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May 9, 2013

Vol. 13, No. 18

MINNOWS & WORMS AVAILABLE

$1.00 incl. GST.

South Frontenac Rental Centre

Complete Line of         Paints Mon-Fri: 8am-5pm Sat: 8am-4pm Northbrook 613-336-2195

Your independent community newspaper since 1971

Circulation: 9177 households

4317 Colebrooke Rd Harrowsmith 613-372-2662

Frontenac County budget Frontenac Farmers Market moves outdoors for the season debates ends quietly, followed by recrimination by Julie Druker

by Jeff Green

I

vendors at the Frontenac Farmers Market in Verona

V

endors at the Frontenac Farmers Market, which runs from 9am-1pm every Saturday until October at the Lions Hall in Verona, held their first outdoor market day of the season on May 4. The market has been running since 2005 and attracts many local vendors, including farmers, growers and makers of a wide variety of locally grown and produced products. At the market there are

home made preserves and other comestibles, fresh organic vegetables and meats, cheese, sauces, maple syrup, fresh baked goods, Middle Eastern cuisine, and many other delicious edible items plus a wide assortment of hand crafted items made by local artisans, which make beautiful gifts.

- continued on page 20

f the Frontenac County budget process were a play (it would likely be a melodrama) then the first thing that would strike the audience about the final scene, was that one of the major players was missing. Choosing instead to preside over Business over Breakfast meeting in Sharbot Lake, County Warden Janet Gutowski ceded the chair for the final budget meeting last Thursday (May 2), leaving North Frontenac Mayor Bud Clayton to preside over the meeting. About an hour into the meeting, Gutowski slipped in, and sat quietly at the table as the 2013 budget was finally approved. Before addressing the budget, Council looked briefly at a proposal from South Frontenac Councilor John McDougall to earmark $1.5 million of the accumulated County surplus in federal gas tax rebates for a homelessness and low income housing strategy. The proposal was quickly deferred until after the budget was approved. The next item of business, one that did relate directly to the budget, was the county reserve fund policy. This topic was also deferred until after the budget process was complete, and will likely resurface at the May 15th monthly meeting of Council. With this matter out of the way, after a bit more confusion over whether the budget was already passed after Council inadvertently accepted the budget document and had to then bring it back for reconsideration, there was finally an opportunity for members

of council to open up the budget document to scrutiny for the first time since the document was rejected on March 20. Frontenac Islands Mayor Dennis Doyle had a number of questions regarding the document. However, there was still no appetite at the table to revisit any of the major program budgets, such as Fairmount Home, Frontenac Paramedic Services or County Administration. Instead, Doyle decided to focus on the fate of the $130,350 operating surplus that the County ran in 2012. “An operating surplus should be applied directly to the levy to taxpayers, and should not be simply lumped into the working fund as has been done. I move that the levy be decreased by $130,350,” said Doyle. However, the county working fund had already been depleted earlier in the budget process. According to information provided by the Treasury department, $339,658 in working funds had already been used to offset costs, and another $178,246 was transferred to specific reserve funds. With the additional $130,350, the working fund has now shrunk by over $600,000. Council accepted Doyle’s amendment to the budget, leaving the budget levy down by about $157,000, or 1.92% as compared to last year. In addition, the local townships will be receiving 100% of county federal gas tax

- continued on page 20

Mike Dean’s Super Food store opens in Sharbot Lake

I

t was like a veritable whirlwind at the end, as crews transformed the ageing Sharbot Lake Freshmart into a shiny Mike Dean’s Superstore in just 23 days. On Friday morning, May 3, the superstore opened its doors. Shoppers were greeted with a gleaming produce section along the side wall, a full meat section at the back, dairy and bread to the left, and a limited selection of groceries. For now. Only the original building had been completed for the opening last week. Two remaining sections are still under construction and plans are to have them opened within a short time frame, hopefully by the May 24 holiday weekend. The other things shoppers noticed are a new brick entranceway, new floors and ceilings, and a new store design - in short, a brand new store. Gordon Dean has been supervising the construction project. “This isn’t the first time we’ve done this,” he said one day last week at the site as dozens of carpenters, electricians, and other tradespersons were working away. “We have worked with all of the contractors a number of times, most recently earlier this year in Almonte, where we’ve just opened a new store. So they know the drill.” The Sharbot Lake store is the sixth store for the Winchester-based company, which operates its own warehouse and carries national brands and its own Nancy’s Fancy

and General Merchant brands. “We’re not shy about what our stores offer,” said Gordon Dean, “Our prices compare favourably to anybody in the region and I will stack the quality of our meat and produce

against anybody else.” The conversion of the Sharbot Lake store is typical of what the company has done elsewhere, taking over older grocery businesses in rural towns, and converting them

The Dean family at the store opening in Sharbot Lake

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in short order to the Mike Dean’s model of a store. “We are a rural store, you can see that from our interiors, it’s wood over steel. And we serve rural communities with quality, fresh food at a very good price. That’s all there is to it,” said Gordon Dean. When the store opened, at 10 am on May 3, shoppers were greeted by three generations of the Dean family, including Mike and Nancy Dean, their son Gordon and daughter Julie, and Gordon’s wife Pamela and their four young children, who were all on hand greeting customers and welcoming them to the new store. A relentless stream of customers soon filled the store, nabbing groceries in short order. Meanwhile, the crews, who had been working all through the night on Thursday night to get the first section of the store complete, took the rest of the day off. In subsequent days the crews have returned, and shoppers can hear the banging on the other side of the wall as the rest of the store is completed. Once the store is fully open later this month, the Deans are hoping to be able to expand the store to the back to add a preparation area so the current building can be entirely converted into a retail area, creating over 10,000 square feet of retail space. That might take some time to come about because it requires zoning, septic permits, etc. involving not only the township but the Conservation Authority and Kingston and Frontenac Public Health as well.

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PAGE 2

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

may 9, 2013

Local budget up by 3% in Addington Highlands

W

ith little muss or fuss, Addington Highlands Council approved their 2013 budget at a council meeting in Flinton on Monday afternoon. With no members of the public in attendance, council passed a motion to adopt a levy of $2.27 million for local expenses in 2013, an increase of $77,000 or 3.1% over the 2012 local expenditures locally. With Lennox and Addington County taxes going up by a similar amount, the impact of municipal tax increases to local ratepayers in AH will be minimal in 2013. The increase in 2013 is significantly lower than a total increase of over 7% in 2012, which included an 11% increase in local taxes. This is the first year of a new four-year property assessment cycle, so individual ratepayers, particularly those who live in waterfront properties, will likely see an increase, while non-waterfront dwellers may indeed see a municipal tax decrease. Waterfront property assessments continue to rise at a higher rate than non-waterfront assessments, which continues to shift the burden of local taxation – a trend that has been pronounced in recent years throughout the region Reeve warned to keep his opinions to himself – After making comments at a recent meeting of Council, which were reported on by the Frontenac News, Reeve Hogg and his council received a letter from Brian Crane, Ontario Chief Negotiator to the Algonquin Land Claim. “I believe that a number of the concerns raised in that re-

port can be addressed with the information below,” wrote Crain. Among the points that Crain made were that local municipalities will have no obligation to “establish or maintain public roads on settlement lands” and that “Algonquin land owners will be in the same position as other private landowners as regards fire protection services.” One of the other points Crain made related to the cost of municipal zoning for settlement lands in the agreement. “The process to provide settlement land parcels with initial official plan and zoning designations will be addressed in the Final Agreement and Implementation Plan to be developed after the AIP [Agreement in Principle]. We do not intend that such implementation will fall on municipalities,” Crain wrote. “None of the responses change very much, because the AIP is vague on so many points,” said Hogg. “The key word in the planning clause, for me, is the word ‘intend’,” said Councilor Adam Snider. “They do not ‘intend’ for there to be costs, but they do not say there will be no costs. ‘Intend’ is not the same as ‘no’.” “I suppose we should prepare a formal written response to this. I’m not saying the reports in the paper were wrong, but they seem to be pretty sensitive about this,” said Reeve Hogg. Hogg then recounted that he had a 30-minute conversation with Norm Lemke, the co-chair of the Municipal Advisory

by Jeff Green

Committee. “Lemke said I should be careful what I say, because we don’t want the agreement to fall apart because the whole thing might end up before the Supreme Court and it might be much worse for us in the end. I personally don’t see how it can be worse, but there you have it.” There are a number of parcels of land in Addington Highlands that are included in the AIP, including two larger pieces just north of Bon Echo Park on either side of Highway 41. Municipal Hazardous Waste for AH residents At the Cloyne Waste site at 3444 Road 506, a shared site for Addington Highlands and North Frontenac residents, there will be a Hazardous Waste Depot available between May 22 and September 25. The depot will be open on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday (1:30 to 6pm) and the 1st Saturday (1:30 to 6pm) of each month. Materials to be accepted include: automotive; antifreeze, used motor oil, gas, diesel, camp fuels, oil filters; aerosol containers such as hairspray, spray paint, etc; garden pesticides and fungicides, weed killers, pool chemicals, etc; household paints, stains, primers, single use and recyclable batteries, corrosive cleaners, etc.; mercury devices (thermometers, switches); and personal care items such as medications for humans and pets, creams, pills, etc.. For a complete list look to addingtonhighlands.ca in the coming days. An ad will also be running in the coming weeks.

South Frontenac gets five years to wean itself off City money

S

outh Frontenac Township’s CAO Wayne Orr took on a thankless task last fall when he went to Kingston City Hall to try to convince the city to continue paying the $600,000 per year to help with road maintenance on roads that were transferred from the city to South Frontenac 15 years ago, at the time of municipal amalgamation. The amalgamation agreement called for the annual payments to end in 2012, but Orr argued that it remains important for the city to subsidize the road maintenance into the future. He had some success. The city has agreed to continue making payments, and will transfer $469,643 in 2013. Payments will continue for another four years, but they will diminish in size with each passing year. In 2014, the payment will be $375,714; in 2015 - $281,786; in 2016 - $187,857; and in 2017 - $93,929. After that the payments will cease.

Township Of Central Frontenac 2013 BUDGET ADOPTION Final 2013 Budget Adoption, May 14, 2013, 4 p.m., at the Soldier Memorial Hall, 1107 Garrett St. Sharbot Lake.

COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT Committee of Adjustment meeting May 23rd, 2013, 6 p.m. at the Soldier Memorial Hall, 1107 Garrett St. Sharbot Lake.

The agreement signed this week between the city and the township makes that point clear: “THAT this agreement represents the final conclusion to the City’s responsibilities under the 1997 Amalgamation Order Section 7.2 “Compensation” (County Arterial Roads)” The same negotiations established a similar denouement to payments between the City of Kingston and the Township of Frontenac Islands, but with smaller payouts. Over the next five years, South Frontenac will receive $1,619,458 and the Township of Frontenac Islands $210,529. Councilor McDougall congratulated the CAO for “concluding these negotiations,” and Councilor Vandewal concurred, saying “This is the best outcome when you consider we could easily have received nothing. Now, with cuts to the OMPF [Ontario Municipal Partnership Funding – a provincial subsidy for rural municipalities] the reality is we are going to have to maintain all these roads ourselves in the future as well as Road 38.” The money from the City of Kingston is earmarked for Perth, Battersea, Sydenham, Bellrock and Harrowsmith Roads (94 kilometres of paved roadway that until 1998 were part of the Frontenac County Road system). Wayne Orr said that by instituting a 1% capital fund on top of each year’s budget, which has already been instituted, the township will have money in place to cover for the lost revenue by 2017, when the agreement with the Kingston City Council expires. Tenders, tenders, tenders: The good news is that the new Tri-Axle truck for the township will cost $90,000 less than budgeted. The bad news is that the new Tri-Axle truck for the township will cost $90,000 less than budgeted. At least that’s how Councilor Vandewal sees it. According to Vandewal, the bad news comes from the

FIRE PERMITS

Open

Permits are required from April 1 to October 31 for any open-air burning, including incinerators. Negligence or carelessness regarding any fire may result in a fine of up to $2,000.00 plus all costs of extinguishing said fire. Please call 613-279-2935, ext. 441, or visit the website to check whether burning is allowed.

Tues. - Fri. 9 AM - 6 PM

The Township of Central Frontenac has submitted bylaws to the Registrar of the Funeral, Burial, and Cremation Services Act, 2002 for Echo Lake, Parham, Piccadilly, Wagarville, Campsall, Gaylord, Elmtree, Mountain Grove New, Mountain Grove Old, Oconto, St.John’s Anglican, Zealand United. Any interested parties may contact Cathy MacMunn at Tel: (613) 279-2935 for information, or to make copies. By-laws or amendments may be reviewed or copied at 1084 Elizabeth Street, Sharbot Lake, Ontario These by-laws are subject to the approval of the Registrar, Funeral, Burial, and Cremation Services Act, 2002. [Tel: Cemeteries Regulation Unit (416) 326-8399]

SERVICE DELIVERY REVIEW Service Delivery Review Meeting, at the Soldiers Memorial Hall, 1107 Garrett St. Sharbot Lake. May 21st, 2013, June 4th and July 2nd at 4:00p.m.

COUNCIL MEETINGS May 14, 2013 at 4p.m. at the Soldiers Memorial Hall, 1107 Garrett St. Sharbot Lake. May 28, 2013 at 4p.m. at 1522 Mountain Grove Road, Mountain Grove Ontario. 1084 Elizabeth Street, PO Box 89, Sharbot Lake ON K0H 2P0 613-279-2935  www.centralfrontenac.com

fact that “$90,000 more was collected in taxes than was required. That’s a 1% increase,” he said. “We should have done more homework on pricing,” said Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth, “although the money for the truck came from our capital reserve, which will be replaced next year.” The township will be paying $231,000 for a MACK truck from Surgenor’s. There was a lower bid, for an International Truck, but the International Trucks the township has purchased in the recent past have “been nothing but trouble” Segsworth said in recommending the MACK truck. Council also accepted the tender of $617,405 from Gordon Barr Limited for reconstruction of Wellington and Cross Streets in the village of Battersea. Although the price was the lowest of 10 bids on the job, it was $117,405 over the $500,000 that was budgeted for the job. To cover the extra, Segsworth recommended that a $350,000 Petworth Road culvert replacement project can be put off because a recent bridge inspection has determined that the culvert in better shape than the township had originally thought. Paving rehabilitation projects in Perth Road and Harrowsmith are being done by Coco Paving Incorporated at a price of $680,991, which is within budget. Finally, a bridge rehabilitation project on the Petworth bridge is being undertaken by Lennox and Addington County. “Our friends in Lennox and Addington have been kind enough to consider the Petworth Bridge a boundary bridge, even though it is located entirely in South Frontenac,” said Mark Segsworth. The $92,000 cost of repairing the bridge will be funded on a 50/50 basis, and the $46,000 unbudgeted cost to South Frontenac will also be taken from the unspent $250,000 on the Petworth Road culvert. Segwsorh said that L&A has informed South Frontenac that once this repair is done the bridge will be entirely South Frontenac’s responsibility. “The upsetting aspect of all this is that the bridge was damaged by a logging truck, and there are people who know which company that truck was working for, but they have not come forward, forcing the entire township to cover the cost,” said Mark Segsworth.

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www.stephenduggan.ca beachlaw@frontenac.net


may 9, 2013

PAGE 3

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

Publisher & Editor............................................. Jeff Green Managing Editor ............................................... Jule Koch Graphic Designer................................................Scott Cox Sales Representative......................................Garry Drew Reporter..........................................................Julie Druker Copy Editors .................... Marg DesRoche, Martina Field Dale Ham, Office Staff.............................................. Suzanne Tanner Webmaster.........................................................Scott Cox

www.frontenacnews.ca

Ambulance cuts

I

have recently returned to the area after wintering in Peterborough with my mother. We made the difficult decision to winter away due to some health concerns she had, and she was taken by ambulance to hospital twice while we were there. After a couple of close calls due to a medication reaction, she was rebuilding her strength and looking forward to enjoying her semi-retirement at her beloved O’Reilly Lake this summer. Anyone who knew Marg understands that full retirement was not in the cards for her! Sadly, she only survived two days into her return home. She experienced an episode of respiratory distress, and while she has managed in the past to make it through these events and come back stronger with medical attention, the wait for the ambulance proved too much for her. Was it 20 minutes? 30? I only know I called a second time to ask them to please hurry as her breathing became slower and slower. The EMS personnel tried valiantly to resuscitate her when they arrived, and they were more than kind with me when they could do no more. Our community lost a strong, vibrant business woman on April 21, 2013, and I firmly believe that had she received EMS treatment just 10 minutes sooner, she would be with us today. As for Mayor Gutowski interrupting a presentation by an EMS professional (twice!), I am embarrassed on her behalf. Ambulance services are critical. I suggest that council appreciates this & makes them a priority before another life is unnecessarily lost. - Nancy Browman

SINCE 1970

  The Frontenac News is published every Thursday Deadlines: Classifieds: Monday at 4:00 p.m. Display ads: Friday at 4:00 p.m..

The Frontenac News welcomes articles and letters, but we cannot publish all the submissions 1970 we receive. All submissions mustSINCE include the author’s name and phone number for verification. We reserve the right to edit submissions for brevity, clarity, and taste. Please limit letters to 300 words or less; articles to 500 words or less.

Letters to the editor if you are boating by a isolated island, large Help save loon nests SINCE 1970

H

ave you ever seen a loon on land? Probably not. Their legs are placed very far back on their bodies which makes them excellent divers but very awkward on land. The only time they come on land is to "nest". They make a very rudimentary nest for their one to two eggs. They will be nesting anytime now. Because they cannot walk on land, the nests are very close to the water's edge. This puts them at risk. If you like the sound of the loon's call, and to many it is synonymous with our northern lakes and natural habitats, we need to pay attention to how we may be influencing the survival rate of the chicks. Because the loon's nest is so close to the water, it is very vulnerable to wave action. If the parent loon is frightened off the nest by a passing loud boat, the eggs may be washed out into the lake and lost. If the loon is frightened off the nest by humans or dogs, the eggs are vulnerable to predation, commonly by raccoons or ravens. You might say, well they can nest again? They might. There is nothing more disheartening than seeing a loon chick, still fluffy, less than six weeks old, in August. This chick will not survive. It will not be big nor strong enough to migrate before the ice forms on the lake. To survive, the chicks must be young adolescents by August, not fluffy chicks. Once laid, the adult pair of loons will take turns incubating the eggs for 30 days. The loons will be nesting any day now. Do you think we might help by having NO WAKE month? mid-May through to the long weekend at the end of June? Please consider this

1095 Garrett St., rear building; Box 229, Sharbot Lake, ON K0H 2P0 Ph: 613-279-3150; 1-888-779-3150; Fx: 613-279-3172 E-mail: nfnews@frontenac.net Office hours: Mon to Fri, 8:30 am - noon; 1:00 - 4:30 Subscriptions (Canadian subscriptions include HST) Weekly: $63.37 HST incl. ($60.00 US for US orders) for 6 months Bi-weekly: $79.20 HST included ($75 US for US orders) for one year, 2 issues, mailed bi-weekly Member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association

was determined to have been an accident, caused by something placed on the stove while it was left on. The two young parents were in hospital for the two days before the fire, so the cause was considered unknown. Thank God they did not go home sooner. The fire department stated that the fire had choked itself out and a person opening the door could have let in a rush of oxygen that could have been fatal. People in the community may not know the two of them or myself at all, but were overwhelmingly generous in assisting in any way they could. They donated money, and all the baby, food and household items the family needed, plus many additional items, and Ken Bouchard, the owner of the building, went above and beyond in the repairs. Our heartfelt thanks to each and every one

or small. Cut your speed, save a loon egg! - Charmaine Jones

It Takes a town.....

