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Thursday, December 22, 2011 building centres

Vol. 10, No. 51

$1.00 incl. GST.

SINCE 1970

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Wishing Everyone a Very Merry Christmas & Happy New Year. Closed from Dec. 24 at 12 noon up to and including Dec. 27th Closed Dec. 31 at 12 noon and January 1st - 2nd, 2012


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THE FRONTENAC NEWS

december 22, 2011

Sharbot Lake Criminal Court – December 19 I

t was a full house in the Oso Hall for criminal court on December 19, including an unusually large number of youth matters. Among the youth matters was a break and enter case involving five young males. Of the five, three are planning to seek diversion, one is contemplating a trial, and the fifth intends to plead guilty. The matters will return on January 16. Convictions: James Jordan, 68, pleaded guilty to a charge of unauthorised possession of a firearm. He received a $500 fine with six months to pay. The firearm was forfeited to the Crown. Charges of careless use/storage and theft under $5,000 were withdrawn. - Jason Kelford 34, pleaded guilty to a charge of driving with blood alcohol over 80mg/100 ml of blood. Mr. Kelford was spotted by police driving erratically on Road 509 on November 11. He pulled onto a side road and was stopped by police, where he exhibited “extreme indicia of impairment” according to the Crown account of the incident. His blood alcohol level was recorded at 210 and 200 when tests were taken at the detachment in Perth, 90 minutes after he was taken into custody. In recognition of the high readings, he received a $1,600 fine and a 12-month driving prohibition. He will be eligible to apply to the Ministry of Transportation for the use of an Interlock device before the year is up. - Troy Lemay, 28, pleaded guilty to a charge of possession of an illegal substance. He was stopped at a RIDE program on Road 509 on September 16, and the police officer could smell marijuana smoke coming from the car. Lemay admitted to possessing one joint in a cigarette pack and 24 grams in a bag in the car. He received a conditional discharge and probation for six months, and will make a $300 donation to the Sharbot Lake & District Lions Club. - Timothy Hamilton, 49, pleaded guilty to a charge of driving with blood alcohol over 80. He was spotted by police driving erratically and extremely slowly (32 km per hour) on Road 38 on November 18, 2011. He pulled over into a driveway as police approached from behind. Because he appeared to be impaired he was given a roadside breath test, which he failed. He eventually tested with levels of 116 and 108 mg of alcohol per 100 ml of blood, a bit over the 80 mg limit. He received a $1000 fine and a 12-month driving prohibition, and may be eligible to drive with an Interlock device on his ignition before the year is up. - Brian Marshall, 44, pleaded guilty to a charge of unauthorised possession of firearms. Police stopped him on Oc-

tober 27 and found he had two rifles and an older hand gun in his car. He did not have a permit for the hand gun, which is not a permitted weapon in Ontario. A joint submission by the defence and the crown asking for 6 months probation and a $350 fine did not sit well with Judge Wright. “There is no permitted legal use for a hand gun,” the Judge said. “You can’t hunt with it; you can’t do anything with it. Where did you get it?” “My grandfather gave it to me just before he died” said Marshall. “I want to see a pre-sentence report. I’m not saying that I won’t accept the joint submission but I want to see a report first,” said Judge Wright. A report will be prepared and Mr. Marshall will return on February 27 for sentencing. - Jessica Patterson, 28, pleaded guilty to a charge of threatening death/bodily harm. Ms. Patterson threatened her former neighbour, Deborah Ann Seymour, at a housing complex at 1096 Clement Road. Police had warned another neighbour at the complex not to harass Ms. Seymour early in 2011, but on May 1, Ms. Seymour was putting up laundry when Jessica Patterson told her that she “was going to go put on my sneakers and then I’m going to kill you.” There was a joint position between the Crown and Defence asking for a conditional discharge, 12 months’ probation and an order to stay away from Deborah Ann Seymour, who has moved away from 1096 Clement Road. The defence said that Ms. Patterson was concerned about having a record because she wants to continue to be able to be involved in school trips with her 10-year-old daughter. “What on earth were you thinking?” Judge Wright asked Patterson. “You threatened to kill this woman because your neighbour told you to. I’m not sure I should give you the discharge so you can participate in school events.” In the end, Judge Wright did agree to the discharge, “somewhat reluctantly” he said. Warrants issued – Six co-accused facing multiple theft and weapons charges, who all come from Oshawa, did not live up to their promise to attend court for a first appearance on their charges. Daniel Wilson, 58, Brandon Wilson, 27, Clifford Mediros, 30, Robert Wilson, 32, Randy Gignac, 31, and Hayworth Wilson, 63, have all had bench warrants issued for their arrest. Trial dates set – Maria Parnell, 53, charged with production of an illegal substance, will be tried on January 16.

By Jeff Green

- Lynne Ward, 49, charged with possession of an illegal substance, will be tried on March 19 First Appearance – Amanda Babcock, 34, charged with threatening death/bodily harm, will return on January 16. - Stephan Pominville, 25, charged with possession of an illegal substance, is undertaking a diversion program and will return on January 16. - Edward St. Pierre, 38, who faces two charges of break and enter and three driving related charges, and Peter St. Pierre, 37, facing two break and enter charges, are both seeking legal counsel and will return on January 16. Transfers: Dannie Teeple, 64, is charged with assault and uttering threats. His case was transferred to the Kingston Domestic Violence Court, where he is scheduled to appear on January 4. - Brett Denis, 19, facing nine break and enter, three mischief, and two possession of stolen property valued under $5,000 charges, is being transferred to Brockville for an indicated guilty plea. - Keith Ditchburn, 19, who is facing identical charges as Mr. Denis (above), has had his case transferred to Kingston. - Robert Johnson, 67, is facing a charge of possession of an illegal substance for the purposes of trafficking. He will be going to Kingston to set a date for trial because the Crown estimates a trial will take more than one day to complete. Withdrawn – Kandra Jordan, 53, has had a charge of theft withdrawn. - Matthew Pinch, 36, has had a charge of possession of stolen property withdrawn after he completed a diversion program. Ongoing – Gerald Asselstine, 50, who faces two assault and two unlawful entry charges, will return on January 16. - Justin Hoselton, 24, charged with threatening death/ bodily harm, is undergoing a diversion program and will return on January 16. - Jacob Mitchell, 28, who faces two impaired driving charges, will return on January 16. - The lawyer for Ellamae Richardson, 59, is seeking further disclosure from the Crown to deal with three firearms charges she is facing and the case will also return on Jan.16. - Kevin Teal, 54, is facing a charge of failing or refusing to provide identification and three charges of failing to comply with court-ordered conditions. He will return on Jan. 16 to set a date for trial.

South Frontenac now a chicken friendly zone by Jeff Green t their final meeting of the year, South Frontenac Council finally dispensed with an issue that they have been pecking away at for six months. The township will now permit residents on lots as small as one acre in size to keep up to 10 hens, but no roosters. The new bylaw is a simple amendment to the existing comprehensive zoning bylaw, which limits hens to lots of 3 acres or more. Several members of the public spoke in favour of the bylaw in a public meeting that preceded its passage, as did a number of members of council. Mayor Davison sounded a note of caution however. “Remember a few years ago people were worried about avian flu from living too close together with poultry,” he

A

said. Nonetheless, the bylaw amendment passed without incident. Private lane upgrade grants – Public Works Manager Mark Segsworth presented a report on the private lanes upgrade program for 2011. The program provides for up to 50% financial support for upgrades that lane associations take on, under certain conditions. “This is the 4th year of the program and it has proved rather popular. The intention of the program is to improve access for emergency vehicles to properties on private lanes, and this year certain issues came up that we had not faced before. Some property owners were not in agreement with some of the work that was done. I also think that some of the lanes have been resurfaced without dealing with drainage issues. What I have ruled ineligible is gravel resurfacing, and I think we might have to make some of the rules more explicit in future years to limit confusion among applicants” said Segsworth. “Maybe we should send this to the Public Works Commit-

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Correction – Bedford Jam Please note that the Bedford Jam will not resume until January 15 in the new year. The date printed in the Godfrey column on page S4 in our Christmas supplement is incorrect, as the schedule was changed after that portion of the paper was printed. For information call Wilhelmine, 374-2614

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tee to review the criteria,” said Councilor Del Stowe. “We have made it clear already that this program is not about just putting down gravel. I don’t think we have to revisit that,” said Councilor Alan McPhail. “Let’s not forget that this is a successful program,” said Councilor Mark Tinlin. Council approved grants totalling $30,771 for work on 10 different lanes, including: Osboren Lane - $276; Wildlife Lane - $2,542; Sandpit Lane - $10,810; Tim’s Lane - $470; Sellers Lane - $3,676; Sharpley Lane - $517; MacComich Lane - $1288; Garter Lake Lane - $1,953; Henry Lane $6,893; Sunset Shores - $2,340. 2.1% pay increase for non-unionized staff - Council confirmed a pay increase of 2.1% in 2012 for all non-unionized staff, which includes themselves. The 2.1% figure is identical to the pay increase that was negotiated for unionized staff through a collective bargaining agreement.

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december 22, 2011

PAGE 3

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

Publisher & Editor............................................. Jeff Green Managing Editor ............................................... Jule Koch Graphic Designer................................................Scott Cox Sales Representative......................................Garry Drew Reporter..........................................................Julie Druker Copy Editors .................... Marg DesRoche, Martina Field Dale Ham, Office Staff.............................................. Suzanne Tanner Webmaster.........................................................Scott Cox

www.frontenacnews.ca

SINCE 1970

  The Frontenac News is published every Thursday Deadlines: Classifieds: Monday at 4:00 p.m. Display ads: Friday at 4:00 p.m.. The Frontenac News welcomes articles and letters, but we cannot publish all the submissions we receive. All submissions must include the author’s name and phone number. We reserve the SINCE 1970 right to edit submissions for brevity, clarity, and taste. Please limit letters to 300 words or less; articles to 500 words or less.

1095 Garrett St., rear building; Box 229, Sharbot Lake, ON K0H 2P0 Ph: 613-279-3150; 1-888-779-3150; Fx: 613-279-3172 E-mail: nfnews@frontenac.net Office hours: Mon to Fri, 8:30 am - noon; 1:00 - 4:30 Subscriptions (Canadian subscriptions include HST) Weekly: $63.37 HST incl. ($60.00 US for US orders) for 6 months Bi-weekly: $79.20 HST included ($75.00 US for US orders) for one year, 2 issues, mailed bi-weekly Member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association

Gutowski wins a draw to become county warden F

or the past 13 years the annual election of the Frontenac County warden has been an election in name only. Each year the warden has tendered his or her resignation and the next in line, the deputy warden, has been the only nominee and has been acclaimed to the post. After an election, if the incumbent warden has been re-elected in their township, they usually stay on as warden for the first year in order to provide continuity. That was what happened in 2011 when South Frontenac’s returning mayor, Gary Davison, stayed on as county warden. Janet Gutowski, also a returning mayor, who had served as warden in 2009, took on the deputy warden role. It was understood that the two other mayors, first timers Dennis Doyle from the Frontenac Islands, and Bud Clayton from North Frontenac would take their turns in the third and fourth years of the county council mandate. That was the way Gary Davison thought things were going at the December 14 meeting of Frontenac County Council. He announced his resignation and then called for nominations. Councilor John McDougall from South Frontenac nominated Janet Gutowski and John Purdon from Central Frontenac seconded the nomination. Just as Gary Davison was about to declare Gutowski elected, another hand shot up. “I nominate Bud Clayton,” said Councilor John Inglis from North Frontenac, and Councilor David Jones from Frontenac Islands seconded the nomination. Janet Gutowski looked surprised, and County CAO Liz Savill said she had to confer with Deputy Clerk Susan Beckel about preparing ballots for the unexpected vote. Gary Davison gave each candidate an opportunity to say a few words. “As you know, in the last term council decided to expand in an effort to bring changes to the county. I feel it is time for the new council to step forward and bring in someone that will do what the previous council expected us to do,” said Clayton. “I feel my experience speaks for itself and I have a track record of collaboration,” said Gutowski. “I feel we have a good staff in Frontenac County. It does take a lot of time to be the warden. I can assure council that I will make my best efforts to work diligently on their behalf.” Susan Beckel then handed each council member a piece of paper and said they should write the name of their preferred candidate on the paper. Once that was done, she gathered up all the pieces of paper. A minute later CAO Savill came to the head of the council table and said, “There has been an equality of votes”. Now it appeared as if all eight members of

council were surprised. SINCE 1970 When Frontenac County Council expanded from four to eight members at the beginning of this term, it was decided that whoever was the mayor of South Frontenac would have two votes, to give council nine votes. That was in order to give South Frontenac, which includes almost 60% of the population, some extra clout and it would also avoid deadlocked votes. So why the tie vote? “Each council only has one vote for the election of officers,” said Susan Beckel. She later explained that that was one of the stipulations in the procedural bylaw that council passed in 2010. Liz Savill then said, “We’ll have to draw for a winner.” She wrote the two names on two pieces of paper, folded them and put them in a hat. Gary Davison pulled one and handed it to Savill.

by Jeff Green t their final meeting of 2011, members of Frontenac County Council received the 2012 draft budget from the County Finance Department. The county expects to spend just over $42 million in 2012, which is a drop of almost $1.8 million from the 2011 total of $43.8 million. This decrease is due mainly to the fact that in 2011 the cost of a new ambulance base and library in Sydenham were included in the county budget, and no large construction projects are planned for 2012. The two major services that the county provides are the Fairmount Home for the Aged and the Frontenac Land Ambulance Service. Both are cost shared with the City of Kingston and the Province of Ontario. The proposed increase in operating costs for Fairmount Home is $53,000, a 2.49% increase, which will edge the home’s budget over $10 million. Of that, the draft budget calls for $735,400 to come from Frontenac County taxpayers, an increase of $18,000 from 2011. The total cost of the Frontenac Land ambulance is projected to rise above $15 million in 2012, an increase of over $500,000, but the province will be increasing their subsidy to the service by over $300,000 and the net increase to Frontenac County taxpayers will be just under $50,000, or 3.31%. All told the draft budget calls for a levy of $8,510,000 to taxpayers, an increase of $112,182 (1.34%) from 2011.

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Deputy Warden Doyle and Warden Gutowski are eligible for election as warden or deputy warden. In order to be eligible, a member on county council must have been elected by all the electors in his/her township, and not just by electors in one ward.)

Draft Frontenac County budget calls for 1.34% levy increase

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“Janet Gutowski is the new warden,” Savill said. With that, the deputy warden position came open. Once again there were two nominees, Bud Clayton and Dennis Doyle. Another vote was taken and Dennis Doyle was declared the winner. Afterwards Warden Gutowski said that the split on council that the vote for warden revealed was “just part of the growing pains of the new makeup of council. To me it is all water under the bridge and we will now move forward.” She also said that one of her major goals for 2012 will be to get work on a County Official Plan off to a good start, to engage the City of Kingston in more meaningful discussions about shared issues, and to start addressing the infrastructure needs of the member townships in the County. (Note – At this time only the four mayors

While members of county council simply received the draft budget for information and will be conducting their budget debate at their January meeting, they did debate one item that is connected to the budget, a proposed pay increase for non-unionized staff. A human resources report recommends increasing pay for non-unionized staff (which includes members of county council) by 2.9% in 2012. This reflects a cost of living increase plus some extra to bring the pay for professional staff more in line with the average costs in other municipalities. “I can’t agree with that,” said Warden Gary Davison (the budget discussion took place before Davison tendered his resignation as warden). “We are going into contract negotiations with unionized staff in 2012 and this is not the kind of example we should be setting. We are looking at 2% as a kind of limit and I think we should stick to that for our non-unionized staff and members of coun-

cil.” The item was ultimately deferred to the next meeting. Garrison Shores – Without fanfare, the plan of condominium to create individual and shared lots on Garrison Lake near Arden was approved by council. Two members of the Garrison Shores Association were on hand to witness the end of a 30-year planning and legal quagmire. County agendas publicly available. The county agenda packages are now available online for the public at the county website by clicking on the council tab. All agendas and reports and minutes from previous meetings will be uploaded and archived using the FilePro document management system. The archives will be searchable as well.

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SINCE 1970

See you in 2012! This is our last edition of 2011. Our office is closed as of today and will re-open on January 9, 2012. Our first edition of the new year will be January 12, 2012, with the usual Monday deadlines. We wish all our readers and advertisers a peaceful, restful Christmas season and a very Happy New Year. Thank you for your support in 2011. Garry, Jeff, Jule, Julie, Scott and Suzanne SINCE 1970

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PAGE 4

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

The Good Life N

By Jeff Green ormally every year we print 50 issues of the Frontenac News and then take two weeks off for Christmas and New Year’s. Every few years, because of the way the weeks line up, we put out a 51st paper before having our annual holiday. That’s what happened this year, and although you wouldn’t think it should matter that much if you add one week to 50, it makes a psychological difference. When I trudged down to Glenburnie for the December Frontenac County Council meeting last Wednesday morning I was certainly feeling it. It was the day after issue number 50, and my body wanted to be on holiday, but I had no one to blame but myself for deciding to go 51 weeks in the first place. Not much happened at the meeting until the end, when a rift on council was revealed through what was ultimately an entertaining election for warden; at least it was entertaining to the two of us in the press gallery. Still, as I was driving over to St. Paul’s Anglican Church in Sydenham after the council meeting I was still feeling like I’d have rather stayed in bed. But when I got to the church and walked into the New Leaf Link Open House I started to feel

december 22, 2011

Editorial better. There was a lot of energy in the room; the volunteers and students all work pretty hard to build a better life for themselves, and they have built an infectious kind of camaraderie. It even made me feel better about Frontenac County Council. For all the politicking, and all the machinations that go on among members of council, county staff, and yes, the press, everyone is really only trying to make things a little bit better - even if they think everyone else is doing it all wrong. Ultimately, what we have the privilege to bring to our readers each week are stories about the efforts that people in our region are making, sometimes against heavy odds, to live a good life. The Good Life is a concept that comes from the Aboriginal heritage that infuses this region. It means that we take the time to look around, to live fully within our physical surroundings, to suffer as little as possible and to help our neighbours suffer as little as possible as well. The Good Life is not the wealthy life nor is it necessarily the happy life. Happiness is not something we can control, but we acn live an engaged life that faces up to suffering as well as joy. In one way or another, just about every story we cover all

year long in The Frontenac News is about things that people have done or are doing in trying to live this way. From the stories about school activities to volunteer fund raising efforts, to a fight over how to spend tax money or about someone who is opening a new business, a community newspaper is really about the struggle to build a good life. People don’t always succeed, and we don’t always succeed in telling their stories well, but the struggle is a worthy effort and that’s what keeps all of us going week after week. At the same time, we all know that we have to make a living; we have to get by; we have to generate income. But living as we do in a rural environment, we know that the goal is not so much to make a good living, it is to make a decent living and live a good life. We don’t celebrate people for their wealth in these communities or in this newspaper. We sometimes celebrate what people do with their wealth, but wealth is not the be all and end all. We’ll be back on January 12 with our first edition of 2012, and we will be joining the Facebook Generation and the Twitterverse in the New Year, leading up to the launch later in the year of a new web-based service to complement our print edition. Happy Christmas.

Letters Re: “NF Council gives New Energy program cold shoulder” (Dec 8 letter to the editor from Wolfe Erlichman) "How can a system that pays $0.80 to a producer for power that sells at $0.07 be a sustainable project?" The answer is IT CANNOT! Ontario Auditor General Jim McCarter's Report released this month begs the question "Did the province rush into renewable energy investment without adequately taking measure of the likelihood for success?” Mr. McCarter noted that no economic analysis was done to determine whether the province's $437-million deal (Since lowered to $110 million) with the Korean firm Samsung, which promises subsidies on power prices and guaranteed access to the energy grid in return for $7 billion in investments - is "economically prudent". Yes, a project that is environmentally friendly and encourages the building of non-polluting renewable sources of energy, which can be fed into our electrical grid does sound ideal, but is it too good to be true? This is the question that I ask myself, if our Liberal Government has not thoroughly researched this, do we want North Frontenac to risk involvement? I think not! Green energy initiatives will cost Ontarians $220 million a year. Energy rates will be expected to increase 7.9% annually over the next five years, with more than half of that attributed to green energy initiatives.

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Dec 21 is the shortest day of the year and some people call it the saddest. Causes include the weather, the holidays, or lack of sunlight. Reduced sunlight can cause an array of symptoms called Seasonal Affective Disorder, which is very real. There is help in the form of special lights that replace the sunlight light that’s in short supply during the winter. Thirty minutes exposure per day is all that it takes. Our pharmacists can talk to you about these lights. Alcohol consumption is on the rise in Canada. In 2007, Canadians consumed an average of 115.75 litres of alcoholic beverages (wine, beer and spirits). Ten years earlier, the average was 99.4 litres. Hangover remedies abound. The goal is prevention and the obvious solution is to drink less alcohol. Some people drink a glass of water with each drink. Another idea that hasn’t been fully scientifically tested is to eat asparagus when you drink. This veggie contains certain amino acids that help metabolize the alcohol. For children between the ages of one and five years of age, two cups (half a litre) of milk each day will provide them with the proper amount of vitamin D and help maintain calcium and iron levels. All of us at the pharmacy would like to wish everyone a happy and safe hoIiday season. We look forward to being here for you in the coming year. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

As referenced in Mr. Erlichman's letter, creating local jobs would be great, but that will not necessarily be the case. Mr. McCarter's report concludes that yes, there will be temporary jobs in construction, but as for permanent jobs, when other jurisdictions have moved into renewable power, it has been shown that higher energy costs result in two to four jobs lost for each green energy job created. The power bills of Ontarians have increased an average of 26% from 2008-2010 and they will keep going up as more renewable energy projects start up. The province is leaning on its 10% clean energy benefit. From an investment point of view, a return of 14 times on your profit...is just another example of the rich getting richer and the poor paying for it. The Ontario government is billions in debt and we have to pay almost $30 million dollars a day in interest right now. Why would we want to add to this, when we have an abundance of hydro that we pay the US or Quebec to take? I do not understand how people can be trying to push the Micro-fit Program onto us North Frontenac taxpayers and then try to make us think that it is the best thing for us. I am a strong believer of the old saying "You don't get something for free!" Merry Christmas. Lonnie Watkins

Reminder from a crossing guard

have just finished a two-month stint as crossing guard at Prince Charles school and wish to comment on how much I enjoyed the job. The children were very respectful and responded very well to my "Good mornings" and my "See you tomorrows". I wish the same was true for the drivers who speed through the school zone. Ladies and gentlemen, I must remind you that the speed limit is 40 kph! At least when a crossing guard is on duty and children are expected to be about. And that also applies to other school zones, not just Prince Charles. Please watch for the children - they are our future. Thanks to the many who waved as you drove through. I chuckled to myself many mornings - it seems that those who passed by before ten to nine kept their waves to themselves. Those traveling after ten to nine appeared to be much more responsive! Curious! I understand that there will be a new guard on duty starting in January. Best of luck to you. Funny thing, I don't remember ever being cold. Which brings me to my thanks to the Lions who provided the bus shelter. Thanks also to the school body and parents who made me feel very welcome and appreciated. - Doug MacIntyre

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Sydenham Veterinary Services A.A.H.A Accredited Hospital

Re: property standards bylaw proposal

renda Piat has a tenable point in her comments about property standards bylaw proposals. (Frontenac News December 15/2011) Yes, Brenda, there are many regulations, imposed by politicians who have nothing better to do than try to impose more control and the subsequent tax burdens on the citizenry. At last count we had over half a million laws on the provincial roll alone, not to mention municipal and federal. When a government is elected, all they do is make more laws, and so it goes over the years. Of course bureaucrats and enforcers are required to make sure the mean and evil, wicked and nasty honest ratepayer toes the line on all these idiotic nuances concocted in the minds of mental midgets with a leaning towards tyranny. When I read of morons having nothing better to do than sneak ILLEGALLY onto PRIVATE PROPERTY THEY HAVE NO LEGAL RIGHT TO ENTER, to make sure that the owner paid dog licence fees on all his pets, I think it is time that layoffs are in order as it is apparent these "uncivil" servants have nothing to do and are a waste of taxpayer dollars. On that note, I would inform the system of the obvious: if any bylaw enforcement officer wishes entry to my property, they can first call me for permission. If they show up unexpectedly, then I will not allow entry and if they insist, I will make a citizen’s arrest, detain them, and call 911 for the police to come and charge them with criminal trespassing. I am within my legal right to do so and will NOT hesitate to take that action. I do have a certified land patent but this is not needed to assert ownership and control of my property. The citizenry have for too long ceded their property rights to the system and to bullies with badges on their uniforms, and it is long past the time that we should take our rights back. Keep in mind, along with imposing control, government focuses on taking as much money as possible from one class of people to give to another (Voltaire). Often that theft is accomplished to benefit their own machinations and to enlarge their coffers. Time to put the boots to this tyranny, and the best way to start is to mark who stands where on freedom, and those who fail the test should be targeted for defeat in the next municipal election. It would not hurt to elect some pro freedom landowners to municipal councils in this area. - Edward Kennedy

B

Christmas Eve Luminarias are back! O

n Christmas Eve, Saturday Dec. 24, the Oso Recreation Committee in coordination with the Friday Night Ladies Group will be re-kindling the tradition of setting up luminarias in the village of Sharbot Lake for the annual Family Luminary walk. Organizers are looking for volunteers to help distribute and light the luminaries. Anyone who would like to help, please come to the township office for 2pm on Dec. 24. The Sharbot Lake Pharmacy has donated the bags for the luminarias, and organizers would welcome additional donations to help cover the costs. For more information please contact Dave Willis, Cathy MacMunn or Charlene Godfrey.

