Issuu on Google+


editor’s note Ever since I was a little girl I have had something of an obsession with Halloween. As a kid, admittedly, I was probably most excited about the abundance of sugar that poured through my little hands. But the passing years allowed me to have different kinds of fun...haunted houses, costume parties, putting up decorations and seeing all the pagentry that comes with the pumpkin’s big night. In the last few years, being able to see Halloween through my children’s eyes really has to be the most fun of all. In this issue of Festivities, we celebrate our favorite parts of fall: apple picking, costuming, Halloween and a little cultural fun with the Mexican holiday, Dia de los Muertos or Day of the Dead. I hope these pages inspire you a bit for fall and that you enjoy viewing them as much as we enjoyed creating them! Paula Biggs Editor-in-Chief

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


ISSUE contents

FALL 2012

features 7

A Picnic with Johnny Appleseed

16 20 32

34 37

Fall Harvest: Apple Picking Let the Ghoul Times Roll

Glow in the Dark Play Dough Tutorial Praline Tutorial Vasaline Glass 101

43 Black Cat Ball 56 Trick-or-Treat Etiquette 58 70 84 86

Nothing Beats a Beet Dia de Los Muertosv Pumpkin Empanadas Marigold Muerte Signature Drink FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


contributors Paula Biggs

Editor-In-Chief Frog Prince Paperie

Paula is a party-loving mom of two with a background in communications and a love for entertaining. She’s the owner of two printable party shops, Frog Prince Paperie and Frog Prince Occasions. Her styling and design work has been seen in national magazines such as Southern Living and Yum! Food and Fun for Kids Magazine as well as many well-known international entertaining blogs.

Nicole Willis

Editor Tradewind Tiaras, Inc. Nicole is the owner of the new party planning and inspiration company, Tikkido.com. Nicole has worked for numerous journalism institutions, including NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. Her work has been featured in Yum! Food and Fun for Kids magazine; and many popular blogs, including Amy Atlas, Hostess with the Mostess, and Style Me Pretty.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Giedre Augustinaviciute g.august photography

Natalie Clause Southern Belle’s Charm

Meredith Long Curator Meadow Brook Hall and Manor

Thank you to our wonderful contributors and that lent their time and talents to this issue of Festivies Magazine

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


WWW.TIKKIDO.COM PARTY SHOWCASES INSPIRATION TUTORIALS


SEASONAL

parties

JOHNNY APPLESEED

Johnny Appleseed

A P IC N I C W IT H

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


SEASONAL

parties

P H OTO G R A P Y A ND S T Y L I NG B Y PA UL A B I G G S

JOHNNY APPLESEED, known for

planting apple trees across the country, was born as Johnathan Chapman in 1774. Even in his day he was a legend and his reputation well earned. Overwhelmingl y generous, a staunch conservationist, and an arborist, he had a way with people and with nature. And as with any good legendary figure, Johnny was extremel y eccentric. The pictures Disney paints of him are onl y half correct. He did in fact wear his cooking pot for a hat, but the onl y--onl y!--stich of clothing he ever wore after his mom no longer had a say-so was a feedsack. He weathered scores of northern winters in his bare feet and still lived into his 80s. While Johnny’s personal habits aren’t necessaril y perfect for little ears, the spirit of what he did in his life is a great subject on which to base a lesson. Every lesson is easier to hear on a full stomach, making a little outdoor picnic a perfect choice to wax poetics on an apple man.

Baskets of apple themed food were offered to the children: apple chips, homemade applesauce (yum!), apple dipped in caramel, hot apple, cheese and ham sandwiches and cute apple cupcakes to finish up with. There was plenty to share! More than anything, Johnny Appleseed personified the creed “Love thy Neighbor.” He showed great love for his fellow man. While we had our picnic, we talked about things we could do to make our world a better place, just like Johnny. It was a proud mom moment to get answers like share, volunteer, be giving, and use less and recyle. It is always good to know they listen once in a while! We wrote these ideas down and strung them on our very own appletree. FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


THE SUN AND THE RAIN AND THE APPLESEEDS

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Apple trees planted from apple seeds are inedible. Tart and bitter, they are used mainly for making apple cider and apple jack, an alchol. Grafted apple trees make for good eating, but Johnny was completely against the practice of grafting. Still, the eccentric man was welcomed by settlers with open arms for bringing his variety of apple trees westward.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Kids love cupcakes, especially when they look a little novel. To make these apple cupcakes, frost the tops with a thin layer of buttercream and roll in red sugar crystals. For the stem, cut a piece of cinnamon stick to about an inch and shape a piece of green fondant for the leaf. Seedlings were a perfect choice to go along with something as green as a Johnny Appleseed party. A little burlap and twine and a sweet tag made these seedlings ready to go home with our guests!