O

n the night of December 14, 2012, my son and his spouse, Shawn and Katie, were at the Smiths Falls hospital having their first child. They lived in the apartment above the Sharbot Lake post office and to everyone’s surprise, they came home to an extinguished fire that had destroyed almost everything in the apartment. Quite a welcome home for first time parents with a newborn baby. I had already called the fire department to put out the fire. The department was quick to attend and searched diligently for the cats, which thankfully had already been removed prior to the firefighters’ arrival. The fire

- Letters continued on page 14

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PAGE 4

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

COMMUNITY REPORTERS (613) Arden.....................................Joan Moore............... 335-2015 Wanda Harrison........335-3186 Cloyne / Northbrook..............Marie Anne Collier.... 336-3223 Crow Lake.............................Marion Ratzinger...... 279-2986 Denbigh............... .................Angela Bright............ 333-1901 Godfrey................ ................ Nicki Gowdy.............. 374-5708 Harrowsmith..........................Kim Gow................... 372-0018 Henderson.............................Jean Brown............... 336-2516 Georgina Wathen..... 336-9641 Maberly-Bolingbroke.............Karen Prytula............ 325-1354 Mississippi.............................Pearl Killingbeck....... 278-2127 Mountain Grove.....................Marilyn Meeks.......... 335-4531 Ompah...................................Linda Rush............... 479-2570 Parham-Tichbome.................Colleen Steele.......... 375-6219 Christine Teal............ 375-6525 Plevna...................................Katie Ohlke............... 479-2797 Sydenham.............................Anita Alton................ 376-6333 Verona...................................Debbie Lingen.......... 374-2091 Zealand.................................Jean Lewis................ 268-2452

ARDEN Joan Moore Wanda Harrison

613-335-2015 maple_leaves02@yahoo.com 613-335-3186 harrisonwanda@hotmail.com

· The Kennebec Rec. Committee would like to express their appreciation to everyone who came out and participated in our Annual Trash Bash. Reports stated that more garbage than last year adorned our roads and a lot of it was recyclable water bottles and pop cans. People, this is your little piece of paradise, along with mine. Let’s everyone do their part and keep it clean and tidy. · Congratulations are extended to Larry Stickwood’s Intrepids. They forged ahead and won the Annual Trivia Contest held last Saturday evening. Defending champs, led by Mardi Brown performed valiantly, but in the end a new champ was crowned. A good job was done by everyone and there sure were plenty of laughs. The Rec. Committee would like to thank everyone who participated in the evening and special thanks to the Beecheys and Katie, who did a swell job organizing everything. · It looked like the Western Dance was a good time, as well. Saw many a Matson Man dressed in full cowboy attire, and it was said that everyone there had a great time. Thanks to the youth group for their exceptional organizational skills. · There will be Eggs as you Like Them this Saturday at the Kennebec Community Centre 8 to 11am. The United Church would appreciate a free will donation for your breakie. Please join into the Silent Auction bidding as well. · Saturday, May 18 will be the annual toll for the Kennebec Fire Fighters. Make sure you dig deep into your wallet, and support our wonderful fire department.

· That evening, join the Arden and Community Wesleyan Church at the Hall for a Spaghetti Dinner 5 to 6:30pm. The church would appreciate a free will offering. From experience, this is a great dinner with amazing fellowship. · After dinner, come to the Kennebec Recreation Park, and enjoy the first fireworks of the year, set off by our own firefighters. There will be volunteers with donation buckets at the entrance to the park, as your contribution pays for the display. The canteen will be open, for your convenience, and will have pop, water, coffee & tea, popcorn (the crowd favorite) and some assorted candy. Come to the park and celebrate the summer’s first long weekend. · The Arden Seniors enjoyed their May meeting and special guest speaker Matthew Behrens, Associate Producer of the Classic Theatre Festival Perth. This is the theatre’s 4th season and it runs from July 12 to Sept. 1. There are two comedies this year; the first is Neil Simon’s “Star-Spangled Girl”, and the second starting Aug. 9 is “The Marriage GoRound”. For more information contact Matthew at www.classictheatre.ca or toll free 1-877-283-1283 x3. Everyone have a good week and don’t forget, Mother’s Day is this weekend. You only have one! Cherish her.

OMPAH Linda Rush lindarush@yahoo.com

Reminder that there will be a community meeting at the Ompah Hall tomorrow, Friday, May 10, at 7pm. North Frontenac Township has requested presentations at their June 8 public meeting from all the community centres on the following issues:1. Community Centres to be declared surplus in seven years - Ompah's has been made part of the fire hall. 2. Proposed new multi-purpose complex 3. Proposed changes to township council's composition. This meeting is to gather your input on the issues for the Ompah Community Centre Committee's presentation.

CLOYNE / NORTHBROOK Marie Anne Collier

C apsule C omments

with Jocelyn

Whalen, B.Sc. (Pharm), CGP

The medical treatment of mental illness has come a long way since the discovery of the first tranquilizer back in 1951. New and much more efficient medications are available today for treating all types of mental illness including bipolar disease and depression. If you or someone close to you has a mental health problem, seek help. Much information is available on-line at www.cmha.ca. Home pregnancy kits are much more dependable today than a few years ago. Manufacturers claim 99% accuracy. For most accurate results, wait until one week after a missed menstrual period. These kits detect a hormone in the urine. If results are needed more quickly, a blood test is available through your doctor. Perhaps the most active sets of muscles in the human body are those that help our eyes to move and to focus. They do that about 100,000 times per day. You’d have to walk about 80 km to give your leg muscles the same amount of exercise. The allergy season is upon us. There are some very effective antihistamines available that can reduce the symptoms without making you drowsy. If the antihistamine doesn’t control the symptoms, there are some cortisone-containing nasal sprays that can help. You have to see your doctor for these. Talk to our pharmacy staff for advice about antihistamines and allergies. There are many to choose from. We can help.

613-336-3223

· News from the Cloyne & District Historical Society: They will be having their annual fundraising Mammoth Yard Sale on Saturday May 18, 9am, rain or shine at the Barrie Hall. Donations will be gratefully accepted; call 613-336-6858 or bring them to the hall on Friday May 17, from 9am to noon. · Ermil Andoney finds his cache with a metal detector. With his family, he has vacationed in this area, and unearthed his booty for years. Some of his exciting finds have been at the bottom of the Little Mississippi River for up to 300 years. Everybody is welcome at the Cloyne & District Historical Society's May Meeting on Monday, May 20 (Victoria Day) at 1 p.m. in Barrie Hall.

MOUNTAIN GROVE Marilyn Meeks

279-2901 1-800-565-7865

613-479-2570

613-335-4531 email: marilynarchie@sympatico.ca

· I recently had a call from a lady who had a big black bear walking along her deck in front of her house. After a long time the bear decided to move on. A very unwelcome visitor. · Happy anniversary to: Gerald & Miriam Howes; Glen & Mary Stinson; Ernest & Suzanne Barr; Barry & Sheila Calthorpe; Donna & Earl Brown; Doris & Don Ritchie; Theresa & William Lowery. It looks like May was a good month for

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ABSOLUTE TITLE Land Titles Act (Subsection 46(2) of the Act) RE: PT OF PIN 36168-0457(LT) Re: part of the road allowance between concessions 9 and 10, geographic township of kennebec described as pt 1 on a draft plan of survey signed by brian w. Kerr and dated the 7th day of may, 2013; township of central frontenac, being part of the pin

may 9, 2013 marriages. · On May 11 there will be "Eggs as you Like them" sponsored by the United Church in Arden community hall, 8-11am. free will donation. · Belated Happy Birthday to Alex Hawley. Happy Birthday to Fred Hawley, Matthew Barr, Heather Beattie, William Lowery, Herb Clow, Archie Meeks, Ray Whitelock, Kathy Scott, Vera Steele, Roy Beechey, Mary Lynn Lafratta. · On May 18 Parham Happy Travellers seniors club will hold a Bake & Yard Sale 10am-2pm near Parham Post Office. · Sympathy to the family of Margaret Purtell, owner of O’Reilly Lake Family Campground. She will be missed by many people. · Mother’s Day is approaching soon. A special day for a special lady.

PLEVNA Katie Ohlke

613-479-2797 email: ohlkek@limestone.on.ca · Tomorrow, Friday May 10, there will be a community information session about the Eastern Ontario Regional Broadband Project at the Clar-Mill hall from 3 to 5pm. Everyone is welcome. See the ad on page 6 for more information. · Clarendon Central Public School will be hosting its 6th Chili Night on Thursday, May 23 from 5:00 - 6:30pm at the school. The cost is $5 per person and you will be given the chance to vote for this year’s Chili Champ! Don't forget there will also be a dessert auction, so be sure to bring your sweet tooth! Of course if you are interested in entering your prize winning chili please call the school at 613-479-2264 and they will register you! See you there! · In preparation for the Plevna United Church commemoration service on Sunday afternoon, May 19, organizers are looking for photographs of church events or activities from its long history in our community. If you have photos that you'd like to share, please call Ed Rohr at 479-8032 to arrange. And plan to come to the Plevna church at 2.30 pm on May 19 to join in the commemoration. · The River of Life Christian Fellowship will be celebrating the first anniversary of the opening of the new church this Sunday May 12 at 10:30 am. There will be special music by the Frizzells and refreshments following the service. All are welcome. · Plevna Joke of the Week: Gwen "Did you enjoy your bear sandwich?" Rene "Yes, but it was a bit grizzly."

HARROWSMITH Kim Gow

613-372-0018 kgow63@hotmail.com

· Wilton's Annual Giant Yard/Craft/Plant/Bake/Book sale will be held May 11 from 8 a.m. – 12 noon at Wilton Hall. Baking, crafts, homemade soaps, plants, books and gently used items will be available. Donations welcome (no clothing or electronics please). Rent your own table for $15. This sale is rain or shine. For information, call 613-386-3673. · The next monthly meeting of the Harrowsmith Social and Athletic Club will be May 13 beginning at 7:30 p.m. Everyone is encouraged to attend as planning is in full swing for "Canada Day in the Park". To help out with a donation, vol-

KFL&A Serving Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox & Addington

Sharbot Lake Site: Caitlin Norwich-Stevenson Office: 613-544-3078  Cell: 613-985-2248 Email: cnorwich-stevenson@alzking.com Fax: 613-544-6320 Toll Free 1-800-266-7516  www.alzking.com

Jennifer Clow

The said plan is available for inspection at Bond & Hughes 10 Market Square Perth ON K7H 1V7 TAKE NOTICE THAT THE CORPORATION OF THE TOWNSHIP OF CENTRAL FRONTENAC, herein called the Applicant, intends to apply to be registered as the owner with an absolute title to the above-described land. AND TAKE NOTICE THAT any person claiming to have any title to or interest in the said land or any part of it is required on or before June 10th, 2013 to file a statement of objection, which sets out the nature and extent of the interest claimed in the objection, together with all evidence, documents or legal provisions and precedents relied upon in support of the objection, directed to the land registrar at the address of the solicitor at the following address:

For Our Aging

9504 Road 38 Godfrey, ON K0H 1T0 T: 613-374-2023

HIV/AIDS Regional Services (HARS)

Bond & Hughes, 10 Market Square Perth ON K7H 1V7 Attention: James M. Bond

Free confidential counseling about HIV/AIDS, sexual orientation, injection drug issues.

If no such statement of objection is filed by June 10th, 2013, I will proceed with the application and any interest you may claim in the subject property will be thereby extinguished and you will not be entitled to receive any further notice with respect to the proceedings.

Education. Training. Pamphlets. Videos.

Dated at Perth this 9th day of May, 2013 James M. Bond

Contact John MacTavish

HARS @ N.F.C.S. (613-279-3151) HARS in Kingston (613-545-3698, 1-800-565-2209)


may 9, 2013

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

unteer or become a new member call Kim 613-372-0018. · A Turkey Dinner will be held at the Golden Links Hall May 19 from 4:30 – 6 p.m. Cost is $13. Call Barb at 613-3722315 for more information. · St. Paul's United Church would like to thank all for coming out and supporting their third annual FUNtastic Street Fair and Sale. A special thanks to neighbours on Church Street for allowing the street to be blocked for the day. · Words to live by: The real measure of your wealth is how much you'd be worth if you lost all of your money.

HENDERSON Jean Brown Georgina Wathen

613-336-2516 613-336-9641

· The North of 7 hummingbirds (aka blackflies) are back with a vengeance. Let's hope the warm weather downs their wings. · Special Happy Birthday to John Fradenburgh. · Crystal Gurnsey visited area friends and family in the village and at Pine Meadow Nursing Home. · "Happy Mother's Day" to all moms, grandmoms, step moms, aunts and all who play a special role in the lives of children. · Great to see the hall being used for so many festive events. Give a call if you want your event covered in “The News.” · Mitchell Gurnsey of Beaver Lake visited area family members this past week. · Your old reporter had a good visit with Ralph and Vera Steele at Village Green nursing home in Selby. We got caught up on all the news from yesteryear to the present. · The weather is so fantastic after a long and frosty winter. It's great weather for our pickups within a 20-mile radius of Henderson of gently used items for the up-coming Henderson United Church yard sale. Just give Allan Gurnsey a call if you have items to donate. Take care everyone – Jean.

DENBIGH Angela Bright

613-333-1901 bright.a@gmail.com · Want to celebrate Mother's Day with your mom or a special lady in your life? The Denbigh Recreation Committee presents Music-in-the-Hall and the 1st Annual Spring Fling Tea on Sunday, May 12, 1pm, with music, food and fellowship. Information: Paul 333-2776, Mark 333-9462; Mike 333-1449. For tea info, contact Gail 333-2224 or Ruby 333-1449. · "Happy Mother's Day" means more than have a happy day. Within those words lie lots of things we never get to say. It means we love you first of all, Then thanks for all you do. It means you mean a lot to us, And that we honor you. But most of all, I guess it means that we are thinking of…, Your happiness on this, your day, with pleasure and with love. Author: unknown

MISSISSIPPI Pearl Killingbeck

613-278-2127

· Don’t forget the potluck supper at Snow Road Community Hall – Wednesday, May 15 at 5:30 p.m. Bring a dish to share. · Sympathy to Art and Monica on the death of Monica’s father in Germany. · Patsy Steele came for a visit. We went to see R.D. and had a two-hour visit. He says hello to all his friends in the north. · Happy 20th birthday to Dylan Clement. · On May 23, Lillian and Harold Antoine will be celebrating

58 years of wedded bliss. · John Jackson’s home in Snow Road has been sold. There will be new people in the village soon. · There were 170 people fed at the last breakfast of the season. The money raised for Melanoma was 1,433.50 from donations. · On Friday, May 17, 2 p.m. to 7, the Elphin Church yard & bake sale will be held, rain or shine. Proceeds to Elphin Church. · A special welcome into full membership within Snow Road congregation is extended to Greg Bullock. · Smile – Summer is the time of year when the children slam the doors that they left open all winter.

SYDENHAM Anita Alton

613-376-6333 rideauraingutter@yahoo.com

· Seems as if some sunshine has finally found us.... Just in time for Mother’s Day. The firefighters are hosting their annual Mother’s Day Breakfast from 8am -1pm at the fire hall this Sunday May 11. Bring your mother and the whole family for this very popular community event featuring pancakes, sausages, juice and coffee along with raffles and silent auctions. Whoever fills the role of "mother" in your life - be sure and honor her this weekend. · Saturday May 25 the Legion is hosting a Chinese Food Dinner and quarter auction. Food is supplied by Jade Garden and is all you can eat for $15. Dinner begins at 5:30 and the quarter auction is to follow. Tickets have to be prepurchased (you can't get them at the door) and there are only 80 tickets available. If you are 19 or older stop in at the Legion and pick up your tickets today. · Ambush is coming to the Sydenham Legion on Friday May 31!! This wildly successful band will play to a sold out crowd - so get your tickets early or you will miss out on this fantastic party night. Tickets are $20 each, available at the Legion. · A Canoe Workshop will be held on May 25 at Gould Lake from 10am-1pm. Learn canoeing skills like carrying, launching, manoeuvring and exiting a canoe. The cost is $35.50 or $30 for annual pass holders. Advance registration is required. Registration forms are available at www.cataraquiregion.on.ca. Gould Lake is located 5 km northwest of Sydenham. Entry fees are: $5.50 for adults and $3 for children 12 and under; maximum fee $14 per car. Annual passes are available for $80 per year. 1-877-956-2722.

Sharbot Lake Veterinary Services 613-279-2780 Tuesday & Thursday 2 - 4 p.m. Emergencies: 613-376-3618

Sydenham Veterinary Services A.A.H.A Accredited Hospital

May 11, 2013 10:00am-4:00pm Contact us to RSVP: 613-335-5403 1361 Price Road Arden ON K0H 1B0

Standard First Aid/CPR (level c) Education for Life May 30 & 31, 8:30am-4:30pm $140.00 (includes hst)

For more info or to register contact: tammyr@careeredge.on.ca (613) 336-9067 x 630 or 1.866.859.9222 x 630 12497A Hwy 41, Unit #5, Northbrook

www.careeredge.on.ca

w w w . m a r b l e l a k e l o d g e . c o m

Opening for the Season

Mother’s Day Weekend Open Friday - Sunday Ate to Ate

Saturday & Sunday

May 11-12th Breakfast & Dinner Buffets Reservations not required but recommended!

June - July August Open Mike Friday Nights, Live Music Saturday Nights

Hwy 506 & Marble Lake Road Reservations 613-336-0117

Open House at CSR For $10 per person, you can enjoy many of the regular camp activities such as horseback riding, high ropes, wagon rides, archery, biking and a BBQ lunch will be available. The whole family is welcome!

www.ardencirclesquare.ca arden@csranch.ca

MEAT CUTTER The position requires sound knowledge of meat operations, meat cutting, sanitation, food safety and Health and Safety practices. If you have the skills and experience we’re seeking, please mail or fax your resume in confidence to:

Northbrook Attention: Charlene 12258 Hwy 41 PO Box 130 Northbrook, On.  K0H 2G0 Phone: (613) 336-2647 Fax: (613) 336-9492

PAGE 5

PARHAM-TICHBORNE Colleen Steele Christine Teal

613-375-6219 613-375-6525 mrsteal2u@hotmail.com

· Sympathy to Archie Meeks on the loss of his sister Shirley. · The Mike Dean's Super Food Store in the former Freshmart in Sharbot Lake opened their doors on Friday. Shoppers were pleasantly surprised at the newly decorated store. What a great turn out to welcome the new owners. The renovations are still going on and we are all looking forward to what lies ahead for the store. · The fundraiser on Saturday night for Drew Cumpson was a huge success. Thanks to the organizers and supporters. Don't forget to vote online for Drew as well to help him in his bid to win a new van!! · ‘Tis the season for blackflies and yard sales. Shoppers were out in full force on Saturday to get a bargain....don't forget the Annual Flea market at Parham Ball field on May 26. This is your "One stop" shopping come out and buy or sell. Rumours have it that there is going to be Home Baking at some of the tables. This is always a "Great hit". · Baseball teams have been practising and honing their talents for the upcoming season which begins the week of May 13! It will be so great to hear the sounds of cheering at the field. This year the Central Frontenac Minor Softball Association has purchased a batting cage and pitching machine that will be housed at the Parham Ball field. The Recreation Committee has agreed to prepare an area so that the cage could be set up for use. Thanks to the many local volunteers who have worked hard to get the field in shape. Do your part in keeping it so! · Memorabilia is still being collected for the Hinchinbrooke Public School closing ceremonies on June 1 - if you have anything that the organizers could borrow for this day please contact the school or myself. · Congratulations to the Child Center for another great dance!! The black and white theme was a hit and it was great to see so many sport their best outfits!! · Happy Birthday to Eddie Running-Adams, Lyann Smith, Sam Lusk, Doug Whan, Jane Neadow, Suzanne Meulenaar, Brooke Raymond and Lorna Duncan. · The Womanless Beauty Pageant is sponsored by the Cen-

continued on pg. 6

613-279-2802

Walk Ins Welcome as time permits. Professionals to serve you.For an appointment, please call Sue, or Janet 1045 Village Woods Dr. Sharbot Lake

Daily Specials, Homemade Soups, Desserts, Pizza 1004 Medical Center St, Sharbot Lake  613-279-3200

Open Wed - Sun 8a.m.- 8:30 p.m.