613-279-2802

Walk Ins Welcome as time permits. Professionals to serve you.For an appointment, please call Sue, or Janet 1045 Village Woods Dr. Sharbot Lake


december 22, 2011

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 5

Elphin couple have spent 30 years perfecting Tempeh - the Noble Bean by Jeff Green (technically it is fibrous mycelium). Not only does the myceliong before Walmart started selling organic produce; um hold the cakes together, it alters the chemistry of the soybefore there were Loblaws Organics products; before beans, breaking them down so they can be readily digested. wheat-free, gluten-free and low cholesterol products were “It also reverses the anti-nutrients in soy,” said Susan Brown, even contemplated; before the 100-Mile Diet and the Local particularly the trypsin inhibitor that prevents digestion of proFood movement, Alan and Susan Brown left their friends tein, and phytic acid, which impedes the absorption of certain at Plenty Canada near McDonalds Corners and moved to minerals including zinc, calcium and iron.” Toronto to start a food business. The Browns had lived at The Farm in Tennessee, a vegetarian communal project that is still going strong today, and it was there that they learned about tempeh, a product made of fermented soybeans, which was originally invented in Indonesia at least 400 years ago. Although tempeh is now a specialty product in North America, it was not known at all back in 1975 when it was being incorporated into the diet of people at The Farm. The Browns were a young couple when they learned how to make tempeh. They learned that it is a highly effective protein source, which was much in demand for a vegetarian community. They came to Canada and became involved with Plenty, which at the time was a small community on the model of the Farm. The Browns, Alan in particular, had an entrepreneurial bent, and when they started developing a small-scale manufactur- Susan Brown, Rosemary Kotze, Dean ing process to make tempeh, the idea of doing it at Plenty was the first plan, but Once the incubation is complete, the Noble Tempeh is in the end it turned out not to be a good fit. So the couple flash frozen, and sold in stores as a frozen product. Along headed off to the big smoke - Kensington Market to be pre- with regular Soy Tempeh, Noble Bean makes Sea Veggie cise - and started up their business. Tempeh, Quinoa Tempeh, and Three Grain Tempeh by addA few years later they were drawn back to Eastern On- ing ingredients before the tempeh is incubated. In addition, tario. “We spent one weekend looking at dozens of places, Noble Bean also sells tempeh burgers, in which the tempeh and then we found this property and snapped it up,” Alan cakes are sliced and marinated before being frozen. recalled last week from the little factory behind their home Over the years, the Browns have continually fine tuned on the Elphin Maberly Road, just south-west of Elphin. their manufacturing process, all the while building up a marOver 25 years ago now, Noble Bean, which is what they ket for tempeh in health food stores in Perth, Kingston, Otcalled their company, moved to Elphin, and the Browns have built their business, and their lives, ever since. In the process they ahve become a living example of how a small-scale local food business should be run, by hands-on owners who are completely committed to the product they make. At first they made tempeh in a small, converted trailer, ore than 150 drawings were submitted for our annual which is still part of the 1,500 square foot hybrid building Christmas Art contest. They were all great, and as always, where the tempeh is made today. the only downside to holding the contest is that we would like Noble Bean is a certified organic, kosher product, and so to choose every drawing as the winner. We loved them all the process through which the tempeh is made is subject and really appreciated the hard work and creativity that went to the scrutiny not only of Canadian and Ontario health and into each one. Thanks so much to everyone who entered the safety inspectors, but also a rabbi from Ottawa and organic contest and congratulations to the winners, who are: regulators as well. OVERALL WINNER Matthew Kotze, Elphin Both Susan and Alan work in the shop. Susan supervises most of the production and the work of two other workers, AGES 4-5: 1st – Ava Fox, Loughborough, 2nd – Sophie Rancurrently Rosie Kotze from Elphin and Dean from Playfair- son, Loughborough, 3rd – Mackenzie Drew, Land O’Lakes ville. AGES 6-7: 1st – Cassie Page, Loughborough PS, In what is a smooth-running operation, dried soybeans are 2nd – Lexa Shelter, Loughborough, 3rd – Jenna Norman, transformed into 350 pounds of tempeh each day, five times Loughborough a week. A year’s supply of organic soybeans sits in a tractor st nd trailer at the far end of the property, waiting to be brought AGES 8-10: 1 – Kayla Newman, NAEC, 2 - Madison, rd into a room where they are poured into a wood and mesh Prince Charles, 3 – Tia Hyndman, Prince Charles box. A fan and a dehumidifier are employed to further dry AGES 11+ 1st – Emalee Riddell, Land O’Lakes, 2nd – Shay, out the beans until the moisture content is down to 10%. At Land O’Lakes, 3rd – Brianna Campbell, Hinchinbrooke that point the beans are hulled, and the casings are sucked out by vacuum tube (the casings help to feed the pigs at a neighbouring farm). The beans are put in porous sacks and boiled. They then go into a machine that resembles a commercial drier for the Anne MacDonald, Registered Dietitian, and Bonnie Sparsurface moisture to be spun out of them. row, Nurse Practitioner, will be in attendance to discuss variFinally the cooked beans are ready to be turned into tem- ous aspects of diabetes management at the Verona Medical peh. At this point the beans are full of protein, but the human Centre. Whether you have just learned that you have diabebody can't get at all that protein. Something needs to be tes or have had it for many years, this will be a chance to done to alter their chemical state. share your experiences, ask questions and learn from each Hundreds of years ago in Indonesia, they would be left other. Sessions are from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on the following exposed to the air, and naturally occurring bacteria would dates: January 26, February 23, and March 22, 2012. There form a white mold over them in a matter of days. will be a grocery store tour following the morning session for Modern tempeh making, just like modern production of those interested at 1 p.m. with Anne MacDonald. Registrabeer, wine and yogurt, requires that for both health and tion, information: Anne MacDonald 613-544-3400 ext 3589. taste reasons, the fermentation must be a controlled reaction. The culture that is used at Noble Bean is Rhizopus oligoporus, which is imported from The Farm in Tennessee Northern Connections Adult or from other sources. The culture is mixed into the cooked Learning Centres soybeans, which are put into plastic that has been puncare happy to announce the winners of the tured with dozens of tiny holes. Then bags are flattened and placed on metal trays that you might see in a hospital cafAging Well Photo Contest. As part of the eteria. The trays are placed in incubators, which maintain a ongoing Seniors Health and Fitness Directory, we asked temperature of over 30 degrees C for 24 hours to incubate the community to submit pictures of local seniors enjoying the culture. healthy, and fitness related, activities. After 24 hours, the beige soybeans have a white coating The winners are: 1st - Charmaine Jones; 2nd - Elaine Garrett; 3rd - Vicki Newlove Honorable Mention: Glenys Bender, Helen Hackett, Angie Billings, Cindy Jones Funniest Photo: Linda Goudet We wish to thank the sponsors who donated prizes for the contest: Sharbot Lake Freshmart, Canadian Tire For every tree sold, we will donate $3 to Store, Perth, Sharbot Lake Petro Canada, Sharbot Lake Pharmacy and Sharbot Lake Home Hardware. the Oso District Fire Department. Thank you, as well, to everyone who submitted photos, Crooked Hills Farm they will make a wonderful addition to the completed 1560 Over the Hills Rd. Seniors Health and Fitness Directory, which will be completed spring of 2012. Clarendon, ON 613-279-3214

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Christmas Art Contest winners

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Diabetes sessions at Verona

Christmas Trees Cut your own $25.00 each.

tawa and Montreal in addition to their original sales base in Toronto and through the Ontario Natural Food Co-op But in the past few years, the market for tempeh has been exploding. The increased interest in healthy protein and gluten-free products has only made the market even stronger, and even though they invested $40,000 a few years ago in upgrades to their production facility to be able to produce as much as they do now, the market is now demanding more and more. “Our sales were steady through the ’90s, but they are now going up every year,” said Alan Brown, “and in 2011 they are up about 13%.” The Browns are not planning to expand their business again, however. After 30 years they are planning to retire and have put Noble Bean up for sale, even though it is more profitable today than it has ever been. It will be the new owner who will have the opportunity to build up the production to meet what looks like a limitless market. The Browns don’t only produce tempeh; they have also become adept at cooking with it. Like tofu, its more famous cousin, tempeh is a food that has a more neutral flavour than other sources of protein. What that means as far as cuisine is concerned, is that it provides the texture and allows other ingredients and spices the opportunity to shine. Ginger and garlic, mushrooms and almonds are all very well suited to cooking with tempeh. In Indonesia, dishes such as Tempeh Sambal Goreng are part of the national cuisine, and a number of websites and cookbooks have sprung up with recipes that use tempeh in other Asian dishes such as Tempeh with Shiitake mushrooms and garlic sauce, and Sweet and Sour Tempeh. It is also used as a meat substitute in Italian and Mexican dishes. Tempeh burgers are available at the Elf Inn Express locally, and Noble Bean Tempeh is sold at Local Family Farms in Verona, Tara Natural Foods in Kingston and Foodsmiths in Perth. For further information, check out Noblebean.ca

Give the “Perfect Gift” – Give Blood Top 10 reasons why donating blood is the perfect gift: 10. Nobody will ever try to exchange or re-gift your gift. 9. Everyone knows someone who is just impossible to buy for. Donating blood is gift giving made easy. 8. Wrapping is not an issue – Canadian Blood Services provides the gift bags. 7. Giving blood doesn’t have any calories. 6. Your credit card gets a holiday, too. 5. Forget making countless trips to the mall. Giving blood takes only an hour – and they give you a cookie. 4. You can certainly claim you made your gift – and it’s a gift that truly comes from the heart. 3. You can give blood every 56 days. That’s like giving a holiday gift six times per year. 2. Your gift will help a hospital patient within five days. 1. By giving blood you could give someone else the gift money can't buy...time. To a hospital patient in need, time is everything -- time with family and friends and time to live and time to love. (A message from Canadian Blood Services)

Best Wishes For A Merry Christmas & A Very Happy New Year John McDougall, Councillor Township of South Frontenac

FLINTON

NEW YEAR’S EVE

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December 31, 2011 Doors Open 7:00pm D. J. & Dance 8:00pm - 2:00am Late Lunch Provided COST $20 per single / $30 per couple Bus leaves hall at 12:30am & 2:00am to: Cloyne, Northbrook, Kaladar, Harlowe 4 Corners Tickets available from:

Wannamaker’s Store, Hook’s Rona Derek & Tracy Maschke by calling 613-336-0482 Sponsored by Flinton Rec. Club


PAGE 6

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

New SMART Board a hit at SLPS

Austin (left), rehearses a presentation he will be giving to his class using the Smart board by Julie Druker in mid-November has been a focus for stuaron West’s grade 5/6 class at Sharbot dents in Mr. West’s class. The tool functions Lake Public School is abuzz with the essentially as a giant computer screen that latest addition to their classroom; a cutting allows students to interact with the latest edge piece of computer technology known computer technology by manipulating the as SMART Board. The device, which comscreen and the information displayed on bines the simplicity of a white board with the it either with their fingers or a pointer. The power of a computer, is the first and only device offers students interactive teaching one at the school, and ever since it arrived tools in a limitless number of subjects. “The beauty of the SMART Board is that it increases student engagement and interaction and increases their attention,” Mr. West said. “The fact that the students have a chance to get out of their seats, come up to the board, touch it and manipulate it has really increased their understanding in a number of different areas. It's also a great tool for students who tend to be more physically active and who may have trouble staying in their seats and focusing for longer lengths of time. The other bonus is that it is a tool that can be 100% student directed so instead me standing at the front of the class making

december 22, 2011

a presentation, students can use it on their own, creating, presenting, and discovering new things on their own.” Right now in math the students are studying three-dimensional shapes and with the board have the ability to investigate the shapes in various dimensions. They are able to manipulate them and view them from various angles. “The SMART Board also gives the students a chance to experience the type of technology that they will go on to use in high school, university and college at later date,” Mr. West said. The board comes with various applications and software and also includes a website where SMART Board lesson plans can be shared amongst teachers who have developed lesson plans specifically for it. For Mr. West, who concedes that he is “heavily into computers and the latest cut-

ting edge technology”, the new $3,000 device was “a logical next step and addition to the classroom and the possibilities it offers are absolutely endless.” SLPS principal David Allison had seen the device at Clarendon Public School in Plevna and was won over. “We felt it would be a great addition to the school. The learning opportunities are limitless and we are seeing the kids become engaged in ways that they were just not before.” When I visited the classroom students were rehearsing their upcoming multimedia presentations about outer space and many will be using the SMART Board to make their presentations. “I love it”, said Alexi. “You can do so much with it; you can write and draw on it. It’s just a lot of fun to use and it’s bigger and better than what we had before.”

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Joy to the World

Merry Christmas to all

Stuff the Cruiser event benefits North Frontenac food bank

Jessica, Grace, Jeremy and Sarah made a food donation to OPP Auxiliary Constable Jeremy Saunders, who was taking food and cash donations for the North Frontenac Food Bank at the Sharbot Lake Freshmart on December17. It was the fourth OPP “Stuff the Cruiser” food drive to take place since 2010, all of which were initiated by Auxiliary Constable Saunders. Together he and his team, which included Auxiliary Constables Travis Thompson in Sydenham and Sylvain Belisle in Verona, raised $3,400 in cash and food donations in this drive alone, bringing the total since 2010 to $13,900. Constable Saunders and his team would like to say many thanks to the generous communities where the drives took place.

Menu

Seafood Bisque

Thick creamy seafood bisque made in-house the traditional way

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Duck Breast, cooked medium then thinly sliced and fanned over our Fall River Waldorf Salad with shaved Napa Cabbage, Apples, Grapes, Green Onion and then finished with Toasted Walnuts and a Cranberry Port Vinaigrette

Palate Cleanser of Limon Sorbet Fall River Filet Mignon

Tender Juicy Beef Tenderloin wrapped in our double smoked bacon, pepper crusted and sauced with a Guinness and Maple Demi-Glace, served with Potato Gratin and Bouquet of Fresh Vegetables, and topped with a Giant Shrimp

Dessert

Choose from either Tiramisu or a White Chocolate Raspberry Ganash made by a local dessert Guru. Both guaranteed to delight!!

Items can be substituted to accommodate special dietary requirements

21980 Highway 7 at Maberly 613-268-2882


december 22, 2011

THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 7

Stories behind the carols - Hark the Herald Angels Sing This is one of the top carols of all times, but neither the writer of the words or writer of the music would have liked it as it is today. Charles Wesley wrote over 600 songs. When he wrote this one he kept to one of his rules, namely that important, theologically deep songs must be coupled with slow and solemn music. His tune was labored, majestic, and overwrought. Felix Mendelssohn, on the other hand, did not approve of religious music and certainly disapproved of chapel style Christian worship. He made it very clear that his music was only to be used for secular purposes. Long after both Wesley and Mendelssohn were dead, Dr. William Cummings joined the joyous, happy music of Mendelssohn with Wesley’s powerful words to create the carol we know and love today.

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Above - The Tay Valley Choir decked out in their “fruitcake” costumes for one of their crowd pleasing favourites

Tay Valley Community Choir concert

T

he Maberly Hall sprung to life on December 3 for a performance by the Tay Valley Community Choir. The choir perfomed some of the songs they have been developing throughout the fall rehearsal season along with a generous number of seasonal songs and haunting hymms.

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The choir meets weekly under the direction of Ann McMahon and Grace Armstrong. In addition to the choir, the audience was entertained by the piano/flute/clarinet trio of John and Sheila Kittle and Melanie Fyfe, who call themselves Mississippi Windsong, as well as the Glen Tay Girls Group from Glen Tay School and Beryl Stott. The highlight of the second half of the concert was the performance of “Fruitcake”, when the choir dressed up as the ingredient they sang about. Treats were served at the end of the concert.

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Fred Warner Shibley was the owner of Aspinwall Island, now known as Shibley Island, and wrote many short stories about the local people he came to know and love.

PO Box 285 Sharbot Lake, ON K0H 2P0

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His stories have been compiled in one book by Don Antoine. Copies are available at Sharbot Lake Pharmacy or by calling 613-279-2657

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Email: chriswinney1@aol.com www.landolakesproperty.com 12309 Hwy 41, Chris Winney Northbrook, ON K0H 2G0 Accessible with support person. Broker


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THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 8

DECEmber 22, 2011

Men’s Workwear Department Located inside, to the right of the front door

Trousdale’s Home Hardware George St, Sydenham

Featuring Fleece Jackets, Shirts Pants, Overalls, Coveralls, Coats, Reflective Outerwear

613-376-3441 613-376-6666

Socks, Caps Kodiak Boots

New

Canadian Made

Northern Happenings

New Men’s Workwear Dept. located inside, to Northern Happenings listings are free ets Verona Hardware, Convenience. the right of theTopper’s front Door Info: Joyce at 613-374-3406. for community groups, and will be published Featuring Hammill Fleece Jackets, Shirts Pants for two weeks. Other listings are paid or are Tuesday December OVeralls Coveralls Coats, Reflective Outerwear27 taken from paid ads in the paper. The News NAPANEE CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT, all CCanaiandanad Made makes every effort to be accurate but events skill levels, feeder watchers welcome; meet at Socks, Caps Kodiak Boots and their details should be independently veri- Tammy’s Country Kitchen 7am; register, Anne fied by readers.

w/ Crimson River & The Proverbs, 6:30pm – midnight, Free Methodist Church, advance booking required, $35pp; 1-800-403-9755. VERONA - NEW YEAR’S EVE, Lions Hall, 7pm, DJ, light buffet, $15pp; proceeds to Christmas For Kids. 613-484-6414; 484-5974

Tuesday January 3

Thursday, December 22

Saturday December 31

Saturday December 24 CHRISTMAS EVE LUMINARY WALK, Village of Sharbot Lake, volunteers needed to prepare luminaries at 2pm at township office.

Sunday December 25 NORTHBROOK - COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS DINNER. Free, all welcome. Lions Hall, dinner served at 1pm; Volunteers needed from 10am on. Dinner deliveries available, please call Marylin, 613-336-1573; SHARBOT LAKE - COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS DINNER, all welcome! Oso hall, 3-5pm, Turkey & Ham Dinner w/ trimmings, free event by community volunteers: info: Jule, 613-2792687; Wayne 613-375-6633 VERONA - FREE TURKEY DINNER! Join us for a music filled day with a delicious Christmas feast with all the trimmings. Doors open 10:30am; dinner 12 noon, open to Verona &area residents. Reserve - pick up free tick-

ARDEN LEGION NEW YEARS EVE, DJ, 9pm, party favors, potluck buffet, bring favorite dish, free will offering DENBIGH GRIFFITH LIONS – New Year’s Eve, $15 ea. FLINTON - NEW YEAR’S EVE, 8pm, DJ & Dance, late lunch provided; $20pp, $30 couple; bus home avail. 613-336-0482; sponsor: Flinton Rec. Club HARLOWE – NEW YEAR’S DANCE w/ Country 4 band, 8pm, hot buffet at midnight, prizes, $12.50 ea. Call Marie for tickets: 613336-2557 HARROWSMITH - NEW YEAR’S EVE, Golden Links Hall, 8pm, DJ, prizes, hot midnight buffet, rides home avail. $30 pp, call Terry 386-8854; 329-0257. SHARBOT LAKE – NEW YEAR’S FAMILY TIME, family games, refreshments, Pentecostal Church 6-9pm, all welcome Sharbot Lake Legion, New Year’s Party with Red Rose Express, 9pm, $15 pp, advance tickets avail.; Designated drivers available. SYDENHAM– NEW YEAR’S DANCE, at Legion w/ “The Jaywalkers”, buffet, bus ride home, $25/person VERONA - DINNER & GOSPEL CONCERT

s ’ lla

E

499

Friday January 6

y HARROWSMITHndYOUTH Baker DANCE, Golden a é f a Links Hall, 7pm for ages 9-15; $6 call 372Saturday January 7 SNOW ROAD – BINGO, fundraiser for Snowmobile Club, Supper 4:30-6; bingo 6:45 VERONA - WINTER WAKE-UP BREAK-

all ’s a

V ari r r o w sm i t h

odist Church, for 55+yrs, $11. Reservations required 613-376-6477.

Regular Happenings AA & AL-ANON 41 GROUP - Cloyne Hall. Wednesdays 8 pm. All welcome 336-9221. AA MEETINGS - SHARBOT LAKE, every Monday, 8:30 pm, United Church C.E. Bldg. AL-ANON: Hope & help for families of alcoholics, 12 weekly meetings in greater Kingston area. Please call 384-2134 for meeting information. We care.

1274; 358-2355

E

299

Wednesday January 11 $

FRONTENAC ADDINGTON TRAPPERS MEETING, Henderson Hall 7pm; guest speakers, door prizes; www.trapon.org

Thursday January 12 Free Delivery! HARROWSMITH DINERS, noon, Free Meth-

C

SHARBOT LAKE – BLOOD DONOR CLINIC, St James Major Catholic Church, 2:30–6pm, appointments recommended 1-888-2DONATE

SHARBOT LAKE - SUPPORT GROUP FOR CAREGIVERS of Alzheimers or related dementia disease, Seniors’ Centre, 1-3pm. Info: 613-279-3078. Full Size Refrigerators SNOW ROAD – FOOT CARE CLINIC, Comstarting at munity hall, Call Community Support Services for info/ appointment: 613-279-3151. $ VERONA DINERS, noon, Lions Hall, for 55+, $11. Reservations required 613-376-6477. 

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Note: our directory of church services is on page S6 of the Christmas Greeting supplement

Friday, December 23

399Monday January 9

$

SHARBOT LAKEDryers – FOOT CARE CLINIC, seniors’ centre, call Community Support Serstarting at vices for info, appointment: 613-279-3151.

Wednesday January 4

Wednesday, December 28

MABERLY - CHRISTMAS CAROL SERVICE, 7pm, community hall (United Church) all welcome, freewill offering.

Sunday, January 8 MABERLY - “LITTLE CHRISTMAS CONWashing CERT” w/ Machines Blue Skies Fiddle & Prep Orchesstarting at Heritage Orchestra, community tras, Celtic hall 2:30pm; $5, under 12 free

NORTHBROOK - FOOT CARE CLINIC Lions Hall, call Land o’ Lakes Community Services 613-336-8934; Heather Balogh, 613-335-2895

Brown, 613-542-8790.

FRONTENAC FLYERS PEEWEE REP TEAM, 6pm, vs. Stirling Blues, Frontenac Arena.

FAST, Trinity United Church, 9-11am; Bacon, eggs, toast, fried potatoes $5; beverages $1.

Holiday Hours

Harrowsmith Varie 4937 RD 38  613-

372-1444.

Open Christmas Da y from 10 am to 2 pm Open Boxing Day from 8am to 4 pm Open Dec. 27th to Dec. 30th from 5 am to 9 pm, Open New Year ’s Da y from 10 am to 2 pm

et y

DOWN

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Brian's Canadian Crossword

Copyright (c) 2011 Brian E. Paquin #SP038 Christmas Crossword 2011 Christmas www.cancross.com by Brian E. Paquin © 2011 www.cancross.com

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48 Traverse 49 Charged atoms 50 Christmas With ___ Mouskouri (1972) 51 Melbourne greeting 55 Affirmative vote 56 Part of an e-mail address 57 Wine container

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71 Not sans 72 Fireplace screen feature 73 www.cancross.com, e.g. 74 Sigh of pity 75 Pound sound 76 Gibberish! 77 ___ To Joy 78 Pa Cartwright

Orange Waffles with Burst of Cranberry Topping 8 tbsp. unsalted butter, softened (4 oz.) 2 cups cake flour (8 oz.) 4 tsps. baking powder ¼ tsp. salt 1 Tbsp. orange zest 2 large eggs 1 cup buttermilk 1 cup whole milk In small saucepan over low heat, melt butter. Cool. In large bowl whisk flour, baking powder, salt, and orange zest until evenly blended. In medium bowl, whisk eggs, buttermilk, and whole milk until well blended. Add this mix to the flour mixture and mix with a fork just until flour is moistened. Stir in the butter just until evenly blended. The batter should be lumpy. Use batter immediately. Cook waffles and remove them to the oven racks to keep warm until serving. Serve with hot cranberry topping. Burst of Cranberry Topping 1 cup water 1 ½ cups sugar 3 tbsps cornstarch 4 cups fresh (or thawed frozen) cranberries In medium saucepan, stir together water, sugar, cornstarch, and cranberries. Bring mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring constantly. Stop stirring, reduce heat, and simmer for 1 minute, swirling pan occasionally. The mixture will be thickened but pourable.


THE FRONTENAC NEWS

DECEmber 22, 2011

A Christmas Message by Rev. Jean Brown

The Classifieds Ad Rates: Classified Text ads: $8.20 + HST per insertion for 20 words & under; 20¢ each extra word. Deadline: 4 pm Monday; Ph: 613-279-3150, Fx: 613-279-3172; nfnews@frontenac.net

NEW AND USED APPLIANCES USED REFRIGERATORS

Stoves, washers, dryers, freezers, dishwashers. 3 months old and up. Sold with written guarantees. Fridges $100 and up.

NEW APPLIANCES

At the lowest prices in the area. Trade-ins accepted on new appliances. Big selection to choose from. We Sell Gas Refrigerators

PAYS CASH $$$

For good used appliances in working order or not, but no junk please. VISA and MASTERCARD accepted. We have our own financing also. Shop at our competitors and then come see for yourself quality at low prices.

Open evenings & 7 days a week. We deliver

Smitty’s “KING of APPLIANCES”

Open Evenings & Seven Days a Week - River Road Corbyville, Just North of Corby’s (613) 969-0287

AUTOMOTIVE KINNEY AUTO WRECKING Station Road, Kaladar. 4x4 trucks & parts for sale. Scrap cars, stoves, fridges wanted. 613-336-9272.

