Rte 55 or Rte 211 and then uuuuuuup the mountain to Front Royal, where you finally get on Skyline Drive and head South at 18 mph behind the RV and the station wagon, why don’t you try this? Get on the “Drive” in the middle, say Rte 33, and then head north? Against the traffic! Get it? Pretty tricky huh? You’re welcome. Warning!!!! If you should stray off the Skyline Drive into the quaint hollows and mountain valleys that run beside the Blue Ridge make sure you have nothing on you or your vehicle that would make the local residents think you work for the gumment. They are still highly peeved that the Gumment moved them off that mountain in ‘34! Trust me... been there... done that... got out alive! Enjoy the leaves and let me know how the trip went at Autoknown@aol.com

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Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Rim Vining is our colorful humorist and man for all seasons.

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November 2013

21


Companion Care

Full Service Hospital featuring:

puppy joy! made safe

Grooming Salon Canine Boarding in Our Indoor/Outdoor Runs Dog Training & Behavioral Consults with certified dog trainer Feline Boarding in Our Spacious Multi-room Condos

by arlene evans, DVM

One of the very best parts about being a veterinarian is getting to enjoy our clients’ new puppies. These delightful babies greet us with wiggles, wet kisses, and wagging tails, and their smiling owners are just as excited about the new adventures they will have with this new bundle of furry joy! A thorough physical exam is the first order of business with the new puppy. Careful attention to the diet is needed. “Baby-proofing” the house and yard is also important. During the transition from the breeder to their new home, lots of changes are occurring for your puppy. He misses his mama and littermates, the activity and attention he receives in your home could be greater than he is used to, and there is a whole new environment to find his way around in. Schedule his first thorough physical exam as soon as possible. Bring a fresh fecal sample to be checked for intestinal parasites. Vaccines will be needed and ears and skin checked for fleas and mites. Rarely, we might find an inherited problem that needs attention. These stresses can sometimes lead to soft stools that will typically firm up after 1 to 2 days in the new home. Try to continue feeding the same diet that the breeder was using for the first week or two. Then gradually over the next 7 to 10 days, you can transition to a different food if you wish. Feeding excessive treats, rawhides or table food can also trigger a digestive upset. If diarrhea develops, dehydration can be a serious health problem. Call your vet if your puppy’s bowel movements change. Puppy-proofing the house is ideally done before he sets a paw in your home. If you remove any objects that a human toddler might have problems with, you will avoid most of the hazards for your puppy. Hide electric cords and keep

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November 2013

small childrens’ toys out of reach. We have surgically removed rubber duckies, squeak toys, and the feet of dolls. Throw away any mouse/rat poison or insect bait; also, household cleaning products (including Brillo pads and fabric softener sheets). Bleach, bathroom cleansers, toilet bowl disinfectants, and soap cause irritation to the digestive tract. Holiday foods and decorations are also dangerous to puppies - they have eaten Christmas tree ornaments, turkey carcasses, and chocolates. Some have chewed into prescription medication bottles and ingested drugs. Rubber bands and clothcovered hair ties are favorite targets (for cats, too). Shoes, yarn, sewing needles and thread, straight pins, dental floss, staples, jewelry, and money, old pennies made of zinc, even paper money . A bouncing Labrador retriever ate nearly 10 feet of stereo system wiring. You might have seen photos of dogs that swallowed knives, or – as shown in this Xray image – an 8” ratchet wrench! Socks, underwear and other cloth objects can be more difficult to diagnose because they do not show clearly on X- rays. Bathroom wastebaskets are a real treat in a dog’s view but some hygiene products require surgical removal. Kitchen waste is probably the most common source of digestive issues. Most worrisome are cooked chicken/ pork/ fish and beef bones because cooking allows the bones to splinter into sharp needles. The most spectacular ingestion results from eating crayons - the bowel movements are shockingly colorful! Outdoor objects — ornamental plants, mushroom or fungus, mulch, and grass (when they are sick as well as healthy); gravel and large rocks (from the stomach and intestines); baited hooks, acorns (toxic if swallowed), and, of course, antifreeze. The one surgery I did personally that I will never forget was on a very large Rottweiler dog. The owner was practicing his golf swings and had his dog with him. His Rottweiler chased after every golf ball he hit, but when the owner went to collect the balls, he couldn’t find them but I did! 12 golf balls were in the dog’s stomach! The Rottweiler recovered, and the owner leaves his pet indoors now when he golfs. Thankfully, the vast majority of puppies makes it safely through the chewing stage and goes on to live long and happy lives without requiring surgery to remove something they swallowed! Dr. Arlene Evans practices veterinary medicine at White Oak Animal Hospital.

Front porch fredericksburg

AutoKnown Better

ROXBURY F

ARM

MAIN: (540) 373-9124 NURSERY: (540) 371-8802

& GARDEN CENTER

Since 1929

601 LAFAYETTE BLVD

roxburyfarmgarden.com

Trees for Autumn Planting Home Brewing & Wine Making Supplies Fresh Rolled Sod From Us to You With Roxbury’s Friendly Service

archive

By Rim Vining

Serving you & your companion animals for 16 years Stacy L. Horner, DVM; Gary B. Dunn, DVM; Melanie Bell, DVM; Sandi L. Pepper, DVM; Melissa A. DeLauter, DVM ; Arlene Evans, DVM; Jennnifer Skarbek, DVM

540/374-0462 www.woahvets.com

10 Walsh Lane

Keyboard Classes Ages 3 - Adult Free Introductory Lesson Schedule at: ymsfred.com 371-4526 Classes now in Session

YAMAHA MUSIC SCHOOL OF FREDERICKBURG

207 William Street

“Transmission Hump” Now there is a lost term. Ever do 500 miles before they built the interstate as the youngest offspring straddling the transmission hump? It actually wasn’t a ‘straddle’ it was ‘sidesaddle’ because you weren’t allowed to put your foot on the driver’s side floorboard as it might interfere with the driver. Those nice deep coil springs that felt so good on the driver’s behind? They didn’t extend over the transmission hump. Nope, just a little horsehair stuffing and some vinyl. Just to make it more of an adventure the car might have had a split bench seat so there was this nice hard seam of vinyl cording running down your back and right through your derriere! Permanent wedgie... lovely memory. That hint of fall in the air has sparked these wonderful memories. Anyone who grew up on the East coast was treated to weekend drives just to see the leaves change color. Now be real! Those leaves might be different colors but I never actually saw one change. In fact, I mostly saw wet, brownish, reddish mounds on the side of the road and a few trees that had some lingering leaves that hinted of their former majesty. Some folks must actually love that annual fall foliage drive in the Smokies or Catskills or even down our very own Skyline Drive in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, and for those brave souls I do have some questions? Observations? Comments? Suggestions? Do you drive a “Motor Home?” Let me get this straight. Four miles to the gallon with three or four generations crammed inside and still only four windows? As you drive this beast up the mountain at roughly 18 mph does the

bathroom door flap open and shut like the ones on a Trailways bus? Perhaps you have a station wagon? Volvo and Mercedes have some nice offerings these days that have offroad capabilities, sunroofs, turbo-charging and even those wonderful rear facing third row seats. So tell me? Do the kids that are facing backwards still throw-up after the fourth turn? And was the Kompressor really worth the extra kost when you are only doing 18 mph following a motor home? Want some free advice? Need a leg up on those other sightseeing suburbanites? While most of the DC metro area sightseeing public sits in an endless stream of traffic driving out 66 West and then down Rte 55 or Rte 211 and then uuuuuuup the mountain to Front Royal, where you finally get on Skyline Drive and head South at 18 mph behind the RV and the station wagon, why don’t you try this? Get on the “Drive” in the middle, say Rte 33, and then head north? Against the traffic! Get it? Pretty tricky huh? You’re welcome. Warning!!!! If you should stray off the Skyline Drive into the quaint hollows and mountain valleys that run beside the Blue Ridge make sure you have nothing on you or your vehicle that would make the local residents think you work for the gumment. They are still highly peeved that the Gumment moved them off that mountain in ‘34! Trust me... been there... done that... got out alive! Enjoy the leaves and let me know how the trip went at Autoknown@aol.com

Front Porch Fredericksburg

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Supporting Local Artists Since 1997

Rim Vining is our colorful humorist and man for all seasons.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

21


Senior Care Spirituality, Religion & successful aging By Karl Karch

H2 O integrative medical practice members: Dr. Wayne Whitley’s dentistry practice and inspirations can be found on wwhitley.org. His office is located at 433 Bridgewater Street in downtown Fredericksburg, and appointments may be made through the website or calling (540) 371-9090.

H2 O:

21st Century Integrative Medical Practices For an historic town By katie hornung

Michelle Earnest, RN, FNP-BC, EEM-AP of Fredericksburg Complementary Therapies, LLC, can be found at enhealing@gmail.com or 540-273-0386 Gloria Jackson, MD can be contact via org@foundationforthehealingarts.org or 415-720-6551. Yvonne Villarreal, MD of Embracing Health, Inc. can be found via or by www.embracinghealth.org calling 540-657-1223. Christine Thompson, DC is a practitioner at Whole Health Chiropractic on Bridgewater Street. She can be found on www.wholehealth.net or by called 540-899-9421.