Dinner Specials - May 9-12 Thurs: Munchie Combos - 3 assorted appetizer platters for two $19.99, 20.99, 21.99) Fri: Beef Kabobs - Marinated beef and vegetables, grilled to perfection. Served on rice pilaf. Starter soup or salad $14.99 Sat: Sausage Dinner - Grilled Italian Sausage, topped with sautéed sauerkraut and onions. Served with potato choice and vegetable. Starter soup or salad $12.99 Sun (Mothers Day) Seafood Fettuccini - Shrimp, mussels & crabmeat sautéed in a creamy pasta sauce and served on fettuccini with a garlic baguette. Caesar salad to start. $17.99 Roast Pork Dinner - Roast Pork, roasted potatoes and vegetables. Starter soup or salad $14.99

Dinner Specials May - 15-19 Wed: Veggie Lasagna - Creamy, baked lasagna, loaded with fresh vegetables. Served with a garlic baguette and Caesar salad to start $12.99 Thurs: Munchie Combos - (wings, bread sticks, potato munchers, shrimp, fried ravioli, nachos) Fri: Chicken Stir Fry - Chicken and vegetables sautéed in sauce and served on rice or pasta. Starter soup or salad $12.99 Sat: Steak & Wings - 8oz New York, topped with 4 wings(as you like)Served with potato choice and vegetables. Starter soup or salad $17.99 Sun: Breaded Pork Tenderloin - Baked to perfection, served with roasted potatoes and vegetables. Starter soup or salad $14.99


PAGE 6

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

Parham Tichborne - from page 5 tral Frontenac Minor Softball Association and will be on May 18 from 7 pm to 1 am at Oso Hall in Sharbot Lake; cost is $8 per person or $15 per couple; 19 years of age or older - no minors. There will be a midnight buffet and several draws for prizes. Tickets are available at Joe & Marg's store in Parham.

GODFREY Nicki Gowdy

613-374-5708 bus524@hotmail.com

· An excellent crowd turned out in support of Drew Cumpson! It is very rewarding to see the community support Drew as he is and has been such a great, vibrant part of our community. · A big thank you to Chad Van Camp of Verona Hardware for his continued support of Verona Minor Ball. Chad generously donated new first aid kits for the ball teams this year! All of the children thank you for your kindness. · With Mother’s Day just around the bend, are you finding it difficult to find that perfect gift for a mom who has everything? How about a one-of-a-kind gift from one of our many talented local artisans. Local artisan, Carmen Shaw, has a variety of beautifully crafted pens made out of wood, acrylic, and deer antler available at the Godfrey post office, or you can contact him at 613-374-1492. · Happy Mother's Day to all those moms out there this weekend! Take some time and put your feet up and enjoy some thoughtfulness from your loved ones!

VERONA

Debbie Lingen

613-374-2091 debbie@lingens.com

may 9, 2013

Health Services Committee is seeking to raise $100,000 for future expansions and also for ongoing maintenance of the clinic. Watch for a letter with more information inserted in next week’s Frontenac News. · Pies! Delicious home-made pies. Verona Trinity United Church is holding their Annual Mother’s Day Pie sale at the church on Saturday, May 11. A wide selection of freshly baked nine-inch pies will be sold for $9 each. The sale starts at 9 a.m. But hurry, they sell out quickly. · There will be a Diabetes Education Session on Thursday May 16 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon at the Verona Medical Center. The guest speaker will be psychiatrist Dr. Joe Burley. For more information call 613-544-3400, Ext: 3589. · The 18th Verona Cattail Festival is less than three months away. Don't miss out on the excitement this year. Discover the fun in helping the community prepare for this event. The next Cattail Festival meeting is Tues. May 21 at the Verona Lions Club, 7 p.m. There will be lots to discuss and decide. Come and enjoy the camaraderie. Everyone is welcome. · We offer our heart-felt condolences to the Revell family on the passing of Betty Mary Eileen Revell (née Aylesworth) on Saturday, May 4. Beloved wife of Harry Revell. Loving mother of Alan and his wife Judy, Larry and his wife Tracy, Janice and her husband Robert. · Registration for the 2013 Swim and Day Camp Programs at McMullen Beach will be held at the Princess Anne Community Center in Hartington on Thurs. May 30, 6-8pm and Sat. June 8 from 9am-1pm. In order to expedite the registration process, please complete the registration form on the South Frontenac Township website and bring it to the registration location. The 2013 fee for swim lessons is $50 per child per session. The fee for day camp is $230 per child per session. Session 1 is July 2-12. Session 2, July 15-26. Session 3, July 29-Aug. 9. Session 4, Aug. 12-23. For more information, please contact Nate Moyse at 613-376-3027 Ext: 2231. · Effective May 1, South Frontenac Township is advising residents of changes to the hours of operation, accepted materials and tipping fees at waste disposal sites. You can view the document for changes on the township’s website. For inquiries, please contact Peggy Spafford at 613-376-3900 Ext 4330 or email: fswsupport@township.southfrontenac.on.ca. · This is a big weekend for moms. Treat your mother to a very special day and have a Happy Mother’s Day!

· Two days left to vote for Drew Cumpson, who is taking part in the current National Mobility Awareness event, which is offering up three brand new accessible vans to the individuals that acquire the most on-line votes. Drew is six feet tall and he hopes to acquire one of the new vans, which have larger door openings. Help Drew reach his goal of 20,000 online votes. You can vote for Drew once a day up until May 10 by visiting www.mobilityawarenessmonth.com/local-heroes and typing in Drew's name in the local heroes search bar. · The Verona Medical Clinic needs your financial support to Karen Prytula 613-325-1354 ensure that you and your family continue to receive quality karenprytula33@gmail.com care. The clinic has been providing medical care to Verona and surrounding communities for almost 50 years and pres- · The ABC Hall music jam and community potluck will be ently serves more than 2100 patients. The Verona & District held Saturday, May 11. A potluck dinner will be served at 5 pm, followed by musical entertainment and dancing at 6pm. Come for the potluck only or stay for an evening of musical entertainment. All musicians, singers, entertainers and audience members (young and old) are encouraged to come out! For information please call Glenn at 273-2571. · Calling all musicians! A Musician’s circle (musicians only) is held on Thursday evenings, 7pm at the ABC Hall in Bolingbroke. Come out to network with fellow entertainers, to share your knowledge with others or to learn from fellow musicians. All ages are welcome. Contact Matthew 273-9005. · The ABC Hall Thursday Games afternoons has changed to an EVENING event for the summer months. They will be held on MONDAY evenings at 7pm. Bring your favourite board game or card game to share. A nominal admission fee of $5 ($2 for a 50/50 draw) helps support ongoing hall expenses. Come out for an evening of fun and laughter. ConMother’s Day Buffet May 12th tact: Janice Chornohus 273-2965. · Calling all pie bakers! Here is advance notice of the Maberly Come join us for a traditional Mother’s Day Buffet Agricultural Society’s “Pie in the Sky” & Country Market on Enjoy Sunday Brunch from 9:00 - 2:30 July 6. PIE: sale of fresh, homemade pies. Sky: view solar objects through a high-powered telescope under the tuteand Dinner Buffet from 4:30 - 7:00 lage of local astronomer, Fred Barrett, Royal Astronomical Reservations are recommended Society. (Read Fred’s regular column in the Frontenac News, 14276 Highway # 41 “What’s up in the sky”). Country Market: buy or sell plants, fresh vegetables, antiques and rummage sale treasures. Cloyne, On  613-336-9054

MABERLY-BOLINGBROKE

The Hardy Inn

Matson Insurance Grand Opening of new office M By Jeff Green

atson Insurance Brokers (MIB), now a division of Insurance Specialty Brokers (ISB) of Kingston, will be celebrating the opening of their office in Sharbot Lake on Wednesday, May 15, between 12 noon and 4 p.m. The office has, in fact, been up and running since the beginning of the year, and the partnership between the two brokerages started a year before that. Older yet, much older, is the tradition of service to the community that dates back to 1965, when Ewart Matson bought the business and moved it to the front room of the house on Queen Street in Arden. Forty-eight years later, a lot has changed in the local community, but they need for a full service insurance broker hasn't. “We've always been able to provide service to our customers, and that's what keeps them coming back, generation after generation,” said Sherry Scott, the granddaughter of Ewart Matson, who runs the Sharbot Lake operation with her mother Marilyn. Marilyn took over from Ewart in 1998. “We work with many different insurance companies, companies that understand and are committed to the rural market, and that's why we can offer the kind of service that people find useful,” she added. ISG is also a community-based company. In an industry that has become dominated by larger regional and national corporations, they serve and are based in the greater Kingston market. The affiliation with Matson's enables them to reach out into the countryside as well as keep their focus on their Kingston-based clientele. Both MIB and ISG were already serving as brokers for Wawanesa, but they each had a number of other companies they work with. Clients at the new MIB/ISG office in Sharbot Lake now have access to The Dominion Insurance, Lanark Mutual, Echelon, Optimum Frontier, Farmer's Mutual, Economical, Aviva and Intact, among others. “It has been a really good fit for us,” said Dave Fraser, the General Manager of ISG. “We believe that each and every client deserves personalized insurance service for their home, cottage, boat, auto, business or farm, and those values are shared by MIB,” he added. The move from Arden to Sharbot Lake has not changed the way Sherry Scott sees the business, although, she said, “it has given me some more space back at home. People have always known where we are, and there might be an added convenience for some by us being located in Sharbot Lake, but our clientele is scattered far and wide. Please feel free to come and visit us at our new spacious office,.” MIB/ISG invites the public to visit their new office, which is located at 1021B Elizabeth St, in Sharbot Lake on May 15. There will be cake and coffee as well as a special draw for a brand new gas BBQ, and the first 100 guests will each receive a free gift. To reach Matson Insurance, call 613-2792925. TO DONATE PIES: phone: Anne, 273-5069, Marlene, 2682369, or Mary Lou 273-5683. To rent vendor space for the market, phone Beryl Stott, 278-0041. A fundraising event of the Maberly Agricultural Society. Donations welcome. Proceeds to the Maberly Fair. www.maberlyagsociety.ca · On Sat. May 18 from 2-4pm you are invited to the opening of FIELDWORK’s 6th season of presenting imaginative art in and around a road-side field. Meet the artists and hear what they have to say about their creative process during a brief introduction to their work at 2:30pm. Fieldwork is Maberly’s outdoor art galelry, located across the road from 2501 Old Brooke Rd. www.fieldworkproject.com. · Happy Mother’s Day to all the Moms out there, especially you Louise Prytula!

Vaughan’s Automotive 6674 Main Street, Verona Ontario, K0H 2W0 Owner

Vaughan B. Good

EASTERN ONTARIO REGIONAL BROADBAND PROJECT COMMUNITY INFORMATION SESSION THE COUNTY OF FRONTENAC Broadband is coming to Eastern Ontario with the help of the Eastern Ontario Wardens Caucus Inc. and the financial support of the federal and provincial governments along with the private sector. The Eastern Ontario Regional Network’s (EORN) goal is to bring higher speeds and bandwidth to at least 95% of homes and businesses in Eastern Ontario, a majority of which will gain internet speeds of up to 10 Mbps. To learn more about this exciting initiative please join the EORN Team at one of the Community Information Sessions being held in your area: Friday May 10, 2013  3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Clar-Mill Hall- 6598 Buckshot Lake Road Plevna ON - Municipality of North Frontenac For more information contact Anita Prosser at aprosser@eorn.ca or 613.925.7010

Tel: (613)374-5439 Fax: (613) 374-1393

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PUBLIC NOTICE - PROPOSED BELL MOBILITY 90 METRE TELECOMMUNICATIONS GUYED TOWER SUBJECT: • Construction of a guyed tower with a height of 90 metres. • Location: East Bay Rd east of Thacker Lane, North Frontenac, ON. Site is to be located on the south side of East Bay Road, south of Crows Foot Lane. • Legal Description: LT 6 CON 2 MILLER; NORTH FRONTENAC • The tower will provide high speed wireless internet and wireless voice services of high quality.

ANY PERSON may make a written submission to the individuals listed below by end of day June 8, 2013 with respect to this matter. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Further information may also be obtained through the following contact: CanACRE Ltd. c/o Haseeb Amirzada 200 boul. Bouchard, 5CS Dorval, Québec H9S 5X5 Fax (514) 420-8302 Email: consultation@bell.ca


may 9, 2013

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

pax vobiscum George M y father told me in the kitchen of my parents' house in Eston, Sask. on Friday, April 26 that George Jones had passed away. Staring at the floor and trying not to cry is harder than it looks. But the tears did come when I tried to speak and I said that I had hoped to see him one last time. The next thing my father said was, did I want to go to the funeral in Nashville and I said no, I was hoping to hear him sing. He reminded me that one of his great regrets was not making the trip from Eston to Montreal for the funeral of Maurice Richard. Brother Sam, living in South Okanogan, was an easy mark - we both arrived in Nashville on the Tuesday, not knowing where or when the funeral was. But we had faith. Faith in the hope that we were in the right place at the right time. When my brother Freddie first introduced me to George Jones I commented that he reminded me of Billie Holiday who he had led me to years earlier. I was thinking of the phrasing not the debauchery. George and Billie were among a select few records that we would play and flip, play and flip, sometimes for the entire day.

By Buck Tibbitt

The first George Jones album I ever bought was a cassette from Antone's Records in Austin while there on my first honeymoon in 1985. It was Jones Country and to this day it is my favourite. I still have the tape... Those songs are etched on my mind - Radio Lover, Girl At The End Of The Bar, Wino The Clown. The last line in One Of These Days will still straighten my back even after a thousand listens. “I said one of these days... Honey one of these days... But not tonight”. Frank Sinatra once famously said that

PAGE 7

George Jones was the second best white male singer in America... he was almost right in that. The funeral was at the Grand Ole Opry House and when we arrived the end of the line was not in sight. When we did find it we fell in with a bartender turned postman playing hookie... come rain nor sleet nor snow ...but not today. Evidence of overnighters and early risers were everywhere - even abandoned strollers. There was talk of George but the main topic was the seating capacity of the Opry House. Some said 4000 some 6000 some 8000 but most said, don't matter we ain't gettin in, too many people here. The line behind us seemed as long as the line in front and when Sam and I got in they closed the doors. Sorry for their luck. Tanya Tucker was just finishing as we sat down. Governors, preachers, country stars, a First Lady and a rocker all spoke and sang about George as a kind of funny, sweet, generous, ornery, shy, attention seeking demigod. All of which rang true and every single one of them spoke to Nancy, George's widow. They all made a point of offering their profound gratitude for her pulling him from the ashes, dusting him off and setting him right. At opposite ends of some spectrum, Laura Bush and Kid Rock displayed the width and breadth of his

Free WIFI - Staying connected and doing business at Sharbot Lake beach

Marcel Giroux, Dave Smith and Tom Dewey by Julie Druker or the second summer in a row, the North Frontenac Telephone Company (NFTC) will be providing free WIFI service to visitors at Sharbot Lake beach. Once again the company will be broadcasting a high speed signal from their central office, which will provide WIFI service to beach goers and boaters

F

OPP hosts Prescription Drug Drop-off Day

T

he OPP will be hosting collection locations on Prescription Drug Drop Off Day on Sat. May 11, 10am-3pm at the Frontenac detachment in Hartington; at the Carleton Place Detachment; and the Napanee detachment. Anyone wishing to dispose of outdated, unused, and unwanted prescription drugs may do so anonymously without having to get out of their vehicles. Common prescription drugs being misused are opioid pain relievers (such as oxycodone), antidepressants, and stimulants. Recent studies indicate 24% of teens reported misusing prescription medications at least once within the previous year. Most of the teens took the medication from their family home.

who want to stay connected while enjoying the fun and sun at the beach. Added to the service this year will be a new “splash page”, where local businesses will have an opportunity to sponsor the service by advertising on it. Beach goers connecting to the WIFI at the beach will first see the splash page come up with the advertisements for the local businesses and links to their websites. Dave Smith, Manager of NFTC, was the speaker at the Central Frontenac Economic Development Committee’s Business over Breakfast gathering at The Maples restaurant in Sharbot Lake on May 2. He announced to the numerous business owners in attendance how the service presents a new opportunity for them. “It's a great way for new people to the area to be made aware of local businesses, their services and the products that they offer,” he said. The idea of the splash page originated with Billy Young Jr., an employee with NFTC, and Duncan McGregor, who works with the Westport Telephone Company (WTC). The two designed the program to allow local businesses to advertise through the NFTC's free WIFI signal. Smith said the free WIFI service, which did not offer a splash page last year, was used extensively while it was up and running and he imagines the service will continue running in years to come. He also expects the

Central Frontenac Minor Softball Association Is looking for the following for the upcoming 2013 Season League starts May 13th! • Junior Men – ages 17-21 (under 22) • Squirt – ages 10-11 (under 12) If you are interested in any of the above please call Randy Kempe at 613-2791233 or Christine Teal at 613-375-6525 or email cfminorball@hotmail.com

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service to expand. “McGregor and Young are also looking into creating another idea where businesses can offer their own personalized hotspot through the free WIFI service or else by connecting right into the NFTC site, which would allow users to connect right into their business page.” Smith is encouraging local businesses to take advantage of this special opportunity to advertise. Not-for-profit organizations are invited to advertise at no charge and for-profit businesses can advertise for a nominal fee of $100, which would enable them to advertise from April 1 to November 1 and also during special events held throughout the winter months, like the Frontenac Heritage Festival that takes place in February. Those who missed the meeting can contact the NFTC at 613-279-2193 or email nftc@frontenac.net for more information.

holy fandom. If The Grand Ole Opry was the dessert then Lower Broadway was the main course and we pigged out. Four blocks of honky tonks and bars, record shops and western wear. Every bar, restaurant - you name it - had a band or a singer with a guitar and every one of those was damn good. Gruhn Guitars at 4th and Broadway had a wall of vintage Martins a mile high and a mile long. I was playing a $20,000 guitar and Sammy says, if you ding that thing I do not know you. After the first long night at Layla's and several other establishments Sammy woke with a mysterious black eye. Our bar of choice became Robert's Western World, a long narrow bar transformed from a western shop. Straight rows of new, not for sale boots lined the west wall. This is where we really connected with the spirit of George Jones. The bars were full and loud and we were all shouting and singing of our mutual love of the great George Jones. I told and retold of my first time seeing George with my sister Jennifer and brother in-law Joe at a hockey rink in Peterborough, Ont. where in our mid-40s we were the youngest people by many years in the place. And how when he came out on stage I could only point and gasp...that... that...ohmygod that’s George Jones. As if all was now well and I could live in peace. In Robert's they understood this and had stories of their own to tell. The members of The Silver Threads and The Don Kelley Band understood why we were there hour after hour at our special table. Even in death George Jones has led me to worlds beyond - Nashville is my new heaven on earth. pax vobiscum, George Jones.

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WEIGHING THE COSTS: Building a Case for a Local Food Economy

SATURDAY, MAY 11

at Oso/Soldiers Memorial Hall

7-9:30 pm

A FREE Local Food Presentation & Interactive Workshop by Karen Holmes

Local food advocate and educator Karen Holmes will speak on the real costs of our food, the true sustainability of a local food system, and how important it is to support local food. Karen will follow her presentation with an interactive workshop.