CHILD CARE COUNTRY KIDZ CHILD CARE CENTER, two full-time spaces now available. Drop-in program also available. Please call Stephanie at 613-279-2735

COMING EVENTS SHARBOT LAKE - COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS DINNER, Christmas Day, Sunday December 25, Oso hall, 3-5pm, Turkey & Ham Dinner with trimmings, free event put on by community volunteers. All are welcome! Jule, 613-279-2687; Wayne 613-375-6633

EMBROIDERY & ENGRAVING UPPER FRONTENAC GRAPHICS – Custom Embroidery, Imprinting, Trophies, Awards & Engraving. Caps, jackets, golf shirts, hoodies, teamwear & more. 613-539-6340; dwedden@ aol.com; ufg@hotmail.ca

FOR RENT 3 BEDROOM UPSTAIRS APT. Mountain Grove, utilities included, $950 /month, call 613335-3878 or 613-213-3055 COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE located on Hwy. 7 just east of the Junction of Hwy 38 and Hwy. 7. For further information, contact Ram at 613-279-2827 SMALL CABIN-SIZE HOUSE in Denbigh Village, 1st & last, references required, $300 plus utilities. Please call 613-374-3336 VILLAGE, SHARBOT LAKE. 2 bedroom home, first and last plus reference, $850. single or couple (holding tank). Call Mike 613 279 3137

FOR SALE ’96 FORD RANGER EXTENDED CAB, 3L motor, 5 speed standard $875. Cap also available $100. 613-279-3243 ELECTRIC SCOOTER, Quickie P-100, comes with charger, separate cushion. As new, $350, 613-479-0341 HAND KNIT VESTS, baby cloths, crib blanket, assorted socks (many colours) phone 613-4792169 FRONTENAC MODULAR HOMES. Custom built. New 1280 sq.ft. 28’x52’ home, 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, delivered and on your basement or foundation, oak cabinets available. $79,900 USD plus taxes. Financing available OAC. 1-866-775-8268 www.frontenacmodularhomes.com WOOD HEAT SOLUTIONS. Instant rebates up to $1,200 on Outdoor Wood & Corn Furnaces OR Trade-out discounts up to $1,500 on the purchase of an E-Classic. YOUR CENTRAL BOILER DEALER. Frankford, ON 613.398.1611; Bancroft, ON 613.332.1613

GARAGE/YARD SALES SPYGLASS COVE, 1016 Schoolhouse Rd. Clarendon, Hwy 509. Follow the Garage Sale signs. Open Tues - Sat. 9am-5pm (Open Christmas Eve and new Year’s Eve). Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Open all winter. New items every week.

HALL RENTAL S&A CLUB HALL, Harrowsmith. Air conditioned, capacity 90, $25/hr up to 3 hours; $125 for more than 3 hours. Call 613-372-5678; 613372-1910 VERONA LIONS BANQUET HALL AND BOARD MEETING ROOM (Lions’ Den). Reasonable rates in a convenient location. Air conditioned. Full kitchen and bar facility. Weddings, anniversaries, parties, conferences.  613-3742821

HELP WANTED WANTED: PART-TIME HELP, Country View Care is looking to add to our staff. If you think you may be an asset to our team, please drop off a resume at 9504 Road 38 or call 613-3742023

HUNTING & FISHING FIREARMS & HUNTER ED COURSES. Firearms course: January 13 & 14. Hunter Ed: January 20 & 21. Harrowsmith. Wild Turkey license examinations. Call Bill at 613-335-2786 HUNTER SAFETY AND FIREARMS COURSES. Turkey Examinations. Course date January 20, 21, 22, Flinton. Limited seating. Call 613-336-9875. TRAPPERS / FUR MANAGEMENT COURSE, tentatively scheduled for mid-January 2012. For details call 613-336-8807 or 613-336-8359. www.trapon.org

LEGAL SERVICES RURAL LEGAL SERVICES, A community Legal Clinic providing legal services without charge for residents of Northern Frontenac County and surrounding area. Sharbot Lake: phone 613-279-3252 or toll free 1-888-7778916. Northbrook: 613-336-8934

MUSIC LESSONS TOM’S MUSIC STUDIO is now accepting students for drums, guitar, bass guitar, piano, beginner banjo and theory; repairs to all stringed instruments. Tom 613-539-4659

SERVICES DRYWALL AND PLASTER REPAIRS. Professionally trained. Drywall installation, old fashioned quality, three coat hand finishing. Free estimates. Call Rick at 613-375-8201. HOMESTYLE WEDDINGS. Minister Judie Diamond helps design your ceremony and performs the marriage at location of your choice. 613-375-6772 PET SITTING in Mountain Grove. Going away? Let us help. Dogs, Cats, etc. Spacious, individual accommodations. Long walks. By appointment only. Laura Mills 613-335-3658. Evenings are best or leave a message. PHOTOCOPY, FAX & LAMINATION SERVICES available at The Frontenac News, rear building, 1095 Garrett St., Sharbot Lake. Call 613-279-3150 for information. REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST in North Frontenac – clinic in Harlowe, also available for house calls. We have gift certificates available for the Holiday Season. Please call Timothy Christ at 613.661.4459. REGISTERED PRACTICAL NURSE AVAILABLE for personal care, light housekeeping, shopping, meal preparation for seniors. For more information call Cathy 613-479-9924. SYLVIA’S FOOT CARE. Providing Nursing foot care in the privacy of your own home. Registered with Dept. of Veterans’ Affairs to provide foot care to veterans who qualify. For further information call Sylvia at 613-335-2940.

WANTED TO BUY WANTED: HOUSE in Sharbot Lake Village or vicinity. Call 613-279-1316 STANDING TIMBER, firewood, pine, cedar, bush lots. Free quotes, cash paid. Call 613279-2154.

Shaw Direct Satellite TV Free Installation* Free Dish* Great Packages Start at $49 mth. 600 model HD Receiver $49.** Also available 605 HD, 630 PVR HD

Don’s Satellite Service 613 328-6811

This Christmas shop local

PAGE 9

Free site surveys for Xplornet Internet *Free install for new activation *No Contract ** After Rebate  Service to all Satellites

I

n the hustle and bustle of Christmas preparations let us all pause, and remember the true religious significance of this spiritual event - the birth of Jesus Christ. We spend so much time preparing, buying, baking, planning, when in fact at the original event, planning did not play a big role. Mary was astonished at her circumstances, however she persevered and responded to God, as did Joseph. They didn't have any plans at all, however willingly responded to God's plans for them and the baby Jesus was born in a barn - quite a palace for the royal King. As a child I recall preparing for Christmas by anxiously awaiting the arrival of the Eaton's catalogue. When it came we would begin to make out lists of the items we wanted. I'm embarrassed to say we would even write down the page number and the item number and long for that gift. My mom would get so annoyed with us and remind us of the best Christmas gift - the birth of Christ. Thankfully she persevered and we finally caught on. Somehow we have blown it all out of proportion by continuing to disregard the true religious meaning of the event; the two frightened ill-prepared young folks responding to God and taking on a huge assignment. Somehow we have concentrated on the gifts of the wise men and in giving gifts rather than responding to the willingness of the wise men to follow a star and to set out on an unexpected journey into the unknown, not always knowing where they were headed, but knowing that God would guide them onward. Somehow we have forgotten that the Holy Child was born in a simple manger: no decorations, lights, tinsel or comforts, and instead we have filled our empty spaces with excess rather than with our God. Currently serving at the two United Churches of Ompah and Plevna as they ponder their future, I'm amazed at the willingness to

Corporation of the Township of Addington Highlands Public Notice The Addington Highlands Township OFFICE will be closed Dec 26th & Dec 27th, 2011 and again on Jan 2nd, 2012. KALADAR WASTE SITE will be closed on Dec 24th & Dec 26th, 2011 and again on Jan 2nd, 2012. VENNACHAR & MACKAVOY WASTE SITES will be closed on Dec 24th & Dec 25th, 2011 and again on Jan 1st, 2012.

TOWNSHIP OF CENTRAL FRONTENAC NOTICE TO RESIDENTS

step out in faith and to try new ventures and new ways of being the church. Just as the shepherds responded to the angel and headed out across the fields in search of the Christ Child, so too have our churches been exploring and seeking new ways of representing the Christ Child and in being the church. They have been meeting faithfully, and have tentatively decided to continue in a modified form - going back to the old lay-led house church meetings of long ago, and then in the spring resuming worship in the churches with a part-time minister. Certainly there are many needs and if you can help with any of these, please let the cochairs Betty Hunter or Helen Forsey know. The needs: praying, accounting and keeping records, checking on the manse until it is sold in the spring, cleaning, grass-cutting, ground maintenance at the manse until it is sold, offering suggestions and practical help, and most importantly, up-holding all churches in your prayers. This plea goes out to all attenders and non-attenders - we need help! In closing, sincere thanks to all and may the peace and inspiration of the Christ child infuse us with optimism, hope, and new life.

The Treasure Trunk Second Tyme Around Clothing

1171 Cannon Rd., Sharbot Lake

613-279-2113 Winter Hours: Open first 2 Saturdays of Each Month Mon - Sat: 9am-3pm

5 Bag Days Every Day

$

Quality New & Used Clothing at Affordable Prices! For furniture drop off, please call ahead. 279-2113 ask for Janet.

Township of Central Frontenac Attention all Residents Effective immediately Central Frontenac Township now accepts electronic waste at the Olden and Oso Waste Disposal Sites free of charge. Also Central Frontenac now accepts all milk cartons, tetra packs, paper coffee cups and juice boxes. These items all go into the paper bin.

The Township of Central Frontenac performs winter highway maintenance and will not be responsible for damages to mail boxes, newspaper boxes or parked cars where the said boxes or vehicles interfere with the snowplowing of Township roads.

Starting January 2nd 2012, bulk Styrofoam will also be accepted free of charge at the Olden and Oso waste sites. Bulk Styrofoam is from around appliances, TV’s and other large items. It does not include coffee cups; take out dishes, packing peanuts, etc. These smaller items continue to go into the waste stream.

Parking of vehicles on Township roads and village streets from 12:00 midnight to 7:00 a.m. will not be permitted from December 15, 2010 until April 15, 2012. The prohibition of parking applies to the entire road right of way, normally 10 metres or 33’ from the centre of the road.

Effective immediately clean lumber, brush, stumps and leaf and yard waste will not be accepted at the Oso and Olden Waste Disposal Sites. These items can be disposed of free of charge at the Hinchinbrooke Transfer Station.

Pursuant to Section 181 of the Highway Traffic Act “No person shall deposit snow or ice on a roadway without permission in writing so to do from the the road authority responsible for the maintenance of the road.” The fine associated with this offence is $90.00 plus a $25.00 surcharge. Your cooperation is requested to avoid prosecution. Mike Richardson, Public Works Manager, Township of Central Frontenac Box 89, 1084 Elizabeth St, Sharbot Lake, ON  K0H 2P0 613-279-2935 ext 223

The 2012 “free load of garbage” dates are now in place. Residents may take one load of free garbage per property per year with a residential dwelling on it to either the Olden or Oso Waste Disposal Sites. Residents can use either the spring or fall period to use their free load. The spring session runs from the Saturday before the May long weekend to the Sunday following the May long weekend (May 12th-May 27th). The fall session runs from the Saturday before the Labour Day weekend to the Sunday following the Labour Day weekend (August 25th- September 9th). The waste sites will be open their normal hours during these times.


THE FRONTENAC NEWS

PAGE 10

Received for Information – Addington

SOCIAL NOTES BIRTHDAY

MARRIAGE ANNOUNCEMENT

Come join in the Surprise

MOORE - MORISON

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Birthday Celebration for Lois Pero at Verona Free Methodist Chuch January 7th, 2012 from 1-4 pm. Best Wishes Only

Happy 60th Birthday

Ken McGonegal

IN MEMORIAM

Dec. 22/2011

Elliott, Frances

Love Penny

In loving memory of a dear wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother

CARD OF THANKS

Your presence we miss Your memory we treasure Loving you always Forgetting you never.

Thank You

Sadly missed by Floyd, Denise & family, Eric & family, Robbie & family

OBITUARY

Clancy: Lena Mildred

Peacefully with her family at her side, at Lennox & Addington County Hopspital, on December 9, 2011. Born in Tamworth beside the Salmon River, on December 9, 1915, the daughter of the late Lucy (Thompson) and G. Wesley Good. She will be missed by her children Eldon Clancy, Bonita (Bob) Goddard and Carson Clancy; her grandchildren Brett, Rachel, Travis, Michelle, Keith and Amanda; stepgrandchildren Tina, Lisa and Sheri; 8 great grandchildren; her brother Charles Good and sister Verna Decock. Predeceased by her husband Gerald; her son Joseph Wesley; sisters Ethel Kennedy and Myrtle Davis; brothers Earl, Don and George Good. Mrs Clancy rested at the Cassidy Funeral Home, Tweed, on Tuesday, December 13 from 10am until time of service, presided by James Ginn, Jacques Secour and Bob Goddard, at 1pm. Interment Henderson Cemetery. Pallbearers were Owen Deline, Brett Goddard, Doug Clancy, Wayne Good, Dennis Scott and Keith Clancy. Honourary pallbearer was Clifford Gurnsey.

FUNERAL SERVICES

Maschke Funeral Home Northbrook

(613) 336-6873 1-888-336-3725 www.maschkefuneralhome.com

The Festival of Trees Committee would like to thank all the sponsors and participants for their donations and entries. Without you there would be no Festival of Trees. A thank you to all the entertainers for donating their time and sharing their talent with us. The public participation was overwhelming and resulted in very successful benefits for Villages Beautiful and the North Frontenac Bank. Thank you and Merry Christmas everyone!

Thank You - Gillam St. James Major Roman Catholic Hall was rocking on Nov. 19th as friends & family from far and near gathered together to wish me a Happy 60th. I was overcome by this surprise, shocked & speechless. What an evening and all the hard work behind the scenes mountains of food; heartwarming speeches & some embarrassing moments of my youth being recalled. Sisters do get even! It was quite the video presentation down memory lane for my last 6 decades; and music that kept everyone hopping. My heartfelt thanks to the Central Frontenac Volunteer Firefighters who tended the bar; all those who worked behind the scenes with most notable mention-Joy & Brian; and to Lakeside B&B, Rockhill B&B, and the Sharbot Lake Country Inn for your hospitality and accommodation. As Scott once wrote in an essay, "Family is more than just what goes on inside a household. It's the people all around, the ones you hang out with, celebrate with, the ones you may not see every day but the ones you know will always be there for you when you need it most. It's your community, the people that support you and the things you do that make you who you really are." This evening was a true testament to these words. Thank you. A very Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays to all! Sincerely, Dawn Gillam FUNERAL SERVICES

Trousdale Funeral home Proudly serving all faiths Pre-Arranged Funeral Plans

Sydenham, On 613-376-3022

www.trousdalefuneralhome.com

Highlands Council, Dec. 19 By Jeff Green hen a township council wants to reject a request for money or support, or ignore the recommendation of a consultant, government body or even a member of their own staff, they have a polite way of doing so. They simply ignore whatever the request for action is, and receive the correspondence “For Information”. In response to an email from an outfit called the Dimestore Fisherman asking for a cash donation and five days’ free accommodation in order to have a TV show filmed in Addington Highlands, Councilor Bill Cox said “Motion to receive for information” and everyone put up their hand. To a request for support for a meeting with the Ministry of Natural Resources to address a lack of enforcement of hunting and fishing violations, it was Councilor Helen Yanch’s to turn to make a motion to “receive the request for information”, which council did. Council also received for information a supplemental report from a consultant after they had complained that the consultant’s report on recycling in the township had overstated the costs of their program and misunderstood the way it works. “He said he made some changes to the report, but it doesn’t look like he did much of anything,” said Henry Hogg after the report was received. Township will not clean up other peo-

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The families of John Moore and Brittany Morison would like to announce their marriage, which took place on September 24, 2011, in Westport at The Stepping Stone Inn. Congratulations on a beautiful day.

DECEmber 22, 2011

Serving the area for over 100 years.

David Goodfellow Owner/Managing Director

Parham, Ontario

613-375-6254

ple’s messes – A motion to have the public works department clean up a large amount of garbage, including chesterfields, tires and other large items on a dead end road that is a boundary road with North Frontenac, was defeated. Denbigh Waste site still waiting for Certificate of Approval - Works Manager Royce Rosenblath reported that work has been completed on a leachate pond at the Denbigh waste site. “We have done everything that the Ministry of the Environment has asked us to do, and we will wait for them to either find something else they want us to do or give us our certificate so we can proceed.” New tendering plan - The township is planning to go to tender early in 2012 to find vendors of record for specific kinds of smaller jobs, so when jobs need to be completed as quickly as possible, they can simply hire the vendor instead of having to wait through a tendering process. Library work to commence – The township has received the cheque for $72,000 from the Trillium Foundation, and renovation work at the new Denbigh Recreation Centre to accommodate the library’s move to the centre will commence in January. (Editor’s Note: Addington Highlands Council will be meeting on January 3 at 1pm at the Flinton Recreation Centre, during the News’ hiatus, and we will not have a report from that meeting).

North Frontenac Long Term Service Awards

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n December 12, North Frontenac presented its Long Service Awards for 2011. Recipients include: Tamara Vladimirova - 15 years (photo at right with Mayor Bud Clayton), Steve Dunham – Fire Volunteer 10 years, Josh Wheeler – Fire Volunteer 10 years

The old man’s Christmas gift By Father Raby (submitted by Marg DesRoche) Every year at Christmas time, To make the manger scene complete, An old man placed an offering At the Christ child’s feet.

I had a shawl to keep me warm. “Twill make the Christ child smile. But a little girl cried from the cold, So I lent it for a while.

It was his way of showing, As he so often told, How he welcomed Christ the Lord As the Magi did of old.

I had gloves, too, so warm and soft, I thought you would enjoy. I saw small hands so blue with cold, I gave them to the boy.

But this year there was no thing To gift wrap or to leave. And he pondered as he made his way To church on Christmas Eve.

I know, I thought, I’ll give some time To keep you company. But a sick old friend prevented that, For he kept calling me.

What can I give you, Jesus As a gift this Christmas time? I have no gold or incense, Not even bread and wine.

He stood by the manger with empty hands, And in sorrow shook his head. Though his lips were still and no words came His mind in sadness said:

I’d like to give a present I’d give anything to part With something fine and precious, To show it’s from my heart. I had a coin of value, Kept and treasured for this day. I’d have it now except I gave it To a beggar on the way. ACROSS

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Big stories Lava lamp inspiration German steel city Starbucks, e.g. Annual NHL game Sergeant or corporal One of the Seven Dwarfs Long-haired bovine Suit piece Dec 25 is this for Christina and Christos Quiet-mouse connector Naughty child Atlas abbrev. Duration Spelling of television A-apple connector College girls Potent starter Certain flower fruit Being part of a scheme Actor Phil ___ (Jingle All The Way) Couch potato Singer Horne Not all Traverse Charged atoms Christmas With ___ Mouskouri (1972) Melbourne greeting Affirmative vote Part of an e-mail address Wine container Just gets by Calculate Christmas leftover I'm home! Kids, sometimes First stops for some Christmas shoppers Foe of Caesar Not sans Fireplace screen feature www.cancross.com, e.g. Sigh of pity Pound sound

18 I had a precious jewel 19 That sparkled in the sun. 20 21 22 A perfect25 gift at last I thought, 26 For God’s27 Immortal Son.

31 28 But a widow and her children 34 29 30 37 Called at39 my door today, 31 32 40 33 Hungry, homeless, penniless, 41 34 42 35 I gave the43 jewel away. 36 44 45 52 53 54 55

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A Promise for You “Fling 6059wide the gates, open 51 61 the ancient doors, and the5655king 62 57 of glory6463 will come in” Psalm 24: 9 58 59 65 67 68 76 79 80 81 82

Fear not my friend, from the manger spoke The child with a smile you could see. What you have given to those in need, You already gave to me.

DOWN

He was so1 Christmas hungry, I could see, present that 1 Mend socks might cuddle coo 2 Genus of olives He really looked it and too. 5 Count of drummers 3 This begins 46 days drumming before Easter So I gave11the coin saved This is often that striped Iathad 4 Casino command Christmas 5 The Polar Express, e.g. To give this to you. 16 On year the sheltered side 6 Desire 17 Receivers of news on 7 Anxious Santa's progress Maker of some Christmas trees Monopoly fee They are heard on high Shepherd's charge Front lawn displays Count of lords a-leaping Santa ___ winds With a ___ as big as a kite They make the sky bright With a ___cob pipe and a button nose Marsh gas Suggest Melville novel Filled with delight Without water Third-day gifts Reply to Parson Brown They precede the lords a-leaping Sounds of hesitation O ___ Night Route This begins on the 4th Sunday before Christmas The ox and lamb kept this Christmas Spirit singer Summer Come On Christmas singer Dwight ___ Telephone abbrev. SantaLand Diaries, e.g. Sermon ender Island on a river Network that popularized It's a Wonderful Life Then one foggy Christmas Eve, ___ Toy that is sometimes called Robbie Works over a hot stove Like Mr. Grinch Concert hall Least talkative

It’s Christmas time again dear Lord, And I have nothing left to give, The things I had, I gave away To help some others live.

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Brian's Canadian Crossword Copyright (c) 2011 Brian E. Paquin

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www.cancross.com

E 86

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THE FRONTENAC NEWS

DECEmber 22, 2011

PAGE 11

Sharbot Lake Community Improvement Plan Sydenham & District Lions help bring Christmas to the community by Julie Druker

County intern Jenny Liu, Anne Marie Young and Peter Young

I

n a two back-to-back public meetings held at Oso hall on Dec. 14, county council staff members Anne Marie Young and Peter Young along with guests from the Front of Yonge community, which is located between Brockville and Kingston, made their presentations highlighting plans for upcoming community improvements in Sharbot Lake. Peter Young and Anne Marie Young are spearheading the Sharbot Lake Community Improvement Plan (CIP) in partnership with the Township of Central Frontenac. In their presentation, they outlined the proposed plan, a municipal document under the Planning Act whose goal is to encourage and stimulate economic development and community revitalization through financial incentives and funding programs aimed at projects unique to the community. Peter Young spoke of the ability of the CIP to address issues like preservation and adaptive use of heritage and industrial buildings; environmental assessment of brownfields; remediation and redevelopment; facade and structural improvements to commercial and other buildings; and downtown/waterfront revitalization. The plan hopes to allow municipalities to facilitate and encourage community change in a coordinated manner by focusing on local initiatives and priorities, and by creating partnerships between the private sector and community groups. Peter Young hoped the presentation would invite input from the community, and provide feedback regarding specific goals that people here are looking toward. “So far signage has been a pretty important issue that people are talking

Water

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The Front of Yonge contingent, l-r, Joan Ruman, John Rhodes, Roger Haley and Richard Marcoux about, “ he said, “specifically the need for signage pointing towards the locations of area businesses and also local recreation facilities. Another issue raised was the empty buildings existing throughout the community, which remain tenant-less, and the public desire to develop some kind of incentive to get those building filled.” The topic of community branding was also raised, Young reported, specifically the desire to link the smaller villages in the township. Some who attended the meeting also brought up the idea of focusing on cottagers and tourism to create more economic development. Following the presentation was a related report by representatives of the Front of Yonge community, who are participating in the First Impressions Community Exchange program along with a team from the Sharbot Lake community. The First Impressions program is funded by OMAFRA and designed to assist communities who are aiming to make community improvements. The FoY team had many positive things to say about Sharbot Lake, which they visited in October. Front of Yonge mayor, Roger Haley, highlighted Sharbot Lake’s strengths: namely, its attractive waterfront setting; its strong infrastructure (though he did mention that some of the local roads could use some work); its plethora of social, recreational and emergency services; ample parking; its friendly service providers and well-maintained residential properties; attractive public murals and more. On the downside they mentioned that nowhere could they find a bin to recycle and/or dispose of their lunch refuse. They also spoke of the need for better directional signage; the need for an improved washroom facility; the general lack of retail options; and the need for more aggressive advertising on the website. The Sharbot Lake CIP is still in its very early stages and the Young team in the near future will be hitting the streets, walking door to door and speaking to local business and property owners in person to let them know of the CIP and the programs that will be available to help them undertake the improvements that they would like to make and reach their desired goals.

WELL WATER SOLUTIONS & PLUMBING REPAIR Pumps & Pressure Systems, Water Purification, Plumbing Repairs,

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613•375•6705

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Steve Tarasick, residence

(613) 267-1752 Fax: (613) 267-1959  1-866-699-1799

613•375•8290

51 Industrial RD, Perth, Ontario K7H 3P2 1525 John Counter BLVD, Kingston, ON K7M 3L5

(613) 544-3335 Fax: (613) 544-3304  1-877-544-3335

www.ecoaltenergy.com

SOLAR & WIND

MicroFIT & Off-Grid Systems Since 2005 24719 Hwy. 7, Sharbot Lake, ON, K0H 2P0 613-279-1076 or 866-976-3749 e-mail: sharbotlake@ecoaltenergy.com Electrical Contractor ESA Lic. 7006273

A

t their regular monthly dinner meeting held at the Sydenham Town hall on Dec. 19, members of the Sydenham and District Lions presented a cheque for $1000 to Sue Clinton, chair of the Loughborough Christmas and Emergency Relief Fund. The fund assists members of the community who require emergency relief on a number of fronts. The organization, which is run by six volunteers, has been serving the community for 23 years. The Lions donation will be used by the organization specifically for their Christmas basket program, which ensures that all members of the community can enjoy a generous Christmas dinner with all the fixings. The over 65 baskets that will going out this year also include a gift for each child in the family, a book for each teen, and food supplies to help the families get through the holiday season. The funds donated were raised by the Lions through their Christmas poinsettia sales and represent just one more way that the Sydenham and District Lions strive to meet specific needs of the local community. Lions president Dave Almas said, after making the cheque presentation, “Our motto is: We Serve and helping the community is really what we are all about. With that in mind, we are more than happy to help support an organization like this one, which does so much for members of the community who are in need, especially at this time of the year. ”

STORRING

SEPTIC SERVICE LTD. Pumping of septic & holding tanks Licenced by M.O.E. since 1972

(613) 379-2192 Tamworth

Employment Service Resumé Writing | Job Search Strategies | Job Postings

To better serve you, we have a special holiday schedule.