I can’t believe we are approaching the holiday season already. I always look forward to the fall colors and the opportunity created by holidays to get together with family. It is also a time of religious significance. Religion and spirituality play an important role in the lives of most seniors. While religious affiliation has decreased over the years in the U.S. population, it has increased among older adults. A Pew study found that 92% of people over age 70 have a religious affiliation compared to 74% of people ages 18 to 29. The older we get, the closer we come to the reality and inevitability of the end of life. The elderly focus on the meaning of their lives and what happens next, leading them to seek religious and spiritual support to help them through important life/death issues. Many studies show that there is a strong connection between spirituality, health, and longevity. A Stanford University study found that women who engaged in religious activity had an increased life span. The researchers concluded that religious women are less likely to smoke, drink, abuse drugs, and are also more socially involved than nonreligious women. A Duke University research found that low levels of meditation and prayer significantly predicted death in healthy seniors. Another study followed 21,000 adults for nine years and concluded that religious involvement prolonged life by about seven years. The vast majority of seniors report that their religion helps them cope with the challenges of aging. Reading scripture and prayer often provides seniors with the motivation to care more for themselves and those around them, and gives more meaning

22

November 2013

and purpose to their lives. It helps them cope with the challenges of aging such as: chronic pain, isolation, dependence on others, and disability. The social networks formed by religious communities can contribute to good health and longer lives by giving seniors a sense of well-being and by helping to fill the need to love and be loved. Members often provide support and encouragement to those who face serious issues such as: hospitalization, chronic illness, or loss of a spouse or family member. Emphasizing prayer or meditation can help reduce stress, anxiety, and depression. If a senior has transportation difficulties, many religious organizations have volunteers who offer rides. Churches provide occasional healthy meals and mixed generational social functions. Friends, neighbors, or paid caregivers are other options to accompany the senior to their place of worship. If the senior is homebound like my aunt was, they can tune to a radio, television, or Internet service. However, a word of caution, beware of groups that prey on vulnerable seniors with urgent pleas for money. It’s important to research the organization before sending money. The important take-a-way from this is that by having people care for you and incorporating spirituality/religion into your life, you will have better health, a longer life, and a better quality of life which is key to successful aging. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. Please go to www.homeinstead.com/614

Front porch fredericksburg

Donna Hetrick, certified clinical nutritionist, blood chemistry analyst and certified personal trainer, can be contacted at Lifestyle Fitness & Nutrition 540-898-5219. Cynthia Armbrister of Natural Therapy may be contacted via lunachi1@yahoo.com or by calling 540-621-2885. Chinese Acupressurist Steve Chen of Natural Therapy may be contacted by calling 540-361-7030. Carol Orrell is a Healing Touch Certified Practioner and also offers Rolf Structural Integration and Shambhala Healing Tools at 2217 Princess Anne Street. She can be reached at www.yourhealingbody.com or 540-846-7653. Hands of Little Light, Natural Energy Therapy’s Sue. F. Wallen, a Healing Touch Apprentice practicing in Goldvein may be contacted at 540604-0867. Barbie Babcock, a yoga instructor in Spotsylvania, can be found at www.agoyoga.net and 540820-2039. Holley Ryan, a yoga instructor, can be contacted at hryan67@yahoo.com or 540-8998979 or www.holleysyoga.com. Karen Oliva, an acupuncturist, may be contacted at Karen@crosskeysacupunture.com or by calling 443-990-1165.

When health practitioners gathered at Peter Chang’s in Central Park to speak on the topic of Integrative Medicine, they were called there by Steve Chen, an American-Chinese 27-year practitioner of acupressure and holistic healing methods who owns Natural Therapy in Falmouth. (Photo: Tai Chi with Steve Chen, Keeley Bruce, holistic practitioner/aesthetician, and Keeley’s son.) Mr. Chen and his fellow practitioners are now more widely regarded for their prowess, as evidenced by Dana Greene. Forty-three years ago, Mrs. Greene, wife of Dr. George Greene, was in a car accident while in Atlanta. It caused her such pain that she admits she thought about ending her life. She’d found temporary relief from a chiropractor; however, he informed her her pain would be chronic. Allopathic medicine was not solving her problem. Fast forward to four years ago when Mrs. Greene began her sessions with Steve Chen. After just two sessions, Mrs. Greene’s pain disappeared and has not reappeared. Dr. Chen “keeps her healthy” with healing touch acupressure and lessons in Tai Chi to relieve pressure in her joints. Mr. Chen is joined by Cynthia Armbrister, certified Holistic Health Practitioner. After completing a 1,000+ hour program in San Diego to become a licensed Holistic Health Practitioner, she apprenticed with a yerbera (herbalist) in Mexico who encouraged her to undertake additional studies in herbalism and nutrition. “Everyone is getting together — western medicine practitioners, energy practitioners, and nutritionists — to diminish the boundaries present in other medical communities.” Holley Ryan, a certified yoga instructor, teaches yoga for cancer

patients at MWH in conjunction with Thrive, the healing center. She sees first-hand how yoga can heal people. The relief of stress, anxiety, and depression is her main objective. “How yoga heals is why I do this— it’s transformative,” she says. Dr. Christine Thompson, a chiropractic doctor who has practiced transformative medicine here for 17 years, was involved in attempts to start an informal integrative medicine group during the early years but gives Mr. Chen credit for getting the group to “gel” in 2010. The group —Holistic Healers Organization, or H2O for short – is, Dr. Thompson says, “Healthcare providers working together for the benefit of the patient in a manner that serves their needs... This is why we formed the H2O group,” for which she was on the Steering Team that began the process of forming the Integrative Cancer Center in May 2011. When Dr. James R. Daniel, Senior Medical Director at Stafford Hospital and Medical Director at the Regional Cancer Center at MWHC, found in 2009 that management of his Spinal Stenosis had stalled, he began investigating holistic care integrated with western medicine and has helped develop collaboration between the two types of treatment, including an integrative oncology at MWHC. At a town hall meeting last year, he remarked to his colleagues about the problematic tendencies of western medicine. “When I said we sometimes have to do terrible things to people to make them well, I was referring to surgical resections and stressful medications. These treatments leave side effects sometimes that holistic care can combine with western medicine to hopefully provide relief. The problem with the holistic side is we have no scientific data. We will try to collect data regarding benefits of holistic therapy.” Nutritionist Donna Hetrick was Director of PR/Marketing at MWH when she started her integrative journey. She obtained an Associate’s Degree in Nutrition, a master’s level clinical nutrition certification, and a blood chemistry analysis certification. “Keep an open mind and evaluate how holistic/integrative services can help achieve a higher level of health,” she says. Her colleague, and general practitioner Yvonne Villarreal, a Board Certified Family Practitioner and Holistic Integrative Medicine Practitioner, practices at Embracing Health, Inc. in Stafford. “I have

been integrating ideas in nutrition and relaxation techniques to change the paradigm of current ideology in allopathic medicine… to look beyond fixing a symptom and explore why it occurred in the first place…My patients no longer need some of their chronic medicines.” Since 1982, before this category of medicine was even coined, Dr. Gloria Jackson, MD, has widened her experience through personal explorations with healers, shaman, ND’s, OD’s, DC’s and others from around the world. “Those years outside of conventional medicine taught me that humans are displays of collective health experiences and not just single expressions of specific imbalances…Once you take the driver’s seat in obtaining the results from the care you’ve chosen, look at the types of healthcare providers most beneficial in reaching your desired goals…Choose carefully.” “Do your homework,” agrees Michelle Earnest, a Board-Certified Nurse Practitioner and former hospital/hospice chaplain at MWHC. Mrs. Earnest has master’s degrees from VCU and Wesley Theological Seminary. “Integrative practice is holistic based: body, mind, and spirit. Illness is a total body occurrence that stems from emotional, physical, and spiritual issues. True healing helps the body come to wholeness — its natural state. Energy healing isn’t new or controversial; its roots are ancient.” Wayne Whitley, DDS, has found salvation in the practice of integrative medicine’s Oral System Biology (OSB), a new therapeutic system that can alleviate headaches, chronic pain, and sleep problems. “This device lets your throat muscles relax to permit deeper breathing and easier swallowing. This helps balance the Autonomic Nervous System that regulates heart rate, body temperature, and digestion.” Dr. Whitley participated in one of its great impacts: Julie Durban had 1000 outbreaks of squamous cell carcinoma. She went into complete remission after inception of an oral appliance balanced her oral function. So, the question may be: Why Fredericksburg for integrative medical development and why now? Dr. Whitley postulates: “This America’s most historic city. There was an American Indian nation here; the Rappahannock was a major route of commerce; the Revolution; the Civil War; Beltway movers and shakers living here; all provide a fertile groundwork for big change. Now? The pain is too great not to change!” Katie Hornung teaches at JMHS.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

23


Senior Care Spirituality, Religion & successful aging By Karl Karch

H2 O integrative medical practice members: Dr. Wayne Whitley’s dentistry practice and inspirations can be found on wwhitley.org. His office is located at 433 Bridgewater Street in downtown Fredericksburg, and appointments may be made through the website or calling (540) 371-9090.

H2 O:

21st Century Integrative Medical Practices For an historic town By katie hornung

Michelle Earnest, RN, FNP-BC, EEM-AP of Fredericksburg Complementary Therapies, LLC, can be found at enhealing@gmail.com or 540-273-0386 Gloria Jackson, MD can be contact via org@foundationforthehealingarts.org or 415-720-6551. Yvonne Villarreal, MD of Embracing Health, Inc. can be found via or by www.embracinghealth.org calling 540-657-1223. Christine Thompson, DC is a practitioner at Whole Health Chiropractic on Bridgewater Street. She can be found on www.wholehealth.net or by called 540-899-9421.

I can’t believe we are approaching the holiday season already. I always look forward to the fall colors and the opportunity created by holidays to get together with family. It is also a time of religious significance. Religion and spirituality play an important role in the lives of most seniors. While religious affiliation has decreased over the years in the U.S. population, it has increased among older adults. A Pew study found that 92% of people over age 70 have a religious affiliation compared to 74% of people ages 18 to 29. The older we get, the closer we come to the reality and inevitability of the end of life. The elderly focus on the meaning of their lives and what happens next, leading them to seek religious and spiritual support to help them through important life/death issues. Many studies show that there is a strong connection between spirituality, health, and longevity. A Stanford University study found that women who engaged in religious activity had an increased life span. The researchers concluded that religious women are less likely to smoke, drink, abuse drugs, and are also more socially involved than nonreligious women. A Duke University research found that low levels of meditation and prayer significantly predicted death in healthy seniors. Another study followed 21,000 adults for nine years and concluded that religious involvement prolonged life by about seven years. The vast majority of seniors report that their religion helps them cope with the challenges of aging. Reading scripture and prayer often provides seniors with the motivation to care more for themselves and those around them, and gives more meaning