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


GOOD

eats

HOT APPLE, CHEESE AND HAM SANDWICHES The favorite part of the picnic - besides the cupcakes! Serve them hot or cold, they’re delicious both ways. For Vermonters, a piece of cheese with your apple is the only way to eat it! 2 slices whole wheat bread 1 slice muenster cheese 1 slice cheddar cheese 2 slices deli ham 5 thinly sliced apple pieces Butter Spread butter on one side of each of the pieces of bread. Lay the bread butter side down into a frying pan on medium low. Place one slice of cheese on each piece of bread. Put the apple slices on one and the ham slices on the the other piece of bread. Cook until the cheese starts to slightly melt. Using a spatula, put the filling sides together to create a sandwich and remove from heat. Slice and serve! FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


APPLE PICKING

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Apple Picking: a Fall Tradition BY NICOLE WILLS, TIKKIDO.COM

A crisp September afternoon, golden rays of sunshine, and a family outing to the apple orchard. Memories are made on days like these. But an excursion to go apple picking can be so much more than just a fun adventure. It can be a fabulous learning experience, too. Trisha Lucas, Education Director at Desert Sun Child Development Center, knows this well. She spends her days designing educational plans to teach children important skills through play, so that they’ll not only learn what they need to know, but love the process, too. Lucas intimately understands the benefits of a farm visit. “A lot of kids don’t get to experience these things on a day-to-day basis anymore,” says Lucas. “I grew up on a farm. I knew where my food came from. I knew where my clothes came from—it was a cotton farm. Visiting a farm can be so much more than just quality family time. It can give children a sense of where things come from, where things begin.” This isn’t to say that a day at the farm has to be full of lectures and lessons. Children learn through their senses, and most importantly, through play. “Picking up leaves and twigs, feeling the textures, smelling the smells of a farm—these are things most kids read in books, but don’t experience regularly.” The adventure and action of going to a pick-your-own farm is the perfect central activity for play-based learning.

“Making applesauce is a wonderful Way Up High in the Apple hands-on learning opportunity,” says Tree Lucas. It engages - Author Unknown all the senses—smell, touch, taste, sight, Way up high in an hearing—and teaches apple tree. children about Two red apples sequencing when following the recipe. smiled at me. It reinforces numbers, I shook that tree as measurements, self hard as I could. confidence from Down came the making something apples! themselves. “Plus kids are more likely Mmmmmm they to eat it if they make were good! it,” notes Lucas. Help children peel, chop, cut, boil, smash (“the fun part!”) the apples and watch them learn while having a wonderful time. Lucas also recommends cutting the apples in half and using them as stamps. “Cut them in half one

A day full of taste and touch and smell in the orchard starts the lesson, but parents can enrich the experience and continue the learning at home, helping children to draw connections between what they’ve seen on the farm and their everyday lives. Lucas suggests making applesauce once you get home with your bounty from the orchard. FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


way,” says Lucas, “and find the seeds. Cut an apple in half the other way, and see how the seeds make a star shape. Kids love discovering that!” Use the cut apples to paint shapes on paper, further enriching the educational experience. Continue the apple fun with any number of the wonderful apple-themed books available for children, like Apples, by Gail Gibbons or 10 Apples up on Top, by Dr. Seuss. There are many wonderful songs about apples, as well. Lucas recommends Way up High in the Apple Tree for preschoolers. Ready to go on a pick-your-own adventure? Head to http://www.pickyourown.org/ to find a farm near you.

Endearing quote about enjoying the orchards with family...

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


BLACK LIGHTS DISSAPEARING INK

SCARY SWEETS GHOSTLY FUN

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


v Liquor ipsum dolor sit amet benromach. Old mr. boston golden doublet nikolaschka bumbo chopin tomintoul bruichlad-

dich charro negro police gazette glenburgie. Bellini; glen moray red lotus kentucky tavern cheeky vimto. Vodka martini joker long island iced tea redline, tennessee cowboy white horse tennessee cowboy culto a la vida. Bumbo pulteney dickel gummy and coke longmorn isle of jura stolichnaya dark and stormy talisker pepe lopez galliano two fingers, grand marSEASONAL nier.