Tarasick Carpentry & Cabinets General Contracting Kitchen & Bathroom Cabinets

Sue Clinton receives a cheque from Dave Almas

We will be open:

December 23 December 28 December 29

8:30 - 1:00 8:30 - 3:30 8:30 - 3:30

Happy Holidays Gray Brothers Construction

Mountain Grove, Ontario, K0H 2E0 COTTAGE ROADS, EXCAVATIONS, SEPTIC SYSTEMS. TRUCK, LOADER, BACKHOE RENTALS, CEMENT GRAVEL, BEACH SAND, TOPSOIL, ETC.

HUGH GRAY 613-335-5366

Your job is out there. We’ll help you find it.

For more information or to register contact the Sharbot Lake Resource Centre at 1099 Garrett Street (613)545-3949 press 4 or email essl@sl.on.ca

employmentservice.sl.on.ca This Employment Ontario program is funded by the Ontario government.


PAGE 12

FRONTENAC NEWS Eastern Ontario’s Space Heating & Solar Energy Specialists

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A Merry Christmas to All!

Season’s Greetings

Here's hoping all of you enjoy a thoroughly happy holiday season!

Clelebrate that ChrIstmas feeling! We happily express our thoughts of thanks for your business this past year.

Jeff, Jennifer & Staff

Management & Staff,

   Jeff’s Auto Glass

Northbrook

Windows & Doors A Division Of K&S Supply Ltd.

15 Lanark Road (613) 264-9266 Perth, ON, K7H 2R9

Season's Greetings

DECEMBER 22, 2011

IDEULWHF We’re all aglow with the spirit of Christmas and we want to share it with you. Thanks. Merry Christmas and A Happy New Year Doug, Jane, & Staff

• With Rona’s purchasing power we can offer the highest quality cabinetry and hardware at the lowest possible price • Styles and accessories for every budget • In store design specialist • 3D computer concept • DIY or have our expert team do the installation

Hook’s

(613) 336-8416 www.hooksrona.com 13586 Hwy 41 Between Northbrook & Cloyne

Holiday Greetings Best wishes to all our customers! Looking forward to providing you great food and excellent service in the new year. Frank & Sandra White & Family

Closed: Sat. Dec. 24 up to & including Fri. Dec. 30 Open: Sat. Dec. 31 at 6pm for Dinner & Show Featuring The Wolfgang Brothers Blue Grass

Cloyne, ON

Closed: Jan. 1, 2012

Sharbot Lake Country Inn Sharbot Lake  613-279-2198

Happy Holidays! Thanks for letting us light up your Christmas. Wishing you a Healthy & Prosperous New Year!

Our sincerest thanks to our valued customers for your continued support. N

Plevna

Ron, Anne, Family & Staff

E

W

Family Restaurant S

7325 Hwy 506 Plevna, ON 613-479-2603

Merry Christmas and a

Happy New year

As we open our hearts and homes this season, we welcome in the joy of the holidays. Thanks for your valued business.

Merry Christmas

We wish to thank all our customers for a most successful year. To each of you a very Merry Christmas and prosperity in all the coming years.

Sharbot Lake ON  1-613-279-1076  1-866-976-3749

M e rr y Christmas

Tarasick Carpentry General contracting

Parham 613•375•6705

From all of us at Ram’s Esso Sharbot Lake - 613-279-2827

This Christmastide let's say a prayer... For Peace, Love, and Happiness everywhere.

From

DiCola Petroleum & Staff 613-267-1604


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S1

3rd Place Ages 8-10: Tia Hyndman, ► age 10, grade 5, Prince Charles PS.

▲2nd Place Ages 4-5: Sophie Ranson, Senior Kindergarten, Loughborough PS.

▲ 3rd Place Ages 6-7: Jenna Norman, grade 2, Loughborough PS. 2nd Place Ages 8-10: Madisen, ► grade 5, Prince Charles PS.

▲ 3rd Place Ages 4-5: Mackenzie Drew, age 5, Kindergarten, Land O’Lakes PS.

▲2nd Place Ages 6-7: Lexa Shelter, Grade 2, Loughborough PS

▲2nd Place Ages 11+: Shay, age 13, grade 8, Land O’Lakes

▲3rd Place Ages 11+: Brianna Campbell, grade 6, Hinchinbrooke PS.

Have a VerY Merry Christmas From outdoor fun to inner peace and joy, all the best to you this holiday season

Wishing you and all your loved ones a very Merry Christmas. The Furnace Broker Frank Domen, Lloyd Lee & Families Godfrey, ON 613-374-2566

Doug Brown, Lloyd Lee & Staff

8109 RD. 38, Godfrey, ON K0H 1T0  Tel: 613-374-5604


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S2

A memorable “Walk” to first century Bethlehem in Verona W ith a cast of 28 characters, the Verona Free Methodist Church’s third annual “Walk to the First Christmas” once again delighted guests, who were treated to a journey back in time to the historic day of Jesus' birth. The over 150 guests who participated in the walk were guided by a narrator through the church, which had been elaborately transformed into various sets depicting the scenes that led up to the birth of Jesus. Guests visited the manger in Bethlehem, King Herod’s throne room, a Bedouin tent in the desert, and many more indoor and outdoor scenes, each boasting its own set of characters who acted out the story of Jesus’ birth. Robed in typical dress of that time, the characters, played by members of the church’s congregation, included Joseph, Mary, Elizabeth, Gabriel, a choir of angels, shepherds, three wise men and a very imposing King Herod, who lorded over a sumptuous meal that he invited guests to share with him in his guarded throne room. The meal was a definite highlight of the evening, in which guests were treated to an authentic first century supper that included matzo ball soup, dried fish and manna bread, honey cake, roast beef and other delicious and timeless munchies. The tour began at the scene where guests first come

Holiday Greetings

upon Mary, who is visited by the angel and told of the child that she will soon give birth to. We follow Mary to her meeting with Elizabeth and then later to her meeting with Joseph, with whom she shares her news. We next follow the couple to the manger in Bethlehem where baby Jesus is born, and on the way witness a group of shepherds visited by a choir of angels, telling of the Messiah’s birth. The angels appeared from behind a black curtain, dramatically back-lit in their flowing white robes and surrounded by exquisite angel dolls suspended from the ceiling overhead. After enjoying the elaborate meal in King Herod’s throne room, we next followed the wise men outside of the church to a dark and cozy Bedouin tent where the three wise men bestow their gifts. This scene brought our walk to a close. This was the third year that the church has put on the event, which was the brain child of long-time VFMC board member and youth leader Scott Ball. According to Scott, the event takes roughly two months, and hundreds of hours to get up and running. Ball's goal every year is to bring something new to it. Though he was hoping for the addition of live farm animals to this year’s walk, that unfortunately did not pan out. However, the event remains remarkable for its creators’ attention to detail, including the first century meal at King Herod’s throne room. The menu was painstaking researched and included ingredients and

by Julie Druker

recipes that would have been eaten at that time in history. “I've gone to Bible college and done a lot of studying and what I tend to see in a lot of churches is that for events like these the guests are often just sitting in seats and hearing the story in a very passive way. I wanted to do something different, in a way that gets people involved in the learning, where they can walk literally side by side with the characters as the story unfolds and actually become an integral part of the action”, Scott said. The event ran on Dec. 16 and 17 and the play was performed numerous times by a hard working and dedicated cast and crew that included a very amiable group of kitchen servers in Herod’s kitchen. Thankfully the king decided to spare them on account of the excellent meal they prepared. I asked Scott what he hopes guests will leave with, other than a belly full of authentic first century AD fare. “One thing I really hope is that people will come away with a sense of just how humble Jesus' birth was, along with a sense of what it might have been like to have lived back in that time, when life was quite a bit more difficult.” The event is indeed one of a kind and that was Scott's aim. No doubt next year he will add a few more changes that will keep the crowds coming back for another First Century Walk In Verona.

Happy Holidays To all our friends and customers, old and new. North Frontenac Pet Supply Your authorized Sears Catalogue Outlet 14628 Rd 38, Sharbot Lake

279-3177

Season Greetings from the Council and Staff of the Township of North Frontenac Township office CLOSED 12 Noon, December 23rd until Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012 Be sure to regularly visit the Township’s website for:

tes regular news upda

I wish to thank all of my customers for a most successful year. To each of you a very Merry Christmas and prosperity in all the coming years. Thank you.

the community directory the photo gallery, submit your photos! hours and contacts quick reference maps digital agendas and minutes

www.NorthFrontenac.ca

From Rick, Bev, Miranda & Staff

Gibson's Garage

24709A Hwy 7, Sharbot Lake  613-279-2727

Because the goodwill of those we serve is the foundation of our success, it is a real pleasure during the holiday season to say “THANK YOU” as we wish you a full year of Happiness & Success! Lake District Realty Corp., Brokerage The Waterfront Company™ www.LakeDistrictRealty.com 1-866-279-2109

Real Estate Brokerage Sharbot Lake, ON

613279-2657

Mimi Antoine, Broker of Record www.antoinerealestate.com

A special WELCOME to all the new members of our community.


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S3

Something to be proud of at NAEC by Julie Druker

At the NAEC's final Pride Assembly for 2011, which took place on December 16, four young students were invited by the school's vice principal Mr. John Mooney to present a cheque to Carolyn Hasler, Chair of the Flinton Relay for Life. The cheque for $1734 will benefit cancer research, and represents the total amount that the 219 elementary students at the school raised at this year’s Terry Fox run, which took place in October. Cheque presenters included: from grade two, Emma Mc Fadden; from grade three Sasha Berndt, and Jakob Acosta-Vlasic; and from grade four Sierra Baldachin. The four students were chosen to make the presentation, since together they have raised close to $3,000 by cutting and donating their hair to either Locks for Love or Angel Hair for Children, two organizations that make wigs for patients who have lost their hair while undergoing cancer treatment. The four students’ efforts, along with the cheque, brings the school’s total to just under $5,000, something the school can definitely be proud of. Following the presentation, student Sierra Baldachin invited her dad Sean to the stage to assist her in cutting off her 86 cm waist-length locks, which she has been growing since birth. Sierra’s grandmother died from cancer, and Sierra recalled the self-consciousness her grandmother experienced due to hair loss while undergoing her treatments. So for Sierra, cutting off her own locks made perfect sense. “I'll miss having long hair and I won't be able to do as much with what is left but I know that getting it cut will definitively change some people’s lives and that makes it all worth while.” NAEC Vice Principal Mr. Mooney had nothing but praise for the efforts of the students at the school. “Part of the education we teach today is character education, which is all about helping students to see how they can make a difference and be a positive force in society. So by publicly recognizing and celebrating both the students’ group and individual efforts, I feel that we are showing them that they can indeed make a positive difference in the world.” The school held their annual Christmas concert on Dec. 21, and guests were encouraged to bring non-perishable food items that will be donated to the local food bank.

Season's Greetings No matter where you journey for Christmas, may you be blessed with the peace & joy of this special season.

Above: Sierra’s dad, Sean Baldacchin assists in her Locks for Love donation at NAEC. At right, NAEC students Emma, Sierra, Sasha and Jakob present a cheque to Carolyn Hasler

Vintage wedding dresses, quilts needed S

harbot Lake United Church will celebrate our 125th anniversary in 2012. In conjunction with the Heritage Festival we hope to have a display of wedding dresses from the past 125 years. If you have a wedding dress or one belonging to your mom, grandmother or great grandmother, we would like to put them on display in the church for the Heritage Festival in February. If you could include a write-up of the wedding, and it possible, a picture would be appreciated. We are looking for dresses dating from 1970 back to the late 1800s. We would also like to have a display of old quilts in the centre, who made them and what family they belong to. Please call the church office 613-279-2245 or Dianne Lake at 613-279-2991. (submitted by Dianne Lake)

Santa Will Be Right Down!

Hang the stockings, trim the tree, and enjoy your gifts! Thanks friends. Merry Christmas from Dale & Murry Northey

▲Drawing by Erika Wood, 5, Land o’Lakes PS

Christmas quotes: Perhaps the best Yuletide decoration is being wreathed in smiles. - Author Unknown

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year to all my friends & relatives. Winnie Martin

Greetings from John, Eleanor & Staff

Nowell

Motors LTD.

A very happy & joyous holiday season to all our friends & neighbours

More to Go ON.TM

14165 Hwy. 41 N, Cloyne 613-336-2547

Lombard Manor

Edith & Tom Olmstead

Happy Holidays from Happy Holidays from our "HOME" to yours!

Thanks for your support, from the staff of

Lookout Hardware Building Centre Plevna, Ontario  613-479-5579


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S4

COMMUNITY REPORTERS (613) Arden.....................................Joan Moore............... 335-2015 Cloyne...................................Marion Collier........... 336-3223 Crow Lake.............................Debbie Jones........... 279-2226 Marion Ratzinger...... 279-2986 Denbigh............... .................Alice Madigan........... 333-9542 Godfrey................ .................Jean Campbell.......... 374-5718 Harrowsmith..........................Kelly Calthorpe......... 372-1655 Henderson.............................Jean Brown............... 336-2516 Georgina Wathen..... 336-9641 Kaladar/Northbrook................................... columnist needed Maberly-Bolingbroke.............Karen Prytula............ 325-1354 Mississippi.............................Pearl Killingbeck....... 278-2127 Mountain Grove.....................Marilyn Meeks.......... 335-4531 Ompah...................................Linda Rush............... 479-2570 Parham-Tichbome.................Colleen Steele.......... 375-6219 Christine Teal............ 375-6525 Plevna...................................Katie Ohlke............... 479-2797 Sydenham.............................Anita Alton................ 376-6333 Verona...................................Debbie Lingen.......... 374-2091 Zealand.................................Jean Lewis................ 268-2452

DENBIGH Alice Madigan

613-333-9542 ali-cj.madigan@sympatico.ca · The Denbigh/Griffith Lions Club is hosting its New Year’s Eve Party, Saturday December 31 starting at 9pm with a champagne toast and buffet at midnight. Tickets are $15 per person. For tickets or further info please contact Gail at 613-333-2224. · Upcoming events for January include the Denbigh Diners Club on Monday the 2nd, Music-In-The-Hall on Sunday the 8th, Lions Club Bingo on Tuesday the 10th and 24th, Lions Club Food & Fellowship on Wednesday the 18th and Denbigh Euchre on Friday the 13th and 27th. · Merry Christmas everyone and a Happy New Year!

MOUNTAIN GROVE Marilyn Meeks 613-335-4531 email: marilynarchie@sympatico.ca

· Sympathy to the family of Mel Love, loved father of Scott and David. Sympathy also to the family of Mona Hodgson (Ball) daughter of the late Stan and Myrtle Ball. · Thinking of Tom Wilson, Lyn Uens, Betty Tarney, Frances Badour, Lorna Gray, Vivian Bertrim, Louise Meeks, Violet Cooke. · Land o’ Lakes seniors held their Christmas dinner on

Wishing you peace and joy at Christmastime

Arden Batik Sarah Hale

December 14. After a delicious dinner the seniors were entertained by Ray Whitelock and Bob Goodberry. A big thank you to the caterers, Tim and Penny Cota and helper Candace Bertrim. Thanks also to the president John Purdon, Treasurer Jean Brown, Seceretary, Theresa O’Connor · Merry Christmas to all and a healthy New Year. I wish to express holiday greetings to my five Ds Deb, Diana, Danny, Dale, Duane and my parents Fred and Joyce Smith.

Zealand Jean Lewis

613-268-2452

· Christmas time has come again and we are busily preparing for family and friends. We bring out our favourite recipes and brush off the old traditions we carry on from year to year. There are tree ornaments made by our children that simply must be hung again and others that hold past memories. From Zealand we want to wish everyone a joyous holiday and a healthy New Year. “For unto us a child is born, unto us a Son is given.”

Come with me

Come with me to another year When we were free of cares, The only things that filled our heads Were toys and teddy bears. We wrote our lists for Santa Claus In hopes that he might find That we’d been good all through the year So sweet and nice and kind. We’d sit and dream beside the tree With branches lush and green. The lights would glow and sparkle bright It made a festive scene. So come with me down memory lane Let’s throw the years aside Let sugar plums and toys galore Within our hearts abide.

SYDENHAM Anita Alton

613-376-6333 rideauraingutter@yahoo.com

· Plan to ring in the new year at the Sydenham Legion. There is a dance featuring the Jaywalkers; buffet and a bus ride home - all for $25 per person. · This is a fun and festive season and if you find yourself at an event that will have you enjoying some spirits remember Operation Rednose. This free service will bring you and your car home safely. They do take donations - and are operating weekends and New Year’s Eve. Call 544-7447 to book a ride or if you want to be a driver. They won’t come out to Sydenham, but if you are in town they will bring you out here. Good to know.. · Whatever Christmas and the holidays mean to you -

Thinking of you, and wishing you happiness at Christmas time and all through the year.

Arden Pottery

Wishing you Love

Joanne, Pat, Luke & Emma

Happiness

MABERLYBOLINGBROKE Karen Prytula 613-325-1354 karenprytula@sympatico.ca · Maberly United Church invites you to an early Christmas Eve service on Friday, Dec. 23 at 7 p. m. in the hall at Maberly. Enjoy an evening with friends and neighbours singing carols and hearing, once again, the Christmas story. Everyone is welcome. Free will offering. · Ian at the Fall River Restaurant would like to invite you out Wednesday nights for a Bluegrass Jam. The Fall River Restaurant is interested in promoting and exposing local musicians to the community they live in. The Jam runs from 6pm to 10pm so come on out and enjoy the live music. · On Sunday, Jan. 8, at the Maberly Hall, the Blue Skies Community Fiddle Orchestra, Prep Orchestra and Celtic Heritage Orchestra will make the rafters ring with their annual “Little Christmas” concert at 2:30pm. Guitars, mandolins, penny whistles, viola, cello, drums and singers join in the music. Admission is $5 (children under 12 free). You won’t want to miss this lively and joyous event. · The Althorpe Bolingbroke Community Hall will host a music jam and community potluck on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012 from 1 to 5 pm, with potluck dinner at 5:30 p.m. Come out to enjoy an afternoon of music and dancing, come for the potluck dinner or enjoy both with friends and neighbours. Children are welcome. For information contact Glenn Russell, 273-2571. · I would like to thank all of you who contribute to this column in one format or another. I have received tremendous feedback over 2011and all of it good so I’d like to pass this acknowledgement on to you. Thank you! The community appreciates all the gatherings and celebrations, card games and potlucks, jamborees, choirs, dances, meetings and gatherings. Our readership has told me time and again that they like knowing what is going on in and around their community. By the way, deadline for this column is Sundays in 2012. Merry Christmas, everyone. See you in the New Year.

Godfrey Jean Campbell

613-374-5718

· Sympathy is extended to the family and friends of the late Melville Love of Godfrey, who passed away December 12. Sympathy also to the family of the late Mona (Hall) Hodgson, who also passed away on December 12. · Howard Wallace and granddaughter Casey Lansdell arrived home safely the past week after a trip to Huntsville, Ontario to bid farewell to Howard’s son Rodney and his wife Jan who have been transferred to Prince George B.C. because of his job. Good luck to all. · Christmas songs, bells and spirit highlighted the Open Mic program at Bedford Hall December 18. Talented Roberta Goodberry took advantage of the occasion to give out some of her beautiful hand crafted Christmas cards! Wilhelmine Card asked that a round of applause be given to Judy Murphy for keeping things running smoothly at the sessions. It was also nice to see Barry Calthorpe back, fit as a fiddle (no pun intended). He sure can play one well. The next Open Mic will be January 8, 2012. Merry Christmas to all. Tip this week - If you prefer the yolks of your hard boiled eggs to be dead centre, stir the eggs gently, but continuously, with a wooden spoon while you are cooking them to prevent the yolks from settling on one side.

Canadian Small Engines Hwy. 38 & Van Order  389-4658

Peace and Joy

Happy Holidays

throughout the holiday Season.

Whatever is beautiful; Whatever is meaningful; Whatever brings you happiness; May it be yours this holiday season and throughout

the coming year.

Thank You to Our Many Customers & Friends. Bishop Lake Outdoor Centre Sport & Variety The Yearwoods

enjoy it with the people who are special to you. Best wishes to all of you for a safe and happy Christmas and New Year!

613-336-2311

Brian Cassidy & Laurason Gunning

Cassidy’s Funeral Home Tweed  613-478-3807

May you rejoice in the spirit of Christmas. From Management & Staff


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011 Joanne Robertson, and Betty Lou Young. · Christmas Eve offers a variety of worship services for all ages, so be sure to check out the schedules and attend. Love and peace to all- Jean

MISSISSIPPI Pearl Killingbeck

613-278-2127

· It was a great afternoon at Sharbot Lake United Church last Tuesday as the UCW held their potluck luncheon. Approximately 30 people attended. The atmosphere was very Christmassy and there were skits and quizzes. · On Saturday evening approximately 90 people attended an appreciation dinner at Snow Road Snowmobile Club. There was a turkey dinner and music by “Country 4”. Everyone enjoyed the dancing by the wee tots. · On Dec. 18 the Mississippi Free Methodist Church held a lovely candlelight service with a potluck after. · Get well wishes to Peter D’Aoust. · I would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. All the best in 2012, and may your troubles last as long as your New Year’s resolutions.

HENDERSON

Jean Brown: 613-336-2516 Georgina Wathen: 613-336-9641 Photo: L to R. Virginia Weese and her Grandmother Bonnie, Sheila Deline and Virginia's Mom, Jill Weese are seen the recent Henderson United Church commu-

at nity

CLOYNE Marion Collier - 613-336-3223 Good news – Marion Collier has volunteered to be the new Cloyne & area reporter. We welcome Marion to the News. Her contact information is above, so please feel free to call her with your news.

ARDEN Joan Moore

613-335-2015 pinky24247@yahoo.ca

· Apologies to Brad and Robby, whom I mentioned in last week’s column – their last name is Stephenson, not as I had spelled it. · Dave Magill was down visiting Brad Stephenson. Will miss him as he went home to Toronto · Todd Pringle is coming home from Vancouver, BC for the holidays to spend time with his parents Dick and Jeanne Pringle. · Fun Raiser: Elly Peterson is putting on a Christmas Celebration at the Legion for the children. It is today, Thursday Dec. 22 at 4:30 to 8:30 with hot dogs and hot chocolate. They are going to decorate a tree after making the decorations-have dinner - and go caroling. So watch for them (if raining it will be inside the Legion) · Line dancing will resume on January 9 at 9:30 a.m. at Kennebec Community Centre. I would like to take this time to wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Remember - drive safe!

PARHAMTICHBORNE concert on Sunday evening. It was a fabulously spiritual and inspiring evening thanks to the talent of young and old. In particular, the youth group of Arden United and area led by Jennifer (Matson) Scott, Amanda Matson, and the Rev. Barbara Mahood-Young, along with teen and parental leaders and a large crew of area teens really rocked the stage with their modern interpretation of the birth of Jesus Christ. It made us think, laugh, and ponder the holy happening while seeing it with new eyes and an appreciation of God our heavenly Parent. Thanks. Also many talented musicians such as Ophelia Cooper, Lionel Grimard and Lorraine Shorts really got our toes tapping. I'm sure I've missed some names!! · Folks coming and going this week included Lionel Grimard and Eleanor Richman. Special thinking of you to

Season's Greetings Here's hoping this holiday is the start of a joy-filled New Year. Best wishes to all our Clients and Friends.

Crains' Construction Ltd.

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Colleen Steele: 613-3756219 Christine Teal: 613-375-6525 email: mrsteal2u@hotmail.com · The Mayflower Lodge will be having a Sing Song Carolling on Friday Dec. 23. If you are interested they are meeting at the IOOF Hall in Parham at 6:30pm and then returning to the hall for some hot chocolate. · Laughter filled the air on Saturday as District #4 Recreation Committee held their annual Kids Christmas Party at Hinchinbrooke. Special thanks to Santa for taking time out of his busy schedule to give each child their present and to elf Tammy and helpers for all their hard work in making this a great day. · The Parham United Church Sunday School held their Christmas program on Sunday and enjoyed some chili following. · Happy birthday to Aaron Lapointe. · Congratulations to Jesse Teal and Sarah Burke on their new bundle of joy. · Christmas concerts are happening this week at public schools in the area...Tuesday was Land o'Lakes, and Thursday is Hinchinbrooke's. · The room was filled to overflowing at the Grade 8 students and helpers hosted a Ham and Turkey bingo last Friday to raise funds for their graduation trip. Congratulations to all the winners, to Nicole Power who won the $100 raffle, to all those that bought Community Cookbooks and the homemade pies (which were yummy!!). What a glorious time of year Thank you to everyone for for one and all! their help in making this a

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great night for all. · Congratulations to new parents Dave and Kerri Courtney, on their baby girl, Madison Ray, born on Wednesday Dec 15. Ecstatic grandparents Brian and Cheryl Bertrim and Dan and Barb Courtney welcome their precious Madison. · We wish you a Merry Christmas and all the best in the New Year of 2012 from our house to yours.