22

November 2013

and purpose to their lives. It helps them cope with the challenges of aging such as: chronic pain, isolation, dependence on others, and disability. The social networks formed by religious communities can contribute to good health and longer lives by giving seniors a sense of well-being and by helping to fill the need to love and be loved. Members often provide support and encouragement to those who face serious issues such as: hospitalization, chronic illness, or loss of a spouse or family member. Emphasizing prayer or meditation can help reduce stress, anxiety, and depression. If a senior has transportation difficulties, many religious organizations have volunteers who offer rides. Churches provide occasional healthy meals and mixed generational social functions. Friends, neighbors, or paid caregivers are other options to accompany the senior to their place of worship. If the senior is homebound like my aunt was, they can tune to a radio, television, or Internet service. However, a word of caution, beware of groups that prey on vulnerable seniors with urgent pleas for money. It’s important to research the organization before sending money. The important take-a-way from this is that by having people care for you and incorporating spirituality/religion into your life, you will have better health, a longer life, and a better quality of life which is key to successful aging. Karl Karch is a local franchise owner of Home Instead Senior Care, a licensed home care organization providing personal care, companionship and home helper services. Please go to www.homeinstead.com/614

Front porch fredericksburg

Donna Hetrick, certified clinical nutritionist, blood chemistry analyst and certified personal trainer, can be contacted at Lifestyle Fitness & Nutrition 540-898-5219. Cynthia Armbrister of Natural Therapy may be contacted via lunachi1@yahoo.com or by calling 540-621-2885. Chinese Acupressurist Steve Chen of Natural Therapy may be contacted by calling 540-361-7030. Carol Orrell is a Healing Touch Certified Practioner and also offers Rolf Structural Integration and Shambhala Healing Tools at 2217 Princess Anne Street. She can be reached at www.yourhealingbody.com or 540-846-7653. Hands of Little Light, Natural Energy Therapy’s Sue. F. Wallen, a Healing Touch Apprentice practicing in Goldvein may be contacted at 540604-0867. Barbie Babcock, a yoga instructor in Spotsylvania, can be found at www.agoyoga.net and 540820-2039. Holley Ryan, a yoga instructor, can be contacted at hryan67@yahoo.com or 540-8998979 or www.holleysyoga.com. Karen Oliva, an acupuncturist, may be contacted at Karen@crosskeysacupunture.com or by calling 443-990-1165.

When health practitioners gathered at Peter Chang’s in Central Park to speak on the topic of Integrative Medicine, they were called there by Steve Chen, an American-Chinese 27-year practitioner of acupressure and holistic healing methods who owns Natural Therapy in Falmouth. (Photo: Tai Chi with Steve Chen, Keeley Bruce, holistic practitioner/aesthetician, and Keeley’s son.) Mr. Chen and his fellow practitioners are now more widely regarded for their prowess, as evidenced by Dana Greene. Forty-three years ago, Mrs. Greene, wife of Dr. George Greene, was in a car accident while in Atlanta. It caused her such pain that she admits she thought about ending her life. She’d found temporary relief from a chiropractor; however, he informed her her pain would be chronic. Allopathic medicine was not solving her problem. Fast forward to four years ago when Mrs. Greene began her sessions with Steve Chen. After just two sessions, Mrs. Greene’s pain disappeared and has not reappeared. Dr. Chen “keeps her healthy” with healing touch acupressure and lessons in Tai Chi to relieve pressure in her joints. Mr. Chen is joined by Cynthia Armbrister, certified Holistic Health Practitioner. After completing a 1,000+ hour program in San Diego to become a licensed Holistic Health Practitioner, she apprenticed with a yerbera (herbalist) in Mexico who encouraged her to undertake additional studies in herbalism and nutrition. “Everyone is getting together — western medicine practitioners, energy practitioners, and nutritionists — to diminish the boundaries present in other medical communities.” Holley Ryan, a certified yoga instructor, teaches yoga for cancer

patients at MWH in conjunction with Thrive, the healing center. She sees first-hand how yoga can heal people. The relief of stress, anxiety, and depression is her main objective. “How yoga heals is why I do this— it’s transformative,” she says. Dr. Christine Thompson, a chiropractic doctor who has practiced transformative medicine here for 17 years, was involved in attempts to start an informal integrative medicine group during the early years but gives Mr. Chen credit for getting the group to “gel” in 2010. The group —Holistic Healers Organization, or H2O for short – is, Dr. Thompson says, “Healthcare providers working together for the benefit of the patient in a manner that serves their needs... This is why we formed the H2O group,” for which she was on the Steering Team that began the process of forming the Integrative Cancer Center in May 2011. When Dr. James R. Daniel, Senior Medical Director at Stafford Hospital and Medical Director at the Regional Cancer Center at MWHC, found in 2009 that management of his Spinal Stenosis had stalled, he began investigating holistic care integrated with western medicine and has helped develop collaboration between the two types of treatment, including an integrative oncology at MWHC. At a town hall meeting last year, he remarked to his colleagues about the problematic tendencies of western medicine. “When I said we sometimes have to do terrible things to people to make them well, I was referring to surgical resections and stressful medications. These treatments leave side effects sometimes that holistic care can combine with western medicine to hopefully provide relief. The problem with the holistic side is we have no scientific data. We will try to collect data regarding benefits of holistic therapy.” Nutritionist Donna Hetrick was Director of PR/Marketing at MWH when she started her integrative journey. She obtained an Associate’s Degree in Nutrition, a master’s level clinical nutrition certification, and a blood chemistry analysis certification. “Keep an open mind and evaluate how holistic/integrative services can help achieve a higher level of health,” she says. Her colleague, and general practitioner Yvonne Villarreal, a Board Certified Family Practitioner and Holistic Integrative Medicine Practitioner, practices at Embracing Health, Inc. in Stafford. “I have

been integrating ideas in nutrition and relaxation techniques to change the paradigm of current ideology in allopathic medicine… to look beyond fixing a symptom and explore why it occurred in the first place…My patients no longer need some of their chronic medicines.” Since 1982, before this category of medicine was even coined, Dr. Gloria Jackson, MD, has widened her experience through personal explorations with healers, shaman, ND’s, OD’s, DC’s and others from around the world. “Those years outside of conventional medicine taught me that humans are displays of collective health experiences and not just single expressions of specific imbalances…Once you take the driver’s seat in obtaining the results from the care you’ve chosen, look at the types of healthcare providers most beneficial in reaching your desired goals…Choose carefully.” “Do your homework,” agrees Michelle Earnest, a Board-Certified Nurse Practitioner and former hospital/hospice chaplain at MWHC. Mrs. Earnest has master’s degrees from VCU and Wesley Theological Seminary. “Integrative practice is holistic based: body, mind, and spirit. Illness is a total body occurrence that stems from emotional, physical, and spiritual issues. True healing helps the body come to wholeness — its natural state. Energy healing isn’t new or controversial; its roots are ancient.” Wayne Whitley, DDS, has found salvation in the practice of integrative medicine’s Oral System Biology (OSB), a new therapeutic system that can alleviate headaches, chronic pain, and sleep problems. “This device lets your throat muscles relax to permit deeper breathing and easier swallowing. This helps balance the Autonomic Nervous System that regulates heart rate, body temperature, and digestion.” Dr. Whitley participated in one of its great impacts: Julie Durban had 1000 outbreaks of squamous cell carcinoma. She went into complete remission after inception of an oral appliance balanced her oral function. So, the question may be: Why Fredericksburg for integrative medical development and why now? Dr. Whitley postulates: “This America’s most historic city. There was an American Indian nation here; the Rappahannock was a major route of commerce; the Revolution; the Civil War; Beltway movers and shakers living here; all provide a fertile groundwork for big change. Now? The pain is too great not to change!” Katie Hornung teaches at JMHS.

front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

23


Art in the ‘Burg by megan byrnes

it sparkles, you shine By lezlie cheryl

Ponshop Studio and Gallery hosts its Third Annual Jewelry Show this month offering awesome gift ideas for the fast approaching holiday season. Showcasing works by a dozen local jewelry artists, the exhibit features original, distinctive handmade pieces created with a wide variety of materials such as leathers, ceramics, sterling silver, copper, brass, semiprecious stones, hand-colored resin, sea glass, dichroic glass, as well as upcycled items like silverware and wine bottles. Exhibiting artists include: Leslie Brier, Terresa Buelow, Matthew Cirello and Jasmine Lee as Amordivin, Jodi Habel, Lisa Latendress, Trish Schornagel, Erica Voss, and Sylvia White. The gallery also features a group exhibition of featured artists: Nicholas Candela, Stephen Graham, Adam Desio, Crystal and Kevin Rodrigue, Gabriel Pons and more at 712 Caroline Street through Nov. 30. ‘Unique’ and ‘one-of-a-kind’ are good descriptors of gifts oft most cherished, and owners Scarlett and Gabe

Heard: Pons (pictured) know this well. Gabe says he and Scarlett “have the perfect solution for gifting that special someone. This year we’re putting out a ‘Call For Commissions’ and invite you to work with us to create a custom painting (on canvas, skateboard, and vinyl record) or ceramic piece (ranging from yarn bowls to specialty platters, soup bowls and kitchen items). Our customers really appreciate the personal touch that we put into the work and are always pleased to have gifted their loved one with something truly oneof-a-kind.” Ponshop is currently taking commission work for the holiday season through Nov 15. “We definitely plan on raising the bar for our storefront window display for the holidays. We’ll be participating in the ‘Winter Wonderland’ contest organized by the Visitor’s Center and filling the display with a variety of handmade ornaments and gifts by our artists.” Beginning Black Friday (Nov. 29), Ponshop has extended store hours on Fridays and Saturdays to 8PM (regular hours Mon.-Sat. 10AM-6PM, Sundays 12N5PM), and will also participate in Small Business Saturday on Nov. 30. Ponshop is home to an artist studio, gallery and exhibition space, a retail store, and classroom space presenting workshops for students of all ages interested in everything from painting, ceramics, and architecture to street art and skateboarding. Artist Leslie Brier makes unique and quirky jewelry from recovered/reused materials in addition to her popular mixed media sculptural work. An exhibitor in the jewelry show, Brier will also teach a “Vintage Tart Tin Ornaments” workshop on Nov. 9 from 10AM-1PM, creating unique heirloom-quality ornaments using vintage tin molds and holiday ephemera.

Beverly Coates

November 2013

(below) (Missy Colombo, Mark Willis, Joe Hammock, Eli Barreto Ramos) Colonial Tavern Oct 19 gig. Kellie gushed about the great sound and god vibes that night and may have called the King Bolts the best new band in the burg. With Joelle Gilbert behind the bar and Missy Colombo behind the bass, I’m quite certain my favorite hair stylist tells no lie.