parties

Bronx glenburgie red lotus canadian club. Tom collins blue lagoon blue lagoon knockeen hills irish poteen bloody mary or bloodball. Brave bull cragganmore porto flip, “bunnahabhain; cointreau the macallan singapore sling lemon split.” Jacquin kahlua port charlotte ron rico royal bermuda cocktail caipiroska gin and tonic appletini, springbank golden doublet. Colombia, quentão golden dream irish coffee bengal edradour; charro negro, french 75. Northern comfort hayride aberlour glen scotia scapa agua de valencia bumbo godfather, haig & haig “pinch. Tequila sunset bladnoch, tamagozake tequila sunrise cardhu polish martini kirsch french 75. Singapore sling jack and coke leroux arran dalwhinnie sangría, hiram walker kensington court special Liquor ipsum dolor sit amet benromach. Old mr. boston golden doublet nikolaschka bumbo chopin tomintoul bruichladdich charro negro police gazette glenburgie. Bellini; glen moray red lotus kentucky tavern cheeky vimto. Vodka martini joker long island iced tea redline, tennessee cowboy white horse tennessee cowboy culto a la vida. Bumbo pulteney dickel gummy and coke longmorn isle of jura stolichnaya dark and stormy talisker pepe lopez galliano two fingers, grand marnier. Bronx glenburgie red lotus canadian club. Tom collins blue lagoon blue lagoon knockeen hills irish poteen bloody mary or bloodball. Brave bull cragganmore porto flip, “bunnahabhain; cointreau the macallan singapore sling lemon split.” Jacquin kahlua port charlotte ron rico royal bermuda cocktail caipiroska gin and tonic appletini, springbank golden doublet. Colombia, quentão golden dream irish coffee bengal edradour; charro negro, french 75. Northern comfort hayride aberlour glen scotia scapa agua de valencia bumbo godfather, haig & haig “pinch. Tequila sunset bladnoch, tamagozake tequila sunrise cardhu polish martini kirsch french 75. Singapore sling jack and coke leroux arran dalwhinnie sangría, hiram walker kensington court special

LET THE GHOUL TIMES ROLL

Halloween With a Little Mardi Gras Fun BY NICOLE WILLS, TIKKIDO.COM Of one thing we can be sure: the best part of Halloween happens in the dark. The eerie fun of black lights has been a longtime favorite of haunted houses and spooky venues. Black lights can also be used in a more whimsical way, to bring some bright, glowing color to a typically dark celebration. The inspiration behind this Halloween party with New Orleans flair started with printables from Frog Prince Paperie. The jolly, frolicking, mardi-gras-mask bedecked ghosts set the tone for a kid-friendly affair. Using black light to create magical glowing effects was the perfect accompaniment.

Staring in our ghoulish glow show was antique Vaseline glass; it fluoresces an intense green under black light, as the uranium in the glass reacts with the ultra-violet rays. More common pieces can be picked up at very reasonable prices, and add a truly striking element to a dessert table seen under black light. Making the food itself glow was a matter of chemistry. Quinine glows intense blue, while vitamin B glows an eerie yellowish-orange color. Everything from the beverages to the desserts to the play-dough favors was designed to look fabulous—and different— under both regular and UV light. FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


An eerie glow to the beverage station electrifies the atmosphere.. . Spooky eyes watch while apparitions hang candles mid-air. Creatures from the crypt offer up ghostly signs on creepy cupcakes...all to get the ghoul times rolling!

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


A HAUNTED GALLERY

Painted on the sugary surface of a cookie and framed in frosting. The lights go out, and the sweets show their specters.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


COOKIE CRYPTS House haunted souls. In the magic cast by the blacklights, the ghosts come out to say hello! There is nothing quite like a mausoleum for munching.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


ALL AGLOW

Glowing food, surprises that appear only when the regular lights are turned out—the element of surprise in this ghoulish black-light bash is enough to tempt even the most timid little ghostling to join the Halloween fun. Scary Skull Cake Pops provided by Jennifer at The Best Cake Pops www.heavenlycakepops. com or call 623.203.5659 to purchase!

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


MASKED MAURADERS CONCEALING CLOAKS EDIBLE BEADS

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


THROW ME SOME BEADS, MISTER! Beads and masks draped our party in Mardi Gras decadence. We were even able to concoct some creative edible beads that are sure to be the envy of the small social set.

FESTIVITIESvBY BYTIKKIDO.COM TIKKIDO.COMAND ANDFROG FROGPRINCE PRINCEPAPERIE PAPERIEFALL FALL2012 2012 FESTIVITIES


GLOW IN THE DARK Play Dough Bright and cheery yellow under a regular bulb, this spooky playdough glows flourescent under the rays of a blacklight. The secret ingredient makes it special!