Free refreshments supplied by local producers. Sponsored by Sharbot Lake Farmers Market and funded by the County of Frontenac www.slfm.handsonharvest.ca

, ay 18 ! M s t r e l et sta nt Sa Mark ring a Pla featu


PAGE 8

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

may 9, 2013

Sharbot Lake and District Lions Spring Jamboree J by Julie Druker

udging by the capacity crowd that filled the cafetorium at Sharbot Lake High School on April 28, the second installment of the Sharbot Lake and District Lions' annual Spring Jamboree will be one annual event that is here to stay. Hosted by Fred Brown the event featured a plethora of live musical talent on stage that got countless couples on their feet and dancing. The stellar local line up included Dennis Whitty, Mitch Barker, Allen Love, Paige Rombrough, Elvis and The Old Habits. The

Jer’s vision visits NAEC O n April 17, Jeremy Diaz, founder of Jer’s Vision, visited North Addington Education Centre to talk to the students and staff. Jeremy is the force behind the International Day of Pink, a day which NAEC has embraced with growing enthusiasm since they started observing it three years ago. Students sported pink shirts, hats, shoes, badges, etc., on April 10, to celebrate International Day of Pink. Jeremy talked to Ms. Cuthill and Mr. Hill’s classes first, then spoke to the Secondary classes. He talked about the discrimination he had faced during his school days, first be-

Big Thank You to Smitty’s Appliances

by Valerie Allan

cause of race, and then because of sexual orientation. Jeremy told many anecdotes, often using humour to explain how hurtful his peers’ behaviour was. Jeremy successfully sued his school district, because of the treatment he had received, and used the settlement money to start Jer's Vision. The aim of Jer's Vision is to spread a message of inclusion and acceptance for all, using personal appearances, workshops and conferences. Jeremy talked about the harm people do by excluding anyone, for whatever reason. As well as discussing discrimination, Jeremy also discussed violence against women and sexism in general. He urged students and staff to think about actions, conscious or unconscious, which may hurt their peers. Jeremy remained behind after the presentation to address individual questions, and was surrounded by an interested group of students. Jeremy invited students to attend a conference in Ottawa to learn more, and plans are in place to take a group of students on May 30.

COFA supporters fill their plates at annual fundraiser Sharbot Lake Seniors H Home to close R by Jeff Green

Donated by Smitty’s Appliances

Smitty’s Appliances has donated a new $700 commercial waher to Mountain Grove Public School. Shown in picture from left: receiving washer, Michelle Wilkes, Art Tryon, Smitty’s helper and Smitty himself. For the best prices on your new appliance call Smitty’s Appliances. Interest free financing. 40 years in business and still going strong. Same day delivery. The little business man with the big heart.

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esidents of the Sharbot Lake Seniors Home have received notification that the home will be closing later this summer. The home, which is a privately owned and operated seniors' residence with the capacity for 35 residents, has served seniors from Sharbot Lake and area for 20 years. It was established by Doctor Peter Bell after a proposal for a publicly owned, Not-For-Profit Seniors Home in Sharbot Lake failed to receive provincial funding in the early 1990s. There are unconfirmed reports that 21 seniors were residing in the home as of May 1, and that the doors will close on July 31. The News attempted to contact Dr. Bell on Tuesday, but we were unable to interview him. We will have more details on the closing as we ascertain them.

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by Julie Druker ungry diners were in heaven at the roast beef dinner fundraiser that was put on by the Conservationists of Frontenac Addingtons (COFA) on April 27. The barbeque is held annually at the Lions hall in Northbrook. Volunteers offered up to diners over 200 pounds of on-site roasted beef and all of the fixings to help support the work that COFA does in the community. I spoke with COFA president Ron Pethick, who was as usual manning the onion grilling station out back, where he grilled over 60 pounds of onions for the diners whose support enables the organization to provide members of the community with experiences and opportunities they might not otherwise have. COFA provides an annual fishing experience to youngsters, as well as grants and bursaries to graduating students from the community. The organization also supports the local swimming program, while also helping deer and other wildlife in the great outdoors to make it through the winter.

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event attracted Lions from all over the area. Linda Zwier, who is the first vice president of the club and who will become president this upcoming year, said the event was inspired by a similar event that is held in Enterprise. “We saw the success they were having there and so did a trial event last year that sold out.” This year's event also sold out with 150 guests paying the very affordable $10 ticket price. Proceeds from the jamboree will go towards funding a variety of global as well as local organizations. For more information visit www.sharbotlakelions.com

Just a minute south of Northbrook 11893 Hwy 41 Kaladar 613-336-8265

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may 9, 2013

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

Frontenac Outfitters team up with Sandy Pines Wildlife Centre open house, which took place from May 3-5. Not only were they offering up for test paddling and sale over 400 of the world’s finest canoes, kayaks and stand up paddle boards, along with a free BBQ, numerous prizes and a live country rock concert courtesy of Rock Bottom, but this year the couple also invited their friends from Sandy Pines Wildlife Centre in Napanee to the event to raise funds for the centre. Sandy Pines Wildlife Centre is located at 8749 County Road 2 in Napanee, and is a federally and provincially licensed rehabilitation wildlife centre. It has been in operation since 1994 and is the only facility of its kind between Montreal and Faye Wan and Monica Bacon of Sandy Pines with Aidan and Lauren Kiser of Ottawa Toronto. The centre’s aim is to “help all injured and orphaned wildlife and to rearry and Christine Showler, owners of Frontenac Outlease them back into their natural habifitters, the paddlers’ paradise located at 6674 Bedford tat.” The centre also offers free advice and assistance to Road, kitty corner to Frontenac Provincial Park, decided property owners who are having problems with their wild to bring something new to their 29th annual spring sale and animal neighbors and will offer humane alternatives to resolve conflicts. Volunteers at the centre work closely with veterinarians and humane societies across Ontario. Sandy Pines is located in a small clinic facility that has recently acquired some additions, including a new aviary for raptors, who require 100 feet of flying space to pass their pre-release fly test. The centre relies 100% on donations, and staff and volunteers are hoping to build a larger hospital facility that will cost between $250,000 -$300,000. Faye Wan is Sandy Pines’ fundraising coordinator and was present at the event. She said the centre uses up most of their resources for everyday operations so finding funding to build a new hospital will be a difficult undertaking. Sandy Pines was founded by Sue Meech, a former nurse who has been caring for sick and injured wildlife for over 25 years. She said that for most of her life she has been inundated with injured and sick animals as people began to bring them to her. Frontenac Outfitters and Sandy Pines recently forged ties when the Showlers had a pair of wild foxes living on their porch. Seven of the pair’s young pups developed mange after they lost their mom even though dad tried to feed them on his own, supplying them with small prey he killed. When

L

Lionesses Ava and Emily Twigg of Kingston dove for ducks

“Funtastic” time in Harrowsmith H

by Julie Druker arrowsmith and the surrounding communities enjoyed a sun, fun and music-filled day at St. Paul's United Church's Funtastic street fair on May 2. For many the annual Harrowsmith fair represents the beginnings of outdoor fairweather fun in the area. It is the third year the fair has taken place and money raised is used to help fund the everyday upkeep and programming at the church. One of the organizers, Dan Bell, who is a member of the St. Paul's congregation said that the event not only helps make the church more visible in the community but is also a way for members of the community to get together and enjoy some fun, games, food and live music. Fair organizers and volunteers offered up a BBQ and for the kids numerous games, pony rides, a bouncy castle and countless fair confections. For the adultsthere was a plant, yard and bake sale plus a raffle for numerous gift themed baskets. As always there was a stellar and eclectic line up of local musicians who performed on an outdoor stage through the day. This year the entertainers included the Piccadilly Pickers, Bellphonix, Ianspotting, and Brittany Smith and Ava Ludlow. Organizers were thrilled with the perfect weather, which drew a favorably sized crowd out to the much welcomed event.

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left untreated, mange can be life threatening. The Showlers found out about Sandy Pines, whose crew was able to rescue and rehabilitate five of the seven pups. They were treated and released back to the wild. Sue Meech said when I spoke to her by phone earlier this week, “I think that it is man’s inhumanity to animals on a large scale that keeps me working in the field.” Sue works at the centre on average 80 hours per week and she said that this kind of work is “the reason that I get out of bed every morning.” On the day I spoke to her she was up at 8am, answering phone calls and arranging for drivers to pick up rescued animals. Then she helped numerous turtles who were having their fractured shells mended; fed the rescued barn animals and birds; checked on the progress of the new aviary; helped examine a slew of new animals that were being admitted that day including birds, raccoons squirrels and rabbits; helped feed a rescued loon; drove her interns to town to get groceries; and worked out at the gym for 45 minutes before grabbing dinner and heading back to the centre for more work. At Saturday’s fundraiser Faye Wan had on display a number of photos of various animals that had been rescued and rehabilitated at the Sandy Pines over the years. One was a young fox that had been badly injured on its face and legs by a carelessly disposed of fishing hook and line, which Faye said unfortunately happens all too often. Helium balloons and their lines also pose a huge threat to wild animals. The centre also rescues countless animals that have been kidnapped from the wild as well as those injured by cars. While lack of funds does not allow the centre to care for animals that are too sick or severely injured to be released back to the wild, the volunteers still manage to care for, treat and release close to 2000 animals a year. Before my conversation with Sue Meech ended, she recalled for me the words of a song written by an unknown author who was similarly inspired to help injured wild life. “Once in a while we have a chance to give back a little from all that we take, And a wild one returned to the circle of life is a part of the change that we make.” For more information about Sandy Pines Wildlife Centre visitsandypineswildlife.org. Paddling enthusiasts can learn more about Frontenac Outfitters at frontenacoutfitters.ca

taff at Community Living - North Frontenac and members of the community they serve, along with community volunteers, collected more than their fair share of trash at the CLNF's first ever Trash Bash on May 4. Participants were supplied with gloves and bags and were treated to a BBQ courtesy of CLNF staff following the clean up.

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PAGE 9

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THE FRONTENAC NEWS GARDENING ISSUE THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 10

may 9, 2013

“When I’m dead don’t bury me deep, just toss me over the compost heap”. ~Suzanne Tanner

To Fertilize or not to Fertilize? by Ankaret Dean, Lanark County Master Gardeners

F

or centuries people have used fertilizers to increase their crops and encourage plant growth. Until the 20th century these consisted of organic material and inorganic mined mineral nutrients. It was not until the industrial revolution that chemically synthetic inorganic fertilizers were discovered. It has been estimated that almost half the world’s population are currently fed as result of synthetic inorganic fertilizers. Nowadays, gardeners can purchase an easy soluble fertilizer from the store, add it to the watering can or hose and they only need to keep a record of how often they apply the fertilizer. It is as easy as that. Alternatively it can be spread over the ground using a fertilizer spreader. Fertilizers typically provide six nutrients and seven macro-nutrients, however for most gardeners the most essential knowledge is to understand the numbering system on the fertilizers container. These are always written in large numbers, and are in a row of three, such as 10-10-10. The first number represents the ratio of nitrogen, the second number, represents phosphate and the third potassium. Each of these chemicals has a different effect on the plant. Nitrogen, the first number, is to make the green part of the plant grow and develop. Phosphates encourage root growth, and potassium encourages seed and fruit production. Therefore if you buy a fertilizer with a high middle number it will stimulate root growth, which is good for planting out seedlings or transplanting shrubs or trees, A high last number will be good for the production of fruit and flowers, and a high first

number will encourage plant growth. To buy a fertilizer with even numbers such as 10-10-10 means it is an all round fertilizer and can be used on many perennials or shrubs, fruit trees etc. I always fertilized my winter bulbs as they die back with a good dose of 10-10-10. This means that the nourishment goes back into the bulb to wait for next spring. Organic fertilizers, such as manure and compost are more long lasting (except for slow release pellets for containers) and benefit the soil with organic matter. Manure tea can be made by filling a pail with manure, and covering it with water. After a few days the liquid can be used on plants and the manure covered again with water. Using commercial fertilizers has to be done with care. Never fertilize plants in a dry season as it can kill the plants, and most liquid fertilizers should not touch the roots or the leaves. When to fertilize? Spring or early summer is usually the best time, before the active growing season. Also it is good for planting out seedlings or transplanting young or new plants. Fall feeding is suggested for some shrubs but not for roses. New growth at that time of the year could be winter killed. What kind of fertilizer? Many gardeners either spread fertilizer over the garden patch in the spring or spread manure or compost. Perennials and shrubs, vines or fruit trees can be side dressed. Trees can be fertilized using spikes hammered into the ground at the drip line. Manure tea pretty well helps everything. Avoid over-fertilizing, though; too much nitrogen produces lots of leaves but not many flowers or fruits. All your gardening questions can be submitted and answered on our website at www.lanarkmastergardeners.mgoi.ca

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Good bugs, bad bugs by Judy Wall, Lanark Master Gardener

A

s we head into the upcoming gardening season, this is a good time to review many of the bugs in our gardens. So many of them are actually very beneficial in that they can actually help you eliminate or control the bad bugs. The following are considered good bugs: Lady bugs – predator of aphids, mites, thrips, whiteflies and mealybugs, to name a few. Bees - Major pollinators Praying Mantis prey on caterpillars, mites, leafhoppers and other soft-bodied insects. Lacewings Larvae also eat mealy bugs, scale, spider mites, mite eggs, whiteflies,

Lacewing larvae - Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org

leafhoppers, small caterpillars, and thrips. Adult lacewings feed on pollen, honeydew, and mealy bugs. Earwigs can make a holey mess of leaves, which is unsightly but doesn’t kill the plant. They eat aphids, snails and some types of larvae. Earwigs like damp, sheltered places,

Earwig - Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org

like mulched garden beds. They feed at night and look for a damp, sheltered spot to spend the day. Control: Start by clearing the mulch from the area where they are congregating and letting the soil get a bit dry, which will encourage them to move elsewhere. Ground beetles - Large, long-legged, shiny blue-black or brown beetles that hide under rocks and logs during the day, and are fast-moving when disturbed. They feed on slugs, snails, cutworms, root maggots, and Colorado potato beetle larvae. Spiders - All spiders feed on insects and are very important in preventing pest outbreaks. The spiders normally found in gardens do not move indoors, nor are they poisonous. Millipedes - shred organic matter and mix it through the soil. This gives smaller soil organisms like fungi and bacteria greater surface area to work on, and speeds residue breakdown. Centipedes - are also good (but ugly) bugs. These predators feed on pests such as slugs, flies and cockroaches. Ants and Earthworms –yes even Ants. They are just as important as earthworms, when it comes to aerating the soil. SOME OF THE BAD BUGS: Aphids - Small, soft bodied bugs, colours vary from pink and green to black. They feed on sap in shoots, leaves, buds and flowers, which causes distortion and cupping. Colorado Potato Beetle – Reddish orange and black larvae, yellowish, orange and black striped beetles that feed on potato, tomato and eggplants. They strip the foliage right down to the leaf veins. Gypsy Moth – Black, brown and red larvae that feeds on roots – it will defoliate trees. Red Lily Beetle – Orange-brown to black larvae covered in excrement; adult beetle is bright red. Larvaes do the most damage by defoliating plants such as: lilies, fritillaries, some nightshade species, tobacco plants

continued on pg 11

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may 9, 2013

THE FRONTENAC NEWS THE FRONTENAC NEWS GARDENING ISSUE

PAGE 11

“Gardening requires lots of water, most of it in the form of perspiration”. ~Lou Erickson

Deer resistant plants

Compiled by Master Gardeners

– Haliburton

D

eer have an innate sense of determining what foods are good for them and what is not. They know the poisonous plants to avoid but like humans, there are some plants they just don’t like. Some key points when considering plants: if a plant makes them sick or is

Bugs - from pg 10

associated with a bad experience they will avoid it; depending on how hungry they are ... plants they don’t like may become much tastier than before; some individual deer may like plants that most do not; deer often avoid plants with a strong fragrance, fuzzy or prickly texture or bitter taste ~ but not always! This deer resistant plant list is composed from the personal observations of several Haliburtonians, and used with the permission of the Haliburton Master Gardeners www.haliburtonmastergardener.ca.

and others. Asian long horn beetle – Larvae bore into Alliums (Allium) tree trunks of many hardwood, softwood and Angels’s trumpet (Datura) fruit trees. Rudbeckia (black/brown eyed susans) Emerald Ash Borer attack our ash trees. Bleeding heart (Dicentra spectabilis) Slugs can be very damaging pests in Butterfly weed (Asclepias) moist, shady gardens. They feed on the leaves of many plants, especially seedlings. Later in the season they can feed on ripening fruits and vegetables. Slugs are especially numerous during rainy seasons and in well-irrigated gardens. White grubs – Larvae feed on roots of lawn grass, etc. Adults feed on many vegetables, flowers, trees and shrubs. Control: If severe may need to buy parasitic nematodes which you apply to the soil. Clean up garden debris in fall to reduce overwintering populations. To teach our children more about good bugs versus bad bugs, google their images on the internet, and start to think differently about the bugs around us. If we work with Deliveries Sat. May 11 the good bugs, we can save Goodfellow’s Flowers ourselves plenty of time and effort in the garden. 1013 Clement Rd., Sharbot Lake

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Cleome (Cleome) Cosmos (Cosmos) Daffodils (Narcissus) Delphinium (Delphinium) Foxglove (Digitalis) Globeflowers (Trollius) Goldenrod (Solidago virgaurea) Iris (Iris) Lavender (Lavendula) Blazing star (Liatris) Lily of the Valley (Convallaria majalis) Lupins (Lupinus)

Marigolds (Tagetas) Monkshood (Aconite) Nicotiana (Nicotiana) Peonies (Paeonia lactiflora) Rhubarb (Rhubarb) Shasta daisies (Laucanthemum ) Valeriun (Valeriana officinalis) Daphne (Papyracea) Lilacs (Syringa vulgaris) Junipers (Juniperus) Pines (Pinus) Spruce (Picea)

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THE FRONTENAC NEWS GARDENING ISSUE THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 12

may 9, 2013

Gardening is cheaper than therapy and you get tomatoes. ~Author Unknown

Tomatoes for every size and season T

omatoes (Solanum lycopersicum, also, Lycopersicon lycopersicum) are gardeners' number one favourite vegetable to grow. And no wonder, with the juicy, bursting flavour of home-grown tomatoes fresh off the vine! I grow 20 or more varieties, trying some new types each year, just for the wonderful range of colours, shapes, textures, tastes and sizes. There are over 5000 varieties to choose from and they come in all colours; white, yellow, green, striped, black, orange and pink as well as the popular red ones! Tomatoes are grouped or classified in various

ways. You can get hybrids or heirlooms; determinate or indeterminate in growth habit; late, mid-season or early ripening; colours; for specific uses, such as slicing, salad or paste; recently, there are even GMO tomatoes; and the most common classification is by size category. The indeterminates need pruning and staking while the determinates just need a bit of support to keep the fruit off the ground. With our short summers, it’s worth looking at varieties that will let you enjoy your own tomatoes for as long as possible. These are some of my personal favourites:

Can we afford Not to eat local? by Mary deBassecourt “Weighing the Costs: Building a Case for a Local Food Economy,” a presentation and interactive workshop presented by Karen Holmes, local food advocate and educator, will take place on May 11, 7 - 9:30 p.m. at Oso/Soldiers Memorial Hall in Sharbot Lake. This presentation and workshop is part of an educational series on local food and sustainability sponsored by the Sharbot Lake Farmers Market and funded by the County of Frontenac. Many local foods are not much more expensive than their non-local counterparts, even in deep winter. In some cases, local food is actually cheaper than non-local. In other cases, it is the same price as their grocery store counterparts. The challenges of eating locally are real, but overcoming these challenges can also be a source of deep joy, satisfaction and sense of genuine community. Eating locally is all about relationships among family members, community members, farmers, producers, eaters, and with the planet. Our industrial food-system, on the other hand, relies on anonymous relationships that are both dependent and exploitative. It is time to take our dignity back through sustainability and commitment, creatively and coopera-

tively meeting the challenges of eating locally together. Farmers make less money off their farms than they did during the Great Depression, yet: · How much of your income was spent on food in 1970 compared to what you’re paying today? · How much of our produce is imported? · How much money do you spend on gas driving to buy your food? · How much does it cost to truck, fly, or ship food thousands of miles? · How much is it costing us to subsidize factory farms? Karen will address questions like these and will build a case for supporting a local food system, revealing the real costs of our food and the true sustainability of a local food system. There will be an opportunity to participate in an interactive workshop at the end of the presentation. “Cost, availability and convenience are the most common reasons consumers rely on the global food system. The hidden costs of this are not readily apparent.” For more information, contact Mary de Bassecourt, Market Manager, Sharbot Lake Farmers Market, at 613-375-6576 or email info@handsonharvest.ca.