Cost is $55. Materials are included. Other classes available this month include: Adult Stencil and Mixed Media, Children’s Drawing, and Adult and Children’s Clay. Ponshop also offers a sponsorship program providing access to its children’s art workshops for kids (ages 8-17) who might not otherwise have the resources to participate. Learn more at www.ponshopstudio.com Lezlie Cheryl is a regular Front Porch contributor. She writes the “Art in the ‘Burg” column. lezliecheryl@gmail.com

Many congratulations to Alex Capshaw-T Taylor: this awesome lady not only landed herself a book deal last month, but a fiancé too! Alex is currently working on producing her first knitting tome and planning her wedding to her beau, Alex Hanisch.

Heard:

Sanay Sharma, owner

of Jay’s restaurant and lounge, will be opening up a sports bar in the former Sullivan’s space on William Street by the end of January.

Congratulations

to Jacquie

Damm on her new position at Mary Washington Hospital on the Cardiac Progressive floor. So proud of my smart, caring friend! Local celeb Danny McBride gave a shout-out to Kybecca, Bistro Bethem, Bangkok Café and the Rec Center during a Reddit chat. Oh yeah, we’re cool! p.s. Happy October birthday to his lovely bride, Gia, too!

Happy birthday

My two new favorite places in town are most definitely Vivify and FLY Fitness (life is all about balance, right?). If you head over to Vivify, please do try the salted caramel milkshake. It is a revelation. And say hi to Derek Kirkland for me. So anyway, like I said, I’m also loving FLY Fitness (above Peymon Imports on William St). I’ve taken barre palates classes with Emily Snow, (above) and I’ll tell ya, I’m pretty sure that milkshake was burned right off after an hour at the barre with her (this is, of course, my second favorite kind of bar(re)(have I made this joke before?).

Seen:

Christie Doherty walking

her pup downtown on a foggy, cool Wednesday morning; Amy, Tom and little Flora Hastings mingling at the Courtyard Marriott downtown with all their old Fredericksburg friends during a brief stop through; Randall Farren shopping, produce-style at Wegmans; Lisa Olsen at FLY Fitness getting her yoga on; Gannon and Carey Sims brunching al fresco at Bistro Bethem; Seth Casana dog walkin; Ryan Ridgely get his work on at Enterprise Rent-a-Car. Making a splash (forgive me): Olympic gold medalist swimmer Jeff Rouse, president of REDCO (Rappahannock

Bruce Day Fine Art Always From Life Only The Best Original Oils Giclee Print City Scenes

810 Weekend Gallery

thefigureblog.blogspot.com

Front porch fredericksburg

to all the

many (many) Fredericksburg Libras out there: Brooke Farquhar, Jim Tharp, Tom Byrnes, Georgia Rathje; (below) Lori Izykowski, Mark Wenger, Brian Downing, Ian Soper, George Solley, Margot Storch, Amy Woodruff, Chris Park, Ana Brugos, and Laura Shepard, just to, you know, name half the town.

Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline St. Downtown Fredericksburg 368-0560 additional works at 810 Caroline St. Downtown 371-4099

24

Economic Development Corporation) was the featured speaker at a Next Generation of Business Leaders’ motivation event at Renato’s downtown.

Kellie Walsh at the King Bolts

Burning up the competition (my puns this month are criminal, really): Kenmore Inn executive chef, Jacquie Hartman, (above) won first place in an Iron Chef-style culinary competition in Virginia Beach. Jacquie beat out a previous first place winner and had to stand before three certified executive chef judges, including a former White House executive chef! Jacquie’s secret ingredient was salmon (thankfully not brains or something, right?) and with it she whipped up the winning risotto, salmon and cherry tomato salad dish. Congrats, Jacquie!

Heard: the Fredericksburg area is getting its own TV network! The CVTV (Central Virginia Television) network will debut on Comcast on November 4th, serving the Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania and Stafford regions. Hey producers, I’m ready for my close-up!

Scene:

the new Water Street

Studio held its grand opening on First Friday last month. Artists Elizabeth Seaver, Lynette Reed and Susan Carter Morgan are gearing up for a writing, art and workshop-filled first year! Correction: Jenny McGee is celebrating 15 years at the CRRL, not ten.

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

BETSYGLASSIE.COM

brucedaystudio.com

BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

540-899-6556

540 376-1676 front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

25


Art in the ‘Burg by megan byrnes

it sparkles, you shine By lezlie cheryl

Ponshop Studio and Gallery hosts its Third Annual Jewelry Show this month offering awesome gift ideas for the fast approaching holiday season. Showcasing works by a dozen local jewelry artists, the exhibit features original, distinctive handmade pieces created with a wide variety of materials such as leathers, ceramics, sterling silver, copper, brass, semiprecious stones, hand-colored resin, sea glass, dichroic glass, as well as upcycled items like silverware and wine bottles. Exhibiting artists include: Leslie Brier, Terresa Buelow, Matthew Cirello and Jasmine Lee as Amordivin, Jodi Habel, Lisa Latendress, Trish Schornagel, Erica Voss, and Sylvia White. The gallery also features a group exhibition of featured artists: Nicholas Candela, Stephen Graham, Adam Desio, Crystal and Kevin Rodrigue, Gabriel Pons and more at 712 Caroline Street through Nov. 30. ‘Unique’ and ‘one-of-a-kind’ are good descriptors of gifts oft most cherished, and owners Scarlett and Gabe

Heard: Pons (pictured) know this well. Gabe says he and Scarlett “have the perfect solution for gifting that special someone. This year we’re putting out a ‘Call For Commissions’ and invite you to work with us to create a custom painting (on canvas, skateboard, and vinyl record) or ceramic piece (ranging from yarn bowls to specialty platters, soup bowls and kitchen items). Our customers really appreciate the personal touch that we put into the work and are always pleased to have gifted their loved one with something truly oneof-a-kind.” Ponshop is currently taking commission work for the holiday season through Nov 15. “We definitely plan on raising the bar for our storefront window display for the holidays. We’ll be participating in the ‘Winter Wonderland’ contest organized by the Visitor’s Center and filling the display with a variety of handmade ornaments and gifts by our artists.” Beginning Black Friday (Nov. 29), Ponshop has extended store hours on Fridays and Saturdays to 8PM (regular hours Mon.-Sat. 10AM-6PM, Sundays 12N5PM), and will also participate in Small Business Saturday on Nov. 30. Ponshop is home to an artist studio, gallery and exhibition space, a retail store, and classroom space presenting workshops for students of all ages interested in everything from painting, ceramics, and architecture to street art and skateboarding. Artist Leslie Brier makes unique and quirky jewelry from recovered/reused materials in addition to her popular mixed media sculptural work. An exhibitor in the jewelry show, Brier will also teach a “Vintage Tart Tin Ornaments” workshop on Nov. 9 from 10AM-1PM, creating unique heirloom-quality ornaments using vintage tin molds and holiday ephemera.

Beverly Coates

November 2013

(below) (Missy Colombo, Mark Willis, Joe Hammock, Eli Barreto Ramos) Colonial Tavern Oct 19 gig. Kellie gushed about the great sound and god vibes that night and may have called the King Bolts the best new band in the burg. With Joelle Gilbert behind the bar and Missy Colombo behind the bass, I’m quite certain my favorite hair stylist tells no lie.

Cost is $55. Materials are included. Other classes available this month include: Adult Stencil and Mixed Media, Children’s Drawing, and Adult and Children’s Clay. Ponshop also offers a sponsorship program providing access to its children’s art workshops for kids (ages 8-17) who might not otherwise have the resources to participate. Learn more at www.ponshopstudio.com Lezlie Cheryl is a regular Front Porch contributor. She writes the “Art in the ‘Burg” column. lezliecheryl@gmail.com

Many congratulations to Alex Capshaw-T Taylor: this awesome lady not only landed herself a book deal last month, but a fiancé too! Alex is currently working on producing her first knitting tome and planning her wedding to her beau, Alex Hanisch.

Heard:

Sanay Sharma, owner

of Jay’s restaurant and lounge, will be opening up a sports bar in the former Sullivan’s space on William Street by the end of January.

Congratulations

to Jacquie

Damm on her new position at Mary Washington Hospital on the Cardiac Progressive floor. So proud of my smart, caring friend! Local celeb Danny McBride gave a shout-out to Kybecca, Bistro Bethem, Bangkok Café and the Rec Center during a Reddit chat. Oh yeah, we’re cool! p.s. Happy October birthday to his lovely bride, Gia, too!

Happy birthday

My two new favorite places in town are most definitely Vivify and FLY Fitness (life is all about balance, right?). If you head over to Vivify, please do try the salted caramel milkshake. It is a revelation. And say hi to Derek Kirkland for me. So anyway, like I said, I’m also loving FLY Fitness (above Peymon Imports on William St). I’ve taken barre palates classes with Emily Snow, (above) and I’ll tell ya, I’m pretty sure that milkshake was burned right off after an hour at the barre with her (this is, of course, my second favorite kind of bar(re)(have I made this joke before?).

Seen:

Christie Doherty walking

her pup downtown on a foggy, cool Wednesday morning; Amy, Tom and little Flora Hastings mingling at the Courtyard Marriott downtown with all their old Fredericksburg friends during a brief stop through; Randall Farren shopping, produce-style at Wegmans; Lisa Olsen at FLY Fitness getting her yoga on; Gannon and Carey Sims brunching al fresco at Bistro Bethem; Seth Casana dog walkin; Ryan Ridgely get his work on at Enterprise Rent-a-Car. Making a splash (forgive me): Olympic gold medalist swimmer Jeff Rouse, president of REDCO (Rappahannock

Bruce Day Fine Art Always From Life Only The Best Original Oils Giclee Print City Scenes

810 Weekend Gallery

thefigureblog.blogspot.com

Front porch fredericksburg

to all the

many (many) Fredericksburg Libras out there: Brooke Farquhar, Jim Tharp, Tom Byrnes, Georgia Rathje; (below) Lori Izykowski, Mark Wenger, Brian Downing, Ian Soper, George Solley, Margot Storch, Amy Woodruff, Chris Park, Ana Brugos, and Laura Shepard, just to, you know, name half the town.

Brush Strokes Gallery 824 Caroline St. Downtown Fredericksburg 368-0560 additional works at 810 Caroline St. Downtown 371-4099

24

Economic Development Corporation) was the featured speaker at a Next Generation of Business Leaders’ motivation event at Renato’s downtown.