How to make it 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup salt 2 cups water 1 Tablespoon oil 1 teaspoon cream of tartar Vitamin B (either in powdered capsule or liquid form) Add vitamin B to water for easiest, even distribution. If you are using the powder from a capsule, stir until the vitamin B powder is dissolved in the water. Place flour, salt, colored water, oil, and cream of tartar in a large saucepan. Cook over medium high heat, stirring constantly, until it turns into play dough. Don’t over think this— you’ll know it when you see it. Turn dough out onto the counter and let sit until it’s cool enough to knead. Knead briefly just to be sure that the play dough is completely mixed. Store in an airtight container. One batch of this recipe filled four small deli containers perfectly. Note: vitamin B is a water soluble vitamin, so if a child happens to eat some of this play dough, it’s not a problem. He or she will just get a little extra vitamin B, and any extra the body can’t use will get flushed out of his or her system the natural way.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


PRALINES No celebration with Creole inspiration would be complete without the classic pecan praline. This seriously sweet candy is a treat nobody will want to pass up. MATERIALS:

4 quart saucepan candy thermometer Wooden Spoon parchment paper spoon for scooping

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 cup toasted pecan halves and pieces 1 1/2 cups white sugar 3/4 cups brown sugar 6 Tbsp butter 1/2 cup cream 1 tsp vanilla Pinch of Salt

Preparation is key in making pralines, since things come together quickly. Have all the ingredients measured out, and all the necessary equipment within reach before beginning. Heat sugar, brown sugar, butter, cream, salt and vanilla in a large saucepan over medium heat. Stir occasionally, and heat until the mixture reaches 240 degrees Fahrenheit (softball stage). This happens quickly, so keep a close eye on the candy thermometer, and don’t turn away from the stove for even a moment. When the mixture reaches 240 degrees Fahrenheit, remove from heat and quickly mix in the pecans. Stir vigorously for 1-2 minutes, until the mixture starts to thicken and crystallize slightly. At this point, be prepared to move quickly. As fast as possible, spoon the candy mixture on to the parchment sheets. The mixture hardens quite rapidly once removed from the heat, so don’t worry about making perfect circles; just worry about getting the candy on the parchment. Let cool, and enjoy the heaven that is a real southern praline.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


VASELINE GLASS BY MEREDITH LONG


This amazing season brings with it one of the best holidays of the year, Halloween! It is a time for the kid at heart, when imagination reigns supreme and homes come alive with make believe. The creatives among us take up the cause and create magical worlds of wizards and princesses, ghosts and monsters for our families and friends to enjoy. It seems only fitting to use Vaseline glass on your holiday table: the only tableware that gives off an eerie green glow!

History Many today are confused about the name “Vaseline” as it conjures up visions of jars filled

with petroleum jelly. The name “Vaseline” refers peripherally to its color, not its original contents. Produced since the 1840s, people started referring to it as Vaseline in the 1920s because its light yellow color is reminiscent of petroleum jelly. The name stuck. In actuality, its primary color is a bright yellow to yellow-green. Not only does this glass vary in yellow shades, it also varies in opacity, ranging from transparent to semi-transparent. It has had many different names over the years, such as “Canary” because of its similarity to the bright yellow feathers of the popular winged pet, or “Uranium glass” because of the additive that gives it its distinctive glow. Differing

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012

“Vaseline” refers to the color of the glass, not its original contens. colors and names that change from decade to decade and country to country often make collecting this glass a bit tricky. Even more tricky is that all Vaseline contains uranium but not all glass with uranium is Vaseline.


“IF IT DOESN’T GLOW GREEN, IT’S NOT VASELINE.”

There are types such as Custard and Burmese glass that contain uranium but are opaque instead of transparent. To make matters worse, what is known as green “depression glass” has uranium but is considered a different type of glass than Vaseline. Confusing, but well worth the effort for those willing to do a little research. Those who have collect Vaseline glass use a black light to test for Uranium and the saying “IF IT DOESN’T GLOW GREEN, IT’S NOT VASELINE.” The distinctive radiance of Vaseline glass shines as the ultraviolet light causes its uranium additive to fluoresce. Although the use of uranium often elicits fear of zombie apocalypselike proportion, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission concluded the glass is safe, as it gives off only 1-to-2 % of the average American’s natural radiation exposure.

Vaseline glass has been made in the United States from the 1840s to the present day. At the peak of its popularity, between 1890 and 1940, it was used for a variety of decorative and functional purposes. Whole table settings were made in the 1890s and would have made quite a statement in dark, moody, Victorian homes. Its beautiful coloring lends itself to a wide array of goods such as vases, cake plates, lamp shades, marmalade dishes, candlesticks and even novelty items. That is one of the greatest things about Vaseline glass -- its variety.