Hook’s

by Paul Pospisil, Master Gardener Emeritus

Very Early Tomatoes - Without doubt, the heirloom, Stupice, from the Czech Republic, is the earliest and hardiest for our region. A 52-day tomato ripening as early as end June from plants set out in May, it produces a supply of small to medium size fruit till September. Use Kozy Koats or other frost protection to set out earlier. Medium-size Tomatoes Popular with home gardeners for their convenient size, there are hundreds of varieties in this group. My favourites are Bonny Best and the yellow Lemon Boy. Heirloom Tomatoes - For old-time flavour, heirlooms like Brandywine, the giant Oxheart, Dufresne from Quebec and Czech Select are worth growing. A good selection of seed can be found at the annual “Seedy Saturday” organized by Canadian Organic Growers in Ottawa the first Saturday in March. The Beefsteaks - There are dozens of varieties sold using “beefsteak” in their name. Huge tomatoes are desired by many more for their size than their taste. I grow several from this group every year. One, simply called Beefsteak, is an old garden standard producing bright red fruit about 62 days from transplant. White Beauty is an heirloom beefsteak with creamy white flesh inside and out. Must be eaten when ripe, as it doesn’t keep. Another heirloom, Brandywine, has been grown by the Amish since 1800. It produces beefsteak size fruit with pinkish-red flesh, ripening gradually over the season to give a steady supply. Has a true tomato flavour. For competitions at the fair, try one of the many hybrids like the T & T Monster that grows to about 2 lbs and holds a world record of 6 lbs! Cherry Tomatoes - For a steady supply of eat-from-the garden-by-the-handful or for salads, the Grape tomato and its yellow partner, Ildi, are my choice for the sweetest cherry size tomato. Both need to be regularly tied up on a trellis or tripod, as they will grow 6-8 feet high. They continue to put out side branches with hundreds of fruit. For smaller plants or patio pots, the red Tiny Tim is an

excellent choice. Paste Tomatoes - often determinates and prolific producers of meaty fruit. I grow the 75-day Viva Italia, and the reliable, heavy yielding, 80-day Giant Roma. They have less juice and are sweeter so they are better for cooking and canning. A Storage Tomato, Longkeeper - As the name suggests, when picked, unblemished fruit will store 12 weeks in your cold storage area. We regularly enjoy our own tomatoes until Christmas and one year, we ate the last one from the September harvest on January 17! Plant Longkeeper later than others and harvest as late as possible in September. Tomatillos (Physalis ixocarpa) - These Mexican husk tomato are a close relative of tomatoes but hardier. They produce well in marginal soils and are not affected by tomato blight. Harvest when the husks turn brown and begin to open and reveal the tomatillos. They are green when ripe. Their tangy taste makes them a must for making “real” Mexican salsa. Start your tomatoes from seed about 8 weeks ahead of transplanting. Plant seed in sterile planting mix and keep moist and very warm. Tomato seeds germinate quickly in less than a week. Once up, put them in a cooler spot in full sun so they don’t get leggy. Once the first true leaves appear, transplant them into individual pots and grow them cool with lots of light. I start my main tomatoes the 2nd week of April, the very early types around the end of March and the Longkeepers in May. Harden seedlings before setting out in the garden around Victoria Day. Stupice can go out around May 1st but provide frost protection. Once in the garden, feed, weed and water tomatoes regularly for a bountiful harvest. Prune the indeterminates for a better crop and larger size. You’ll find the reward of tasting a juicy tomato fresh from the garden well worth the little extra work in your garden. All your gardening questions can be submitted and answered on our website at www. lanarkmastergardeners.mgoi.ca

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may 9, 2013

THE FRONTENAC NEWS THE FRONTENAC NEWS GARDENING ISSUE

PAGE 13

“How fair is a garden amid the trials and passions of existence”. ~Benjamin Disraeli

Standing on rocky ground – scree gardens by Gillian Boyd, Ottawa Carleton Master Gardeners depth of 10cm in some places.) Surprisingly, a great many attractive plants will flourish in these well-drained gravelly conditions. Their roots will reach down really deep to help them withstand winter conditions. The surface drainage round the crown or base of the plants is extremely important to prevent them rotting in the cold. Freeze and thaw winters are bad for all plants, but those that grow in scree survive remarkably well. Planting small rock or alpine plants in gravel is not always easy. First, water the pots well and place them where you want them to grow. Persevere with scooping out a depression in the gravel deeper than the pot. Add compost to the scooped hole, remove the pot and place the plant so the crown will be level with the surrounding gravel. Add more compost round the sides but not up towards the crown, and then replace the gravel. Water again and let your plants settle in. If the weather is dry, water regularly until established.

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alpinus, D. amurensis, D. arenarius, D. gratianopolitanus), pink, white; Pussytoes (Antennaria dioica) pink, white; Rock cress (Arabis and Aubrieta spp) purple, pink, white. Healthy scree plants are extremely tough and you can tread on them without damage. After flowering, I often walk or push a wheelbarrow over mine without them minding a bit. A scree garden is ideal for droughtresistance and low maintenance. Keep things simple and let your plants look after themselves while you sit back and enjoy!

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f you have poor, sandy soil and a south or west-facing lawn that goes dormant in summer, it might be the perfect place for a scree garden. You will already have good drainage and the remaining preparatory work is fairly simple. Mark out your chosen area with a garden hose and, ideally, remove 30cm of soil. It doesn’t matter if buried rocks, builder’s rubble or tough roots prevent you reaching that depth as long as you have dug down 15cm if possible. Spread a 10cm layer of good soil or garden compost over the bottom of your excavated area, and then a 10cm layer of stone dust or crushed stone. Level off the site with 10cm of gravel or peastone. Measurements don’t need to be precise and quantities for a shallower depth can be adjusted accordingly. (My own plants flourish despite only having a prepared

Gravel stays damp and cool below the surface and provides ideal conditions for new roots to form. Once your plants are growing well, no further care is needed except to cut back after flowering each year to keep them in check. In a good year, some may flower again in the fall. Scree plants should never be fertilised because they prefer to find their own nutrients from the lean and mean soil that suits them best. Here are some low-growing, easy plants to try: Creeping phlox (Phlox subulata), pink, red, white, blue-mauve; Creeping thyme (Thymus serpyllum) pink; Dwarf veronica (Veronica alpina, V. rupestris), blue, white; Pinks (Dianthus


PAGE 14 10

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

may 9, 2013

Trailer Mixed Concrete At $200/yard!

You will be able to purchase cement by the yard. The material will be loaded for you into our cement mix trailer. The cement is mixed as you drive and the hydraulic lift on the trailer makes it Trousdale’s simple to unload. Home Hardware When you purchase the concrete, you receive the use of the George St, Sydenham 613-376-3441  613-376-6666 trailer for 2 hours - free of charge!

Northern Happenings Northern Happenings listings are free for community groups, and will be published for two weeks. Donations to offset the cost of publication would be appreciated. Other listings are paid or are taken from paid ads elsewhere in the paper. The News makes every effort to be accurate but events should be independently verified by readers.

Thursday May 9 LAND O’ LAKES GARDEN CLUB, 7pm, Pine View Free Methodist Church in Cloyne, presentation on Ikebana, Japanese flower arranging YOUTH 4 YOUTH COFFEE HOUSE, 7-9pm, Sharbot Lake High School

 Friday May 10 OMPAH – COMMUNITY MEETING, community center, 7pm, to discuss council decisions. SHARBOT LAKE - MOVIE “BACK TO THE FUTURE” community movie night, 7pm Oso Hall, free, donations welcome; sponsored by NF Community Services & Community Living North Frontenac, SHARBOT LAKE – DINNER at the Legion. 5:30–7 pm baked chicken SNOW ROAD - MORNING COFFEE/TEA, community hall, drop in from 10am-12 noon SNOW ROAD SNOWMOBILE CLUB AGM, 7:30pm, 1106 Gemmills Rd., all welcome.

Saturday May 11 ARDEN – BREAKFAST, 8-11am, Eggs as You Like Them, community centre, sponsor: United Church, free will donation. ARDEN – CIRCLE SQUARE RANCH Open House, $10pp, horseback riding, high ropes, wagon rides, archery, biking, BBQ BOLINGBROKE - MUSIC JAM & COMMUNITY POTLUCK, ABC Hall, 5pm potluck; 6pm music, all welcome; info Glenn 273-2571. MOUNTAIN GROVE - MIXED 3-PITCH BALL TOURNAMENT, $150/team plus ball - 3 girls on field. Home Run Competition, info: 613539-7788, fundraiser for LOLPS Grade 7&8 OPP PRESCRIPTION DRUGS DROP OFF DAY, 10am-3pm, at Frontenac detachment in Hartington; prescription drugs may be dropped off anonymously. PARHAM SMORGASBORG potluck supper Oddfellows hall, sponsored by Oddfellows, 4:30pm, $10.

PLEVNA – JACK’S JAM, Clar-Mill Hall, 2-9pm; potluck supper 5:30pm; musicians, singers, dancers welcome; sponsors: ClarMill Community Volunteers SHARBOT LAKE - “Building a Case for a Local Food Economy”; Presentation & Interactive Workshop by Karen Holmes, local food advocate & educator, 7-9:30pm Oso Hall, free to the public, free refreshments. WILTON COMMUNITY YARD & PLANT SALE, community hall, 8am-12noon; table rental $15; sponsors: Community Association, Women’s Institute; 613-386-3673

Sunday May 12 DENBIGH MUSIC-IN-THE-HALL & SPRING FLING TEA, 1pm, community hall, sponsor: Rec Committee MCDONALDS CORNERS – JAMBOREE, Agricultural Hall, music begins 1pm, dinner @ 5pm, $14; info: 613-278-2427 MCDONALDS CORNERS - AENGUS FINNAN CONCERT, MERA Schoolhouse 2pm, $20; www.ticketsplease.ca; 268-2376 PLEVNA – RIVER OF LIFE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 1st anniversary service; special music by the Frizzells, 10:30am, refreshments following, all welcome SYDENHAM - MOTHER’S DAY PANCAKE BREAKFAST at fire hall, 8am - 1pm, music, silent auction tables, sponsored by the fire fighters

Monday May 13 SHARBOT LAKE – FOOT CARE CLINIC, seniors’ centre, appointment: 613-279-3151 SYDENHAM WOMEN’S INSTITUTE meet 7pm, at library, new members welcome

Tuesday May 14 HARROWSMITH - “Introduction to Marketing“, free workshop 9:30am Frontenac CFDC Office; register: 613-372-1414; krista@frontenaccfdc.com LIVING WITH ADHD? Parent support group; Elginburg Public School, 6-8pm www.adhdsupportgroup.ca OMPAH - NORTHERN 5 DINERS, noon, For those 50+, $10, reservations requ’d 279-3151 OMPAH – GOLDEN FRIENDSHIP CLUB meets after Diners, 1:30pm, community centre SYDENHAM - CAREGIVER SUPPORT DROP-IN, 9–10:30am, Grace Centre, Mary Gaynor-Briese 613-376-6477, 1-800-763-

Letters to the editor It takes a town here go. Again, most of you have never met - continued from pg 3

of you for your amazing generosity (see also our Card of Thanks on page 16). The family has recently moved back in and are doing very well. I always wondered where the expression started, 'It takes a village'. Now, I've been so privileged to experience it first hand. I am so proud to be a part of this little town and to see how wide spread the hearts and souls of the people who live

Speaking with one voice

W

hen someone in a position of power starts talking about the need for everyone to "speak with one voice", watch out! That's code for the new Canadian way of quelling dissent and imposing tyranny. The party in power muzzles its own Members of Parliament to ensure that only one voice – that of the leader – is heard. Public service scientists are gagged and bound to prevent them from voicing factual evidence that might throw government policies into question. Now the RCMP brass are prohibiting their officers from talking freely with politicians, saying the Force must "speak with one voice". And don't think for a moment that this is happening only at the national level. In a

the parents, yet you gave assistance without batting an eye. It makes me proud to tell others about what you have done to help out. I can only hope to return the favor to this town in the future. I'm surprised Sharbot Lake isn't larger, needing more space to contain all these wonderful hearts. Proud to call Sharbot Lake/Clarendon Station home.. Brenda Repaye small Canadian city, the board of the public library reprimands one of its members for criticizing an unfair policy, saying all directors should "speak with one voice". In an obscure rural municipality, a councillor is warned against publicly disagreeing with an ill-advised decision, because the entire council is supposed to "speak with one voice". To hell with public debate, informed discussion, citizen representation. In countries like North Korea, people are still compelled to "speak with one voice" or remain silent. But democracies depend on a diversity of voices, and so do democratic institutions. So whatever Big Brother may try to command, I for one will continue to "speak with one voice" – my own. And it will be loud and clear. - Helen Forsey

9610 SYDENHAM – FOOT CARE CLINIC, Grace Centre 1-4pm. For appointment call Bob: 613376-6477; 1-800-763-9610 VERONA – FOOT CARE CLINIC, medical centre 9am-noon. For appointment call Bob: 613-376-6477

Wednesday May 15 SNOW ROAD - POTLUCK SUPPER Community Hall, 5:30pm, all welcome

Thursday May 16 DIABETES EDUCATION SESSION, 9amnoon, Verona Medical Centre, speaker, psychiatrist Dr. Joe Burley; i544-3400 ext. 3589. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY Ground Breaking Ceremony, 1pm at the Tichborne build site (west side of Road 38, south of railway tracks), all welcome.  LANARK - 50+ RECREATION EXPO, 10am2pm, Civitan Hall, admission free, lunch $5; entertainment, floor shuffleboard, lawn bowling, pole walking, clubs, activities, blood pressure checks, OPP presentation on frauds & scams, info: Kate 613-492-0291.

Friday May 17 ELPHIN – YARD & BAKE SALE, Presbyterian Church 2-7pm; proceeds to church HARROWSMITH - YOUTH DANCE, Golden Links Hall, 7-10pm for ages 9-15; $6;l Wayne 358-2533 or Sharon 372-1274 NORTHBROOK - NEW OLE TYME FIDDLERS, 7:30pm, Lions Hall, $6 non-members, $5 members, entertainers $2, lunch, prizes. All welcome

Fri & Sat. May 17 & 18 PERTH ROAD - GIANT YARD SALE, Sunday school hall, Fri noon-6pm; Sat 8-2; 353-1690, 453-1941; proceeds to United Church

Sat – Mon. May 18 – 20 BROOKE VALLEY STUDIO TOUR, 10am-5pm; art, music, food, jewelry & more; maps at www.brookevalleyspringtour.com

Saturday May 18 ARDEN - VICTORIA DAY FIREWORKS at dusk, sponsor: Rec Committee & firefighters. Rain date Sunday ARDEN - SPAGHETTI DINNER, community hall, 5-6:30pm, free will offering; www.ardenchurch.com, sponsor: Arden & community Wesleyan Church. CLOYNE - MAMMOTH YARD SALE, Barrie Community Hall, 9am, fundraiser for Cloyne & District Historical Society FARMERS’ MARKETS – Local farmers’ markets held every Saturday, 9am-1pm at: McDonalds Corners MERA schoolhouse;

Sharbot Lake Oso beach; Verona Lions Club FLINTON - COMMUNITY YARD SALE DAY, info: flintonrecreationclub.ca MABERLY - FIELDWORK: opening of new installations at the outdoor art gallery, 2-4pm; all welcome; 2501 Old Brooke Rd.; www.fieldworkproject.com MATAWATCHAN – HAM & SCALLOPED POTATO DINNER, St. Andrew’s United Church 5-6:30pm; $12; 6-12yrs $6; 5 &under free O’DONNELL FAMILY BAND “Bordertown” from Cloyne, entertaining at opening of Madoc Market, noon-4pm. PARHAM BAKE SALE & FLEA MARKET, 10am-2pm, sponsored by Parham seniors, Post Office parking lot. SHARBOT LAKE - WOMANLESS BEAUTY PAGEANT 7pm, Oso Hall, sponsored by Central Frontenac Minor Softball; $8pp; $15 couple buffet; must be 19 or older, tickets at Joe & Marg’s

Sunday May 19 BEDFORD OPEN MIC & JAM, 1-5pm, Bedford Hall 1381 Westport Rd, Bluegrass, Country, Gospel & more, $2, 613-374-2614 HARROWSMITH - TURKEY DINNER, Golden Links Hall, $13; 4:30-6pm, Barb 372-2315 OMPAH & PLEVNA - UNITED CHURCH COMMEMORATION -  Ompah Church 12.30 pm; Plevna church 2.30 pm.  RELAY FOR LIFE Team Timeless Memories Road Hockey Tournament, 11am, for ages 1014; register: Lesley Pickard, Janice Conway

Monday May 20 CLOYNE & DISTRICT HISTORICAL SOCIETY w/ speaker Emil Andoney, gatherer of local treasures, 1pm, Barrie Hall, all welcome

Tuesday May 21 HARROWSMITH - CASH BINGO, Golden Links Hall, early bird 7pm, Barb 372-2315 KENNEBEC DINERS, noon, Arden hall, for those 50+, $10, reservations required: 613279-3151 PLEVNA – FOOT CARE CLINIC, Clar-Mill Hall, appointment: 613-279-3151 PLEVNA - CLAR-MILL COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS meet 7:30pm Clar-Mill Hall, all welcome to attend.

Tues & Wed May 21 & 22 FLINTON - RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE Township Rec Centre

Thursday, May 23 PLEVNA - CHILI NIGHT, Clarendon Central Public School, 5-6:30pm; $5; to enter chili call 613-479-2264

Relay for Life 2013 North and Central Frontenac: Sponsorships by Diane Whan/Christine Teal re you a business or company that would like to do your part to support a great cause against a disease that affects so many in our area? Want to increase your advertising for a very small fee? Then Relay for Life North and Central Frontenac may just be the answer you are looking for. The chairs for this year's Corporate Sponsorship Committee are Diane Whan (disit29@hotmail.com) and Liz Bonser (lizbonser@frontenac.net). They are here to assist you in helping you to get the best bang for your buck and help in our Fight against Cancer. The Corporate Sponsorship Committee has the privilege to genuinely express the importance of Relay for Life North and Central Frontenac and the importance of the businesses in our surrounding area. They have been working hard to make this event not only happen but make it successful and your monetary help, or your pledge to donate a prize helps tremendously in obtaining that success. Knowing that the money raised, or donated is used to minimize this cost is rewarding. We can’t do it without you! Each year, Relay for Life looks to find Corporate Sponsors to ensure that our event can happen. This year, we are thrilled to

A

have Corporate Sponsors in the form of Luminaries (North Frontenac Telephone Company); Media (The Frontenac News); Survivor (W.A. Management Asset Management Ltd.) and Event Sponsor (Rebekkah Lodge). To become one of these sponsors, the cost is $1000. To each of these wonderful companies/groups, we say a Huge Thank You! We do offer other sponsorships as well as the popular track signs for $100; you can always give what you can in the fight against Cancer. As well, businesses can become a T-shirt sponsor for $500 and your name is printed on all 2013 Relay for Life North and Central Frontenac shirts. Not only a great advertising deal but a great way to say, as a company, you contributed in the success of a great local event, and worldwide, a much needed cause. Just think about all the people who will be wearing your name on their back - everywhere they go - the possibility of increased business is mind blowing! Act now; there are still a couple of spots still available! As you can see, we need you in order to make this event happen! Contact Diane or Liz and they will be happy to assist you. Together we can make this happen!