Kellie Walsh at the King Bolts

Burning up the competition (my puns this month are criminal, really): Kenmore Inn executive chef, Jacquie Hartman, (above) won first place in an Iron Chef-style culinary competition in Virginia Beach. Jacquie beat out a previous first place winner and had to stand before three certified executive chef judges, including a former White House executive chef! Jacquie’s secret ingredient was salmon (thankfully not brains or something, right?) and with it she whipped up the winning risotto, salmon and cherry tomato salad dish. Congrats, Jacquie!

Heard: the Fredericksburg area is getting its own TV network! The CVTV (Central Virginia Television) network will debut on Comcast on November 4th, serving the Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania and Stafford regions. Hey producers, I’m ready for my close-up!

Scene:

the new Water Street

Studio held its grand opening on First Friday last month. Artists Elizabeth Seaver, Lynette Reed and Susan Carter Morgan are gearing up for a writing, art and workshop-filled first year! Correction: Jenny McGee is celebrating 15 years at the CRRL, not ten.

Betsy Glassie STUDIO: LIBERTYTOWN 916 LIBERTY ST. FREDERICKSBURG, VA

BETSYGLASSIE.COM

brucedaystudio.com

BGLASSIE@AOL.COM

540-899-6556

540 376-1676 front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

25


JUVIE

COMMUNITY LINK Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

from an author’s world view

Stafford 350: correcting the myths By david s kerr

by susan carter morgan

Author Steve Watkins writes for many reasons. But the main one, he says, is to “tell a rockin’ good story.” In JUVIE, his newest book, he has done that, fictionalizing a story with local roots. Based on a court case involving two sisters, one of whom went to jail so the other wouldn’t have to, the novel explores an intriguing situation of a teen who must navigate life in a juvenile detention center. His book references the detention center in Stafford County and several area high schools, so you’ll visualize the setting easily. He even names the main characters after former University of Mary Washington students. “I like them, and their names fit,” he says. But for those who’ve not set foot in a youth detention center, be prepared to cringe while reading. Graphic details place you in the middle of the main character Sadie’s turmoil, and you will be

engrossed as she tries to figure out how to survive. Steve’s visit to the Rappahannock Juvenile Detention Center helped shape many of the details he used in the story: how to walk, talk, how to manage relationships with guards, other girls, and the legal system. Though he did not use details of anyone’s life (girls are not allowed to talk about their own situations there), he was able to capture the isolation and fear each young woman feels. “You come with nothing, and you leave with nothing,” he says. Though the premise seems dismal, he writes young adult fiction, in part, because it’s fundamentally hopeful. “That’s not to say there isn’t darkness, and you explore that. But there’s an inherent optimism that things can get better. Not that they will, but they can.” On page 309, he writes from a borrowed poem: Hold on to what is good,

As Stafford County celebrates the

even if it is a handful of earth. This attitude shouldn’t surprise you if you know Steve. A yoga instructor, a volunteer tree-planter, and the father of four daughters, he wants to, as he says, “do good in the universe, be at peace with the universe.” He writes fiction because he is interested in the conflicts that define life and how people negotiate and endure through those conflicts, and what happens as they resolve those them. In JUVIE, Steve opens up an “invisible world.” There are 640,000 young women in the juvenile justice system, and most have been abused sexually or emotionally. His volunteer work with CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) initially made him aware of these situations. Telling this story allows him to bring it to the public. “I try to have a social conscience,” he says, “An essential morality comes out in your world view. The work has to have its own integrity, and your moral sense of the universe is your touchstone. If you don’t have a world view, you are just writing to entertain.” Indeed, reviews have been positive. Booklist Reviews calls JUVIE, “a haunting story of loyalty, regret, and the fervent hope for second chances.” Steve is now working on a postIraq war novel called Great Falls, which will be published by Candlewick Press, and two books for a series for Scholastic, paranormal war history novels, to be published the spring of 2015 and fall of 2015. He has also opened Dragonfly Yoga Studio with partners this fall in downtown Fredericksburg. JUVIE is available at Riverby Books on Caroline Street and online.

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

Susan Carter Morgan is a founder of Water Street Writers’ and Artists’ Studio at 915 Sophia.

Healthcare For the Whole Person SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Dr. Christine Thompson

26

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

$79

350th anniversary of its official chartering by the English colonial government this is probably a good time to correct a few myths about the county’s very first residents. These are a people who were here a long time before the first European set foot on North America. There is a popular misconception about Native Americans in Stafford County. It’s probably a creation of Hollywood Westerns. And that’s that these early Stafford residents didn’t have fixed or permanent settlements. That like the Indians portrayed in the movies, they were nomadic and unaccustomed to towns or to tending crops. However, the reality is that the Indians who lived in Stafford had permanent settlements and what’s more had a profitable agricultural sector. One of the most prominent Indian settlements in Stafford was on the Potomac Creek at Indian Point, not far from Marlborough Point. The original settlement was established in about 1300 A.D. That’s roughly the same time as the last of the Crusaders were returning to Europe from the Holy Land. The Indians moved to a new site, not far away, in the late 1500s. Unfortunately this newer location, the village that John Smith visited, and near where the kidnapping of Pocahontas took place, is submerged under the waters of the Potomac. However, the older site remains. The residents of this settlement were the Patawomeck Indians and they spoke an eastern Algonquin language. It’s still spoken today by members of the tribe in Stafford. In the late 1500s the Patawomeck joined a larger political organization called the Powhatan Confederacy. The Confederacy included 30 tribes, and according to Thomas Jefferson’s “Notes on Virginia” covered roughly 8,000 square miles. The buildings in the Patawomeck settlement were primarily longhouses

built of heavy timbers. These structures were an impressive 50 to 60 feet in length and 26 feet wide. Other buildings, equally rugged, were circular. However, one of the unique characteristics of the Patawomeck town was its fortifications. Just like many towns in Europe it had a wall and a moat. Yes, a moat. Being so accessible by water, and with potential raiders from other tribes a continuing threat, the Patawomecks invested heavily in defense. The economy of the tribe was based on agriculture. In other words, they were farmers. This surprises many people. There are extensive references, in several histories, to large corn crops which they exported to other tribes and bands. Capt. John Smith, for example, traded with the Patawomeck for their corn. The town was extensively excavated in the late 1930s as well as in subsequent digs. Rather sadly, these digs removed the earthly remains of 134 individuals that are now kept by the Smithsonian Institution. The Patawomeck tribe, which defying the odds still exists today, has been recognized by the state. They hope that if they are able to get federal recognition, they can ask that the remains be returned to Stafford. The Indian population in Stafford when the first Europeans arrived didn’t conform to Hollywood’s vision of Native American life. There were long established towns and a settled agricultural sector. Just consider that another myth, busted. (Illustration: from “The Stronghold” - A Story of Historic Northern Neck of Virginia and Its People. Author: Miriam Haynie (courtesy of project Gutenberg) David S. Kerr of the “350” committee will pen a Stafford County story every month in FP through 2014. Sue Henderson of “350” guests on Ted Schubel’s Community Link on November 17 at 8 a.m. on NewsTalk1230.net and AM 1230 WFVA, in partnership with this magazine.

$650

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 12/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 12/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

27


JUVIE

COMMUNITY LINK Courtesy of WFVA and Front Porch

from an author’s world view

Stafford 350: correcting the myths By david s kerr

by susan carter morgan

Author Steve Watkins writes for many reasons. But the main one, he says, is to “tell a rockin’ good story.” In JUVIE, his newest book, he has done that, fictionalizing a story with local roots. Based on a court case involving two sisters, one of whom went to jail so the other wouldn’t have to, the novel explores an intriguing situation of a teen who must navigate life in a juvenile detention center. His book references the detention center in Stafford County and several area high schools, so you’ll visualize the setting easily. He even names the main characters after former University of Mary Washington students. “I like them, and their names fit,” he says. But for those who’ve not set foot in a youth detention center, be prepared to cringe while reading. Graphic details place you in the middle of the main character Sadie’s turmoil, and you will be

engrossed as she tries to figure out how to survive. Steve’s visit to the Rappahannock Juvenile Detention Center helped shape many of the details he used in the story: how to walk, talk, how to manage relationships with guards, other girls, and the legal system. Though he did not use details of anyone’s life (girls are not allowed to talk about their own situations there), he was able to capture the isolation and fear each young woman feels. “You come with nothing, and you leave with nothing,” he says. Though the premise seems dismal, he writes young adult fiction, in part, because it’s fundamentally hopeful. “That’s not to say there isn’t darkness, and you explore that. But there’s an inherent optimism that things can get better. Not that they will, but they can.” On page 309, he writes from a borrowed poem: Hold on to what is good,

As Stafford County celebrates the

even if it is a handful of earth. This attitude shouldn’t surprise you if you know Steve. A yoga instructor, a volunteer tree-planter, and the father of four daughters, he wants to, as he says, “do good in the universe, be at peace with the universe.” He writes fiction because he is interested in the conflicts that define life and how people negotiate and endure through those conflicts, and what happens as they resolve those them. In JUVIE, Steve opens up an “invisible world.” There are 640,000 young women in the juvenile justice system, and most have been abused sexually or emotionally. His volunteer work with CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) initially made him aware of these situations. Telling this story allows him to bring it to the public. “I try to have a social conscience,” he says, “An essential morality comes out in your world view. The work has to have its own integrity, and your moral sense of the universe is your touchstone. If you don’t have a world view, you are just writing to entertain.” Indeed, reviews have been positive. Booklist Reviews calls JUVIE, “a haunting story of loyalty, regret, and the fervent hope for second chances.” Steve is now working on a postIraq war novel called Great Falls, which will be published by Candlewick Press, and two books for a series for Scholastic, paranormal war history novels, to be published the spring of 2015 and fall of 2015. He has also opened Dragonfly Yoga Studio with partners this fall in downtown Fredericksburg. JUVIE is available at Riverby Books on Caroline Street and online.

Advanced Dental Care of Fredericksburg 540-891-9911

Susan Carter Morgan is a founder of Water Street Writers’ and Artists’ Studio at 915 Sophia.