Collecting and Display If you have decided that Vaseline glass is for you, how do you begin your collection? It is important to look for six basic things: pattern, size, color, labels, condition, and manufacturer marks. Pricing is affected by all of these factors

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


and more, and can vary by region, country and dealer. The most critical to understand is availability and condition. Availability is obvious, as the rarer an item is, the more a collector will pay for it. This doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the entry level collector, however. There are many price points to start your new obsession and plenty of affordable pieces that will give you years of enjoyment without breaking your bank! Another important element of collecting any type of glass or ceramic is condition. Look at the piece, once, twice; move over to

a window and look at it again. Make sure to examine a potential purchase well and run your fingers over the rim, the handles and the base as your eyes will often miss what your fingers can feel. Pricing is highly dependent on the condition of a piece, so it is important as you want to pay what the piece is worth. Once you have a collection, Vaseline glass is marvelously fun to display, and your options are as endless as the enjoyment you will receive from it. Lighting will dramatically affect the look and enjoyment of your collection. Natural light creates a bright and cheery glow out of the glass,

whereas a black light will produce the intense fluorescent glow for which the glass is known. Furniture like antique pie safes, barrister bookshelves, and wardrobes all make dramatic display cabinets when wired for lighitng. The greatest part of applying a little creativity to your display Merideth Long is the Curator of the cabinet is that it can be just as Meadow Brook Hall and Manor in impressive as Rochester, Michigan. your collection.


PRINTABLE PARTIES WITH MAGIC.

frog prince PAPERIE

INVITATIONS

DECORATIONS CUSTOM DESIGNED PARTYWARE


HALLOWEEN HIJINX AT THE

SEASONAL

parties

Black Cat Ball BLACK CAT BALL

WRITING, STYLING AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY PAULA BIGGS OF FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


SPOOKY IN A SNAP

CUPCAKES. Order these goodies from the store and dress up with cupcake toppers.

CHOCOLATE COVERED OREOS. Dip, sprinkle and cool for an instant personalized look.

FRESH POPCORN. Roll patterned papers into cones for dressed up dishing out.

CARROT CAULDRONS. Easy to find plastic pots with dressing make healthy fun!

LITTLE FAVORS. Fill a spooky box full of treats to send home with guests.

RING DING KITTIES. Add chocolate ears and candy noses and watch the kids’ glee!

Halloween in a hurry--armed with some brightly colored printables, some store bought treats and storebought tissue poms, you can delight your trick-or-treaters without a lot of effort. Temper the treats with some good-for-you snacks like popcorn and carrot sticks made festive with a fun presentation.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


SEASONAL

parties

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


The Black Cat Ball IN HIGH STYLE A little Halloween magic went into creating a bit of “kid-fancy” for our annual All Hallow’s Eve party this year, turning our house into the stage for the Black Cat Ball where our little felines came to play. The concept of “fancy” is way different for kids than adults. A little sparkle, satin and a smattering of feathers and you’ve got yourself a decadent party in a child’s eyes. We decided to go a step further with this fancy idea and create sort of a sketched in backdrop that was printed out and pasted up. With all the printed decor, we were able to easily cover a lot more space than we usually do. So fancy everywhere, and so much more fun.

FESTIVITIESBY BYTIKKIDO.COM TIKKIDO.COMAND ANDFROG FROGPRINCE PRINCEPAPERIE PAPERIEFALL FALL2012 2012 FESTIVITIES


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


All in the presentation... A few well chosen serving pieces can make the most ordinary thing extraordinary. Cupcakes served from champagne saucers filled with black bubbles are a clever and easy way to make this party staple “kid fancy.” Butterscotch pumpkin parfaits served out of mini martini glasses also puts the polish on this easy-to-do dish.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


SOMETHING SWEET THIS WAY COMES...

SPOOKIE SUGAR COOKIES brought scaredy cats and jack-o-lanterns to the table. Made by Bees Knees Creative, www. beeskneescreative.com

MERINGUE GHOSTS that are frighteningly sweet, yet easily created at home.

SPUN SPIDER PETITE FORS made from pre-made pound cake bring creepy crawlie to a new level.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY BY TIKKIDO.COM TIKKIDO.COM AND AND FROG FROG PRINCE PRINCE PAPERIE PAPERIE FALL FALL 2012 2012 FESTIVITIES


SEASONAL

parties

AND THEN SOMETHING SAVORY

BETA CAROTENE BROOMS Are something to balance the sugar high, nestled in cauldrons of ranch dressing.

PARMESEAN POPPYSEED CRACKERS IN HUMMUS are not only fabulously yummy, but also exciting for kids in their individual serving dishes.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


BLACK CAT PARTY TRICKS ARTFUL GARNISHES - they make almost anything look spectacular. Make a recipe of royal icing and pipe shapes onto waxed paper. After the icing has dried, carefully remove from the paper and garnish your dessert right before serving so the sugar doesn’t melt away.

CRACKER DETAILS. A simple template cut from card stock provided the form for our cat silhouettes on our crackers. A simple egg wash and a sprinkling of poppy seeds before baking gave these crackers character!