PAGE 14 10

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

may 9, 2013

Trailer Mixed Concrete At $200/yard!

You will be able to purchase cement by the yard. The material will be loaded for you into our cement mix trailer. The cement is mixed as you drive and the hydraulic lift on the trailer makes it Trousdale’s simple to unload. Home Hardware When you purchase the concrete, you receive the use of the George St, Sydenham 613-376-3441  613-376-6666 trailer for 2 hours - free of charge!

Northern Happenings Northern Happenings listings are free for community groups, and will be published for two weeks. Donations to offset the cost of publication would be appreciated. Other listings are paid or are taken from paid ads elsewhere in the paper. The News makes every effort to be accurate but events should be independently verified by readers.

Thursday May 9 LAND O’ LAKES GARDEN CLUB, 7pm, Pine View Free Methodist Church in Cloyne, presentation on Ikebana, Japanese flower arranging YOUTH 4 YOUTH COFFEE HOUSE, 7-9pm, Sharbot Lake High School

 Friday May 10 OMPAH – COMMUNITY MEETING, community center, 7pm, to discuss council decisions. SHARBOT LAKE - MOVIE “BACK TO THE FUTURE” community movie night, 7pm Oso Hall, free, donations welcome; sponsored by NF Community Services & Community Living North Frontenac, SHARBOT LAKE – DINNER at the Legion. 5:30–7 pm baked chicken SNOW ROAD - MORNING COFFEE/TEA, community hall, drop in from 10am-12 noon SNOW ROAD SNOWMOBILE CLUB AGM, 7:30pm, 1106 Gemmills Rd., all welcome.

Saturday May 11 ARDEN – BREAKFAST, 8-11am, Eggs as You Like Them, community centre, sponsor: United Church, free will donation. ARDEN – CIRCLE SQUARE RANCH Open House, $10pp, horseback riding, high ropes, wagon rides, archery, biking, BBQ BOLINGBROKE - MUSIC JAM & COMMUNITY POTLUCK, ABC Hall, 5pm potluck; 6pm music, all welcome; info Glenn 273-2571. MOUNTAIN GROVE - MIXED 3-PITCH BALL TOURNAMENT, $150/team plus ball - 3 girls on field. Home Run Competition, info: 613539-7788, fundraiser for LOLPS Grade 7&8 OPP PRESCRIPTION DRUGS DROP OFF DAY, 10am-3pm, at Frontenac detachment in Hartington; prescription drugs may be dropped off anonymously. PARHAM SMORGASBORG potluck supper Oddfellows hall, sponsored by Oddfellows, 4:30pm, $10.

PLEVNA – JACK’S JAM, Clar-Mill Hall, 2-9pm; potluck supper 5:30pm; musicians, singers, dancers welcome; sponsors: ClarMill Community Volunteers SHARBOT LAKE - “Building a Case for a Local Food Economy”; Presentation & Interactive Workshop by Karen Holmes, local food advocate & educator, 7-9:30pm Oso Hall, free to the public, free refreshments. WILTON COMMUNITY YARD & PLANT SALE, community hall, 8am-12noon; table rental $15; sponsors: Community Association, Women’s Institute; 613-386-3673

Sunday May 12 DENBIGH MUSIC-IN-THE-HALL & SPRING FLING TEA, 1pm, community hall, sponsor: Rec Committee MCDONALDS CORNERS – JAMBOREE, Agricultural Hall, music begins 1pm, dinner @ 5pm, $14; info: 613-278-2427 MCDONALDS CORNERS - AENGUS FINNAN CONCERT, MERA Schoolhouse 2pm, $20; www.ticketsplease.ca; 268-2376 PLEVNA – RIVER OF LIFE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 1st anniversary service; special music by the Frizzells, 10:30am, refreshments following, all welcome SYDENHAM - MOTHER’S DAY PANCAKE BREAKFAST at fire hall, 8am - 1pm, music, silent auction tables, sponsored by the fire fighters

Monday May 13 SHARBOT LAKE – FOOT CARE CLINIC, seniors’ centre, appointment: 613-279-3151 SYDENHAM WOMEN’S INSTITUTE meet 7pm, at library, new members welcome

Tuesday May 14 HARROWSMITH - “Introduction to Marketing“, free workshop 9:30am Frontenac CFDC Office; register: 613-372-1414; krista@frontenaccfdc.com LIVING WITH ADHD? Parent support group; Elginburg Public School, 6-8pm www.adhdsupportgroup.ca OMPAH - NORTHERN 5 DINERS, noon, For those 50+, $10, reservations requ’d 279-3151 OMPAH – GOLDEN FRIENDSHIP CLUB meets after Diners, 1:30pm, community centre SYDENHAM - CAREGIVER SUPPORT DROP-IN, 9–10:30am, Grace Centre, Mary Gaynor-Briese 613-376-6477, 1-800-763-

Letters to the editor go. Again, most of you have never met It takes a town - from pg 3 here the parents, yet you gave assistance without of you for your amazing generosity (see also our Card of Thanks on page 16). The family has recently moved back in and are doing very well. I always wondered where the expression started, 'It takes a village'. Now, I've been so privileged to experience it first hand. I am so proud to be a part of this little town and to see how wide spread the hearts and souls of the people who live

batting an eye. It makes me proud to tell others about what you have done to help out. I can only hope to return the favor to this town in the future. I'm surprised Sharbot Lake isn't larger, needing more space to contain all these wonderful hearts. Proud to call Sharbot Lake/Clarendon Station home.. Brenda Repaye

Septic pumpouts for Sharbot Lake

can do is ensure that our septic systems are functioning well. Here is our opportunity to help Sharbot Lake. Safeline Marine Construction has agreed to bring their large (34 ft x 11 ft) pontoon boat to both East and West basins of our lake May 21 - May 24. They will not return until at least 2015. It is very difficult to find a septic service on a boat, licensed operators with all the required permits and contacts to safely transfer, transport, and treat the sewage after the pumping. The price varies depending on the size of the holding tank. You do not need to be onsite at the time of the pumpout, as long as you are on the list to be done, have provided enough information about location of an access point, and that the tank has been identified and exposed. Please call Melissa at 613-326-0600 before May 17. Charmaine Jones

I

t has been a long time (more than 20 years) since a licensed septic service has been available for the water accessible homes and cottages on both basins of Sharbot Lake. In a bygone era, trucks would drive out on the ice to empty these difficult to reach septic holding tanks. However, with climate change and increasing insurance costs along with concern for the environment in the case of a spillage, this hasn't happened for years. Some citizens concerned for the health of our lake have been busy in the background. We have all heard or seen the increasing algae in the lake. There are a couple of things we can do to help our lake. One is not to disturb the vegetation along the shoreline and not to use lawn fertilizer as this will run into the lake with the next rain. Another we

Letters continued on pg 19

9610 SYDENHAM – FOOT CARE CLINIC, Grace Centre 1-4pm. For appointment call Bob: 613376-6477; 1-800-763-9610 VERONA – FOOT CARE CLINIC, medical centre 9am-noon. For appointment call Bob: 613-376-6477

Wednesday May 15 SNOW ROAD - POTLUCK SUPPER Community Hall, 5:30pm, all welcome

Thursday May 16 DIABETES EDUCATION SESSION, 9amnoon, Verona Medical Centre, speaker, psychiatrist Dr. Joe Burley; i544-3400 ext. 3589. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY Ground Breaking Ceremony, 1pm at the Tichborne build site (west side of Road 38, south of railway tracks), all welcome.  LANARK - 50+ RECREATION EXPO, 10am2pm, Civitan Hall, admission free, lunch $5; entertainment, floor shuffleboard, lawn bowling, pole walking, clubs, activities, blood pressure checks, OPP presentation on frauds & scams, info: Kate 613-492-0291.

Friday May 17 ELPHIN – YARD & BAKE SALE, Presbyterian Church 2-7pm; proceeds to church HARROWSMITH - YOUTH DANCE, Golden Links Hall, 7-10pm for ages 9-15; $6;l Wayne 358-2533 or Sharon 372-1274 NORTHBROOK - NEW OLE TYME FIDDLERS, 7:30pm, Lions Hall, $6 non-members, $5 members, entertainers $2, lunch, prizes. All welcome

Fri & Sat. May 17 & 18 PERTH ROAD - GIANT YARD SALE, Sunday school hall, Fri noon-6pm; Sat 8-2; 353-1690, 453-1941; proceeds to United Church

Sat – Mon. May 18 – 20 BROOKE VALLEY STUDIO TOUR, 10am-5pm; art, music, food, jewelry & more; maps at www.brookevalleyspringtour.com

Saturday May 18 ARDEN - VICTORIA DAY FIREWORKS at dusk, sponsor: Rec Committee & firefighters. Rain date Sunday ARDEN - SPAGHETTI DINNER, community hall, 5-6:30pm, free will offering; www.ardenchurch.com, sponsor: Arden & community Wesleyan Church. CLOYNE - MAMMOTH YARD SALE, Barrie Community Hall, 9am, fundraiser for Cloyne & District Historical Society FARMERS’ MARKETS – Local farmers’ markets held every Saturday, 9am-1pm at: McDonalds Corners MERA schoolhouse;

Sharbot Lake Oso beach; Verona Lions Club FLINTON - COMMUNITY YARD SALE DAY, info: flintonrecreationclub.ca MABERLY - FIELDWORK: opening of new installations at the outdoor art gallery, 2-4pm; all welcome; 2501 Old Brooke Rd.; www.fieldworkproject.com MATAWATCHAN – HAM & SCALLOPED POTATO DINNER, St. Andrew’s United Church 5-6:30pm; $12; 6-12yrs $6; 5 &under free O’DONNELL FAMILY BAND “Bordertown” from Cloyne, entertaining at opening of Madoc Market, noon-4pm. PARHAM BAKE SALE & FLEA MARKET, 10am-2pm, sponsored by Parham seniors, Post Office parking lot. SHARBOT LAKE - WOMANLESS BEAUTY PAGEANT 7pm, Oso Hall, sponsored by Central Frontenac Minor Softball; $8pp; $15 couple buffet; must be 19 or older, tickets at Joe & Marg’s

Sunday May 19 BEDFORD OPEN MIC & JAM, 1-5pm, Bedford Hall 1381 Westport Rd, Bluegrass, Country, Gospel & more, $2, 613-374-2614 HARROWSMITH - TURKEY DINNER, Golden Links Hall, $13; 4:30-6pm, Barb 372-2315 OMPAH & PLEVNA - UNITED CHURCH COMMEMORATION -  Ompah Church 12.30 pm; Plevna church 2.30 pm.  RELAY FOR LIFE Team Timeless Memories Road Hockey Tournament, 11am, for ages 1014; register: Lesley Pickard, Janice Conway

Monday May 20 CLOYNE & DISTRICT HISTORICAL SOCIETY w/ speaker Emil Andoney, gatherer of local treasures, 1pm, Barrie Hall, all welcome

Tuesday May 21 HARROWSMITH - CASH BINGO, Golden Links Hall, early bird 7pm, Barb 372-2315 KENNEBEC DINERS, noon, Arden hall, for those 50+, $10, reservations required: 613279-3151 PLEVNA – FOOT CARE CLINIC, Clar-Mill Hall, appointment: 613-279-3151 PLEVNA - CLAR-MILL COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS meet 7:30pm Clar-Mill Hall, all welcome to attend.

Tues & Wed May 21 & 22 FLINTON - RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE Township Rec Centre

Thursday, May 23 PLEVNA - CHILI NIGHT, Clarendon Central Public School, 5-6:30pm; $5; to enter chili call 613-479-2264

Relay for Life 2013 North and Central Frontenac: Sponsorships by Diane Whan/Christine Teal re you a business or company that would like to do your part to support a great cause against a disease that affects so many in our area? Want to increase your advertising for a very small fee? Then Relay for Life North and Central Frontenac may just be the answer you are looking for. The chairs for this year's Corporate Sponsorship Committee are Diane Whan (disit29@hotmail.com) and Liz Bonser (lizbonser@frontenac.net). They are here to assist you in helping you to get the best bang for your buck and help in our Fight against Cancer. The Corporate Sponsorship Committee has the privilege to genuinely express the importance of Relay for Life North and Central Frontenac and the importance of the businesses in our surrounding area. They have been working hard to make this event not only happen but make it successful and your monetary help, or your pledge to donate a prize helps tremendously in obtaining that success. Knowing that the money raised, or donated is used to minimize this cost is rewarding. We can’t do it without you! Each year, Relay for Life looks to find Corporate Sponsors to ensure that our event can happen. This year, we are thrilled to

A

have Corporate Sponsors in the form of Luminaries (North Frontenac Telephone Company); Media (The Frontenac News); Survivor (W.A. Management Asset Management Ltd.) and Event Sponsor (Rebekkah Lodge). To become one of these sponsors, the cost is $1000. To each of these wonderful companies/groups, we say a Huge Thank You! We do offer other sponsorships as well as the popular track signs for $100; you can always give what you can in the fight against Cancer. As well, businesses can become a T-shirt sponsor for $500 and your name is printed on all 2013 Relay for Life North and Central Frontenac shirts. Not only a great advertising deal but a great way to say, as a company, you contributed in the success of a great local event, and worldwide, a much needed cause. Just think about all the people who will be wearing your name on their back - everywhere they go - the possibility of increased business is mind blowing! Act now; there are still a couple of spots still available! As you can see, we need you in order to make this event happen! Contact Diane or Liz and they will be happy to assist you. Together we can make this happen!


may 9, 2013

Habitat for Humanity ground breaking By Sharon Matthews

T

here will be an official Ground Breaking ceremony for the Tichborne Habitat Build on May 16 at 1pm at the build site (on the west side of Road 38, just south of the railway tracks). Habitat invites all to come out to mark this important milestone that officially launches their first build in Central Frontenac. This will be the third home of the ambitious goal of eight houses that the local affiliate plans to build over five years. “We are well on our way to reaching our goal of eight homes in five years, but we will need the community’s support”, says Ron Darling, Chair of Habitat Kingston’s Board of Directors. “We can’t achieve this without the labour of volunteers, the funds from donors or the support from local individuals and businesses.” As construction begins, Habitat Kingston and Frontenac continues to encourage potential homeowners to apply, enlist volunteers and solicit donations for the home that will be built on the site in Tichborne. If you’re interested in getting involved please don't hesitate to contact Sharon Matthews, our Local Project Coordinator, at Sharonm.LongLake@ gmail.com or 613 375-8343. Even before the official ground breaking ceremony, work has begun. Nedow Construction was on site on May 6, putting in the new septic system for the home. Also, fundraising for this important community project gets kicked off on June 1 & 2 with the “Quilts & Beyond” event. There are many talented folks in the community who do very creative things with fabric. QUILTS AND BEYOND! will be held at 1010 Lawn & Garden Centre, corner of Clement Rd. & Road 38, June 1 & 2; Saturday 10am-4pm, Sunday 1-5pm. Admission is $10 and includes one raffle ticket, refreshments and musical entertainment; raffle tickets are 10 for $5. Please plan to attend, and admire the handiwork of our talented contributors, enjoy a cup of tea with some delicious refreshments, and purchase something from our vendors! The greenhouse will also be open to purchase that special plant or shrub for your garden! It’s going to be a lot of fun and is a great way for you to show your support for the Tichborne Build. For further information, please contact Jane Drew - 613-375-6142 or Donna Hollywood - 613-279-2664

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

New defibrillator in downtown Sharbot Lake K by Julie Druker

aren McGregor, the coordinator at St. Lawrence College Employment Services, announced at the recent Business over Breakfast gathering in Sharbot Lake that a new portable defibrillator is available for use by the public. The device is located just inside the door at the St. Lawrence Employment Centre which is located in Sharbot Lake at 1099 Garrett Street. A sign outside the building indicates that the unit is located there. McGregor said that a number of businesses have been trying for a number of years to purchase a defibrillator for the downtown core of Sharbot Lake but had yet to do so because of the expense. McGregor said that St. Lawrence stepped up to the plate and purchased one and that her staff have been trained to use it. The device comes with instructions so that anyone can use the device in case of an emergency. “We know that if someone should collapse at the store or the pharmacy or elsewhere, within seconds someone can rush over here, grab the defibrillator and bring it to the location where it is needed.” McGregor said that the device will not replace the fire department or 911 who will still be called out in case of an emergency but that having the device close at hand for anyone to use will be a great help for anyone in need in the community.

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Over 93 Years

AEC has seen a recent spate of budding video producers. Mr. Pelow's Restart program, on the elementary side, has produced Public Service Announcements (PSAs) on the subjects of Getting Even (three separate ones), Empathy, Respecting Teachers, and Pride. They are using the PSAs as a showcase to teach other students about what doesn’t work when solving a problem, and the importance of showing empathy, respect, and pride. The PSAs project was the idea of RESTART Program teacher Tim Pelow, who remembered the type of character-building PSAs that were on television when he was a child. “The hope is that by making these videos and sharing them with the students, staff, and families in the school community, we can start to gain a common understanding of how to solve problems appropriately and how to show other people that we are a caring community,” Pelow says. “I think the video was fun to do and I learned that getting even in a bad way doesn’t work,” said Edison. When asked about what people might learn about altering their choices, Edison also stated, “I think [people] might learn that it’s a challenge to do it, but you have to take it” Mrs. Walker's Working and Living with Children class made a PSA supporting individuality and International Day of Pink. As well as showing their own support, the class showcased the support of elementary classes, who made special Day of Pink displays for the front foyer. View these PSAs at: youtube.com/user/restartnaec Mrs. Walker's Grade 10 Physical Education class also produced a video dealing with the issues of drugs and alcohol, called "A Better Life". It can be found at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=pCausJsbLq4. The PSAs were conceptualized by the students, who also made their storyboards (the step-by-step visualization of how the video would unfold), wrote their scripts, acted, and directed their videos. They included guest appearances by staff and student teachers in cameo roles. - by Valerie Allan

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For more information or to register contact the Sharbot Lake Resource Centre at 1099 Garrett Street (613)545-3949 press 3 or email essl@sl.on.ca

employmentservice.sl.on.ca This Employment Ontario program is funded by the Ontario government.


THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 16

May 9, 2013

SOCIAL NOTES OBITUARY Jennie Kozak (Licari)

in her ninety-first year, surrounded by loving children and grandchildren, was quietly re-united with her beloved Johnny on Saturday, May 4, 2013. She is survived by her daughter, Rosemarie Bowick (Bill) of Sharbot Lake, her son Conrad (Divina) of Surrey, BC and two grandsons, Scott and David Bullen (Erika). Known to all as Nana, she was also much loved and will be greatly missed by her nine natural and adopted grandchildren and 16 great grandchildren. Jennie, third daughter of the late Francesca and Peter Licari, was pre-deceased by her brother Joseph (Curlie) and sisters Josephine Cashman and Carmella (Mella) Gorley. She is survived by her sister Rose Lalande and brother Tony Licari. Also surviving is her treasured friend, Mary Disipio, with whom she shared a lifetime of experiences, from early married life to child rearing and retirement. They were there for each other through it all. Jennie spent most of her years in Ottawa where she worked for the Department of National Defense. Johnny’s military career also saw them living in Kingston, Fredericton and Monterey, California. Jennie did volunteer work at the Ottawa Civic Hospital and was active in the St. Anthony’s Ladies’ Aid where she served for more than thirty years. Jennie’s final years were spent under the loving care of the Alzheimer staff at Lanark Lodge and her special care giver, Cheryl Findley. A gentle, caring person, herself, Jennie deserved and returned the love she received. She was a classy lady who will be missed by many. Friends are invited to visit at Kelly Funeral Home 3000 Woodroffe Ave 613-823-4747 Wednesday, May 8 between 2:00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 PM . The funeral service will be held at St. Anthony’s Church on 427 Booth Street in Ottawa on Thursday, May 9 at 2:00 PM. A reception at the Kelly Funeral Home will follow burial at Capital Memorial Gardens. Memorial donations to the Lanark Lodge, 115 Christie Lake Road, Perth On. K7H 3C6 for Montessori Methods of Dementia program would be appreciated.