Healthcare For the Whole Person SPECIALIZING IN: ` Gentle, Individualized Chiropractic Care ` Cranio-Sacral Balancing (Sacro Occipital Technique - SOT) ` Addressing Your Total Health Needs with Natural, Holistic Treatment Methods ` Detoxification/Weight Loss Nutritional Programs

Dr. Christine Thompson

26

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

$79

350th anniversary of its official chartering by the English colonial government this is probably a good time to correct a few myths about the county’s very first residents. These are a people who were here a long time before the first European set foot on North America. There is a popular misconception about Native Americans in Stafford County. It’s probably a creation of Hollywood Westerns. And that’s that these early Stafford residents didn’t have fixed or permanent settlements. That like the Indians portrayed in the movies, they were nomadic and unaccustomed to towns or to tending crops. However, the reality is that the Indians who lived in Stafford had permanent settlements and what’s more had a profitable agricultural sector. One of the most prominent Indian settlements in Stafford was on the Potomac Creek at Indian Point, not far from Marlborough Point. The original settlement was established in about 1300 A.D. That’s roughly the same time as the last of the Crusaders were returning to Europe from the Holy Land. The Indians moved to a new site, not far away, in the late 1500s. Unfortunately this newer location, the village that John Smith visited, and near where the kidnapping of Pocahontas took place, is submerged under the waters of the Potomac. However, the older site remains. The residents of this settlement were the Patawomeck Indians and they spoke an eastern Algonquin language. It’s still spoken today by members of the tribe in Stafford. In the late 1500s the Patawomeck joined a larger political organization called the Powhatan Confederacy. The Confederacy included 30 tribes, and according to Thomas Jefferson’s “Notes on Virginia” covered roughly 8,000 square miles. The buildings in the Patawomeck settlement were primarily longhouses

built of heavy timbers. These structures were an impressive 50 to 60 feet in length and 26 feet wide. Other buildings, equally rugged, were circular. However, one of the unique characteristics of the Patawomeck town was its fortifications. Just like many towns in Europe it had a wall and a moat. Yes, a moat. Being so accessible by water, and with potential raiders from other tribes a continuing threat, the Patawomecks invested heavily in defense. The economy of the tribe was based on agriculture. In other words, they were farmers. This surprises many people. There are extensive references, in several histories, to large corn crops which they exported to other tribes and bands. Capt. John Smith, for example, traded with the Patawomeck for their corn. The town was extensively excavated in the late 1930s as well as in subsequent digs. Rather sadly, these digs removed the earthly remains of 134 individuals that are now kept by the Smithsonian Institution. The Patawomeck tribe, which defying the odds still exists today, has been recognized by the state. They hope that if they are able to get federal recognition, they can ask that the remains be returned to Stafford. The Indian population in Stafford when the first Europeans arrived didn’t conform to Hollywood’s vision of Native American life. There were long established towns and a settled agricultural sector. Just consider that another myth, busted. (Illustration: from “The Stronghold” - A Story of Historic Northern Neck of Virginia and Its People. Author: Miriam Haynie (courtesy of project Gutenberg) David S. Kerr of the “350” committee will pen a Stafford County story every month in FP through 2014. Sue Henderson of “350” guests on Ted Schubel’s Community Link on November 17 at 8 a.m. on NewsTalk1230.net and AM 1230 WFVA, in partnership with this magazine.

$650

New Patient Special Includes Exam, X-Rays and Cleaning

Per Arch Full AcrylicDenture or Partial

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 12/1/13 A $239.00 Value

With this Coupon only for non-insured patients. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Offer Expires 12/1/13 A $1100.00 Value

Because we care for you! 10524 Spotsylvania Ave. Ste #104 Fredericksburg, VA front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

27


In Memoriam Josephine Primrose Gundry Vining (July 5, 1925 to October 18, 2013)

Immigrants Today we want to contribute

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

By alicia antezano

what man? By stuart m. perkins

Josephine Primrose Gundry Vining was born in Baltimore, the oldest child of Jesse and Alice Gundry of Catonsville, MD, and Rehoboth Beach, DE. Primrose was a 1946 graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Married in 1947 to the late L. Heath Vining, Jr., she is survived by her sister, Mrs. Jerome B. Tinling of Alamogordo, NM. Primrose is also survived by her four children: R. Neil Vining and his wife, Peggy, of Cary, NC; Harrison F. Vining of Rehoboth Beach, DE;

Josephine Vining Sheatsley and her husband, David, of Richmond, VA; and Robert E. Vining and his wife, Kathryn (in photo), of Fredericksburg, VA. Her family also includes eleven grandchildren and fifteen great-grandchildren. In addition to raising a family, Primrose was an R.N. who practiced nursing in many roles and was a member of the Red Cross. In 1967, she was among the original staff members of Goodwin House in Alexandria, VA, where she became one of the first licensed nursing home administrators in the country. Primrose retired in 1990 and moved to Westminster-Canterbury of the - BY FRANK FRATOE Blue Ridge in 1993. Since that time, she has become a friend to many in the area and was FREDERICKSBURG AFTER DARK able to re-establish her relationship with Grace Church How few would notice very often anymore in Keswick, where she had the curious sound of a train-horn faroff attended services as a child. across the city muffled early at night, Primrose was a faithful devolved as our metaphor for loneliness soldier of the Lord; never or an outcry listeners could have heard questioning His presence, His when all their promises were left undone. strength, or His grace. She never met a stranger and never Balconies of apartments are stacked up forgot a face. She will be sorely where windows glow like a checkerboard missed by all who knew and interfacing each square in the darkness, loved her. Gifts in her memory while behind glassfront there are people may be made to the waiting together for the second chance Westminster-Canterbury to bring hope alive and vows fulfilled. Fellowship Fund, 250 Pantops Mountain Road, Charlottesville, VA 22911. Frank Fratoe lives and

THE POETRY MAN Not Too L ate

writes in the city

28

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

On Tuesday, October 8, tens of thousands of people marched on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in support of comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants living and working in the U.S. I was one of them. I went to the march in D.C. that Tuesday with a group organized by SINOVA and Virginia Organizing because I think that passing comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship is a necessity for us immigrants. We joined thousands of other rally-goers because reform is necessary for our success at work, our studies, and in living dignified lives where we can integrate ourselves into American society. Immigration reform is also a necessary step to allow immigrants to contribute economically to this country even more than we already are, and to continue to make this country even better. We come to this country with our dreams, our children, and as a strong workforce, but the current immigration system poses many barriers to full inclusion.

I came to this country because my husband was out of work in Peru. We were thinking of the future of our children, so we decided to take all of our savings and move with our children to this country. My husband and my oldest son applied for their visas as students, and my other two children entered the public schools. I started cleaning houses while my children cleaned cars, helped families move, worked in gardens, and more. We live in a small “mini-apartment,” but we work hard to be able to support ourselves here. Our savings were able to support our children through their studies, but now they need to find work here because we have roots in the U.S. now, and the whole family is here. My daughter finishes high school this year and my son finishes next year. I am worried that they will not have the opportunities they need to be successful. We are good people who have overcome many obstacles, but we need to advance! We need this reform to be able to move forward. Alicia Antezano is an immigrant from Peru.

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

“Y’all heard about that man, didn’t you?” Daddy asked us kids. “What man?” we responded. Daddy grinned. He pulled cigarettes from his shirt pocket, lit one as suspense built, then pretended he’d forgotten he asked a question. “What man?” we repeated, and grinned back at him. We knew a joke was coming. Was it a joke? Daddy told a joke in such a way that after we laughed we wondered if it were true. “Is that real?” we asked after the punch line. “I don’t know, that’s what they tell me,” he answered, then walked off leaving us wondering. Daddy’s joke and storytelling styles were the same – set us up, hit us with a punch line, then walk away. It was genetic. I saw similar styles exhibited by his siblings, all excellent joke and story tellers. Like many families gather around

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

the television, our extended families gathered on my grandmother’s porch. Nannie enjoyed the fact that her children had homes next to her farmhouse and we all enjoyed her porch filling with family. My parents, aunts, and uncles would shift chairs around the porch as they asked Nannie about the garden or wondered when we’d dig potatoes. Amid the sounds of ice tinkling in glasses and chairs being scooted into position someone would finally say, “Y’all heard about that man, didn’t you?” The games had begun. A story would be stretched out and the porch would laugh. The first story would trigger a second. The second would give rise to a third. Someone would remember a joke. More laughing. Mama or an aunt would feign disgust over a story or joke they considered off color. “Thank goodness that’s all you told,” they’d say. “I was afraid you were going to tell the one about the horse!” A clear signal that the one about the horse should be told. Once that joke began, Mama and the aunts would sigh in disgust then grin at each other between sips of iced tea. The stories told were funny, but I also loved the story telling styles. Daddy could stretch a knock-knock joke into a filibuster. One uncle delivered lightning fast one liners, another uncle rivaled Daddy for airtime. An aunt couldn’t finish a story for all the laughing she did as she told it. I loved hearing what was told and how it was told. Earlier this year my kids and I sat on my parents’ porch. Daddy, eighty years

old now, joined us. As we discussed the kids’ summer plans I remembered my own summers on Nannie’s porch listening to the story telling. During a pause in the conversation I asked, “Y’all heard about that man, didn’t you?” “What man?” my kids asked. “He’ll tell you,” I said, and nodded towards their grandfather. Daddy grinned. He pulled cigarettes from his shirt pocket, lit one as suspense built, then pretended he’d forgotten I’d asked the question. “What man, Big Daddy?” the kids asked him. Daddy launched into a story. He stretched it, paused, sped up, then hit the punch line. The kids doubled over with laughter and told him he was “awesome.” I could tell something was on their minds. “Funny, but was it true?” they asked him. He looked at me and grinned. He remembered the old days too. Getting no response from him, the kids turned to me. “Well?” they asked, “Was that true?” I remembered the feeling when what I’d just heard had been told to me in such a way that I wasn’t sure it was a joke. Daddy’s grin widened when I responded to my kids. “I don’t know, that’s what they tell me,” I said to them. In unison, Daddy and I left the porch, leaving the kids still wondering.

Stuart M. Perkins likes to find humorous or poignant messages in everyday scenarios. He blogs his observations at storyshucker.wordpress.com.