VERONA

Debbie Lingen 613-374-2091 debbie@lingens.com · It is that magical season of the year, when the darkest time of the year can seem so bright. As we assemble with loved ones to enjoy the festive season, we can be thankful for so many things. One of the things I am thankful for is that we chose Verona to live in. There is so much going on. Each week brings new events and occasions to report in the column. The VCA, Lions Club, our churches and many other organizations in Verona are active the year round. Music concerts, jamborees, festivals ... a never-ending kaleidoscope of fun! And this is the time to thank the people who make Verona this exciting place to live in. The volunteers! We would be a very dreary village without our volunteers. We would not be able to hold these successful events. You make it happen. Kudos to our volunteers. You have a lot to be proud of. And if you have never volunteered, make 2012 the year to volunteer. · Join us on Christmas Day for a festive Christmas Dinner with all the trimmings. This free event is for everyone- from children to seniors. Pick up your free tickets now from Toppers or Verona Hardware. It is going to be a special day of togetherness filled with music, fun and great food. Verona Lions Hall. For info contact Joyce Casement, 613-374-3406. · Need a last minute stocking stuffer? "Find A Doc" Cookbooks for $10 can be purchased at: Something Cool Frozen Foods (Harrowsmith), Local Family Farms, Verona Drug Mart, Nicole's Gifts, Willow's Agriservices (Harrowsmith), Mom Restaurant and the Verona Medical Clinic. · There will be a New Year’s Eve Party at the Verona Lions Hall. December 31, 7 to 1 pm. DJ, light buffet and cash bar. $15 a ticket. All proceeds go to Christmas For Kids. For more information or tickets contact Bianca Sinclair 613-4846414, Dustin Pritchard 613-484-5974 or Geoff Crawford 613-329-7159. · Trinity United Church will be serving their popular "Winter Weekend Wake-Up Breakfasts" starting Saturday, January 7. Enjoy a good old fashioned home made breakfast and chat with friends and neighbours. Scrambled eggs, bacon, toast and fried potatoes for only $5. Plus your choice of tea, milk, juice, bagel, muffin or bottomless cup of coffee for $1 more. Conversation is free. Breakfast will be served from 9

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Greetings Best wishes to all my family, friends and neighbours.

Jean Campbell

Christmas Cheer

"Jesus Christ came to teach the people of the world... heavenly civilization and not material civilization. He breathed the breath of the Holy Spirit ino the body of the world and established and illumined civilization."

May your hearts be filled with love for all the peoples of the world! Happy Holidays from your Baha'i friends in North Frontenac

May you carry the hope of peace and love in your heart now and every day.

Township of Central Frontenac Council & Staff


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The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

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to 11 am. Trinity United Church, Verona. · The Christmas for Kids collection jars have been distributed throughout the village in various stores and businesses. Any unwrapped new toys, books and clothing can also be dropped off at the Verona Hardware Store. Your generosity will help make this a special Christmas for a lot of Verona and area children and their families. · My wish for all the Frontenac News readers echoes these best wishes from the poet D.M. Dillinger. "This is my wish for you: peace of mind, prosperity through the year, happiness that multiplies, health for you and yours, fun around every corner, energy to chase your dreams, joy to fill your holidays!"

PLEVNA Katie Ohlke 613-479-2797 kohlke@mazinaw.on.ca · Gary Weber celebrates his birthday on December 26 and Tamara Vladimirova celebrates on January 3! Happy Birthday to both of you. · Season’s Greetings to you and yours, and a Happy 2012! · Plevna Joke of the week: Adeline "Where did Santa go on vacation?" Evangeline "To a ho, ho, hotel!"

O come let us adore Him Your local churches welcome members of the community to share in worship celebrations with them for the Christmas season and beyond Friday December 23 MABERLY - CHRISTMAS CAROL SERVICE, community hall, sponsored by United Church, 7pm, freewill offering,

Community Christmas dinners by Jule Koch ho wouldn’t enjoy a completely FREE 336-1573. Christmas dinner that they didn’t have W SHARBOT LAKE - The 8th annual to cook? Once again this year, community Sharbot Lake dinner will be held once again volunteers will be happily cooking and serving up delicious Christmas feasts on Christmas Day itself, Sunday December 25, at three locations in our readership area. Their only request is that they have people to cook for! Community Christmas dinners are a great way to meet new people, to enjoy Christmas Day without all the work of cooking, and to just have fun. Everyone is invited and welcome. NORTHBROOK: The Northbrook dinner will be held at the Lions Hall at 1pm. Volunteers are needed to help prepare the dinner, and they should come to the hall from 10am on. Dinner deliveries are also available, please call Marylin Bolender at 613-

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or you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sakes He became poor, that you through His poverty might become rich - 2 Corinthians 8:9

Christmas Eve - Saturday Dec 24 ARDEN & COMMUNITY WESLEYAN CHURCH, Christmas Eve service 6:30pm ARDEN - United Church, 9pm, Christmas Eve Family Service ARDOCH – St. Kilian’s Church, Christmas Eve Mass 5pm BEDFORD - Sacred Heart Catholic Church 4:30 pm, Christmas Eve Mass, CLOYNE - Pineview Free Methodist Church, Christmas Eve, 6:30pm CLOYNE - United Church, Christmas Eve Lessons, Carols and Communion, 7.30pm. COLE LAKE Free Methodist Church, 6pm. DENBIGH - St. Luke’s United Church, Christmas Eve Service 7 pm FLINTON - Riverside United Family Service, 5.30pm FLINTON - St. Paul’s Anglican Church, 5pm, Christmas Eve Service, FLINTON – Through The Roof Ministries, Candlelight Service, 6pm. HARROWSMITH – St. Paul’s United Church Communion Service 7:30pm HARROWSMITH - Free Methodist Church, Candlelight Service, 6:30pm HENDERSON - United Church, Christmas Eve Family Service, 7:30pm, MATAWATCHAN - St Andrew’s, Christmas Eve, 4 pm MCDONALDS CORNERS – Knox Presbyterian Church, Christmas Eve, 7pm MOUNTAIN GROVE – United Church 6pm, Christmas Eve Family Service, OMPAH – United Church, Christmas Eve candlelight worship, 7pm PARHAM - United Church, Christmas Eve Service, 7pm, PARHAM - St. James Anglican Church, 3:30pm Nativity Pageant; 4pm Christmas Eve Holy Eucharist. PLEVNA - Holy Trinity Anglican Church Christmas Eve Service, 7pm, SHARBOT LAKE – Pentecostal Church Christmas Eve Service, 7pm SHARBOT LAKE - United Church. Carol Service, 7pm SHARBOT LAKE - St James Major Catholic Church, 7:30pm Christmas Eve Mass SHARBOT LAKE – St. Andrew’s Anglican Church, Christmas Eve Holy Eucharist 11pm, SYDENHAM - St. Paul’s Anglican Church 7pm, Family Christmas Eve Communion service VENNACHAR - Free Methodist Church Candlelight Service, Christmas readings and music, 7pm, VERONA - Free Methodist Church, Candlelight Christmas Eve Service, 7pm. VERONA Pentecostal Assembly Christmas Eve Service, 6pm. VERONA – Trinity United Church Family Service, 6pm

Christmas Day – Sunday Dec. 25 BEDFORD - CHRISTMAS DAY MASS, Sacred Heart Catholic Church 10am CLOYNE - Pineview Free Methodist Church, Christmas Day Service, 11am COLE LAKE Free Methodist Church, 10 AM

from 3-5 p.m. at the Oso Hall. This is a turkey and ham dinner with all the trimmings. Transportation to the dinner is available, and also delivery of Christmas dinners to anyone who is unable to attend. Please call by December 23 to arrange: Jule, 613-2792687; Wayne 613-375-6633 VERONA – The Verona dinner will be held at the Lions Hall. Doors open at 10:30am and dinner will be served at 12 noon. The dinner is open to Verona & area residents, who are invited for a day filled with fun and music. Please reserve by picking up your free tickets at Verona Hardware or Topper’s Convenience. Store. For more information call: Joyce at 613-374-3406.

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his is how the birth of Jesus Christ came about: His mother Mary was

pledged to be married to Joseph, but before they came together, she was found to be with child through the Holy Spirit. Because Joseph her husband was a righteous man and did not want to expose her to public disgrace, he had in mind to divorce her quietly.

DENBIGH - New Apostolic Church, 10:30am Christmas Service. FLINTON - Riverside United, 10am, Share the Good News of Christ’s Birth HARROWSMITH Free Methodist Church, Christmas Day Worship 10am. PARHAM Free Methodist Church, Fellowship 10:30 am; Christmas Service 11am PARHAM United Church, Christmas Day, shared service w/ Sharbot Lake & Maberly, 11am PLEVNA – River of Life Christian Fellowship, 10:30am, SHARBOT LAKE – Pentecostal Church Christmas Day Service, 10:30am, SHARBOT LAKE St Andrew’s Anglican Church, 10am, Christmas Lessons & Carols with Holy Eucharist SYDENHAM Holiness Church, Christmas Day service 11am SYDENHAM - St. Paul’s Anglican Church 10am-Christmas Day Eucharist, VERONA - Free Methodist Church, Christmas Service, 10am

Saturday Dec 31, New Year’s Eve BEDFORD – Sacred Heart R.C. Church, New Year’s Eve Mass, 4:30 pm, SHARBOT LAKE – NEW YEAR’S FAMILY TIME, family games, refreshments, Pentecostal Church 6-9pm, all welcome SHARBOT LAKE - St James Major Catholic Church, 7:30pm New Year’s Eve Mass VERONA - DINNER & GOSPEL CONCERT w/ Crimson River & The Proverbs, 6:30pm – midnight, Free Methodist Church, advance booking required, $35pp; 1-800-403-9755.

New Year’s Day January 1, 2012 BEDFORD – Sacred Heart R.C. Church, New Year’s Eve Mass, 10am. CLOYNE - Pineview Free Methodist Church New Year’s Day Service, 11am CLOYNE – United Church, New Years Day 10am, bring seasonal leftovers to share, games after worship. FLINTON - St Paul’s Anglican Church, 11am HARROWSMITH – St. Paul’s United Church 11am PLEVNA - Holy Trinity Church, 9am. SHARBOT LAKE – Pentecostal Church 10:30am VERONA – Trinity United Church, 9:15am,

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ut after he had considered this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, “Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will give birth to a son, and you are to give him the name Jesus, because he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what the Lord had said through the prophet: ”The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and they will call him Immanuel” - which means, “God with us.” hen Joseph woke up, he did what the angel of the Lord had commanded him and took Mary home as his wife. But he had no union with her until she gave birth to a son. And he gave him the name Jesus.

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- Matthew 1: 18-24

n those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to his own town to register.

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o Joseph also went up from the town of Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to Bethlehem the town of David, because he belonged to the house and line of David. He went there to register with Mary, who was pledged to be married to him and was expecting a child. While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.

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nd there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over

their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.”

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uddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests.” hen the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let’s go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.”

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o they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told. - Luke 2: 1-19


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011 Finding the magic of Christmas T

by Vennessa Lemke he innocence and the naiveté of children often amaze me, especially around the holiday season. As children get older, we parents search for ways to keep the magic of Christmas alive. When the kids are very young it is much easier to do. They see this time of year as a chance to have all their toy wishes granted by the great Santa Claus. They get to eat sweets in abundance that they otherwise only get in rations, and somehow they get to make more noise and mom and dad don't get so upset. To them it is wonderful. Then all of a sudden - and you know what I mean by "all of a sudden" - they are not toddlers anymore. They seem to have a mind of their own and start asking questions. They want to know more about “things”. Now you have work to do! In our house, we have tried to put the emphasis on giving of yourself to others. Doing community work and giving to those in need. We also enjoy the Christmas preparation, the baking, and decorating. As my children have grown up they have seen the amount of work that goes into making the holidays something magical - it requires time and attention. As a family we decorate the outside of the house and put up our Christmas trees indoors. Yes, I said “trees”. This is where we found the “magic”. As our kids got older they acquired many homemade Christmas decorations you know the ones they make at playgroups, craft time, and school. Each one carefully made with great pride, all needing to be the one that goes on the front of the tree for all to see. Well, how do they all go in that one special spot? We decided to give the kids their very own special tree to display their precious ornaments. Being only five and seven years old, they were thrilled. Problem solved...I thought. My children quickly jumped on the idea that Christmas trees were a definite part of the holidays. The lights and sparkle were really pretty and each ornament was something to treasure. Two years ago, as our kids were at the prime age for friends to question if they believed in Santa Claus, Santa himself decided to take matters into his own hands. He saw what my children needed to believe in him. On Christmas Eve he got to work ever so quietly, so quietly that my husband and I did not hear him, and placed a beautifully decorated tree in each of my kids’ bedrooms. They were lit with lights and sparkling like nothing else I had ever seen. When our children awoke Christmas morning and saw their trees shining at the foot of their beds they began to cry. Our son said, "I don't need any more gifts. Santa has given me the best gift ever!" Now I can say that if there was ever any doubt, that has been erased! These Christmas trees will be with our children as long as they want them. They can have a piece of home with them on the holidays as they go off to college, and as they get their first homes. I believe they will continue with the same traditions as we have. Now we have five trees to prepare each year. That takes help from the whole family! Each family has their own ways of celebrating the holidays. It might be different from the neighbour but it is no less important. As parents, it is our job to seek out the opportunities to make it special and memorable for our children. Sometimes it may be easier to give up on the idea, but then you lose the magic for your kids and for yourself. After all, is that not part of the experience?

Have a Joyous Holiday

What’s Up in the Night Sky - Fireballs

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ou have my early December column as a reference for what’s going on for the month and this Christmas issue is an opportunity to emphasize how beautiful the clear winter skies can be. Orion is high in the sky in the east and it would be a real shame not to go out and look at this beautiful constellation. In that direction in early evening, the Pleiades cluster of stars rises up early and is followed soon after by the spectacular Hyades star cluster with the red eye of Aldebaran, a red giant star, prominent in the cluster. And then Orion comes up over the horizon in all its glory. Get your binoculars out and enjoy the view. If you have followed my columns, you know that I have recommended going out on clear nights to learn the night sky and at this time of the year there are so many vistas to adventure through. Viewing the night sky is free entertainment, something hard to find nowadays. May the stars guide you in the New Year as they have guided sailors across the seas and across the years. We look up and see a miraculous universe that is both thought provoking and so beautiful. NIGHT SKY SIGHTINGS: In the last few weeks we have had several reports of unusual meteors/fireballs being sighted locally. In our Dec. 8 issue we reported an unusual sighting on Dec. 3 around 6pm in the Burke Settlement Road area and asked our readers to contact us if anyone else had seen the object. This week Brian Echlin called in to report that on that same evening he and his wife just happened to look out of their living room window around 6pm and saw a large fireball traveling west, very low in the sky. He said it was quite a spectacular sight.

Northbrook Legion winner D

Double “S” Sports & Marina Ompah 479-2176

by Fred Barrett

On Dec. 12, Pearl Olmstead of Sharbot Lake came frighteningly close to a meteor as she was traveling west on Highway 7 between Maberly and Silver Lake. That night several cameras captured footage of what astronomers have named the Selwyn Fireball, which was seen by many people and reported on the news. Around 6pm Pearl saw a piece of the orange fireball come down quite close to her car. She describes it as being about the size of a basketball, and so bright that it hurt her eyes to look at it. She said it came so close that she thought it was going to hit her car (although exceptionally rare, it has happened to other people). It got smaller as it descended and disintegrated in a burst of green sparks that vanished before they hit the ground. She said that the next day her eyes still felt burned. Welders exposed to arc flashes get the same eye pain. Dale and Barb Whan were also traveling west on Highway 7 at the same time. They were around McGowan’s Lake when they saw the fireball come down. Thanks to everyone for their reports, As well, as I reported in my Dec. 1 column, the sun is close to its maximum sunspot level, so keep an eye out for the Aurora Borealis. Clear Skies! Fred. Editor’s Note: Next year there will be a special new addition to Fred’s columns, which will feature our readers’ observations. This is an exciting opportunity for readers to report dark sky observations. We would like to encourage everyone to call or email in their observations and we will publish them in the paper. You can email Fred directly at cygnushill@hotmail.com or contact him through the paper.

Submitted by Cathy Meeks

amian Spicer proudly shows off his 3rd. place winning certificate and money that he won in the B&W Poster contest held in Kingston Zone Division!! Missing from photo is Emma Fuller who placed 2nd. in the Zone Colour Poster contest. Congratulations from your local Br. 328 Northbrook!

May you go forth into this wondrous season in love and good will. Peace and thanks

From Dale, Merrilie, Dean, Tracy & Isabella

D. Gray Lumber LTD.   Mountain Grove

Christmas quotes:

One of the nice things about Christmas is that you can make people forget the past with a present. - Author Unknown

Don’t let stress get to you over the holidays... We may be able to help! Do you suffer from sleep troubles, sinus & allergies, pain anywhere in the body, headaches, digestive troubles, or fatigue?

Merry Christmas

Dr. Kathy Wickens, D.C. Dr. Karim Guirguis, D.C., Dr. Ashleah Linden, D.C. Registered Massage Therapists Beth Fequet, Jen Balfour, Dan Deacon and Annette Gray-Jackson

May your stockings be filled with warmth and wonder. We so enjoy your friendship and support. Thanks. Rose, Denis & Staff

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Estheticians: Barb Willoughby & Kyla Truelove Personal Trainer: Hanna Murphy

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Season's Greetings from

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Wishing Everyone a Happy & Healthy Holiday Season! Best Wishes, Your Health Care Team Chiropractic Care and Longevity Center 5 Gore Street West, Perth (613) 264-0616 www.chirolongevity.com chirocare@primus.ca


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

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The treasures of the cedar chest O ur father was the manager of a trailer park in Pefferlaw, Ontario. Unwanted items of the tenants were discarded over a hill. The snow covered everything. One day my brother Jay and I had just returned from tobogganing. “Hope, look – I see something interesting jutting out of the snow,” said Jay as he dusted some snow away. “Just looks like junk,” I replied. “No, it looks like a chest or something. See the lid. I bet there are some tools inside the chest.” “It’s just old wood,” I said, frowning. The chest was frozen into the ice and snow. “Help me get the chest out of here,” Jay said as he tried to dig more snow away with his mittened hand. “Oh, it looks too heavy. See if Dad can help you,” I exclaimed as I tried to tug at the handle. “Good idea.” Dad and Jay carried the chest to our apartment. When they lifted the lid, they found a couple of old tools. However, Dad noticed the chest was cedar-lined. “I think this is an antique. It’s going to take a lot of restoring. Brad and Judy have a yard sale several times a year. Let’s see if they are interested in buying the chest,” said Dad. My brother agreed and we talked to Brad and Judy. “Yes, it is an antique. We would like to restore it,” said Brad as he looked the chest over. “Smells nice, inside, when you open the lid,” said Judy, and smiled. A price was agreed upon. Jay was very pleased. He decided he wanted to buy a watch for Christmas. “Jay, why don’t you wait till we’re in Toronto? We are visiting Grandma soon. There will be lots of choice and perhaps even a bargain for Christmas,” said Mother. “That sounds good,” said Jay happily. Brad and Judy showed us the cedar chest. They had done a splendid job of restoring it. It looked good as new. They already had a buyer.

KFPL Book of the Week A Year of Living Generously: dispatches from the front lines of philanthropy by Lawrence Scanlan

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new year beckons new beginnings so why not be inspired by Lawrence Scanlan who bravely sought to understand the meaning of what it is to leave a legacy. Not long after his mother’s death, Scanlan examined the “social entrepreneur” – the whole notion of the very wealthy doing so much more than cutting a cheque for a worthy cause, but throwing themselves into charity work on a very personal level. Scanlan, who has a history of charitable involvement, decided to get his hands “dirty” by getting personally involved with twelve charitable organizations, dedicating a month of hands-on involvement to each one. He sought to make a difference, can we? Visit us at www.kfpl.ca to reserve a copy of this book. The Book of the Week is brought to you by the Kingston Frontenac Public Library

by Hope Attaway

Mom and I were chatting with Grandma while Jay and my father went downtown to purchase a watch. We were talking about the wonderful blessings we had shared as a family and how thankful we were for Jesus’ provision in our lives all year long. “Grandma, look at my watch. I have my Christmas present,” said Jay proudly. “It’s a Casio,” said Grandma and smiled. “Grandma, here is a Christmas present for you. When I bought the watch, I also got a free portrait. You can go downtown to this photographer and he will take your picture for free,” explained Jay. “Oh, thank you, Jay. That sounds like fun. It is like a gift certificate.” The cedar chest was beginning to unfold into a chain of events. My father was going to Jamaica to help set up a workshop for the physically challenged. We all were accompanying him there. Jay, while we were in Jamaica, decided to sell his watch. My father and Jay went to a jewelry store in Kingston, Jamaica. Jay was quite surprised by the amount he received for the watch. He decided to buy a hurricane lamp. The rest of the money he kept until he could decide what else he needed. The hurricane lamp proved to be useful as Jamaica had many electrical shut offs, especially at night. We all benefitted from the lamp. We returned to Canada and decided to visit Grandma. She was pleased to see us. “I have a Christmas present for you,” said Grandma. Grandma handed us a golf-framed photograph of herself. We all agreed Grandma looked like a queen. The photographer was a professional.

Dead Creek Christmas cranberry sauce concoction by Rev. Jean Brown

4 cups Dead Creek cranberries 1 large seedless orange 1 cup sugar Wash cranberries in cold water and drain. Pare the orange with a knife and pull out the white inner portion of the skin. Separate the orange into sections, removing the membrane. Put cranberries, orange sections and yellow part of orange peel through a food chopper or food processor using the coarsest blade. Stir in sugar. Turn mixture into a clean glass jar or bowl and cover tightly- overnight is best. Serve as a relish with turkey or any foods. It is possible to cut back on the sugar and to add more orange to taste. My husband doesn't really like cranberry at all- but this does taste good, and it's locally found.

Manitoulin Cream Cheese Balls

by Rev. Jean Brown 1 – 8 oz. pkg. cream cheese 1/8 tsp salt 1- 10 oz. can crushed pineapple, drained 10 graham wafers, crushed 1 Tbsp. Sugar 1/3 cup icing sugar ½ cup coconut 10 maraschino cherries, chopped small lump of butter Combine cream cheese, icing sugar, salt, coconut, pineapple and cherries. Chill mixture for 1 hour (will be soft). Combine graham wafers, butter and sugar. Drop teaspoon of chilled mixture in to wafer crumbs and roll in balls. Freeze. Takes 10 minutes to thaw. This is an old Manitoulin favourite- for sure.

Have a Bright and Merry Christmas   From All of Us at

Gray’s Grocery

May you enjoy every minute of a Merry Christmas and share its good times with those dear to you. Thanks all.

Kaladar Shell

Restaurant - General Store - Gas Bar Hwy. 7 & 41, Kaladar, ON  (613) 336-8679 Goga & Staff

It was after our visit to Grandma that we decided to winter in Florida. We were going to assist a church in Clearwater, Florida. Jay and I did babysitting for the church and for various couples. We had enough money saved. With the money Jay had from the watch he sold in Jamaica, and from the babysitting, we were able to purchase brand new rods and reels for fishing. Fishing was good in Clearwater. We had the rods and reels for many years. Every time I look at Grandma’s portrait on the dresser, I think of the treasures of the cedar chest and wonderful Christmas memories.

Are you ready for Christmas? by Susan Ramsay, Early Literacy Specialist “So, are you ready for Christmas?” My eyes fall to the ground. I have not yet finished my shopping or gift wrapping. I have not baked shortbread or decorated the Christmas tree. “Ummm,” I mumble, pushing back a mixture of guilt and panic, “There’s still a bit of time before Christmas…isn’t there?” In a fast-food/high-speed internet world my response feels totally incompetent. Even Santa provides instant delivery on Christmas Eve. But, I know if this question was asked a little differently, I could hold my head high and answer with a smile. If I was asked, “Are you enjoying getting ready for Christmas?” my answer would be “Oh yes!” Sometimes I think we can focus on questions with too narrow a perspective. I was reminded of this when I read a study by Mary Ann Evans and Jean Saint-Aubin called “What Children Are Looking at During Shared Storybook Reading”. In this study the researchers displayed children’s books on a computer monitor. Each child's mother or preschool teacher read the books while the child sat on the adult's lap wearing a headband that recorded the child’s visual fixations. What did the researchers discover? Children spent very little time examining print in books. Instead they focused on the pictures. Preschoolers spent, on average, five seconds per book looking at text, and three minutes looking at the illustrations. If parents think that their children are absorbing how to decode print during story times, researchers warn, they are mistaken. But deciphering letters and knowing how words look and are spelled is only one component of literacy learning. Children have to understand that text is meaningful before they are motivated to decode print. Without comprehension, decoding skills are useless. Of course children will look at pictures when a story is read. Pictures in children’s books show the meaning of written words. Pictures help children think about the storyline and how the story relates to their own experiences. Only after children soak in the meaning, humour and nuances represented through a book’s pictures, will they choose to pay attention to print. Questions are important to ask, but it can be too easy to feel discouraged by questions that dwell on a narrow perspective. Decoding skills do require parents and educators to teach letter names and letter-sound relationships explicitly, but comprehension skills, vocabulary and narrative skills are essential literacy skills too. Children do gain emergent reading skills when someone in their life takes the time to read to them often. Seeing the bigger picture is important. The next time someone asks “Are you ready for Christmas?” I will remember that this is a question that could be asked differently. I will remember that preparations for one day do not need to consume the pleasure of the Christmas season. There is good reason to slow our busy pace, and many good reasons for taking time this holiday to read stories your child loves to hear. (Susan Ramsay, an Early Literacy Specialist for HastingsFrontenac-Lennox & Addington, can be reached at 613-3546318, Ext 32)

May the magic of Christmas stay with you always. Happy Holidays to all.