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CARD OF THANKs Thank You ~ Jim Wright’s family Kay, Bill, Dianne, Brian and their families would like to thank each and everyone who came to the funeral home, sent cards, flowers, food, phone calls, visits, donations, email tributes, stories, and made this difficult time a little easier. A special thank you to Lanark Lodge, (The Maples Neighbourhood) for all the care they gave to Jim and our family for over a year. To Perth Hospital who, with care and compassion, took care of all of us for Jim’s brief stay in hospital. To Derek Maschke and his staff at Maschke Funeral Home in Northbrook for all your guidance and advice. Much appreciation to Legion 328 in Northbrook for the service and recognition for what Jim did for the Legion through out his years; he enjoyed the comradery of the Legion. Thank-you also to the staff at Pine Meadow for their support for Kay and the family through this time of loss. Thank you Rev. Jean Brown for your words of kindness, to Jim’s best friend Bruce Sage for a great tribute, and to Jim’s granddaughter Sara Lake for singing a Scottish song. Lake Kashwakamak has lost a great man who did his business with a hand shake and his word. He has left people with many memories that will stay with us always. Thank You ~ Garrett The Garrett family would like to thank our family and friends for their support during this difficult time through calls, cards and food. We offer our gratitude to everyone who attended the funeral and visitation, for comforting words, flowers and charitable donations. Many thanks to Dave and Ann Goodfellow for their support and guidance. Our appreciation to Rev. Juliette Schimpf for her spirited service and comforting words. Thankyou to Harrison Garrett for reading and to Kelly (Garrett) Baker for sharing family memories at the funeral service. A special thank you to Mary Howes for her many visits to the hospital, for being there when Harris needed her, and for singing at the funeral service. Thank you to all of the Pall Bearers: Todd Baker, David Armstrong, Grant Armstrong, Christopher Conboy, Jason Conboy, and Peter Garrett. Thanks to the United Church Women For the delightful lunch after the funeral. Many thanks to all of the caregivers; to Dr. Bell for the very special care over the past several years; to Jennifer Clow and the caring staff at Country View Care for their sincere love and for really making it "home”; to the staff at KGH; to Specialized Geriatrics Acute Care Consult Team for checking in and knowing exactly what to do; and finally to the staff on 2 South for the calm, kind, compassionate care of all of us. We will never forget what you all have done for us. Harris was a wonderful Father, Grandfather, Poppa and friend to many and he will be missed by all. Fortunately, he has left everyone with many memories to cherish forever. The Family of Harris Mervin Garrett FUNERAL SERVICES

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Jack & Jill North Frontenac We would like to take this opportunity to thank the community for their support with our 1st Annual Trash Bash. Thanks to the Municipality for picking up our trash bags and RAM’s Esso for supplying us with water. We look forward to next year so we can do it all over again to help in keeping our community clean.

for Daniel Wilson & Michelle Player Saturday May 11, 2013 Verona Lions Hall, 4504 Verona Sand Rd, Verona ON Tickets 1 for $10 / 2 for $15 Tickets available at door

IN MEMORIAM Teal, Isabelle

It has been 3 years since we lost you, yet it feels like yesterday. I miss you so much. Time will not heal this hurt. I know now what you meant when you said I wish it was over. Can’t wait till I see your smile again.

Love your oldest son, Douglas

Harvey

In loving menory of Mildred M. Harvey, dear mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother. Heaven’s gate swung gently open, The Master called softly, “Come,” And you, dear one, took the Master’s hand, And your work on earth was done. We ’ll never cease to miss you, And shed many silent tears, Because we cannot share with you Our hopes, our joys, our fears. But one day, in God’s garden, When the Master calls us to come. You’ll be at the gates with open arms And say to us, “Welcome Home!” Remembered and loved always Daughter Shirley & family OBITUARY CLARK, MADELINE Eileen Suddenly but peacefully at Sharbot Lake Seniors Home on Monday April 29, 2013. Madeline Peters at age 89. Went to Heaven to meet her most precious Saviour, whom she knew throughout her entire life. Beloved wife of Nial. Predeceased by her son Brian (August 2012) and by her parents Charles and Violet Peters and her brothers and sisters Bryon, Mildred, Cecil, Roy and Edith. Madeline was a very special aunt “mom” to her niece Frona and husband Jack Price. She held a special place in the hearts of her many nieces and nephews. A celebration of life will be held at the Parham Free Methodist Church on Saturday May 11, 2013 at 11 am. Inurnment will follow at Wagarville Cemetery. Donations to the Parham Free Methodist Church would be appreciated. Online condolence at goodfellowsfuneralhome.com.

Knitters for Global Warmth

(To the tune of the Twelve Days of Christmas!) On the 11th day of April my true love Joe and I, went to Huntsville to deliver knitting: 172 pairs of socks, 72 toques, 21 lap blankets, 15 children's sweaters, 12 children's vests, 8 large afghans, 6 pairs of mitts, 4 baby sweaters, 2 each of adult sweaters, hats, mitts; one each of adult gloves, slippers, baby bootees and a scarf that will suit anybody. Seriously, we delivered 322 articles of knitting, with special thanks to Henriette Middleton for the socks, Brenda Garrett for most of the beautiful sweaters, Yvonne LeBlanc of Sydenham, and the following people from North Gower: Betty Hill, Lloyd Montgomery, Vi McEwen and Pat Ramsay. And thanks to Eileen Wood of North Gower who assists me in collecting. Our son is moving down here so I am not sure how we will be delivering knitting in the future, but God will provide. Blessings to all. Peggy Beckett 268-2443.

CARD OF THANKs

Thank You – Repaye Our heartfelt thanks to everyone in the community for all they did for my son Shawn, his spouse Katie and new born baby Bryson after they came home to their apartment above the Sharbot Lake post office, which was destroyed by fire on Dec. 14. Thanks so much to the fire department; to Josh and Julie Middleton, Ronda from Bellrock Rd and Jessie L, for all the wonderful baby items; to Sandra and the congregation of Impact Church in Kingston who delivered a truckload of baby, household, and food items; to the staff member at the township office who pulled together a fine group of people to help them through this devastation; to Lake District Realty and W.A. Robinson for your generous donations, you helped out in more ways than you could possibly know; to the Treasure Trunk for the little things they needed immediately; to Bill & Barb of Bee Sanitation for hauling away all the fire damaged articles on such short notice; to North Frontenac Telephone for helping out with the changes in billing. To Ken Bouchard, owner of the building, you went above and beyond in the repairs and made the apartment into a gorgeous home to raise a family in. To Brian Steel, of Steel Dynamic's we can't say enough; to my family members who have been there through this ordeal. And my mother....biggest thanks for everything you always do. I most likely have forgotten to mention someone, but not for lack of appreciation. Thanks again. Brenda Repaye

O P P report S

Fatal farm tractor accident

L

anark OPP responded on Wednesday May 1 to a serious farm tractor accident in Lanark Highlands Township. The investigation revealed that the operator of the tractor was attempting to dislodge and remove a cedar stump from the property when the chain apparatus being used in the removal caused the tractor to flip over backwards, trapping the operator underneath the tractor. Douglas Love, age 71, of Lanark Highlands Township, was pronounced dead at the scene.

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THE FRONTENAC NEWS

may 9, 2013

PAGE 17

The Classifieds Ad Rates: Classified Text ads: $8.85 + HST per insertion for 20 words & under; 20¢ each extra word. Deadline: 4 pm Monday; Ph: 613-279-3150, Fx: 613-279-3172; nfnews@frontenac.net

AUTOMOTIVE KALADAR AUTO RECYCLING. We sell cars for under $1990 safetied & E-tested, low kilometres. We have good winter tires. We take trade-ins. 11520 Hwy 41; 613-336-9899; 613885-8644 KINNEY AUTO WRECKING Station Road, Kaladar. 4x4 trucks & parts for sale. Scrap cars, stoves, fridges wanted. 613-336-9272.

COMING EVENTS COMMUNITY FUN DAY, Harrowsmith Free Methodist Church, 3876 Harrowsmith Road, (Proceeds in support of our community) Saturday, May 25th - 9:00am to 2:00pm. Free Community BBQ, Bake Table, GARAGE SALE, Kid’s Crafts, Face Painting & Games.

EMBROIDERY & ENGRAVING UPPER FRONTENAC GRAPHICS – Custom Embroidery, Imprinting, Trophies, Awards & Engraving. Caps, jackets, golf shirts, hoodies, teamwear & more. 613-539-6340; dwedden@ aol.com; ufg@hotmail.ca

FARM EQUIPMENT 684 INTERNATIONAL TRACTOR, 4WD, with cab, low hours, 8 foot bucket, 8 ft grader, good tires. $19,500. Please call 613-268-2222.

FLEA MARKET TONI’S AND JP’S FLEA MARKET - 6107 Hwy. 506 at Ardoch Road. Open Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. 613-479-0341.

FOR RENT BACHELOR – 1 bedroom apt., $650/month, all inclusive, Northbrook area. Also 4 bedroom townhouse, $850 plus utilities. 613-336-0951 COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE, Hwy. #41, Northbrook, suitable for many uses. Ample parking, available immediately. Phone 613336-9336

FOR SALE BUILDING LOT, 3 acres, outskirts of Mountain Grove. Driveway, well, hydro on lot, $25,000. Call 613-335-3878 CENTRAL BOILER OUTDOOR FURNACES 2013 Spring Rebate Sale. Save up to $600 on selected models. Call for more information. Your local Dealer, Wood Heat Solutions, Frankford, ON, 613-398-1611; Bancroft, ON 613-332-1613 NICOLE’S GIFTS - FREE CARNATION FOR MOM while supplies last. Sat & Sun May 11 & 12. Only at Nicole’s Gifts, 6709 Main St., Verona, 613-374-2323 PRIVATE SALE. Totally renovated 2 bedroom house with two outbuildings Thompson Road, Mountain Grove. New well. Great starter home or retirement home. $78,000. 613-335-3878.

DOUG’S ANTENNA SALES & SERVICE We are your full service dealer for both BELL TV and SHAW DIRECT Satellite. This month’s SHAW Special – Get HDTV in up to 4 rooms for only $50 a room! Call 613-374-3305 for enquiries. www.dougsantenna.com

GARAGE/YARD SALES BIG YARD SALE May 18 & 19, 8am-5pm; 2583 Harlowe Rd., Harlowe; antiques, collectibles, new items, miscellaneous, Royal Doulton, etc. A must see sale. MOTHER’S DAY AVON SALE, featuring gift bags, jewelry and more. Saturday May 11, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 5990 Arden Road; 613-3352940 SPYGLASS COVE, 1016 Schoolhouse Rd. Clarendon, Hwy 509. Open Tues – Sat. 8am7pm. Fishing reels; blackfly jacket; Hawaii 5-0 DVD series season 1-3; green hand-blown glass vase; porcelain doll; etc. Free gift with any purchase THIS AND THAT THRIFT SHOP, 32 Peterson Rd., Northbrook (turn at lights in Northbrook). Open 9 am to 7 pm, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. Something for everyone. YARD SALE at 4350 Wheatley Street, Sydenham proudly participating in Sydenham’s 1st Annual Giant Yard & Sidewalk Sale Day - May 25th - 8 am to 2 pm Rain or shine. 613-376-3519

NEW AND USED APPLIANCES USED REFRIGERATORS

Stoves, washers, dryers, freezers, dishwashers. 3 months old and up. Sold with written guarantees. Fridges $100 and up.

NEW APPLIANCES

At the lowest prices in the area. Trade-ins accepted on new appliances. Big selection to choose from. We Sell Gas Refrigerators

PAYS CASH $$$

For good used appliances in working order or not, but no junk please. VISA and MASTERCARD accepted. We have our own financing also. Shop at our competitors and then come see for yourself quality at low prices.

Open evenings & 7 days a week. We deliver

Smitty’s “KING of APPLIANCES”

Open Evenings & Seven Days a Week - River Road Corbyville, Just North of Corby’s (613) 969-0287

HUNTING & FISHING FIREARMS & HUNTER ED COURSES. Tamworth: Firearms Course – May 10 and 11, Hunter Education Course – May 24 and 25. Wild Turkey license examinations. Call Bill at 613-335-2786 HUNTER SAFETY AND FIREARMS COURSES. Turkey Examinations. Please call for course dates and details. Call Richard 613-336-9875.

MUSIC LESSONS TOM’S MUSIC STUDIO is now accepting students for drums, guitar, bass guitar, piano, beginner banjo and theory; repairs to all stringed instruments. Tom 613-539-4659

RAFFLE WINNERS OMPAH SPRING ATV RAFFLE WINNER: At the end of another successful Ompah Volunteer Firefighters Association Spring ATV run we are pleased to announce the winner of our Honda ATV raffle. The draw was held at 8pm April 27 2013 at the Ompah Community Center. The winner was Brett Gunsinger with the winning ticket no. 0411. We would like to thank Kanata Honda for their assistance in providing the 2013 Honda 420 ATV for our raffle. - Ompah Volunteer Fighters Association.

SERVICES DRYWALL AND PLASTER REPAIRS. Professionally trained. Drywall installation, old fashioned quality, three coat hand finishing. Free estimates. Call Rick at 613-375-8201. FINE CONSTRUCTION prop. John St. Aubin experienced renovator. For free estimate call 613-375-6582. Web site www.mindspan.net/ construction HANDYMAN  WITH TRUCK;  general labor, Junk Pickup/Disposal,  Minor home repairs  & local pickups/deliveries. Call Kevin 9-5, MonSat.  613-279-1901 HOMESTYLE WEDDINGS. Minister Judie Diamond helps design your ceremony and performs the marriage at location of your choice. 613-375-6772 PET SITTING in Mountain Grove. Going away? Let us help. Dogs, Cats, etc. Spacious, individual accommodations. Long walks. By appointment only. Laura Mills 613-335-3658. Evenings are best or leave a message. PHOTOCOPY, FAX & LAMINATION SERVICES available at The Frontenac News, the Annex (rear building), 1095 Garrett St., Sharbot Lake. Competitive prices! 8½“ x 11” - Black & White, 1-10 copies: 15¢ ea; 11-25 copies: 10¢ ea; 26-100 copies 8¢ ea. Color copies 65¢ each (25¢ for 50+). Taxes extra. Call 613-279-3150 for information.

WANTED TO BUY

STANDING TIMBER, firewood, pine, cedar, bush lots. Free quotes, cash paid. Call 613279-2154.

The Township of North Frontenac

Notice to Heirs & Creditors BENSON PETERS - All persons having claims against the Estate of Benson Peters of the former Hinchinbrooke Township, now Township of Central Frontenac, in the County of Frontenac, who died between 1920 and 1950, and all other persons claiming an interest in property formerly owned by Benson Peters located at or about Lot 10, Concession 2 of said Township, are requested to file proof of same with James L. McDonald of Cunningham Swan LLP (jmcdonald@cswan.com). Legal proceedings are intended that may affect your rights and in which you are entitled to participate.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT To The Fire Chief, Clerk/Planning Manager And To Assist With The Crown Land Stewardship Program The Township is seeking resumés for a new position from a highly organized, experienced person to join our municipal team as the Administrative Assistant to the Fire Chief, Clerk/Planning Manager and to assist with the Crown Land Stewardship Program. Working under the direction of the Deputy Treasurer/Administrative-Financial Coordinator, the incumbent will assist with the Township’s administrative and office support needs, in accordance with the procedures and guidelines established by the policy of Township Council and/or the CAO.

The Corporation of the Township of Addington Highlands

Job duties shall include, but are not limited to, receptionist duties as required, provide typing, keyboarding and data entry services as required, general office duties such as copying, filing, research and retrieval of information and to assist in composition of correspondence and reports as directed.

Request for Proposals Notice

RFP 2013-01 FLINTON HALL MECHANICAL UPGRADES The Corporation of the Township of Addington Highlands invites proposals from qualified proponents for Flinton hall mechanical upgrades

Individual must have at least Grade 12 education with job related courses. Preference will be given to individuals with at least 6 months to one year of relevant experience, preferably in a government/ institutional setting. Proficient in windows based software and hands-on experience with computer operations, including MS Word, MS Excel, Outlook and programs relevant to municipal operations; and have a high degree of tact and public relation skills.

Copies of the RFP will be available for downloading from the Township’s web page at: www.addingtonhighlands.ca Proposals are to be delivered electronically to proposals@posteritygroup.ca on or before 14:00 local time on Friday, May 31, 2013. Proponents shall be solely responsible for the delivery of their Proposal submission in the manner and time described in the RFP. Faxed submissions will not be accepted.

The salary range is $17.34 - $20.94 per hour and the normal work week is 37.5 hours. A comprehensive benefit package is available.

Requests for information, instructions or clarifications may be made by email to proposals@posteritygroup.ca. All questions related to this RFP or any clarification with respect to this RFP must be made no later than 14:00 local time Friday, May 24, 2013 in order that Township officials have sufficient time to respond. The Township cannot guarantee a response to any questions received after this deadline; however it does reserve the right to extend the deadline if required.

A copy of the Role Description can be obtained from the undersigned. We thank all applicants for their interest. Only those applicants selected for an interview will be contacted. The Township of North Frontenac is an equal opportunity employer. Please apply with a detailed resumé by Noon local time on Thursday, May 23rd, 2013 to

The responsibility shall be with the proponent to seek clarification of any matter that they consider unclear before submitting a proposal.

Cheryl Robson, AMCT CAO Township of North Frontenac 6648 Road 506, Plevna, ON K0H 2M0 Phone: (613) 479-2231 Ext. 221 Fax: (613) 479-2352 E-mail: cao@northfrontenac.ca

NOTE: All potential proponents who intend to submit an RFP shall be required to attend a site meeting on Tuesday May 21, 2013 at 10:00.

NOTICE OF TENDER FOR THE REMEDIATION OF THE BUCKSHOT LAKE ROAD LANDFILL SEALED TENDERS on the forms supplied will be received in the envelopes provided by the Roads Supervisor of the Township of Addington Highlands until: 2:00 p.m., local time Thursday May 30th, 2013 for the Remediation of the Buckshot Lake Road Landfill located at 4252 Buckshot Lake Road The work includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the following: Capping of the existing landfill site and general grading. Tender documents may be obtained at the office of the Engineer upon payment of a nonrefundable sum of $25.00 (inclusive of G.S.T.) payable to the Engineer. Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.

When there’s somethin’ going on In the neighborhood Who’re you going to call?

Your local businesses!