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection Chatham Manor (built 1730), known as the Lacy House during the Civil War, was occupied by the Union Army during the Battle of Fredericksburg and was converted into a hospital by necessity after the Union's debacle at Mary's Heights.. Reach William T. Garnett at 540-424-2448. front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

29


In Memoriam Josephine Primrose Gundry Vining (July 5, 1925 to October 18, 2013)

Immigrants Today we want to contribute

Porch Light

For Sale Now at Amazon.com

Stories that shine a light on life

By alicia antezano

what man? By stuart m. perkins

Josephine Primrose Gundry Vining was born in Baltimore, the oldest child of Jesse and Alice Gundry of Catonsville, MD, and Rehoboth Beach, DE. Primrose was a 1946 graduate of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Married in 1947 to the late L. Heath Vining, Jr., she is survived by her sister, Mrs. Jerome B. Tinling of Alamogordo, NM. Primrose is also survived by her four children: R. Neil Vining and his wife, Peggy, of Cary, NC; Harrison F. Vining of Rehoboth Beach, DE;

Josephine Vining Sheatsley and her husband, David, of Richmond, VA; and Robert E. Vining and his wife, Kathryn (in photo), of Fredericksburg, VA. Her family also includes eleven grandchildren and fifteen great-grandchildren. In addition to raising a family, Primrose was an R.N. who practiced nursing in many roles and was a member of the Red Cross. In 1967, she was among the original staff members of Goodwin House in Alexandria, VA, where she became one of the first licensed nursing home administrators in the country. Primrose retired in 1990 and moved to Westminster-Canterbury of the - BY FRANK FRATOE Blue Ridge in 1993. Since that time, she has become a friend to many in the area and was FREDERICKSBURG AFTER DARK able to re-establish her relationship with Grace Church How few would notice very often anymore in Keswick, where she had the curious sound of a train-horn faroff attended services as a child. across the city muffled early at night, Primrose was a faithful devolved as our metaphor for loneliness soldier of the Lord; never or an outcry listeners could have heard questioning His presence, His when all their promises were left undone. strength, or His grace. She never met a stranger and never Balconies of apartments are stacked up forgot a face. She will be sorely where windows glow like a checkerboard missed by all who knew and interfacing each square in the darkness, loved her. Gifts in her memory while behind glassfront there are people may be made to the waiting together for the second chance Westminster-Canterbury to bring hope alive and vows fulfilled. Fellowship Fund, 250 Pantops Mountain Road, Charlottesville, VA 22911. Frank Fratoe lives and

THE POETRY MAN Not Too L ate

writes in the city

28

November 2013

Front porch fredericksburg

On Tuesday, October 8, tens of thousands of people marched on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in support of comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants living and working in the U.S. I was one of them. I went to the march in D.C. that Tuesday with a group organized by SINOVA and Virginia Organizing because I think that passing comprehensive immigration reform with a path to citizenship is a necessity for us immigrants. We joined thousands of other rally-goers because reform is necessary for our success at work, our studies, and in living dignified lives where we can integrate ourselves into American society. Immigration reform is also a necessary step to allow immigrants to contribute economically to this country even more than we already are, and to continue to make this country even better. We come to this country with our dreams, our children, and as a strong workforce, but the current immigration system poses many barriers to full inclusion.

I came to this country because my husband was out of work in Peru. We were thinking of the future of our children, so we decided to take all of our savings and move with our children to this country. My husband and my oldest son applied for their visas as students, and my other two children entered the public schools. I started cleaning houses while my children cleaned cars, helped families move, worked in gardens, and more. We live in a small “mini-apartment,” but we work hard to be able to support ourselves here. Our savings were able to support our children through their studies, but now they need to find work here because we have roots in the U.S. now, and the whole family is here. My daughter finishes high school this year and my son finishes next year. I am worried that they will not have the opportunities they need to be successful. We are good people who have overcome many obstacles, but we need to advance! We need this reform to be able to move forward. Alicia Antezano is an immigrant from Peru.

Dearly Wanted: Fredericksburg's Oldest Residents For Our Oral History -A Fredericksburg Treasure

online: www.save7lives.org in person: Dept. of Motor Vehicles

Front Porch is calling for Our Town's Ageless Citizens to let us know who they are so our writers can sit and hear their wonderful stories. We treasure your lives and memories.

Author: J Robert Du Bois Edited by Rob Grogan

“Y’all heard about that man, didn’t you?” Daddy asked us kids. “What man?” we responded. Daddy grinned. He pulled cigarettes from his shirt pocket, lit one as suspense built, then pretended he’d forgotten he asked a question. “What man?” we repeated, and grinned back at him. We knew a joke was coming. Was it a joke? Daddy told a joke in such a way that after we laughed we wondered if it were true. “Is that real?” we asked after the punch line. “I don’t know, that’s what they tell me,” he answered, then walked off leaving us wondering. Daddy’s joke and storytelling styles were the same – set us up, hit us with a punch line, then walk away. It was genetic. I saw similar styles exhibited by his siblings, all excellent joke and story tellers. Like many families gather around

Give a Child Something to Think About Books, Games, Amusing Novelties M-Sat. 10am-6pm; Sun. 1pm-4pm

810 Caroline Street (540) 371-5684

the television, our extended families gathered on my grandmother’s porch. Nannie enjoyed the fact that her children had homes next to her farmhouse and we all enjoyed her porch filling with family. My parents, aunts, and uncles would shift chairs around the porch as they asked Nannie about the garden or wondered when we’d dig potatoes. Amid the sounds of ice tinkling in glasses and chairs being scooted into position someone would finally say, “Y’all heard about that man, didn’t you?” The games had begun. A story would be stretched out and the porch would laugh. The first story would trigger a second. The second would give rise to a third. Someone would remember a joke. More laughing. Mama or an aunt would feign disgust over a story or joke they considered off color. “Thank goodness that’s all you told,” they’d say. “I was afraid you were going to tell the one about the horse!” A clear signal that the one about the horse should be told. Once that joke began, Mama and the aunts would sigh in disgust then grin at each other between sips of iced tea. The stories told were funny, but I also loved the story telling styles. Daddy could stretch a knock-knock joke into a filibuster. One uncle delivered lightning fast one liners, another uncle rivaled Daddy for airtime. An aunt couldn’t finish a story for all the laughing she did as she told it. I loved hearing what was told and how it was told. Earlier this year my kids and I sat on my parents’ porch. Daddy, eighty years

old now, joined us. As we discussed the kids’ summer plans I remembered my own summers on Nannie’s porch listening to the story telling. During a pause in the conversation I asked, “Y’all heard about that man, didn’t you?” “What man?” my kids asked. “He’ll tell you,” I said, and nodded towards their grandfather. Daddy grinned. He pulled cigarettes from his shirt pocket, lit one as suspense built, then pretended he’d forgotten I’d asked the question. “What man, Big Daddy?” the kids asked him. Daddy launched into a story. He stretched it, paused, sped up, then hit the punch line. The kids doubled over with laughter and told him he was “awesome.” I could tell something was on their minds. “Funny, but was it true?” they asked him. He looked at me and grinned. He remembered the old days too. Getting no response from him, the kids turned to me. “Well?” they asked, “Was that true?” I remembered the feeling when what I’d just heard had been told to me in such a way that I wasn’t sure it was a joke. Daddy’s grin widened when I responded to my kids. “I don’t know, that’s what they tell me,” I said to them. In unison, Daddy and I left the porch, leaving the kids still wondering.

Stuart M. Perkins likes to find humorous or poignant messages in everyday scenarios. He blogs his observations at storyshucker.wordpress.com.

Days Gone By Courtesy of the William T. Garnett Collection Chatham Manor (built 1730), known as the Lacy House during the Civil War, was occupied by the Union Army during the Battle of Fredericksburg and was converted into a hospital by necessity after the Union's debacle at Mary's Heights.. Reach William T. Garnett at 540-424-2448. front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

29


ceremony to honor our local fallen

Protocols

By susan carter morgan

By pamela coopwood

Salute to Our Veterans Angelo Laviano, 82, from Lake of the Woods, has a special reason to celebrate Veterans Day this year. Two of his granddaughters are serving in the military. Besides that, as a Korean war veteran and one who serves on various committees and commissions that help veterans, Laviano believes these events reinforce and remind people of the sacrifices soldiers have made. “Vets make up a smaller and smaller part of the general population,” Laviano said. “The more we can do to make the public aware of the sacrifices, the better.” The 2013 Fredericksburg Area Veterans Council ceremony will be held Monday, November 11 at the veterans memorial on at the intersection of George Street, Liberty and Barton Streets near Maury Stadium. The memorial is inscribed with the names of Fredericksburg area veterans who gave all in WWI, WWII, Korea, Viet Nam, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan. In special commemoration, another name has been added to the Master columns of the memorial. Sergeant George a. Bannar, Jr. a native of Orange, Virginia and a Soldier assigned to

30

November 2013

Company C, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Fort Bragg died from injuries sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire in Wardak province, Afghanistan on 20 August 2013. He rests in the Culpeper National Cemetery. Included in the day’s events are the presentation of colors by the Honor America Corps and music by teacher Greg Reed and the Enduring Freedom Honor Team. Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw, and Congressman Rob Wittman will also attend and speak. The keynote speech will be given by Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Douglas J. Robb (pictured), Director, Defense Health Agency (DHA), Defense Health Headquarters, Falls Church. He is responsible for the coordination of medical, dental and pharmacy programs for 9.6 million uniformed service members, retirees and their families worldwide. Lt. Gen. Robb entered the Air Force in June 1979 as a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy. He is board certified in aerospace medicine. He has

Front porch fredericksburg

spent 20 years in the practice of aerospace medicine in support of Air Force, joint, and coalition aviation forces. Clinically, he has held the positions of chief of flight medicine, aerospace medicine squadron commander and hospital and medical center commander. Additionally, he has held staff positions as the chief flight surgeon for U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Command Surgeon, U.S. Central Command, and Command Surgeon, Air Mobility Command. Prior to his current position, Robb served as Joint Staff Surgeon, Office of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C. A chief flight surgeon with more than 1,600 flying hours, he has maintained additional crewmember status in the A-7, OV-10, F16, C-9, C-130 and KC-135 aircraft. Angelo is asking all veterans to “wear their medals” on Veterans Day, a “tradition practiced in Europe, but we hope to encourage it here.” This year’s event, which begins at 10:45 a.m., is the sixth since the Fredericksburg Area Veterans Council took over responsibility for maintaining the war memorial, a

Guest-ations…Great Guest Protocols! Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Old Town’s Greatest Tour monument that began in 1921 to recognize the dead from World War I. It has now grown to include soldiers killed from any war since then. FAVC also holds a Memorial Day event. “It’s important to recognize that so many citizens have spent time in the military defending our rights,” Angelo said. Susan Carter Morgan writes from Water Street Writers and Artists’ Studios at 915 Sophia.