Janet’s Clip-It 613-279-2802

Janet & Sue


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S9

By Sara Carpenter

W

ho doesn’t want to make Christmas dinner easier? For me, the bird has always been the challenge: how do you have a perfectly roasted bird emerge from the oven in tandem with three or four side dishes and lumpfree gravy, while your favourite cousin commandeers the main workspace to make his triumphal salad (by the way, can you make me a salad dressing?), and 13 or 14 of your nearest and dearest hover nearby, their proximity in perfect proportion to the intensity of the turkey aroma. To be honest, I haven’t a clue. Oh, sure, I’ve picked up a few tricks over the years. I have a great make-ahead mashed potato recipe (you can even freeze it). I serve turkey gravy I’ve previously frozen, and chill the deglazed drippings from this one to make gravy later for the freezer (hot tip: if you thicken it with 3 parts flour to 1 part tapioca starch, the consistency is fabulous and it won’t break when you thaw it). But considering the number of “feast meals” I’ve put on, you’d think by now I’d have it nailed. Not! So this year, I did a little research. Can you, I wondered, spatchcock a turkey? (Lest you wonder why anyone would want to, let me explain: if you cut out a chicken’s backbone, then open the bird up and bear down on the breastbone to flatten it, you have a spatchcocked a.k.a. flattened out chicken. It roasts both white meat and dark to perfection, and gives you lots of crispy skin.) I went online and found instructions from Martha Stewart. I should have known better. First step: cut out the backbone. With a chicken, kitchen shears work nicely. With a turkey, trust me, you need power tools. You wouldn’t believe the size of the knife I had to wield to do that. Next, flip the bird over and flatten the breastbone. I tried. I bore down on it with all my might. Nothing. I got up on the counter on my knees and applied my most forceful CPR-type compression. Still nothing. Finally, I covered the bird with a tea towel, assumed my full height – still on the counter, mind you – placed one foot on the defenseless breast and stomped down hard for all I was worth. I heard some unconvincing crunching. The ribs on one side had broken, but the breastbone remained intact. Close enough, I said. I. A lopsided spatchcocked turkey it is. It roasted up beautifully – what a valiant bird! – in roughly twice the time Martha promised. Was it going to make Christmas dinner any easier? Decidedly not. But you know what? Who cares. It’s not about easy, it’s about being with family and friends, and pausing in gratitude to appreciate what we have. No doubt you have your own tips and tricks for the big day, and sometime, if you have a minute, please share them with us at The News. In the meantime, here’s a thought that helps put it all in perspective: [O Lord], what variety you have created, arranging everything so wisely! Earth is completely full of things you have made. Psalms 104:24, Jerusalem Bible May your Christmas be filled with abundance and joy in all things, and may your table be a gathering place to welcome visitors and those you love. Bon appétit!

EAST-WEST TURKEY WRAPS

Here’s nice, casual way to use up leftover turkey. You can free-style it with the veggies if you like. Makes 6 servings Prepare and transfer to a bowl 1/2 c. thinly sliced mushrooms; 1/2 c. sliced snow peas; 4 green onions, sliced. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook 1 tbsp. vegetable oil; 1 inch grated gingerroot; 2 cloves garlic, minced; 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes until the garlic is softened and beginning to brown. Add the prepared vegetables; cook, stirring often, until the vegetables are crisp-tender, about 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in 1 1/2 c. cubed cooked turkey; 1 small carrot, grated; 1/3 c. Hoisin sauce; 1/4 c. cranberry sauce; 1 tsp. soy sauce; 2 c. cooked brown rice and a splash of water to keep things from drying out. Cook, stirring frequently, until heated through. Divide among 6 large tortillas; roll the tortillas around the filling, folding up the bottom to enclose the filling as you go. Serve with chutney if desired.

UCW: The Sharbot Lake United Church Women held their Christmas potluck on Dec. 17 - submitted by Carol Raymo

The Season of Advent by Rev. Nancy MacLeod, the Anglican Parishes of Parham - Sharbot Lake & Maberly – Lanark he Anglican tradition, like a number of other Christian denominations, begins the season called Advent on the fourth Sunday before Christmas. The beginning of Advent is actually the start of our new church year! While some Christians keep Advent as very penitential, for us Advent is primarily a time of preparation, hope and expectation. We not only prepare to celebrate God coming to us as a human being in the historic event of the birth of our Lord, Jesus, we also focus on preparing our lives for all the ways in which God comes to us regularly in our daily routine, and in joyful anticipation of the promised second coming of Christ to bring to fulfilment His Kingdom. Symbols are an important part of our worship. In Advent, a wreath with candles is placed in the worship space as a symbol of our Advent journey of preparation. Many folks also have one at home as a focus for personal or family devotions. The circular wreath symbolizes eternity, everlasting covenant and God’s encircling love, and is usually decorated with evergreens, symbolizing renewal, but the candles themselves are the focus, reminding us that in this dark season we proclaim the birth of The Light of the World, and seek to let His light shine through us for the world. The Advent candle custom probably began quite simply in Germany or Scandinavia, with an extra candle being lit each week as the world outside grows darker towards the shortest day of the year. Over time, however, a number of traditions have been added. Symbols have many layers of meaning! There are five candles on the wreath. Nowadays, usually four are blue - which can represent the coming King, the night sky, the waters of creation, or the Blessed Virgin Mary, but in some more traditional settings, three are violet and the one lit on the third Sunday is rose-coloured, echoing the colours of penitential Lent. The four outer candles may represent the four centuries of waiting from the prophet Malachi until the birth of Jesus. The central, white candle is referred to as the Christ candle. On the first Sunday (and sometimes weekdays after it), the first candle, commonly called the candle of Hope, is lit. On the second Sunday and thereafter, another candle is also

T

Christmas The Holly’s up,

the house is all bright, The tree is ready, the candles alight; Rejoice and be glad, all children tonight. (Old Carol)

Thanks for a great year. Wishing everyone a joyous holiday and a prosperous New Year. 2677 Ardoch RD.  613-279-2501

Orange Mandarin Cake From Linda Mouck This is a simple, moist and delicious cake 1 cup flour 1 cup white sugar 1 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp salt 1 can mandarin oranges, including juice Mix all ingredients together and bake in greased pan at 350 for 30 to 35 mins.

Merry

Christmas & Happy New Year, to all our friends and customers. From Kim, Lisa, Victoria & Sara

Jack Lavigne

Jack Pine Canvas

lit, sometimes called the candle of Peace. Similarly on the third and fourth Sundays those referred to as the candles of Joy and Love are lit, increasing the light. Often a ceremony of word and song accompanies the lighting. Other themes, such as the Prophets, John the Baptist, The Virgin Mary and the Magi may be added to the meaning of the week, to help us prepare to celebrate the mystery of God made human. Finally, on Christmas Eve or Day, the Christ candle is lit the Light of the World has come in Jesus the Christ! Its central position reminds us that Incarnation (Jesus) is the heart of the season. We keep this light burning until Epiphany, the end of Christmas season, January 6. There are many resources available for people who might like to try this wonderful way of preparing for Christmas. If you haven’t already experienced it, why not try next year? May God bless you in these Holy Seasons and always.

Land O'Lakes Community Services 12497A Hwy. 41, Northbrook ON  613-336-8934 Closed: Noon Dec. 24/10 - Jan. 3/11

Topping 3 tbsp. butter 1 tsp. milk 3 tbsp.brown sugar Mix all ingredients in a sauce pan, bring to a boil. When cake is done, pour hot topping over cake, while cake is still hot.

We wish

you all the blessings of the season. It’s been a delight doing business with you.

at

Ken Gould & Family

The Junction Factory Outlet

(K&K Logging)


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S10

L to R Peter Brugmans, Joyce Lewis, Maribeth Scott, Don Amos, Mary Burke, Mike Procter.

Christmas hampers bring Christmas cheer By Jeff Green motley crew of Northern Frontenac Community Services (NFCS) staff members and volunteers worked together early this week at St. James Catholic Church to hand out almost 200 Christmas hampers for local families. The food and gifts were supplied by the Salvation Army, and each hamper included a turkey, potatoes, carrots, dried food items, toys for younger kids and gift cards for teenagers. NFCS raises money, about $3,000 this year, to help pay for the items, and provides the labour for packing and distributing the food. Joyce Lewis, who runs the NFCS front office, said that demand this year from people on employment assistance as well as the working poor is up from previous years, a likely result of increases in the cost of living and the employment situation this year. It’s hard to tell from this picture, but Don Amos, NFCS Executive Director, actually helped unload bags of potatoes from the Quatrocchi truck just minutes before this picture was taken, to the surprise of NFCS staff, who said that until then they had never seen Amos do any real work.

A

Cherished moments with Family & Friends.

May this holiday season bring you peace and happiness.

Christmas Quotes Christmas gift suggestions: To your enemy, forgiveness. To an opponent, tolerance. To a friend, your heart. To a customer, service. To all, charity. To every child, a good example. To yourself, respect. - Oren Arnold

“For it is in giving that we receive”

by Julie Druker

One hundred and twenty students and staff from Sharbot Lake Public School were treated to a festive turkey lunch with all the fixings, including home-made shortbread cookies, all courtesy of the Sharbot Lake and District Lions and the Sharbot Lake High School Parent and Student Councils. The meal took place at Sharbot Lake High School on Dec. 15. Eight Sharbot Lake high school student council members, along with cafeteria supervisor Ilona Cox and SLHS staff member Liz Steele Drew, served up the meal to eager students, who were also treated to a visit by Santa. The jolly old elf handed out candy canes to each of the young diners. Ms.Steele-Drew is always thrilled to assist at the event for the young SLPS student, many of whom will one day be joining the ranks at SLHS. “This is a great way to get to meet the younger students in the community from our feeder school, many of whom have siblings at this school and who will be coming aboard in the near future. It totally fits with our school motto: ‘We are Family’. This is just an extension of that and is something that we love to do and have been doing for years.”

-St. Francis of Assisi

Our loyal friends have given us their very best. We thank you.

From Rob, Vennessa & Family

Memory Lane Flowers & Gifts

12289 Hwy 41, Northbrook, ON (613) 336-9948

A festive meal for SLPS

Sydenham

ECRA/ESA 7003 706

(613) 376-6309

Christmas Joy to All

With special thanks for your patronage and good will, we wish you a merry christmas. Davy Well Drilling LTD. Verona  613-374-2176

Joining Santa in our wishes for a holiday full of bright spirits and happy surprises.

Storring Septic Tank Service Greg, Cheryl & Ian 379-2192 Tamworth

Christmas Greetings As the silvery sounds of Christmas herald a glorious season, we pray yours will be rich with happy moments. Thanks to all.

Wishing you a joyous holiday season. Board of Directors & Employees North Frontenac

Merry Christmas & Our Best Wishes for the New Year LEONARD FUELS LTD.

Parham 375-6254

Hartington

372-2112  1-800-543-7884


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

▲Naomi Mitchell, age 14, Land O’Lakes

Page S11

▲ B.J. MacPhail, age 9, grade 5/6, Prince Charles

Children’s Christmas Sprees

I

t was another great year for the Children’s Christmas Spree held by Community Living – North Frontenac Treasure Trunk. The Red Hat Ladies held the Christmas spree in Arden with great succes,s followed by Sharbot Lake at The Child Center on the day of the Santa Claus Parade with having the children make their own wrapping paper. Plevna/Ompha had their spree at the school for the children to buy for Mom & Dad and Parham at The Oddfellow’s Hall was the best year ever, running out of presents by 11:00a.m. See all of you next year. -Janet Barr

▲ Sarah Morden, age 7, grade 2, Land O’Lakes

Wishing you all the joyous necessities for a merry Christmas and a wonderful time, health, happiness, love and peace.

▲ Damien Shorts, age 6, grade 1, Land O’Lakes

Suzanne Regan Thinking of you, and wishing you happiness at Christmas time and all through the year. Best Wishes from

D.R. Lewis Construction Ltd.

Sales Representative

www.LandOLakesRealEstate.ca

Matson Insurance Brokers Ltd. Marilyn Scott and Sherri Scott Registered Insurance Brokers Arden, Ontario  Tel/Fax: 613-335-2847  Toll free: 1-888-340-3541

613-336-3000 1-877-336-6453 Business or

613-336-8000 Direct Country Classics Ltd. Brokerage Independently Owned & Operated

Don, Gail, Carson, Aaron, Crystal, Britany & Landyn Sharbot Lake, ON

To all our customers and their families, we wish you a joyous season and a very Merry Christmas!

Watson’s Bus Lines & Staff

Thinking of you and hoping your holidays will be filled to the brim with bright Christmas treasures!    Thanks

Yuletide Wishes Here’s hoping the season grants all your wishes, big and small, and that you enjoy health, wealth and peace. We wish the best of holidays to all our customers.

Best Wishes from Peter, Charles & Staff

Nedow Const. Inc. Sharbot Lake    613-375-6389

Mom’s Restaurant Verona, Ontario  374-2817


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S12

New Leaf Link settles in to service

By Jeff Green

A

lmost three years ago New Leaf Link (NeLL) came into existence with the goal of bridging a massive service gap for the community of developmentally disabled people in Frontenac County. “Over the years the school system has really made progress in learning how to integrate developmentally disabled students into the elementary and secondary school panel through the School to Community program, and by allowing developmentally disabled students to remain in school until they reach the age of 20, they have really made a difference in the lives of the students,” said Dr. Karin Steiner, Founding Executive Director of NeLL. But when those students leave school, there is little support for them and their families in the community. The situation is particularly acute in South Frontenac Township because while services are available in Kingston through Community Living – Kingston, and in Central and North Frontenac through Community Living – North Frontenac, those services are not generally extended to residents of South Frontenac for travel and budgetary reasons. As well, because NeLL's founding directors come from an educational background and it has found support from members of the local artist community, its focus has been more on bringing educational opportunities to its clients rather than other kinds of physical or life skill related supports. The program that has developed, and which was marked last week at a Christmas Open House, is a twice-weekly day school that is held at St. Paul's Anglican Church in Sydenham on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9 am and 2:30 pm. Eight students attend the classes, which focus on the production of artwork, healthy eating and exercise, literacy and functional skills. Making full use of the kitchen in their home in the base-

Wishes you & yours a very Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

ment of St. Paul's, the program includes cooking classes that tie in with the work the class has been doing with the Canadian food pyramid. In the winter/spring session that will begin in January, Local Food will be another aspect of the healthy lifestyle program that will take place. Because the disabilities that the different students face are so varied, ranging from: autism spectrum conditions, Down syndrome, intellectual disabilities, acquired brain injury, even blindness, the educational programs are individualized. Nonetheless, one of the most important aspects of the NeLL classes is the interaction between the students. There is a palpable feeling of camaraderie between the students, volunteers, and staff at the NeLL classes, and according to Karin Steiner, whose son Nicholas takes part in the program, the human connection between the people in the classes is a major benefit, one that transcends the skills that are taught. “It took a long time for my son Nicholas, who has autism, to come into his own at Sydenham High School, but he did eventually. When he became too old, there was nothing for him to do but sit at home, and that is no way for someone to move forward. For him, and for everyone in the program, interaction with other people is very important,” she said. As a charitable not-for-profit corporation, New Leaf Link survives on donations, a few isolated grants, including one from the County of Frontenac's community sustainability ini-

Merry Christmas Kelly & Michelle

Sydenham 613-376-3562

from Steve & Jenn Dunham & all the drivers at

Insurance Brokers Limited “Covering Mazinaw Country”

An Independent Insurance Broker Covers You Best

Tel: (613) 336-8333

Holiday Greetings

Holy Holy

May this sacred holiday bring its finest blessings to our many loyal patrons.

Frontenac Modular Homes 4193 Maple Dr. Lane, Verona  1-866-775-8268

Cranberry Coleslaw By Marilyn Meeks 1 cup chopped cranberries ¼ cup sugar 3 cups finely shredded cabbage ½ cup orange juice 2 Tbsp. chopped celery 2 Tbsp. chopped green peppers 1 cup seeded, halved green grapes ¼ cup mayonnaise or salad

We would like to wish everyone a safe & happy holiday

Best wishes to all our customers! Thanks for being so very nice!

Barrington

tiative, and the efforts of volunteers. The volunteer effort of people such as Joanna (Jo) Lyon, a retired special educator who runs the educational program, and Karin Steiner herself, is what sustains the program, and the long term viability of vital service organizations that are fully staffed by volunteers is always a challenge. “We know that we are doing something valuable, and it is something that is not done in other places. That's why, although we focus on residents of South Frontenac, we have participants coming from Kingston and Sharbot Lake,” said Steiner. As the NeLL program wound down for the Christmas break, the Open House last week featured artwork and gift items made by students for sale and the presentation of “The Grinch Who Stole Christmas”. The NeLL program, which costs $30 a day, will be starting up again in early January. Anyone interested in the program, or in opportunities to volunteer should email Newleaflink@xplornet.com or call 613-374-3451.

May the coming season bring tidings of harmony and joy to you and your family and may the new year bring you health, happiness and prosperity.

Dunham Transportation

dressing Mix cranberries with sugar. Moisten cabbage with orange juice, add sugared cranberries, celery, green peppers and grapes. Toss lightly with mayonnaise or dressing. Chill ½ hour before serving

Wishing all a Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year! ® Daren McDonald  Larry Brown Kaladar Auto Parts Inc.

Hwy #7 at Hwy. #41

PO Box 69 Kaladar ON K0H 1Z0

Ompah  613-479-0215

Tel: (613) 336-2923 Fax: (613) 336-8001

Holiday Greetings

Best wishes to all my clients & neighbours!

Full Time Law Office in Sharbot

Lake

(Weekends by Appointment)

Cottage & Rural Real Estate in the Land O'Lakes Wills • Power of Attorney Stephen G. Duggan, B.A., LL.B Hwy 7 East, Perth • 613-267-2300 hintondodge.ca

Southeast Corner of Hwy 7 & 38 613-279-LAWS (5297) beachlaw@frontenac.net


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S13

The Harlowe Wesleyan Church’s Christmas concert took place on Dec. 10

Merry Christmas

Christmas around the community

Thank you for the gift of your patronage

Top: The Harrowsmith Santa Claus parade took place on Dec. 3. Above: the Parham parade took place on Dec. 4

Wilf Hall

Noel

Here’s hoping you and yours experience all the joys of the holiday...peace, brotherhood, and much love. Merry Christmas to all!

Kinney

Auto Wreckers 613-336-9272 4x4 Truck Parts

From our family to yours, we wish you a happy Holiday Season.

& Sons

Well Drilling

B A R B E R SHOP

I hope you haven't been naughty. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

McDonalds Corners 278-2933

Chris, David & Chantel Winney

B A R B E R SHOP

ProAlliance Realty, Brokerage

Chris Winney, Broker Direct Line: 613.336.1737 12309 Hwy 41, Northbrook, ON

613-279-2757

Christmas time is filled with

We’d like to say thank you for your graciousness in all our dealings and for the opportunity to be of service

family and friends gathered round, children giddy with excitement, and giving to those we love. Our funeral home realizes that this can also be a time for memories of those we have lost. During this holiday season, hold on to the memories, for they will keep your hearts warm throughout the year. May the warm glow of Christmas bring you peace, love & happiness now & forever.

With special thanks for your patronage and good will, we wish you a merry christmas. • Heating • Ventilation • Air Conditioning • Sheet Metal • Pumps • Solar

Happy Holidays! Lottery Centre

From the Staff at

Trousdale Funeral Home

Sharbot Lake General Store

613-376-3022

4374 Mill Street, Sydenham

Providing Frontenac County with Home Comfort Tel:  (613) 376-3755 www.foxheating.ca

2977 Rutledge Road Sydenham, ON K0H 2T0


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S14

Susie’s wonderful magazine tree - truly recycled and recyclable E

very Christmas we try to find a simple but appealing paper craft to put in the paper, and this year our receptionist, Suzanne Tanner, found one of the simplest and most satisfying ideas ever – simple because it only involves three easy folds, plus using a few pieces of tape if desired – and satisfying because it transforms junk mail into something beautiful without any need for spray paint, etc. Well - others may think they need embellishment, but we like the trees we’ve made out of flyers, old catalogues, magazines, and scrap paper from our recycling bin just fine - just as they are. We would have made some out of used Christmas wrapping paper, but of course, no one has any used paper yet, and in keeping with the recycling spirit, we couldn’t very well use new wrapping paper. Tree B was made from 20 sheets of ordinary scrap letter paper folded in half and stapled in the middle like a magazine.

Any magazine or catalogue

1. Fold top right corner down to left edge.

2. Fold the folded part down to the left edge again, creasing well, especially at the top.

3. Turn the page over and fold the protruding bottom flap up, level with bottom edge. Tape if desired. Continue folding all the pages. Fan them out and the tree is done! 4. But don’t forget the star! Tree B Make two stars of the same size and glue them back to back with a toothpick in between. Poke toothpick into top of tree. HINTS: 1) If you want to use sheets of scrap paper but don’t have a long-reach stapler to staple them together, you can put a block of wood under the paper and use a nail or awl to pierce the sheets, then sew them together. 2) The width of the page doesn’t seem to make much difference in the height to base ratio of the finished tree. We thought we needed relatively narrow pages to get a tree that was tall rather than too fat, but when we used wider pages, the finished result was almost the same. We confess we haven’t explored the mathematics behind this.

To all our Customers,Volunteers and those who donate clothing. Thank you, your support is appreciated. The Treasure Trunk  Sharbot Lake, ON 

Tree A, made from a catalogue. All you have to do is take any catalogue or magazine and start folding the pages as in steps 1, 2 and 3. It doesn’t take long, but it is addictive.

clintondentistry

Tom Dewey

Councillor, Central Frontenac Kennebec Ward

wishes you a safe & happy holiday season

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year from our family to yours. The Deweys

Office will be closed Dec. 23 - Jan. 3 Visit our website www.clintondentistry.com

Holiday Greetings! We wish to thank all of our customers for a most successful year. To each one of you a very Merry Christmas and prosperity in the coming year. Closed: Noon Dec. 23rd - 8:30 a.m. - Dec. 28th Closed: Noon Dec. 30th - 8:30 a.m. Jan. 3rd 2012

May You Rejoice �� ��� ����� �� ��� �������

In The Spirit Of Christmas

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Wishing You God’s Blessings For Peace And Joy

Algonquin and Lakeshore Catholic District School Board

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North Frontenac Telephone Company Ltd.

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J�IM��KENNELLY ����

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The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S15

Central Frontenac’s Festival of Trees

1st prize - Northern Connections Adult Learning Centre’s “Yippee I Ho Ho Ho!”

Mincemeat Hermits

By Marilyn Meeks

▲ Sidney Teal, 13, Sharbot Lake Middle School

1/2 cup butter or margarine 1/2 cup soft shortening In the “Anything Goes” category, Clip-It Hair Salon’s North Frontenac Telephone’s “Christmas in the 2 cups brown sugar “Spirit of the West” won 1st prize Wild Wild West” took 2nd in the 6.5ft. category 2 eggs 1&1/4 cups minceHeat oven to 350o. Grease meat salt and spices together. Stir Christmas Quotes cookie sheet. Beat butter, 1 cup walnuts into butter mix until blended. A goose never voted for an shortening, sugar and eggs 3 1/2 cups flour Drop by teaspoons onto early Christmas. until fluffy. Stir in mincemeat 1 tsp soda cookie sheet. Bake about - Irish Saying and walnuts. Mix flour, soda, 1 tsp salt 12 minutes. 1 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp nutmeg 1/4 tsp cloves

B

ehold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem, Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him. Matthew 2: 1-2

At this special time of year, our thanks and best wishes go to everyone in the community.