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


SHORTCUT PETITE FORS. These couldn’t be easier, especially when using a pre-made pound cake cut into 1-inch cubes. A lemonflavored sugar glaze spooned over the top gave each bite that traditional petite fors coating. It took three coats for a suitable shell here. Once the glaze was dry, spiders were piped on with black tinted royal icing for a sisnister look.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


PARTY

etiquette

TRICK OR TREAT ETIQUETTE BY NATALIE CLAUSE OF SOUTHERN BELLE’S CHARM WWW.SOUTHERNBEELESCHARM.COM

While the basics of trick-or-treating seem simple, even here, there is protocol to be observed. It’s never too early (or too late) to instill good holiday etiquette in your little monsters. There are lots of things to remember when minding your manners, but at the heart of it, you just need to think of safety and others first! If your kids need a review, here is the short list of things to remember on the big night.

1. Prepare.

Getting dressed up for Halloween and Trick-orTreating is supposed to be a fun time with friends and family. Having to take home a hysterical kid who has been scared witless on their first time out is no fun for anyone. Warn children ahead of time that some houses may be spooky and that some people may be in scary costumes but that they are only having fun. It may help to walk around before dark and point out the decorations. A graveyard setting may be less creepy during daylight hours, and that may help them handle it better when encountering it (or similar decorations) at night.

2. Open for Business.

Lights On! Only approach homes that are well-lit, brightly decorated and welcome trick-or-treaters.

3. Knock or Ring the Door Bell

No More Than Twice. Wait 30-45 seconds between each ring. If

the door isn’t answered within a minute to a minute and a half despite the porch light being on, assume you’ve arrived at a house that didn’t read Rule #10 and go to the next place.

coffins at Trick-or-Treaters, take a quick glance to make sure they’re of an appropriate age group to enjoy such a scare. Save the best frights for those who can really appreciate them.

4. Don’t Trick-or-Treat after 9pm. Most cities offer times

10. Be Respectful. There

that are approved for trick-ortreating in your area. Check the local news stations or fire departments.

5. Manners.

Unless the child is too young (or shy) to speak, saying “Trick-or-Treat” before and “Thank You” afterward are the price for collecting free candy on Halloween.

6. Stay on Sidewalks or Pathways. Don’t take short cuts through lawns or flowerbeds. Not only could you damage the landscaping, you could hurt yourself.

7. Take One Piece of Candy.

Teach your child ahead of time to only take one piece of candy from the bowl, unless they are encouraged to take more.

8. Don’t scare the Little Ones Too Badly. If you’ve got a really

creepy costume to answer the door, or you decorate your house from sidewalk to porch in graveyard chic – remember that what can be delightfully frightening to older kids and adults can terrify toddlers and young kids. Before jumping out of bushes, screaming when you open doors or leaping out of fake

are plenty of people whose religious beliefs prevent them from partaking in Halloween. Sometimes it’s a personal decision not to give out candy on Halloween. If you choose not to participate, that’s your choice and you owe no one an explanation.

11. Lights Out! A dark home is

one that’s not only dangerous to approach—but also one that most people know you should walk on by when trick-or-treating. It’s OK to shut off your lights and send that message, loud and clear, to trick-or-treaters that you are now closed or out of candy.

13. Age Old Question.

How old is too old to Trick-or-Treat? While the rules vary from family to family, if your kid is old enough for their driver’s permit, they’re probably too old for Trick-orTreating. The exception to this is if they are chaperoning their younger siblings, in which case, they certainly deserve a bit of free loot for themselves, so as long as they are willing to dress up and abide by the rest of the holiday protocol. Natalie Clause is the creative party force behind Southern Belle’s Charm. You can find her at www. southernbellescharm. com.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


GOOD eats

Nothing

BEETS

Good Eats

WRITTEN BY NICOLE WILLS PHOTOGRAPHY AND RECIPES BY GIEDRE AUGUSTINAVICIUTE HTTP://WWW.GAUGUST.COM/

Ruddy, rough, crusted with soil from the garden—if you’ve never tasted a beet before, you can get some sense of its sweet, earthy flavor just by looking at this root vegetable. Some shy away from this spectacularly colored vegetable, but just the right prepartion can make this looked-over root an amazing star of the show. Just ask all the beet lovers through history. Beets have been cultivated for thousands of years: remains have been found in ancient Egyptian pyramids, and charred beetroots were found in the Neolithic archaeological site in Aartswold, Netherlands, according to research reported in Plants and Ancient Man, a collection of articles presented at the Sixth Symposium of the International Work Group for Palaeoethnobotany.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


EAT

your

BEETS!

In Roman times, beet juice was considered an aphrodisiac. It’s no wonder beets have been popular for millennia: they’re sweet, nutritious, and an absolutely gorgeous color. Rumored in ancient times to be medicinal, beets have been used to treat fevers, constipation, bad breath, and indigestion. In Roman times, beet juice was considered an aphrodisiac. Who knew beets were so sexy?