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions Recently, a friend confided that whenever he received a social invitation that required him to be on his best behavior, he would fake being busy or ill to avoid what would certainly be “an awkward situation.” Perhaps like my friend, most people regard protocol and etiquette as something required only for special occasions. They think they only have to “show up” because, after all, who will care or even know who they are or who they represent?! Most of us have been in socially awkward situations, but as we become professionally savvy, we recognize that our negligence regarding codes of protocol speaks volumes. Protocols are the rules of a civilized society; etiquette knows how to respond appropriately; manners do so! Proper etiquette enables one to proceed with the important phases of social interaction; the knowledge of and proper execution of protocol and etiquette confer your charisma and “Professional Presence,” which begins and ends with how people view you. It is what your boss hopes you possess publicly. As we enter the traditional season of social entertaining, office parties, and dining, we should remember that an invitation to be a guest is replete with its own set of social graces. Here are a few tips on the basic rules of dinner guest protocol: 1. Practice being a great guest! Most host/hostesses are not prepared for people who arrive early! 2. Dress appropriately! If in doubt, always ask. If you receive a compliment, simply say, “thank you.” 3. Be social! Don’t follow the host/hostess around like a baby chick! Meet new people and plan to spend time interacting. You don’t have to be the life of the party, but you do have to be a part of the party! Learn the rules of introductions (higher authority to lesser authority, older friend to newer friend, etc); practice mnemonics for name recall; give a great handshake upon entering & leaving!

4. Avoid coarse or vulgar joking; hold back noisy rambunctious laughter; refrain from swear words. Men — refrain from snorting or hooting; Women — be conscious of squealing or screeching! Don’t ignore the peace of others. 5. Be mindful of your indulgence! Public intoxication or sociable inebriation may cost you both your reputation and another invitation! It may sabotage a business deal or ruin a friendship. 6. Practice eating properly! Watch your host for dining clues. Use your utensils properly: Do not pick up food with your hands that you are able to pick up with a fork or spoon. Remember, salt and pepper are married; always pass both when asked for either! 7. Know when the party is over! Emily Post states, “The guest who sits on and on, unless earnestly pressed to do so, is wanting in tact and social sense.” Socially acceptable departures may begin 30 minutes after dessert or the last planned activity. Anything sooner appears to have been just a free meal! Avoid being first or last to leave; however, it is okay to depart as part of a group. If it is a business event, establish a future meeting or exchange follow-up information before standing in the doorway. Always seek out the person who invited you (and your host/hostess, if not the same). Speak about what you enjoyed, rather than how you enjoyed. In the words of Emuna Braverman, author of Guest Etiquette, “Proper interpersonal interactions are not instinctive. We need training and guidance…With practice, protocol and etiquette will be a natural, courteous way to properly greet, entertain and exude Professional Presence!

AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Pamela Coopwood is founder and President of The Planned Event, LLC, a woman-owned business specializing in the training of domestic and international business protocol and etiquette. theplannedevent.com, 703615-9525 front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

31


ceremony to honor our local fallen

Protocols

By susan carter morgan

By pamela coopwood

Salute to Our Veterans Angelo Laviano, 82, from Lake of the Woods, has a special reason to celebrate Veterans Day this year. Two of his granddaughters are serving in the military. Besides that, as a Korean war veteran and one who serves on various committees and commissions that help veterans, Laviano believes these events reinforce and remind people of the sacrifices soldiers have made. “Vets make up a smaller and smaller part of the general population,” Laviano said. “The more we can do to make the public aware of the sacrifices, the better.” The 2013 Fredericksburg Area Veterans Council ceremony will be held Monday, November 11 at the veterans memorial on at the intersection of George Street, Liberty and Barton Streets near Maury Stadium. The memorial is inscribed with the names of Fredericksburg area veterans who gave all in WWI, WWII, Korea, Viet Nam, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom – Afghanistan. In special commemoration, another name has been added to the Master columns of the memorial. Sergeant George a. Bannar, Jr. a native of Orange, Virginia and a Soldier assigned to

30

November 2013

Company C, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne) at Fort Bragg died from injuries sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with small arms fire in Wardak province, Afghanistan on 20 August 2013. He rests in the Culpeper National Cemetery. Included in the day’s events are the presentation of colors by the Honor America Corps and music by teacher Greg Reed and the Enduring Freedom Honor Team. Mayor Mary Katherine Greenlaw, and Congressman Rob Wittman will also attend and speak. The keynote speech will be given by Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Douglas J. Robb (pictured), Director, Defense Health Agency (DHA), Defense Health Headquarters, Falls Church. He is responsible for the coordination of medical, dental and pharmacy programs for 9.6 million uniformed service members, retirees and their families worldwide. Lt. Gen. Robb entered the Air Force in June 1979 as a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy. He is board certified in aerospace medicine. He has

Front porch fredericksburg

spent 20 years in the practice of aerospace medicine in support of Air Force, joint, and coalition aviation forces. Clinically, he has held the positions of chief of flight medicine, aerospace medicine squadron commander and hospital and medical center commander. Additionally, he has held staff positions as the chief flight surgeon for U.S. Air Forces in Europe, Command Surgeon, U.S. Central Command, and Command Surgeon, Air Mobility Command. Prior to his current position, Robb served as Joint Staff Surgeon, Office of the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Pentagon, Washington, D.C. A chief flight surgeon with more than 1,600 flying hours, he has maintained additional crewmember status in the A-7, OV-10, F16, C-9, C-130 and KC-135 aircraft. Angelo is asking all veterans to “wear their medals” on Veterans Day, a “tradition practiced in Europe, but we hope to encourage it here.” This year’s event, which begins at 10:45 a.m., is the sixth since the Fredericksburg Area Veterans Council took over responsibility for maintaining the war memorial, a

Guest-ations…Great Guest Protocols! Wills and Trusts Provide for Incapacity Trusts for Minor Children Wealth Preservation Trusts Avoid Probate AhearnEstateLaw.com

540/371-9890

Old Town’s Greatest Tour monument that began in 1921 to recognize the dead from World War I. It has now grown to include soldiers killed from any war since then. FAVC also holds a Memorial Day event. “It’s important to recognize that so many citizens have spent time in the military defending our rights,” Angelo said. Susan Carter Morgan writes from Water Street Writers and Artists’ Studios at 915 Sophia.

35 Monuments, Markers, & Attractions Recently, a friend confided that whenever he received a social invitation that required him to be on his best behavior, he would fake being busy or ill to avoid what would certainly be “an awkward situation.” Perhaps like my friend, most people regard protocol and etiquette as something required only for special occasions. They think they only have to “show up” because, after all, who will care or even know who they are or who they represent?! Most of us have been in socially awkward situations, but as we become professionally savvy, we recognize that our negligence regarding codes of protocol speaks volumes. Protocols are the rules of a civilized society; etiquette knows how to respond appropriately; manners do so! Proper etiquette enables one to proceed with the important phases of social interaction; the knowledge of and proper execution of protocol and etiquette confer your charisma and “Professional Presence,” which begins and ends with how people view you. It is what your boss hopes you possess publicly. As we enter the traditional season of social entertaining, office parties, and dining, we should remember that an invitation to be a guest is replete with its own set of social graces. Here are a few tips on the basic rules of dinner guest protocol: 1. Practice being a great guest! Most host/hostesses are not prepared for people who arrive early! 2. Dress appropriately! If in doubt, always ask. If you receive a compliment, simply say, “thank you.” 3. Be social! Don’t follow the host/hostess around like a baby chick! Meet new people and plan to spend time interacting. You don’t have to be the life of the party, but you do have to be a part of the party! Learn the rules of introductions (higher authority to lesser authority, older friend to newer friend, etc); practice mnemonics for name recall; give a great handshake upon entering & leaving!

4. Avoid coarse or vulgar joking; hold back noisy rambunctious laughter; refrain from swear words. Men — refrain from snorting or hooting; Women — be conscious of squealing or screeching! Don’t ignore the peace of others. 5. Be mindful of your indulgence! Public intoxication or sociable inebriation may cost you both your reputation and another invitation! It may sabotage a business deal or ruin a friendship. 6. Practice eating properly! Watch your host for dining clues. Use your utensils properly: Do not pick up food with your hands that you are able to pick up with a fork or spoon. Remember, salt and pepper are married; always pass both when asked for either! 7. Know when the party is over! Emily Post states, “The guest who sits on and on, unless earnestly pressed to do so, is wanting in tact and social sense.” Socially acceptable departures may begin 30 minutes after dessert or the last planned activity. Anything sooner appears to have been just a free meal! Avoid being first or last to leave; however, it is okay to depart as part of a group. If it is a business event, establish a future meeting or exchange follow-up information before standing in the doorway. Always seek out the person who invited you (and your host/hostess, if not the same). Speak about what you enjoyed, rather than how you enjoyed. In the words of Emuna Braverman, author of Guest Etiquette, “Proper interpersonal interactions are not instinctive. We need training and guidance…With practice, protocol and etiquette will be a natural, courteous way to properly greet, entertain and exude Professional Presence!

AND the Fredericksburg Battlefields Weddings Reunions Shuttles Parties Group Outings Fredericksburgtrolley.com

540-898-0737

ARCHER DI PEPPE CAGA

CERTIFIED APPRAISER

Insurance Riders Estate Settlements Divorce Cases Damage Claims Oral or Written Appraisals SPECIALIZING IN ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Certified Appraiser Certified Appraiser’s Guild of America

adipeppe@aol.com

(540) 373-9636

Pamela Coopwood is founder and President of The Planned Event, LLC, a woman-owned business specializing in the training of domestic and international business protocol and etiquette. theplannedevent.com, 703615-9525 front porch fredericksburg

November 2013

31



November 2013 - Front Porch Fredericksburg