Greetings and Thanks to all our friends and customers during this special season

Ronfeld Electric Northbrook 613-336-2944

Langan Family Law

Merry s a m t s i r Ch

Hali Foster Accounting & Income Tax Inc. Flinton, 613-336-8827

Anne-Marie Langan Family Lawyer

1021B Elizabeth St., Sharbot Lake, ON 855-241-2220 www.langanfamilylaw.com

to all our family, friends and customers. Warmest wishes to you and yours from

Middleton Trucking 279-2971

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from the staff at

St. Lawrence College Employment Service Sharbot Lake

Karen, Arlene, Krista, Anna & Ashley

Wishing your family a warm & safe holiday. 16693 Hwy. 7 East, RR#6 Perth ON 1-877-247-9337


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The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Le Réveillon Christmas dinner, pork pie from Quebec, and local food By Jeff Green ne of the great traditions of Christmas in France is the Reveillon dinner. In some incarnations it is a dinner that only starts after midnight mass, and continues on until the morning, when parents greet their children for opening presents under the tree. Presumably, everyone then goes to bed to sleep away most of Christmas Day. Le Réveillon literally means “eve”, but also refers to the coming of a new day as an extension of the verb réveiller – to wake. There are versions of Reveillon dinners throughout the French Diaspora as well as in France, particularly in Quebec and Louisiana, and the traditional foods have been adapted to local produce and culinary traditions. For those of interested in the idea of local food, the Quebec Reveillon dishes are easily adapted to the 100 mile or even the 15 or 20 kilometre diet. But first to the south of France, to the Provence region. Christmas begins on December 4, St. Barbe's Day, with the planting of wheat germ in saucers on wet paper towels. By Christmas Day the miniature wheat fields will be placed in the family crib. Family crib, or crèche scenes, located in courtyards or in front of homes, are still common, and they include Provencal “santos” or “little saints”, clay figurines that are produced in workshops throughout the region and sold in Christmas markets that spring up each November. On Christmas Eve, the Provencal version of Le Reveillon includes “les treize desserts” (13 desserts) that are served after mass. Before mass, on Christmas Eve, “Le Gros Souper” is served. Numbers are important in these meals as they all have a religious significance. There are 3 white tablecloths on a large table, signifying the Holy Trinity, with 3 white candelabras and 3 saucers of sprouted wheat germ on them. Le Gros Souper consists of 7 dishes, ranging from simple vegetable dishes such as chard, cauliflower, and spinach, to snails and omelettes. The supper is a “lean” offering in memory of the 7 sufferings of Mary, and it is accompanied by 13 bread rolls. After mass, “Les treize desserts” are set out. While everyone is supposed to sample each of the 13 desserts, it is not as onerous, or fattening a task as one might think, because the desserts are not 13 different cakes and pies. The desserts vary from town to town or region to region, but they generally include the four mendicants, referring to four orders of friars who had turned their back on earthly

O

Season’s Greetings

things and survived by begging. The desserts include dry figs (Franciscans), almonds (Carmelites), raisins (Dominicans), and hazelnuts (Augustinians). Dates, symbolic of Christ, are served as well, as are two kinds of almond nougat: a hard black nougat, symbolizing the forces of evil, and a soft white nougat symbolizing purity and goodness. Fresh and candied fruits constitute some of the other desserts, and there are often oreillettes (light, thin waffles) served. An olive oil and orange flavoured bread, called “La pompe a l'huile” is another tradition. In Provence, “Les 13 desserts” are left on the table from early on December 25 until December 27. Another tradition that comes from southern France was the burning of a Yule log in the fireplace overnight between Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. This has come down to us in dessert form as “La Bûche de Noël” Reveillon dinners in more northern parts of France are often elaborate feasts, including foie gras, oysters, lobster, sausages, wine, ham, goose or turkey stuffed with chestnuts and fruit, followed by cheese, pastries and sweet dessert wines or cognac. I'm not sure how such combinations of rich food and wine work to réveiller the revellers, but it sounds like it might be worth a try. In Louisiana, cooking for Reveillon took on a Creole bent, with New World traditions such as game pie, local seafood and la croquembouche (a tree made up of chocolate-covered cream puffs). Réveillons have died out as a home tradition in Louisiana over the last 100 years but they have made a comeback in high end restaurants, particularly in New Orleans, where Prix fixe Réveillon dinners are served throughout December as a means of generating tourist and local traffic during one of the slower months of the year. The famous New Orleans chef, Emeril, is serving Mississippi rabbit tourine, spiced cured foie gras, followed by a main course of Lousiana popcorn rice and tasso stuffed quail with black eyed peas and bacon smothered cabbage, and pecan pie with caramel sauce for dessert at his NOLA restaurant in the French Quarter this month at a cost of $60. But long before Le Réveillon travelled down the Mississippi it had put down roots in New France. The stories of the Order of Good Cheer demonstrate how feasting was used by the early governors of Quebec in the 17th Century to keep up the spirits of the immigrant population, who had to suffer through long, cold winters. They are also the stories of how a distinctly Canadian cuisine was born. To this day, the Reveillon dinners in Quebec demonstrate how hearty rural French cooking has been adapted to the agricultural realities in the land of ice and snow and maple trees that we also share in Eastern Ontario. Tourtieres are a Quebec Christmas tradition like none

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other. Originally they were a pie made out of the meat of the tourtes, or passenger pigeon. Due to over hunting, partly but not exclusively for use in pies, the tourtes became extinct in 1914, and tourtiere now generally refers to a meat-filled pie. There are as many tourtière recipes as there are cooks, but they do fall into two or three categories. In the Lac St. Jean region, tourtieres are still often made using chunks of meat (pork, beef, and sometimes chicken) as well as potatoes and other root vegetables. Elsewhere it is more common to use ground pork, sometimes cut with ground beef to make a pie that is made of only meat, onions, and spices such as nutmeg, allspice and cloves. As well, tourtieres can be a mixed meat pie including any variety of wild game, often deer or moose venison. Ham cooked in maple syrup is also popular, as are maple pork baked beans. For dessert, sugar pie or runny maple fudge as well as a Bûche Noël can be served. I have included a number of recipes that tend towards the rich and filling end of the Reveillon spectrum. Even if the weather has been unseasonably warm of late, we are still faced with 15 hours of darkness each day and we know the bone-chilling cold is coming on. So if there is a time to eat comfort food, we are there now. There are recipes below for Ham and Maple Syrup, Maple Baked Beans, and a simple Tourtiere. As well, while lard and pork scraps on toast does have its appeal, I have included instead a recipe for Chicken Liver Pâté, also a Quebec tradition, instead. For dessert, we have a nod to the Bûche Noël, and a French-inspired Apple Cake courtesy of Andrea Duggan, formerly of Sunsets Restaurant, whose blog Cookingwithandrea.com includes step by step directions for desserts and many other dishes. Ham and Maple Syrup 1 smoked ham (approx. 4 kg. or 9 lb.) 2 cups maple syrup, combined with 10 cups water 2 cups raisins 2 cups maple sugar, crumbled 1 teaspoon dried mustard 2 teaspoons while cloves (optional) 4 teaspoons apple juice In large pot bring ham to a boil in the maple syrup water. Reduce heat and let simmer on low heat 3 to 4 hours, or until the ham is tender. Remove ham from water and let sit 15 min. or until cooled. Reserve a few cups of this water for later use. Once ham is cooled remove the rind and set aside. In a bowl crush maple sugar and mix with mustard and apple juice, stir well till blended. Add cloves to maple sugar and juice mixture and let sit 15 min. until flavors blend together. Place ham in roasting pan and baste with maple sugar juice mixture, making sure to heavily coat whole ham. Add a cup or more of the ham water into roasting pan and add the ham rind. Add aisins, placing some over top of ham.

I'd like to send you each a card But there's just too many of you! To all my cherished customers and friends I wish a very merry Christmas. Sylvia McMenemy Foot Care Nurse & Avon Representative

613-335-2940

Have a Happy Holiday Let's cherish the spirit of Christmas and the joy of friendship.

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The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Bake ham 40 to 50 min. in 300°F oven. Baste often, adding more ham water if needed; the more the tastier it will be. Remove from oven and place on serving platter, pour the raisins and maple syrup drippings over the ham.Serve with mashed potatoes, carrots and turnips all whipped together. Maple baked beans 1 lb small white pea beans 1 onion 1 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon summer savory 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 4 teaspoons chili powder 1½ cups maple syrup ¼ lb salt pork ½ teaspoon salt Soak beans overnight. Drain and place in a 4 quart bean pot. Mix seasonings and maple syrup together and stir into beans. Add enough water to cover. Peel onion and remove root and blossom ends. Push whole onion down into beans and place the salt pork next to it. Bake covered in a 250 degree oven for about 8 hours, checking on them every hour or so and see if you need to add water so they never dry out. When finished if you want the sauce to be thicker, then you can always stir in refried bean flakes and let sit to thicken. Tourtières 1½ pound lean ground pork or 1 pound lean ground pork and ½ pound lean ground beef 1 onion, diced 1 clove garlic, minced 1/2 cup water 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed 1/4 teaspoon ground sage 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves 1 recipe pastry for a 9 inch double crust pie Preheat oven to 425o F (220o C). In a saucepan, combine pork (or pork and beef) onion, garlic, water, salt, thyme, sage, black pepper and cloves. Cook over medium heat until mixture boils; stirring occasionally. Reduce heat to low and simmer until meat is cooked, about 5 minutes. Spoon the meat mixture into the pie crust. Place top crust on top of pie and pinch edges to seal. Cut slits in top crust so steam can escape. Cover edges of pie with strips of aluminium foil. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes, remove foil and return to oven. Bake for an additional 15 to 20 minutes until golden brown. Let cool 10 min. before slicing. Chicken liver pâté 1 lb fresh chicken livers, cleaned 1 cup milk ½ cup cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces 1 cup chopped yellow onion 2 teaspoons minced garlic 2 tablespoons green peppercorns, drained 2 bay leaves 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon fresh ground black pepper ¼ cup cognac or ¼ cup brandy Chopped fresh parsley leaves, for garnish In a bowl, soak the livers in the milk for 2 hours and drain well. In a large sauté pan or skillet, melt 4 tablespoons of the butter over mediumhigh heat. Add the onions

and cook, stirring, until soft, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the chicken livers, 1 tablespoon of the peppercorns, the bay leaves, thyme, salt, and pepper and cook, stirring, until the livers are browned on the outside and still slightly pink on the inside, about 5 minutes. Add Cognac and cook until most of liquid is evaporated and livers are cooked through but still tender. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Discard bay leaves. In food processor, purée liver mixture. Add remaining butter in pieces and pulse to blend. Fold in remaining 1 tablespoon peppercorns and adjust seasoning to taste. Pack pâté into 6 individual ramekins or small molds, about 4 ounces each. Cover with plastic and refrigerate until firm, at least 6 hours. Garnish tops with parsley and surround with croutons or French bread. Serve with sweet pickles, if desired. La Bûche de Noël (Yule log) This is a flourless recipe so it is light and gluten-free. Cake ¼ cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar 6 large eggs (separated) ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 4 ounces semi-sweet chocolate, cut in pieces ¾ teaspoon cream of tartar Chocolate whipped cream filling 1 cup whipping cream (35% butterfat) ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 3 tablespoons sugar 1½ tablespoons cocoa powder Grease a 17 x 12 inch (43x30 cm) baking pan. Line the pan with parchment paper and then butter and flour the parchment paper. While the eggs are still cold, separate the eggs, placing the whites in one bowl and the yolks in another. Cover and bring to room temperature before using (about 30 minutes). Meanwhile melt the chocolate in a heatproof bowl placed over a saucepan of simmering water. Remove from heat and cool. Place the egg yolks and 1/4 cup of sugar in a mixing bowl and beat until light and fluffy (about five minutes). Beat in the vanilla extract. Scrape down sides of bowl. Add the melted chocolate and beat only to combine. In a clean mixing bowl beat the egg whites until foamy. Add the cream of tartar and beat until soft peaks form. Gradually beat in the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar until stiff peaks form. Gently fold the egg whites into the egg yolk mixture using a rubber spatula or whisk, a little at a time. Don't over mix. Spread the batter evenly into the prepared pan. Bake until the cake is puffed, has lost its shine, and springs back when gently pressed, about 15 -17 minutes. Remove from oven and place on wire rack to cool. Cover cake with clean, slightly damp towel. For the chocolate whipped cream: in large mixing bowl place whipping cream, vanilla extract, sugar, cocoa powder and stir to combine. Cover and chill bowl and beaters in refrigerator for at least one hour so cocoa powder has time to dissolve. Beat mixture until stiff peaks form. Once the cake has cooled, spread with the cream (set 2 tablespoons aside) and then gently roll the cake, peeling off the parchment paper as you roll (cake may crack). Trim one end of cake at an angle and set it aside. Then place the cake, seam side down, on your serving

A very special thank you for your valued patronage. Dr. P.H. Radford Optometrist The Bakers worked all through the Night ...constructing homes of gingerbread, while noggins thought to be in dreams ate up their sugarplums instead.

Warm thanks and Merry Christmas to all our customers.

The Rising Bun Bakery & Tearoom Sharbot Lake

613-279-2573

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platter. Take the slice of reserved cake and, using the reserved whipped cream, attach it to the side of the cake so it resembles a branch. Cover and chill until serving time. Dust with icing sugar, the snow on the log, and eat. Apple Cake 3/4 cup all-purpose flour 3/4 teaspoon baking powder Pinch of salt 4 large apples (if you can, choose 4 different kinds) 2 large eggs 3/4 cup sugar 3 tablespoons dark rum (optional) 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350o F. Generously butter an 8” springform or non-stick 9” pan and put it on a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper. Whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt together in small bowl. Peel the apples, cut them in half and remove the cores. Cut the apples into 1- to 2-inch chunks (pretty big chunks) In medium bowl, beat eggs with whisk until foamy. Pour in the sugar and whisk a minute or so to blend. Whisk in the rum and vanilla. Whisk in half the flour and when it is incorporated, add half the melted butter, followed by the rest of the flour and the remaining butter, mixing gently after each addition so that you have a smooth, rather thick batter. Switch to a rubber spatula and fold in the apples, turning the fruit so that it’s coated with batter. Scrape the mix into the pan and poke it around a little with the spatula so that it’s even-ish. Slide pan into oven and bake 50 to 60 min. or until top of the cake is golden brown and a knife inserted deep into the center comes out clean; cake may pull away from sides of pan. Transfer to cooling rack and let rest 5 min. Carefully run blunt knife around edges of cake and remove sides of spring form pan, making sure there are no apples stuck to the pan.

Merry Christmas to All PineRidge BBq Catering thank all their customers for 2011 and wish everyone all the best in 2012. Carl & Jeannette Pixley

Season's greetings from the Ompah Conservation Association We would like to thank the community and our membership for its ongoing support

Wishing You Peace and the Joys of this Season

From the Board of Directors & staff of Northern Frontenac Community Services.

Holiday Hours: Eyecare Clinic

The world in solemn stillness lay to hear the angels sing -Edmund Hamilton Sears

Orser Farm & Septic Pumping Dave, Nancy, Hannah Orser Verona 374-2031

Hoping that the holy light of Christmas will brighten all of your days. To our friends, special thanks.

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Day Care: Closed Dec. 23, 6pm - Jan. 3 Ontario Early Years Centre: Closed Dec. 23, 4:30pm - Jan. 3

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Sydenham

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Emergency Numbers Children’s Aid Society.......... 542-6909 or 542-7351 press 1 Ontario Provincial Police..............................1-888-310-1122 Interval House............................................... 1-800-267-9445 Frontenac Community Mental Health Crisis Line....... 544-4229


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The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

An angel of the Lord

by Rev. Mark Hudson (Luke 2: 8-14) And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, "Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger." Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying, "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests." As I reflect upon our Christmas tree, the ornament placed at the top of the tree is an angel; and you might ask why? The angel of the Lord played a major role, proclaiming "Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you, he is Christ the Lord" It is this Good News that is for all people. The angel is commissioned by God to deliver the message to the shepherds. The angel is a reminder of the message we carry to our fellow man especially at Christmas. The Hebrew meaning for angel is one who "carries a message", "fulfills a special, specific commission" and "represents the one sending him." As we look into scripture, these supernatural beings called angels are also referred to by other names. They are called "sons of God" Job 1:6; "mighty ones" Psalm 29:1; "heavenly beings" Psalm 89:6; "holy ones" Daniel 4:13, 17. It's important for us to acknowledge where these angels come from. They were heaven sent and the presence of the Lord was around them. They were sent by God the Father to deliver a message that was for all mankind. Secondly, the angel brings assurance to these trembling shepherds, "Do not be afraid." They were in the fields protecting their sheep, keeping watch for wild animals but to their surprise, heavenly beings they were not ready for appeared to them. They had little thought or expectation of

Season’s Greetings From the Staff & Board of Directors of

Rural Legal Services Notice: The offices of Rural Legal Services will be closed from December 23, 2011 until January 3, 2012

such things. The presence of the Lord shone around; these men were in the presence of God who is able to sweep away, remove their fear. Unless fear is removed, these shepherds would not be able to hear, let alone complete the mission they were to undertake. Once the angel delivered the message of great joy that was for all people, a multitude of the heavenly host appeared before them praising, worshipping God "Glory to God in the highest." The angel's primary focus is worship; it is God-centered. Thirdly, the message announces peace on earth to men on whom his favor rests.The birth of the Savior Jesus Christ is a great time of celebration, fulfilling the prophecy made in Isaiah 7:14 - 500 years earlier. "Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel" (Meaning God with us). Today, we worship the Savior, Jesus Christ. He did not remain a baby but He grew up to be a man, who became the ultimate sacrifice, bearing all our sins though he was without sin. He died on the cross; three days later he rose from the dead and sits at his Father's right side and will soon return for his bride, the church! Jesus came that we might experience the fullness of life found solely in him and offering those who believe in him eternal life! May each of you discover afresh the Joy of the Lord. As you seek the Savior, remember Jesus came and died for you. Have a blessed Christmas and a safe and happy New Year! To your families from our family at Sharbot Lake Pentecostal Church.

Chipits Noel Crisps

Submitted by Ruth Wendorf

1/2 cup butter 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1 egg 1/4 tsp almond extract 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup semi-sweet Chipits 3/4 cup coconut 3/4 cup chopped maraschino cherries, well drained Cream the butter and sugar. Beat in the egg and almond extract. Combine flour, baking powder and salt. Stir into creamed mixture. Mix in Chipits, coconut and cherries. Drop from tsp onto greased or parchment lined cookie sheet. Bake at 350o for 12 – 15 minutes. Makes about 3 1/2 dozen.

Rainbow Marshmallow Fudge

Submitted by Ruth Wendorf 3 cups semi-sweet or milk chocolate chips 2 Tbsp butter 1 can regular Eagle Brand Milk Pinch of salt 1 – 2 tsp vanilla 2 cups coloured miniature marshmallows Melt chocolate chips with butter, Eagle Brand milk and salt. Remove from heat. Stir in vanilla. Fold in 2 cups miniature marshmallows. Spread evenly onto parchment lined 8x8 inch square pan. Chill 2 hours or until firm. Cut into squares.

Holes count A

by Gray Merriam recent study led by Canadian ecologists Kristina Cockle and Kathy Martin* underlines the fact that many species, birds and some mammals, often have their populations limited by availability of tree holes. Many birds using tree holes for nesting and for overnight refuge, can't excavate holes, but depend on other species, such as the woodpeckers, to make holes for them. We have lots of woodpeckers making lots of holes for other birds and animals, such as our chickadees, bluebirds, our flying squirrels, and our wood ducks. If we wish to supply tree holes that wildlife will use, this study showed that old trees with many holes are less important because they don’t last. And the holes that we can see from the ground are the least likely to be used. The best holes, those that are wellused, and those that that will last for years will be in living trees of the sizes that we normally harvest. To maintain a supply of tree holes and the species that depend on them, we should maintain a diversity of tree species and tree diameters and the woodpeckers will do the rest. When trees die around your lot, let them decay gradually if they are not posing hazards. *Cockle, Martin and Wesolowski, Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, Sept. 2011.

Karen’s Squares

Caramel shortbread

recipes by Mary Barr Base: 3/4 cup flour 1/4 cup corn starch 2 Tbsp icing sugar 1/2 cup butter (or margarine) Press into square pan and bake at 300o for 12 minutes. Filling: 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup pecans – chopped 1 tsp vanilla 1/2 cup cherries, chopped 1/2 cup dates, chopped 1 Tbsp corn starch 3/4 cup coconut Bake at 325o for 35 minutes

Base: 1 cup margarine 1/2 cup brown sugar 1&1/2 cups flour Mix and pat into ungreased 9 x 13 inch pan. Prick with a fork. Bake at 275o for 45 minutes. Filling: 6 oz margarine 6 oz sugar 2 Tbsp corn syrup 1 can Eagle Brand milk Bring to a boil, boil slowly for 5 minutes, pour onto cooled shortbread base. Topping: Melt one Tbsp margarine in a saucepan. Add and melt 1 cup chocolate chips. Pour on top of cooled cake. Cut before chocolate hardens.

Best Wishes Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. From the staff of

Sharbot Lake Family Health Team

Season’s   Greetings

Sounding    Christmas Wishes For Faith Love Peace and Goodwill Royal Canadian Legion Branch #425 Sharbot Lake

2012 We would like to thank our members and guests and wish them a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Royal Canadian Legion Gordon Gaylord Br. 334 Officers, Executive & Membership

Wishing you all a very merry season and thank you for your support. Wayne, Jodi & Ena

Sharbot Lake Lawn Service 613 279-8145


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Christmas Trees T

Celebrating

27 Years

in Business

Happy Holiday It’s the little Christmas joys that bring out the biggest smiles. Hope yours is the merriest

Tim’s Autobody

336-2038

by Ina Hunt Turner athew started playing hockey in Bancroft at an early age and he liked it right from the start. The only fly in the ointment was that he wanted to be a goalie. He never got his wish, because first of all we could not afford the equipment and on top of that, each team he played on already had a very capable goalie. But one fine day he got his big break! The goalie on his team had to go away for a weekend and he lent Mathew his equipment. So on the big day when he was to make his debut he came out of the dressing room wearing a shirt that looked like it had been knitted by a mad woman on steroids and pants that would fit King Kong. His knobby knees, which thanks to his kneepads usually looked like they belonged to Popeye the Sailorman, were now covered by enormous goalie pads. Oh, how proud he was as he entered the ice rink, easily the most important player on the ice (or so he thought) as he kept skating up to the plexiglass and waving at me, just to make sure that I was not missing a moment of his glory. All too soon the game started. In the first two minutes the other team scored on him. In another minute they scored on him again and then another quick one. It was at that time that I decided that my heart could stand no more of this humiliation on his behalf and like the coward that I am, I fled to Tim Horton’s, where I sat until I thought the game might be over. Then I returned to the arena. However, when I got back the game was not over yet and the score was 14-1 against our team. There were five more minutes left of the game and I spent that time praying that first of all, no more goals would be scored against my little warrior and also that he would not be totally crushed by this big defeat. I guess my prayers were answered when the game mercifully ended and the score remained the same. But the biggest answer to my prayer was, when Mathew hobbled over to me as fast as his giant goalie pads would let him, on his way to the dressing room, grinning from ear to ear. He was obviously unaware that I had not stayed for the game as he proudly said, "Hey mom, did you see all the good ones I saved?" That day I learned a very important lesson: You see, where my glass had been half empty, Mathew's glass was half full.

The Gift that keeps on giving by Linda Coaty

So many years ago God gave us a gift, His Son And during Jesus’ time here He gave us gifts and blessings. Even after Jesus’ return And still to this day He is giving us gifts Of healing and miracles As well as talents and blessings Every description, both large and small, All through hands He has blessed To people who have faith. Jesus our gift, was given But not always accepted by all. Now and until Jesus’ return He is still giving gifts to all He is still the gift And he keeps on giving.

Rejoice

By Pastor Ken Walton, Parham Free Methodist Church he familiar Christmas story in Luke 2 has the angel addressing the shepherds and saying: “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Saviour has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.” Many of us are old enough to remember the days before political correctness came along and turned Christmas into the Holidays and Christmas concerts into Seasonal Activities. And many of us remember taking part in nativity plays in schools. Dad’s bathrobe and a staff turned boys into shepherds. Dad’s bathrobe and a crown made you a wise man. If you didn’t have a staff or a crown you were probably Joseph and you had to stand over near the girl who was Mary holding the baby Jesus doll. Of course if you were a girl and didn’t get chosen as Mary you ended up in the angel chorus. There was always a large Christmas tree and every child got a gift, if only an apple and some candy. The trouble was there was no attempt to connect the Nativity scene to the Christmas tree, lights, decorations and gifts. Few people today see any connection between the biblical story and the Christmas tree. Christians saw the evergreen tree as a symbol of joy, of hope, of an ever green tomorrow, a symbol of eternity. It seemed a fitting symbol for Christ’s day. Especially when you decorate it with stars to remind people of the star that led the wise men to the child; with angels to remind us of the messengers that came to Joseph and Mary and the shepherds; with lights to remind us that Jesus is the light of the world and without him we walk in darkness. Gift giving seemed appropriate on the occasion when Christians celebrated the greatest gift of all. God did not just send gifts to man ... He became the gift! That gift didn’t remain in the manger but ended up hanging on another tree ... the cross of Calvary. There that gift died to pay for our sin. That gift rose from the dead to give us eternal life. That gift will, if we accept Him, give us a relationship with Himself. The Christmas trees, lights, decorations, gifts, all these were meant to point us towards God, towards Jesus Christ, to help us understand what God has done for us. Don’t let these images, these pointers, now hide what they were supposed to reveal. Christmas, and Christmas Trees, are about joy and hope, peace and love, all wrapped up in this gift that is Jesus. Christmas is the celebration of the coming of Christ, the babe in the manger, the man on the cross, God the Son, our Lord and Saviour! Merry Christmas!

The Goalie M

To one and all go our hopes for peace on earth and joy in your hearts. Snider’s Service Centre & Restaurant Cloyne  336-2658 Verna, Ted, Arnold, Tim & Kris

SHARBOT LAKE MARINA Sharbot Lake, Ontario (613) 279-2952  SALES & service

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Blue Skies Fiddle Orchestra to welcome 2012 in Maberly By Marily Seitz magine a wintery afternoon in a cozy country hall filled with 60 fiddlers! Imagine the vibrant sound and the spectacular energy! What a great way to welcome in the New Year and to celebrate the twelfth day of Christmas. Be prepared to clap your hands and tap your toes. On Sunday, January 8, 2012 at the Maberly Hall, the Blue Skies Community Fiddle Orchestra, Prep Orchestra and Celtic Heritage Orchestra will play together, sixty strong, as they present their annual “Little Christmas” concert. Guitars, mandolins, penny whistles, viola, cello, drums and singers join in the music. And when all three groups play together, the rafters will ring. The Blue Skies Fiddle Orchestra will fill the hall with classic fiddling and seasonal songs. Carolyn Stewart will lead Celtic Heritage with their distinct brand of fiddle tunes. This will be the first performance for the newly formed ‘Prep Orchestra’. These mostly beginner fiddlers are learning to play, learning to play with others and to follow a director, in preparation for joining the Fiddle Orchestra. After only three months of playing together, their progress is remarkable. Cindy McCall will lead her first Christmas concert since taking over from founding director, Carolyn Stewart. Both the Blue Skies Fiddle Orchestra and Prep Orchestra are directed by McCall. Each is sponsored by Blue Skies in the Community, an offshoot of the Blue Skies Music Festival, which seeks to bring music to our communities throughout the year. The ‘Little Christmas’ concert will be held at the Maberly Hall on Sunday, January 8 at 2:30pm. Admission is $5 (children under 12 free). Refreshments will be available during the intermission. You won’t want to miss this lively and joyous event.

I

Season's Greetings To all creatures

The Best of the Season to You & Yours Here’s hoping your holiday’s a-bloom with joy and laughter. We greatly appreciate your trust in us

great & small.