These days, beets have adopted a more low-key place in the produce aisle and are eaten for more modest health claims. The USDA reports that beets are low in calories, low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and is an excellent source of fiber, vitamin C, and several other minerals. That is still a pretty racy set of nutrients for this purple root veggie. But beets are good for more than just a tasty treat! As anyone who has roasted and skinned a beet (and subsequently sports pink hands) knows, they make an excellent, vibrant natural dye.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


BEETS beets BEETS beets The brilliant color comes from the betalain pigments in the plant, and while it does turn your hands (among other things) pink, it doesn’t work well on fabric. That means your kitchen cloths won’t be ruined after cleaning up after cooking with beets. The betalain pigment from beets does work beautifully as a natural food dye, however. Try using beet juice to dye Easter eggs, or make a red velvet cake without buckets of artificial coloring.

The beet is a cool weather crop, and can last four to five months in a root cellar, making the beet a perfect feature of bountiful fall feasts.

Giedre Augustinaviciute is a selftaught freelance food stylist, photographer, and recipe developer based in Birmingham, United Kingdom.

People tend to be sharply divided on the subject of the tastiness of beets. If you love them, you can’t get enough of them. If you they don’t tickle your fancy at first be sure to try a few different preparations just to be sure. Roasting will bring out the sweetness in beets and steaming will leave more of an earth flavor. A feast for the eyes as well as the stomach, beets are a wonderful addition to any autumn fete.

See her passion for food and photography at http://www.gaugust. com/

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012 FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


be

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


eet

STARTER

ROASTED BEETROOT AND ORANGE SALAD WITH PINE NUTS

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

For the salad:

Preheat oven to 375°F. Wash and slice beetroots. Once sliced, place them onto shallow baking tray. Toss 2 teaspoons of the olive oil over the beets. Roast for 40 – 45 minutes.

4 beets, sliced 4 cups mixed greens 2 oranges, peeled and sliced ½ cup pine nuts, toasted 2 tsp olive oil For the dressing: ¼ cup orange juice (could be squeezed from extra half an orange) 1 tbsp olive oil ½ tsp black pepper 1 tabs cider vinegar ¼ tsp salt

Peel and slice oranges. Toast pine nuts. For the salad dressing, mix orange juice, olive oil, cider vinegar salt and pepper. To serve, place 1 cup mixed greens on each of 4 plates. Top each with sliced oranges and roasted beets. Sprinkle with walnuts and drizzle with the dressing. Makes 4 servings.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


A BOWL OF beets INGREDIENTS 2 large beetroots with stems, chopped 2 carrots, chopped 3 potatoes, chopped into cubes 2 vegetable stock cubes 1 bay leaf Fresh dill 1 tsp salt To serve: 1 tbsp crème fraîche or plain yogurt

METHOD Place chopped beetroots with stems, carrots and potatoes in a large pan with the bay leaf and cover with water. Stir in vegetable stock cubes with salt. Bring to the boil then simmer for 45 min. Stir in dill. Serve with a dollop of crème fraîche or yogurt.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012

BEETROOT SOUP


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


beet

SWEETS

INGREDIENTS 500g whole raw beetroot (3-4 beets) 100g unsalted butter 200g bar white chocolate 1 tsp vanilla extract 250g golden caster sugar 3 eggs 100g plain flour 50g cocoa powder

METHOD Peel the beetroot, roughly chop and put into a large bowl. Add splash of water, cover with cling film, then microwave on High for 12 min or until tender. Heat the oven to 180C/160 fan/350F. Chop the chocolate and cut the butter into cubes. Tip the cooked beetroot into a sieve, drain off any

BEETROOT BROWNIES excess liquid, then put into a food processor with chocolate, butter and vanilla. Whizz until you get smooth mixture. Put the sugar and eggs into a large bowl, then beat using an electric hand whisk until thick, pale and foamy, about 2 min. Spoon the beetroot mix into the bowl, and then use a large metal spoon to fold it into the whisked eggs. Try to conserve as much air in the mixture as you can. Sift in the flour and cocoa powder and gently fold these in to make a smooth batter. Pour into prepared tray and bake for 25 min. Cool completely in the tin, cut into squares. Makes 15 – 20 Baking tray 20 x 30cm, lined with baking paper


día de los

muertos

[ DAY OF THE DEAD ] October 31st comes and goes, but for those who celebrate the Day of the Dead, it’s not time to pack away the skeletons yet. In Mexico, much of Latin America, and any countries with Hispanic populations, Midnight, October 31st marks the beginning of a much more important holiday. Its roots can be traced back to ancient Aztec rituals celebrating life and the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The Spanish conquistadors attempted to quash this “pagan” tradition, but were so thoroughly unsuccessful, that in order to integrate it with Catholic tradition, they moved it to November 1st and 2nd to coincide with All Saints Day and All Souls Day celebrations.