If you are interested in receiving further information on this project, please contact the following individuals: Royce Rosenblath, Roads Supervisor Township of Addington Highlands 72 Edward St. P. O. Box 89 Flinton, ON K0H 1P0 Phone and Fax 613-333-2363

Dan Fencott C.E.T. Project Manager G.D. Jewell Engineering Inc., 1-71 Millennium Parkway Belleville, ON K8N 4Z5 Phone 613-969-1111 Fax 613-969-8988


PAGE 18

Final installment of Centre Stage Cafe by Julie Druker he Centre Stage Cafe band, who have made the Sharbot Lake Legion their winter home this year played and hosted their final installment on April 25, bringing to a close a very successful four-concert series that has introduced a wealth of local musicians to the eager ears of music lovers from near and far. Amy Gillan and Bruce McConnell opened the evening and played an inspiring set of banjo-accompanied ditties. They were followed by local guitar heavies, The Cellar Hounds, comprised of brothers Joe and Tim Asselstine, Randy Kempe and the young up-and-comer, Joe's son Tom Asselstine. The Hounds played an impressive set of classic rock and roll and young Tom brought the house down when he led front and centre for the band’s final tune of the night. The Centre Stage band, (Gary Giller, Terry Reynolds, Jim MacPherson and Dave Limber) who have delighted listeners with their eclectic mash up of classic rock and roll, pop and old favorites, have proved a very capable and always entertaining foursome who have tackled a wide mix of music that has kept listeners coming back for more. Gary Giller who emceed the series said that the band plans to bring the series back this fall. The band will be playing a few gigs this summer to keep them on top of their game. Kudos to the Legion staff, the host band, all of the musical guests and, of course, the many loyal listeners who have made the Legion a popular meeting place throughout the series and who are helping to keep local music alive and well in the community. The Cellar Hounds, Joe, Tom and Tim Asselstine and Randy Kempe rock the Sharbot Lake Legion

T

TOWNSHIP OF SOUTH FRONTENAC 2013 PRIVATE LANE UPGRADING ASSISTANCE PROGRAM The Township will pay up to 50% of the cost for Private Lane Upgrades that will improve access for Emergency Vehicles. Applications will be received until June 21, 2013 and can be found on the website under Public Works/ Roads Department.

CHANGES TO CEMETERY OPERATIONS As of May 1st, 2013, all inquiries concerning Township owned cemeteries can be directed to (613) 376-3027 Ext 2255. See the website for further details.

WASTE DISPOSAL SITES Operational Plan - May 1st Changes Residents are advised that changes in hours of operation, tipping fees and accepted materials came into effect May 1st, 2013. Please see the township website and view the “Waste Management Changes” document on the home page. A paper copy can be picked up at the Municipal Offices for those who cannot print a copy off the web site.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK MAY 5TH - MAY11TH All residents are encouraged to ensure they have their 72 hour emergency kits checked and ready in the event of an emergency. Your kit should include as a minimum: water, food, flashlight, first aid supplies, prescription medication and cash. For a full listing and to view the Township’s emergency plan please see our website.

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

Charities win at Snowmobile Club T

he Snow Road Snowmobile Club is wellknown for its fundraising breakfasts and other events. The funds raised are used to maintain the clubhouse, pay utilities and taxes, etc. as the club does not receive any money from the sale of snowmobile permits. However, as the snowmobile season winds down the volunteers turn their efforts to help others, recognizing that the community that supports them all winter needs support. Breakfasts held in April allowed the club to pass along $612 to Relay for Life for Cancer and $314.75 each to the Alzheimer Society of Lanark County and the Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington Alzheimer Society. The last breakfast, held fittingly on May 4 as May is Melanoma Awareness Month, raised a very satisfying $1,043.50 for this worthy cause. “It’s all about giving back to the community” said Ruth Wark, club president. “It would not be possible without the help of our regular volunteers and those who lend a hand when and where they can. They deserve

Mazinaw Lake swim program needs sponsors T

by Beth Hasler he temperature outside is finally warming and that means that it is time to think about summer. Swimming lessons will be happening again this summer at Bon Echo. For over 40 years youth have learned how to swim and how to be safe around water through lessons offered by MLSP. This program would not be possible without the support of local individuals and organizations. In 2012, MLSP was in dire need of financial support. The following corporate sponsors came forward and donated at least $500 to be swim-athon sponsors: Land O’ Lakes Lions Club, Harlowe Community Club, Flinton Recreation Club, Township of Addington Highlands, Township of North Frontenac, Tobia Guardian Pharmacy, Hook’s Rona, Northbrook Gas and Variety Petro Canada, and Community Fiddlers. Thank you to all sponsors for supporting this program in the past. MLSP is looking for sponsors for the 2013 season. Any financial contribution is appreciated and corporate donations of $500 or more will be recognized by including their logo on the swim-a-thon shirts. Swimming lesson registration is now available. Forms can be picked up at NAEC or at Community Services and can be dropped off at those locations as well. Swimming lessons run from July 1 - 26. Bussing is provided in the $100 cost. People who are interested in swimming lessons but who are having financial challenges can contact Community Services at 613-336-8934. If you have any questions about registration or about being a sponsor for swimming lessons, please contact Beth Hasler at 613-336-2666.

The Household Hazardous Waste Site at 2491 Keeley Road will be open from 3:00 pm to 8:00 pm every Thursday from April 4th, 2013 to October 31st, 2013. See our website for details.

the credit for making it happen. There are so many people in our families and our community that are affected by these diseases.” Special thanks go this week to the extra hands from the family of the late Denise Cooper. Denise spearheaded the breakfast for Malignant Melanoma last year to spread awareness as melanoma is one of the fastest growing cancers in Canada today. Skin cancer is highly curable if detected early, so please remember to practice sun-safety. Ruth expressed appreciation for the representatives from the Cancer and Alzheimer’s Societies who attended the breakfasts bringing displays and information and were available to answer questions. The club will hold a breakfast and bake sale on Saturday, June 29, as part of Canada Day celebrations in North Frontenac and Lanark Highlands townships.

“Did you go to the new grocery store yet?” the 10-year old asked her friend. The friend replied with a nod. “Didn’t it just blow your socks off?” Yes, Grace, it did. In fact, Sharbot Lake was positively abuzz with chatter about Mike Dean’s Superstore, and everyone seemed pretty impressed. “Superstore” may seem like an unlikely moniker for the little store-within-a-store that’s open now, but already you get the picture. By the time construction is finished and the rest of the store is outfitted with well-stocked, shiny new shelves, we’ll have one super store in our neighbourhood. Welcome, Mike Dean and family! For another spin on local food, save the date for Saturday evening. Karen Holmes, formerly with Kingston’s Food Down the Road, is doing a free talk and workshop in Sharbot Lake at the Soldiers’ Memorial Hall (a.k.a. Oso Hall). Karen, who now lives and farms near Verona, has been advocating for a sustainable, local food economy for years, and that’s what Saturday’s meeting is about. Why is a local food system important? What are the hidden costs of our food system? How can we, as a community, create a food system that’s truly sustainable? The meeting runs from 7 to 9:30 p.m. and all are welcome. And speaking of local food, it’s time for the fiddlehead harvest. Fiddleheads are truly a local specialty. They grow wild around here along rivers and streams and their graceful form resembles the carved scroll of a violin. What they are, in fact, is the coiled top of the ostrich fern before it unfurls. They’re used like a vegetable, with a flavour somewhere between asparagus and mushrooms. Some people freeze them or can them, but I don’t think they fare any better than asparagus that way. Fiddleheads are just one of those foods that you either eat in season, or don’t eat at all. Part of the challenge with fiddleheads is to get the redbrown papery husk off. David Brison, who revived this newspaper more than a decade ago, once told me how. David used to gather fiddleheads and sell them to upscale New York restaurants back in the day. With such a volume to clean, he needed a method that was effective and efficient. He made a large wooden frame with handles out of 1x4s and stapled hardware cloth to it, creating a mesh-bottomed tray, in effect. Then he’d toss in the fiddleheads and shake them. This was all done outdoors; the mesh grabbed the husks and the wind blew them away. After a couple of minutes of shaking, the fiddleheads were beautifully clean and green a seasonal delicacy of the finest kind. Like many fresh foods, simple is best. Fiddleheads don’t need anything fancy to bring out their seasonal best. In this easy-to-enjoy side dish, fiddleheads and new potatoes are tossed with a simple olive oil sauce, brightened with fresh herbs and lemon. Poached salmon would be very good with this. Bon appétit!

Fiddleheads and New Potatoes

COUNCIL MEETING The next Council Meeting will be on May 21st 2013 at 7:00 pm.

4432 George Street, Box 100, Sydenham ON K0H 2T0 1-800-559-5862 Website: www.township.southfrontenac.on.ca

by Alice Gilchrist

By Sara Carpenter

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE DAYS

The next Committee of the Whole Meeting will be on May 14th, 2013 at 7:00 pm.

May 9, 2013

Swimming Lessons Supervisor Cole Bolton, swimmers Aidan Brough , Avery and Julia Cuddy and Swim Instructor Jared Salmond accepting a cheque from the Flinton Recreation Club. In addition to their sponsorship, the Flinton Recreation Club donated the $1000 proceeds from one of the 50/50 draws at the Flinton Jamboree to swimming lessons.

Makes 4 servings Add 16 baby new potatoes to a pot of boiling, salted water. Cook about 20 minutes, or until barely tender. Cook 2 cups prepared fiddleheads (thoroughly washed, husks removed) in another pot of boiling salted water until tender, about 15 minutes. When done, tip potatoes and fiddleheads into a sink of cold water for about 30 seconds, then drain. Cut the potatoes in half and combine them in a large bowl with the fiddleheads. Meanwhile, whisk together 2 tsp. Dijon mustard; 1/3 c. olive oil; 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice; 1/2 tsp. salt; several grindings of black pepper. Stir in 1/3 c. snipped fresh chives; 2 tbsp. each chopped basil and flat-leaf parsley. Pour over the warm vegetables and toss gently but well.


THE FRONTENAC NEWS

may 9, 2013

PAGE 19

Barf, booze and bountiful F-bombs- “God of Carnage” had it all T

by Julie Druker he North Frontenac Little Theatre's "God of Carnage" is not for everyone. But for those wishing to delve beneath the surface of coupledom, marriage and parenthood to find what dirt might be lurking there, the NFLT's production of Yasmina Reza's play was the ticket. While some regular North Frontenac Little Theatre goers may have been deterred by the first and third words in this play's title, for those who attended its four-show run at Sharbot Lake High School from May 2-5, God of Carnage proved a refreshingly rewarding and highly entertaining night out. The play appears at first to be a jovial, simple and civil meeting of two respectable couples, Annette and Alan Raleigh (Martina Field and Robert Bell) in the upper class living room of Veronica and Michael Novak (Karen Steele and John Stephen), where the entire play unfolds. But very quickly the dialogue first meanders then dives head first into the uncharted waters of marital resentment, nastiness, and bitter couple-to-couple combat. The play was a serious undertaking for the entire four-member cast, with Reza's unrelenting, rapid fire dialogue never ceasing for

a second, which forced the actors to rely on each other's cues more than might be necessary in productions with larger casts. But the small cast definitely rose to that challenge. The premise for their meeting is an playground altercation between the couples' two 11-year-old sons, whom we never do meet. At first it seems that the Novaks and Raleighs will be able to agree on a plan for their sons' reconciliation but a blame game quickly makes mincemeat of that first initial try. At the door and about to leave, the Raleighs edge back for a second try over clafouti and coffee. The play is clever and much of its comedy lies in the fact that at every turn when a reconciliation seems imminent, bedlam ensues. Adding to the building tension throughout the play are the characters' touching on seemingly unrelated worldly issues and gender-based topics, which in fact demonstrate both couples' faults and flaws. Reza's gift and what gives the play its momentum is her ability through the dialogue to pull the couples constantly back and forth between the point of resolution and all-out battle. Reza touches on the idea of hypocrisy in Veronica's case, as she curses

Letter to the editor

And don't think for a moment that this is happening only at the national level. In a small Canadian city, the board of the public library reprimands one of its members for criticizing an unfair policy, saying all directors should "speak with one voice". In an obscure rural municipality, a councillor is warned against publicly disagreeing with an ill-advised decision, because the entire council is supposed to "speak with one voice". To hell with public debate, informed discussion, citizen representation. In countries like North Korea, people are still compelled to "speak with one voice" or remain silent. But democracies depend on a diversity of voices, and so do democratic institutions. So whatever Big Brother may try to command, I for one will continue to "speak with one voice" – my own. And it will be loud and clear. - Helen Forsey

Speaking with one voice

W

hen someone in a position of power starts talking about the need for everyone to "speak with one voice", watch out! That's code for the new Canadian way of quelling dissent and imposing tyranny. The party in power muzzles its own Members of Parliament to ensure that only one voice – that of the leader – is heard. Public service scientists are gagged and bound to prevent them from voicing factual evidence that might throw government policies into question. Now the RCMP brass are prohibiting their officers from talking freely with politicians, saying the Force must "speak with one voice".

L-r, Karen Steele, Martina Field, John Stephen and Robert Bell out Annette after the latter succumbs to her growing nausea, and in what is the first great shock of the play's uncivil decorum, pukes all over Veronica's very expensive coffee table art books. Later on the gents insult each other's chosen lines of work, with the cell phone-dependent, high flying, holier than thou corporate Alan finding fault with Michael as a lowly seller of plumbing fixtures. Part of the fun of the play is the ever changing alliances that are struck between the men and women. On the subject of gender issues, which is focused on more deeply and to great comic effect in the second act of the play, the gals get increasing tipsy and Annette, who is by far the more reserved and submissive of the two ladies (her husband calls her Woof Woof), lets down her guard and in disgust at her husband's incessant cell phone interruptions, grabs it and plunges it into a vase of tulips. Meanwhile the men join forces, finding comradeship in their love of their former childhood gangs. The bossy and demanding Veronica (Karen Steele) demonstrates the tension in their relationship with endless quibbling about trifles like cake recipes. Steele played the chatty and bossy Veronica with deftness, making her desire for control

in her marriage and her love of conflict and one upmanship a delight to witness. John Stephen was likely the most imaginably likeable of the four characters and he played Michael with a veteran actor's naturalness, every line ringing true. Martina Field's spot on portrayal of the neurotic, timid and finally drunken Annette was highly comedic and her shredding of the lovely tulips near the play's end was a delightful shock to witness. And last but not least, kudos to first time performer Robert Bell, who created a wholly unlikeable and pompous Alan and whose biggest challenge was managing the multiple cell phone conversations that occurred throughout the play. Kudos also to Kelli Bell, who must have had a great time not only directing her husband but also tackling a very dense and subtle script. The stage looked sharp and very civil thanks to Donna Larocque and Peter Platenius, who created the sets and Jeff Siamon, who lit it. Those who missed the play can see the movie version of the play, called simply “Carnage”, directed by bad boy Roman Polanski and starring Jodie Foster, Kate Winslet, Christopher Waltz and John C. Reilly.

Councils of the County of Frontenac and the Townships of North Frontenac, Central Frontenac, South Frontenac & Frontenac Islands declare May 5 to 11, 2013 as

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WEEK Ontario Seniors: Learn how to make an emergency plan and build a survival kit. Get your copy of Ontario Seniors: How to be Prepared for an Emergency at www.ontario.ca/beprepared.

2013 Spotlight on Seniors: Are you Prepared? www.frontenaccounty.ca


PAGE 20

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

Asselstine Hardware

Lots of gifts for Mom! Happy Mother’s Day!

Andrew Asselstine 6826 Road 38, Verona ON 613-374-3400 Open 7 Days a Week

Mon-Thu: 8am-6pm Fri: 8am-8pm. Sat: 8am-5pm. Sun: 9am-4pm

Those who know...trust Ostaco.

Hook’s

(613) 336-8416 13586 Hwy 41 Between Northbrook & Cloyne www.hooksrona.com

ver 450 supporters filled the Frontenac Community Arena on May 4 for a special fundraising event in support of Drew Cumpson and his family. Drew who became a quadriplegic after a surfing mishap in Lima, Peru and who now uses a wheelchair will soon be moving with his parents Heather and Jim Cumpson into a new home in Westbrooke specially designed and built to meet their needs. Over $30,000 was raised at the event, which was organized by Drew’s friends and family members, Leslie Wateman, Lynne and Karen Peters, Lynne Young and Marilyn Cumpson. Up for grabs at the event were over 140 donated items, all on display for a live and silent auction. The $20 ticket price included a late night buffet and all night dancing courtesy of local bands, Bauder Road, Still Standing and Killing Time. Drew was inundated with well wishers who crowded around him throughout the evening. His long time friend Brittany spoke at the event and read a letter she wrote to him after first hearing of his accident. “As upset as I am.... I know that if anyone can tough out this situation it’s you, ” she read. She

ended by addressing Drew directly: “You are an amazing person and I am so proud to call you my friend.” Lynne Peters also spoke and said she was overwhelmed by the outpouring of community support. She said to Drew’s fans, “Let’s now show our support and help to bring Drew home.” Organizer Leslie Wateman said she was not especially surprised by the incredible turnout at the event. “Drew has given so much support to so many people in the community over the years, which is why there are so many people here tonight.” Drew’s fans and supporters included, of course, family and countless friends from university, high school and elementary school and also people from the community whom Drew met during his four-year stint when he was a lifeguard and taught swimming lessons at the Verona beach. I asked Drew how he was feeling. “I haven’t seen a lot of these people since before my accident so for me tonight is a great chance to catch up with them.” Hats off to all of the organizers, donors and guests whose efforts made May 4 a very memorable occasion for Drew and his family, and which

Frontenac Farmers Market continued from page 1

For those who have never been, the Verona Lions Centre offers the perfect setting for a farmers’ market, with a large covered pavilion where the vendors set up their stalls, a large grassy area with picnic tables where families and individuals can sit down for a meal, plus the Lions hall itself, which of-

fers washroom facilities and can be used during inclement weather and for special events. Pets are welcome too. I spoke with Monique Hagar who has been selling her fine homemade Middle Eastern food products at the market for years under the label, “Memories of Alexandria”. She encourages those who have yet to experience the mar-

Open Sundays from 10 - 2

Beautiful shapes for special places.

Coming through for Drew Cumpson

O

may 9, 2013

by Julie Druker

indeed were a great help in bringing Drew and his family home.

ket to come by for a visit. “Our products and produce are wonderful, of excellent quality and come directly from our farms, kitchens, gardens and workshops and it's a great all around venue.” The Verona Lions also serve up a delicious, affordable breakfast for those who might have skipped their first meal of the day. The market is also always looking for new vendors. For more information visit www.frontenafarmersmarket.ca. The Verona Lions hall is located at 4504 Verona Sand Road.

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Frontenac County budget continued from page 1

rebates in 2013, effectively doubling the amount they each receive directly from the federal government each year to help fund local infrastructure projects. These changes were enough to convince the majority of Council to accept the budget, which then passed by a vote of 7-2. The two opposing votes both came from Frontenac Islands, and a subsequent comment about “mismanagement” at the county, attributed to David Jones, a member of County Council from Frontenac Islands, led Warden Gutowski to issue a press release. In her release, Gutowski accused Jones of making “inaccurate, inflammatory, and unfounded” statements, which she described as “a slap in the face to our citizens, our staff, and my colleagues on council ...”. Jones has since responded with his own press release, in which he said that the county has been characterised by inefficiency. “Years of escalating mismanagement, escalating absenteeism in particular, is anything but effective and efficient,” he said, laying the blame for the current reality at the feet of Gutowski, who, he said, is responsible for “an atmosphere of acrimony and distrust in the chamber …”

Monday Night Ladies Fun Golf! Mondays after 4 p.m. starting May 13th Come out and enjoy the new twist to our Monday night ladies golf. We are giving ladies the option of playing a shorter course or playing the regular tees. Gather your gal pals and set an evening aside every week just for you. $29.95 includes 9 holes of golf & choice of an entrée from our delicious menu. Special Deals: 12 play card for the price of 10 games - $299.50 OR 5 games for $135.75 includes a free meal with game 5

7359 Road 38 Verona 613-374-3404 2 Km north of Verona

Wing Night

Thursdays after 5pm

Custom Built Homes... Free 51” TV with Deposit

Yes, we have display homest.by apointmen

Buy a house for spring delivery and and receive free stainless steel kitchen appliances: Fridge, Stove, Dishwasher and Microwave. Put down a deposit and take home a 51” TV

“More home for a lot less money” 4193 Maple Drive Lane, Verona Ontario

1-866-775-8268

www.frontenacmodularhomes.com


Vol.13 No.18