Trousdale’s

Sydenham Veterinary Services

613-376-6666

3050 Rutledge Rd. 613 376-3618

Trousdale’s

Sharbot Lake

613-376-6609

613 279-2780

Sydenham

Holiday Greetings

Before the season melts away, we’d like to say thanks for thinking of us. Merry Christmas.

Season’s Greetings Here’s hoping you find many treasures under your tree! Merry Christmas to one and all!

The Sharbot Lake Dental Office Dr. Dale and Staff

Winter Hours: Monday to Thursday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Friday 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Saturday By Appointment Only call 279-2952 We will be closed for the Christmas holidays from

Wed. Dec. 21, 2011. Reopening Wed. Jan. 4, 2012.

Christmas throughout the world is meant to be shared by all.

From the Students and Staff of Sharbot Lake High School


Page S20

The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Balthazar’s Brainstorm M an, o man, they don't make camels like they used to. Melchior always told me that when I reached 50, I would know that the guarantee was off. He should know; he's 30 years older than I am, but for 81 he is really quite spry. Well, that is, until we decided to take that round trip to Bethlehem. Casper was the only one who came out of it with flying colours, but then when you are 29 you can take more physical punishment from camels. It was some journey. We first of all set off with a caravan, for protection you know, but the caravan commander, unlike others we had travelled with, was a veritable tyrant. Get up, go here, go there, do this, do that. Even the camels did not like him. So we decided to split and go our own way. Melchior had first noticed this star about two months ago when it had begun to increase in its intensity. We knew that any exceptional sign in the heavens foretold of either the birth or death of someone of great significance. But it was Melchior who stumbled upon its cause. You may recall that it was Cyrus the Great of Persia who had liberated the Jews from their Babylonian captivity, which lasted from 586 through 538 B.C. Some of the Jews then returned to Jerusalem but some did not and there remained pockets of Jews in diverse areas, one of which was close to where we resided. Melchior had always been intrigued with their history, their religion and their beliefs. While talking with some of these Jews one day - and of course all talk centred around the star and what it might portend - they suggested to Melchior that it might possibly be heralding the birth of the Jewish Messiah which had been predicted in old Jewish manuscripts through the prophet Isaiah. This seemed to be the most feasible suggestion and I was the one who pushed towards following the star to see this modern marvel. "Bally, (Melchior felt that at his age, he could not waste any of his precious time left on earth calling me Balthazar) I think you have struck upon an uncommonly magnificent plan.." And so we packed our camels and began our journey, not forgetting of course to take some gifts for the little fellow. But what to take? Melchior said that he would take him something of gold, for that signified kingship and virtue. Casper said that he would take him frankincense for that would be an acknowledgement that He was God. I had been impressed by what Melchior had told us about the prophecy concerning this baby. His friends elaborated upon this prophecy of Isaiah that this child was to be born but also that He would die for our sins, that is, for the sins of the whole world, and that even though He did this for mankind, He would be despised and rejected by men. I could not fathom that but I bethought me to take Him some myrrh, which would represent His suffering and death. Our journey was beautiful and uneventful except that Melchior complained a great deal. Casper was always the first to awaken in the morning, ready to be up and at 'em. We told him that he could just make breakfast while Melchior got his

by Antonia Chatson arthritis straightened out. We were doing just fine, following that great star which took us towards Bethlehem. But wouldn't you know it, four days' ride from there, a Roman contingent came galloping up to us and informed us that Herod wanted to see us. Unfortunately the feeling was not mutual. Our blood froze in our veins and we shook right to the very topmost tingle of our diadems. We had heard about this man, about how he had murdered his wife, Cleopatra, then his mother-in-law because he said she was interfering in the line of succession. These Herods were a wicked and murderous bunch, and none of us was even the least bit curious to make his acquaintance. However, the choice was not ours. The soldiers were very polite. They had brought us gifts and extra rations of food but our only thought was - what does he want with us? I was wondering to which of Herod's great palaces they would take us but as we proceeded on in the direction of Bethlehem, I guessed it must be the Herodium. Man oh, man, it was something to behold. The entire structure covered 45 acres. The Romans had lopped off the top of a fairsized hill and built a citadel on top of what remained of it. They then took the rubble from the top of the hill and built a very steep slope around the bottom of the hill, rendering the citadel impregnable to the enemy. The only access to the top of the hill was up a very steep and narrow winding stairway. We followed the soldiers up the 200 steps to the top. Poor Melchior had a terrible time. Casper went behind him and pushed him nearly the entire way up. We were ushered first into a courtyard which was filled with fountains, flowers and statues. Then we entered the main hall at the end of which crouched the great man himself. I say crouched, for his spine seemed to be curved around. I thought at first it was a physical deformity, but as I watched him more closely, I realized it was due to his looking over his shoulder so often. We had heard that he was paranoid and I would think that with so many murders and massacres attributed to him, he was justifiably so. He was, however, very polite. He said that he had heard about the birth of the King of the Jews, asked us to diligently search for Him and when we had found Him, we were to return immediately to him and supply him with information of His whereabouts. Herod further implied that he too wished to go and worship Him. Herod must have access to some good grapevine; there was something in the manner in which he sneered the title "King of the Jews" which alerted our already suspicious minds. Was that not the title the Romans allowed him to use? And this man would tolerate no rivals. We'd better mull this one over. We all began to breathe again when we had been escorted from his dubious presence, but we noticed that the soldiers continued to watch us from the ramparts of the citadel until we disappeared from sight behind a sand dune.

To all of our readers we wish a very

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year from

The Frontenac News

We’d like to thank everyone who supported our newspaper this year. Your news, your ideas, your advertising dollars and donations, help make this a lively and vital communtiy newspaper. May the joys of the season be yours to enjoy with family and friends.

Another two days and we arrived at Bethlehem - and that was where the star halted. The town was busy - the census you know. How to find a baby in this melee! We thought we would have to scour the town, but at the second inn where we enquired, the landlady fairly quivered with excitement as she hustled us out behind the inn to the cave where they kept their livestock. Our hearts sunk as we followed her out there, for surely this would not be the birthplace of a king. But the star remained stationary above this place. But when we entered the cave we no longer doubted, for the face of the man as he stood protectively by his wife, who was seated on a pile of loose hay, had an angelic quality to it. The swaddled newborn, who lay peacefully sleeping in his mother's arms, was bathed in a translucent light. We were struck with awe and quietly knelt down and adored this precious Saviour of mankind. How could anyone think to do Him harm?

Christmas Traditions I

Submitted by Kathryn Foster t has always been our family tradition to gather together to celebrate Christmas and “eat, drink and be merry.” This year our family will be celebrating, for the very first time, a Christmas without mom. Our tradition started as the five of us grew up, and continued as we left home, had children and even grandchildren. It was understood that we would all be together at Christmas if at all possible. At the forefront of all of this was mom. She cooked, cleaned and decorated for us all. In the last few years, when she was no longer able, my oldest sister took over and now we gather at her home. I can’t help but think how different it will be this year without our dear Mom and Nana. Mom always made the traditional fruit cake, shortbread and plum pudding, but another family favourite, that we only enjoy at Christmas, is “Peanut Butter Balls”. I hope you will enjoy these easy to make cookies as we always have…..

Peanut Butter Balls

2 Tbsp butter 3 squares semi-sweet chocolate ½ cup peanut butter 1 Tbsp. refined wax (see note below) 1 ¼ cup icing sugar Small amount coconut, chopped walnuts Have first three ingredients at room temperature and mix together well. Roll into ½ inch balls and refrigerate for 2 hours. Melt chocolate and wax together over a double boiler. Roll chilled balls in melted chocolate and then immediately in coconut or nuts. Place on a cookie sheet covered in waxed paper to set, then into a cookie tin. Refrigerate until ready to serve. If there are any left, they do freeze well. NOTE: Use pure refined wax, the kind that goes on the top of jams and jellies. The wax is necessary to keep the chocolate on the ball.

Merry Christmas

May the warmth of the holidays bring you peace, love and joy throughout the year. From all of us at

Verona Hardware Please Don't Drink & Drive

Santa's On His Way!

Scott Cox, Garry Drew, Julie Druker, Jeff Green, Jule Koch Brison, Suzanne Tanner A very special thank you goes out to our volunteers, who contribute their time and talent so generously. You make The News! • Anita Alton • Fred Barrett • Steve Blight • Rev. Jean Brown • Kelly Calthorpe • Jean Campbell • Sara Carpenter • Morrell Chaisson • Marg DesRoche • Martina Field • Dale Ham • Ina Hunt-Turner • Debbie Jones • Lorraine Julien • Wilma Kenny • Pearl Killingbeck • Jean Lewis • Debbie Lingen • Alice Madigan • Ellanora Meeks • Marilyn Meeks • Joan Moore • Katie Ohlke • Karen Prytula • Marion Ratzinger • Rural Legal Services • Linda Rush • Christie Schroeder-Laundrie • Colleen Steele • Don St. Pierre • Christine Teal • Georgina Wathen • Dale & Barb Whan.

Extending to all our warmest wishes for heartfelt happiness and fond remembrances. from everyone at

Verona Animal Hospital 53 Westport Rd., Godfrey


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Outdoors in the Land O’ Lakes - Becoming a citizen scientist This interesting article on becoming a citizen scientist was written by retired Biology Professor Dr. Jim Bendell about a presentation given by Marlene Doyle of Environment Canada to the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists (MVFN) on Sept. 15, 2011. We couldn't write a better article than Dr. Blendell has, so we're reprinting it with the MVFN's permission. Steve and I would like to wish our readers the very best of the Christmas season and a Happy, Healthy 2012 - Lorraine Julien

W

hen most of us stop and ask ourselves what we value most in life, we likely admit it is not a thing or things at all, but ourselves and other people. Next would be the natural environment, which, after all, we depend upon for at least food, water, clothing, and shelter. What can we do to understand more about our natural environment and how to protect and sustain it? Marlene Doyle of Environment Canada told us what we can do during a presentation: “Citizen Science Networks: Linking Nature Observation with Conservation”, which she made to the Mississippi Valley Field Naturalists (MVFN) in Almonte. Ms. Doyle invited the audience to “Join the ranks of Darwin and the Compte de Buffon” . . . that is to become citizen scientists! As coordinator of our national Nature Watch program, Ms. Doyle has worked for many years in enlisting people of all ages to monitor plants and animals and their habitats. She is currently Canadian representative on the Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Program’s Terrestrial Export Monitoring Group, or, “What’s Up? in the lands of the North?” Monitoring means observing and noting, something we do every day. Ms. Doyle gave us lots of ideas for what we can do to find out “what’s up world?” by monitoring the health and diversity of our natural world as citizen scientists. Everyone can take part and the requirements are simply interest, time, and wanting to help. Along the way you will learn new things, including how top professionals think and work. You will also see for yourself what people are or are not saying and writing about important issues. You will connect to nature and the community. You will certainly make new friends, have fun, and perhaps begin a successful career. The major reward is caring for Canada and the world by recognizing real environmental problems and doing something about them. The concerns are many and the need for help is unlimited. An important issue is climate change, which is real but what can be done about it? We are losing species of animals and habitats, making the world a poorer place, at never so fast a rate. Locally, and in a life time; tree swallows, nighthawks, whip-poor-wills, little brown bats and other birds and mammals have been significantly reduced. Might this signal greater losses for the future and eventually impact negatively on our own way of life? But why the losses and is there anything that can be done about them? A start in solving these problems is to monitor aspects of the environment by sight, sound, odour, or feel. As a citizen scientist, you will work with an experienced leader and follow set procedures. The more who are working together to

Merry Christmas

have helped elucidate the requirements of birds and clearly show changes in the abundance and distribution of species. For example, the counts tracked the spread of an introduced European Starling over the northern states and Canada and the disappearance of the similar Japanese Starling introduced to British Columbia. The Japanese form apparently cannot hatch its eggs under as cool conditions as the European bird and the abundance of both may be linked to climate change. Other projects range from counting Monarch Butterflies (an at risk species) to searching old logs and journals for information on past environments. Ms. Doyle, through Nature Watch Canada, coordinates the input of four large inventories: Plant Watch, Frog Watch, Ice Watch, and Worm Watch. Observations on plants include invasive species and dates of flowering. The kinds and abundance of worms reveal the health of soil. Frogs and the formation of ice are sensitive indicators of many factors in aquatic ecosystems, including temperature. Some relevant organizations are: Environment Canada (NatureWatch, www.naturewatch.ca, Ms. Marlene Doyle, 613-949-7754, marlene.doyle@eg.gc.ca); Natural Heritage Information Centre, Peterborough (705-755-2159, nhicrequests@ontario.ca); Toronto Zoo www.torontozoo. com; Ontario Nature (336 Adelaide St. W., Suite 201, Toronto, ON, M5V 1R9, www.ontarionature.org; Royal Bo-

continued on pg S22

Let us exult in the miracle of the Holy Birth and Celebrate the Glory that is Christmas! Peace and thanks to our Clients

Holiday fun comes in all

shapes and sizes! To our customers and their families go our thanks and best Yuletide greetings of the season!

Karl Wipfli Upholstery

4119 Hwy 38 Harrowsmith, ON

613-372-0290

Woodwark & Stevens Barristers and Solicitors

We would like to thank all those who have participated in activities with us this past year

Westport Home Hardware & Automotive 4 Church St.  273-3142

by Dr. Jim Bendell

The residents and staff of the Sharbot Lake Seniors Home wish you a very Merry Christmas and a peaceful New Year.

& a Happy NEW YEAR from all of us!

the same end, the more powerful will be the result. While amateurs are the main workforce, professionals in organizations, schools, universities and government typically provide information, participate, and publish the results. Observations and actions by citizen scientists may be out-of-doors, or in a laboratory or library. Work as much as you wish, alone or in a group. Some monitoring projects extend over many years. For example, you might go out and tag a clump of wildflowers on your property, and then follow PlantWatch monitoring directions for information that should be collected in the spring, file a report and repeat this again with the same plants each year. Or, you might join a Christmas bird count. You might participate in a marsh monitoring program or a Lakes Loon Survey next summer at your home or cottage. Always there is help at hand for advice and direction. Often people hesitate to participate in an activity because they think it is of little value or beyond their abilities. In fact, thousands of people are actively caring for our environment simply by reporting observations. And their findings have been used by many professionals and others to write reports on research and management in authoritative journals and books. Numerous tests show that inexperienced volunteers, with training, make accurate observations and determinations to provide trustworthy results. Not only is citizen science data reliable but it complements professional monitoring; it is relevant, local, timely, unique; and it is relatively low-cost to collect. Remember, you are not alone and can easily join many other interesting and committed people. A main doorway in joining a quest of interest is through Marlene Doyle (more on how to reach her later). She welcomes your call. There are at least 283 projects powered by ordinary citizens across Canada. A classic example is the Christmas Bird Count, started more than 100 years ago, which now includes 50,000 observers reporting from 2000 locations throughout the United States, Canada, and beyond. The findings, which are solely based on citizen scientist reports,

Page S21

Auto Service: 273-3087


Page S22

The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Citizen scientists - continued from pg S21

Cross-cultural traditions spice up the holiday season in Verona W by Julie Druker

tanical Gardens (Ontario Plantwatch Coordinator, Natalie Iwanycki, niwanycki@rbg.ca); Bird Studies Canada (P.O. Box 160, Port Rowan, ON, N0E 1M0); Canadian Wildlife Service (Ontario Region, 49 Camelot Dr. Nepean, ON K1A 0H3); and Canadian Amphibian and Reptile Conservation Network (Chairperson, Christine Bishop, 4553-46B Street, Delta, B.C. V4K 2N2, apalone_thionyx@yahoo. com). Cornell University also keeps a directory of projects undertaken by volunteers at http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ citscitoolkit/projects/find. Go for it! And the best of outcomes for you and our environment! OBSERVATIONS: Loretta and Jim Garbutt of Little Long Lake sent this photo of an amazingly colourful stick bug that they found in their garage this summer. Send your observations to Lorraine Julien at naturewatching@gmail.com or Steve Blight, natureobservations@rogers.com

hat better way to add a little special something to your look this holiday season than with a beautiful hand painted henna body design, which can make a great conversation piece at any holiday party. Members of the Verona Community likely had just that in mind when they attended a henna party, courtesy of Aziz and Naseem Murji, owners of the Verona Convenience Store. The couple invited long time friend Dr. Shafeena Premji, a professionally trained henna artist currently in her last year of medical school at Queens University where she is studying family medicine. “We wanted to expose people of our community to some of our cultural traditions, and thought this would be the perfect opportunity.” Naseem said when I spoke to her at the party, which was held at a Dr. Shafeena Premji applies henna designs to Astrid and Sierra private residence in Verona on notably Cleopatra, adorned their eyes with henna. It then Dec. 17. migrated to Turkey and Morocco where women entering arShafeena studied the art of henna with Ash Kumar a ranged marriages would have their feet and hands adorned world-renowned “henna artist to the stars” who is based out with henna as a way of alleviating tension, and the practice of London, UK and whose clients include multiple Bollywood began to become known for its medicinal properties. stars as well as many Hollywood movie stars. Shafeena has It then migrated to India and became popular in the Mosince started up her own company called Men.Dhi, through ghal empire, where it was adopted as an art form. Henna is which she offers bridal henna painting, and she has traveled still a traditional part of every Muslim, Hindu, and Sikh wedinternationally to bring her services to more than 400 brides ding and is used in other high holiday and cultural festivals world wide. throughout the world. Just watching the patterns and designs flow effortlessly Henna painting is also fast becoming popular in the west. forth from her fingers is a wonder to behold. Guests in VeShafeena first learned the tradition from her mother, who rona paid a small fee for an application, which takes about was a henna artist and the former began practicing bridal ten minutes for Shafeena to apply and which remains vishenna the age of 17 before studying it as an the art form ible for a number of weeks. The art of henna body painting professionally. Henna comes from the dried leaves of a two goes back 5000 years to ancient Egypt where women, most foot shrub known as a henna plant. The leaves are picked, dried and ground into powder, which is then mixed into a paste and applied onto the skin through an application tube creating a raised surface on the skin much like cake icing. The paste takes 20 minutes to dry and is left on the skin for four hours, after which time it is scraped off, leaving the design, which can last for many weeks. Shafeena cautions consumers to only use real henna, which you can tell from its reddish brown colour. Real henna is never black. You can visit Shafeena at facebook.com/mendhimd or contact Aziz or Naseem at their Verona Store at 613-3745789.

The Magic of Christmas Never Ends. Its Greatest Gifts are Family and Friends.

To All Those Who've Helped Us Along the Way

W.L. (Bill) Robinson

Thanks for making the journey worthwhile. Our hearts are warmed by memories of all the people we've been fortunate enough to work with and serve this year.

Councillor, South Frontenac, Portland District

Merry Christmas to all our Customers, Family & Friends.

Vaughan’s Automotive Inc. 6674 Main Street, Verona ON K0H 2W0 Vaughan B. Good, Owner

Dave & Judy Gray

Bowes & Cocks Limited Brokerage

Tel: 613-374-5439  Fax: 613-374-1393

Box 56, Arden, ON  K0H 1B0  613-335-5673

Dave Gray, Sales Rep.

Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year, from Our Family to Yours from the Robinsons

Thanking all of our friends and customers for your patronage over the past year.

Merry Christmas    from

15 Lanark Road (Hwy. 511) Perth, ON  613-267-2818

Land O'Lakes Lions

wish you a very Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year

and Thank you for your participation in our joint Kaladar/Northbrook Santa Claus Parade


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S23

Christmas 2011 By Marlene G. Ehret

So here we have another year And once again we come with cheer All wrapped up with wishes bright For peace and love and all that’s right. Sometimes the trials of life Seem to dim the Christmas light And grief may fall upon us so, We scarce can feel His joy below. Jesus in the heart of man, Come shine forth across this land And bring that peace that will abide Long after Yule and seasons Tide. So here we have another year, Perhaps it’s not all hale and cheer Yet here’s our love, with wishes bright For peace within and all that’s right.

▲ Drawing by Taylor Babcock, 10, Hinchinbrooke Public School

Practice Fire Safety this holiday!

Merry Christmas

Let's cherish the spirit of Christmas and the joy of friendship. With special thanks for your patronage and good will.

Harmony Esthetics         By Diane

May the spirit of Christmas keep you warm all season long... and the happy glow of holiday joy stay with you thoughout the year. Your business... and friendship...mean the world to us. Thanks

▲ Drawing by Heidi Ferguson, 12, Sharbot Lake Middle School

• Cooking is a major cause of home fires, so don’t leave the kitchen if there’s something cooking on the stove. If a pot catches fire, don’t try to move it. Cover the pot with a lid to smother the flames and turn off the burner. • If the smoke alarm activates when you’re cooking,

do not remove the batteries. Try moving the smoke alarm, or install an alarm with a hush feature.

Certified Esthetician & Reflexologist

Merry Christmas

W

Heres' to a harmonious holiday. May the friendships and fun times abound. Thanks for your kindness and support.

613-374-2766

4358 Sand Road, Verona ON

Hope, Annette, Andrea, Margo, King & Carol

all ’s

C

of Harrowsmith akery

afé and

B

From our branch to your family and business, we wish you a happy holiday season.

& Happy New Year to you & your family from

m

Di

e B enn

e Sharbot Lake Branch 1043 Elizabeth Street 613-279-3191

es

J

Ma

r ia G o

New patients always welcome.

nn

tt

Hwy 38 Verona  (613) 374-2112

ow

a

D r. To r n

Dr Tornow & Staff

Reid’s

We Deliver ~ All Day Slices

Parham Ont 613-375-6335

Merry Christmas

We wish our friends & customers a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

4917 Hwy 38, Harrowsmith

Parham General Store

Staff & management at

E

Linda, Sean, Scott & Staff

372-5693

Have a safe and Happy Holiday

By Marilyn

613-374-5665

• Lit candles should be placed in sturdy candleholders that won’t tip and covered with a glass shade.

ishing all my friends & customers, old and new, a heartfelt Thank You. We appreciate your business & friendship.

Village Hair

Warmest Wishes

Office Hours: Mon- Thurs 8:30am to 5 pm

an

i c e Wa y

TM

Registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. RBC and Royal Bank are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. TM Trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada. 39540 (11/2010)

®


The Frontenac News Christmas Greetings 2011

Page S24

Community inspired holiday crafts by Julie Druker

P

arents and caregivers of young ones and students of all ages will have many hours to fill during the holiday season. Here are a few simple ideas for younger crafters courtesy of the students and staff at Harrowsmith Public School as seen at the school’s 2010 Festival of Trees event Reindeer candy canes Candy canes can be used to make these simple Rudolph ornaments. You'll need a candy canes, pipe cleaners, small poms poms, googly eyes and glue. Pretty straight forward. Cut pipe cleaner to appropriate

As men walk hand in hand let us offer thanks for the promise of Peace on Earth. Your patronage is greatly appreciated. A very Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year to all our clients & their families. From all the Staff at the

Sharbot Lake

We Wish You a Merry Christmas! May the love and family be a

special gift to treasure throughout the season. Our special thanks to all

Sydenham One Stop

4391 George St., Sydenham

376-6482

We value the friendships we’ve built with customers like you. Hope you have a happy holiday!

length and use a single length wrapping it around the bend in the hook of the cane and shaping both sides of it into nice antlers. Glue on eyes and nose Popsicle stick Rudolph You need popsicle sticks, glue, googly eyes and pom poms. Take two popsicle sticks and glue them together making a wide “V” shape. Glue a third stick across the “V “making a wide triangle. Glue on eyes just below the cross stick and a pom pom at the tip of the “V”. Attach a looped length of string or ribbon to the cross bar so the ornament can be hung. Popsicle stick candy cane You’ll need popsicle sticks, red and white paint, glitter, glue, red ribbon, small red pom poms and green felt. On one popsicle stick paint diagonal alternating banding lines of red and white making sure that you vary the widths of colour as you go. When dry, line some of the edges of these lines with a thin band of glue and sprinkle glitter on to it so that it sticks to the glue, The power of His love shaking off the excess. Using is everlasting. green felt cut out two ivy leaf We take this joyous occasion to shapes in a single piece and express our thanks to all of you. glue to the top front of the George E. Duncan stick. Then glue red poms Dressed Lumber poms onto the felt. You can Mouldings cut a piece of construction Millwork paper and write on it whatevMcDonalds Corners 278-2745 Mill er you feel inspired to. Glue a 278-2309 Home looped piece of ribbon to the back for hanging.

May this season

Martha & Staff would like to thank the community for their support

Wishing everyone a Merry Christmas & a Happy New Year

Bravo Restaurant

6557 Hwy 38, Verona  613-374-5444 (Under New Ownership)

overflow with good times, good friends and good fun! We’re especially thankful for our good friends like you.

Book your New Year's Eve Reservation NOW!

Holiday Hours: Open Dec. 24th 8am-2pm. Closed Dec. 25th & 26th Open Dec. 31st, Open Jan. 1st 10am-3pm

Knowler

Tracy, Sandi, & Staff Cloyne, 613-336-8416

Plumbing LTD 613-374-3662

Declaring that this holiday will be the best ever and that a bright Christmas spirit will fill your hearts with happiness. Many thanks From: Hugh, Sylvia & Family

Gray Bros. Construction LTD. Mountain Grove, Ontario

Hook’s

Happy holidays from all the

member businesses of the Land O' Lakes Tourist Association Toll Free: 1-800-840-4445 Email: info@lol.on.ca Ph: (613) 336-8818 www.travellandolakes.com

A blessed and beautiful Christmas to you and yours. We appreciate your patronage and support

Bence Motor Sales Limited

kALADAR, on

BENCE

336-2626

Robert Bence & Staff

Vol.11 No.51  

Frontenac News Vol.11 No.51 - Dec 22/11

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