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


honor those you loved Modern Dia de los Muertos celebrations honor and remember loved ones who have passed in truly festive style. The deceased’s favorite foods are made as an offering; beautiful marigolds and decorations deck homes and grave sites. Food and flowers and music and dance fill the day with exuberance and life, all while remembering the dead. A stucco courtyard, a musical fountain, and an explosion of color set the scene for this Day of the Dead party. Traditional Mexican paper crafts were the perfect décor items to truly make this scene special. Intricate papel picado (cut paper) banners and large paper flowers are common— but spectacular—Mexican folk crafts. Inexpensive and easy to make, the fill the party space with color.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


dance, sing, & celebrate in an explosion of color

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


First dinner was served, giving party-goers who favor savory treats plenty to choose from, too. Sweet corn guacamole and chips, sweet corn tomalito, carnitas, shredded chicken, and tossed marigold salad filled out the dinner buffet.

Serve Traditional Mexican Dishes Guests ate on glass plates with papel-picado style tissue paper skulls peeking through. And everywhere—everywhere—there were candles lighting the velum candleholders with photos of loved ones who have passed. FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Gone but not forgotten Pan de Muerto (“bread of the dead”) and sugar skulls are traditional offerings at Dia de los Muertos celebrations. Our sweets table also featured churros, tres leches trifles, conchas, sugar cookies, and pumpkin empanadas.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


There is more time than life... live well!

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


As the sun set and the night wore long, we enjoyed the friendship of those still with us and the sweet memories of those who are gone. The occasion may be called the Day of the Dead, but it’s a magnificent celebration of life like no other. FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Pumpkin Empanadas BY YVETTE MARQUEZ-SHARPNACK FROM THE MUY BUENO COOKBOOK PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEANINE THURSTON (WWW.FOTOTAILS.COM) Growing up we always knew the fall and winter meant lots of sweet and tasty treats we call empanadas. These sweet pastry pockets are filled with whatever jam or preserves are in season and or whatever you were lucky enough to preserve over the summer. This particular recipe calls for my favorite filling, pumpkin. I prefer to use canned pumpkin, not pumpkin pie filling because making it from scratch is too watery. Adding the freshest spices makes a big difference, so go fresh with your spices whenever possible.

PUMPKIN FILLING

EMPANADA DOUGH

2 tablespoons butter 3/4 cup dark brown sugar, packed firmly 1 (15 ounce) can organic pumpkin puree, NOT pie filling 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

3 cups flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup shortening 2 eggs 1/2 cup milk 2 tablespoons sugar

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Stir in the brown sugar until it dissolves with the butter. Stir in the pumpkin and the spices. Continue to stir over medium heat for about 10 minutes. Make sure the filling is not too watery; otherwise let it cook for a couple more minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat and let it cool down. After it’s cooled off for about 15 minutes, put the filling in the refrigerator to help it set for 30 minutes or overnight.

Mix the first 3 dry ingredients. Cut in the shortening with the dry ingredients. Works better if you use your hands. Add the eggs, milk and sugar. Continue to work in with your hands. Split the dough in half, wrap in plastic wrap and put into the refrigerator for about 20-30 minutes. Take out one half of the dough and split it into 12-18 balls of dough. Depending on how small you want your empanadas. I prefer one dozen per half of the dough. They also fit nicely on one large cookie sheet. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. You can fill your empanadas with any preserves made ahead of time.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012

Roll out the dough into small round circles. Add a small dollop of filling on one half of the rolled out dough. Wet the bottom edge of the dough with water to help seal the two halves. Fold over the dough to seal. Seal off the edges with a fork by pressing down along the two edges. This also makes for a pretty pattern when baked. Brush each empanada with egg whites, sprinkle with sugar and puncture each empanada with a fork to allow steam to escape while baking. Spray a large cookie sheet with cooking spray, place the empanadas on the cookie sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes on medium rack in the oven. If after 15 minutes you notice the bottoms of the empanadas starting to brown, move the cookie sheet to the top rack and continue to bake for the last 5 minutes. For more recipies like these, visit www.muybuenocookbook.com.


FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Marigold Muerte Signature Drink Recipe Did you know that marigolds are edible flowers? Not just edible, in fact, but delicious, with a zesty, citrus-like flavor. Since marigolds are the most common flower associated with Day of the Dead celebrations, it was the perfect flavor inspiration for our signature cocktail, the Marigold Muerte.

MARIGOLD MUERTE This drink is incredibly smooth and tasty, so drink with caution. The citrus flavors from the marigolds pair perfectly with the Limoncello and crisp, light, Vinho Verde that has notes of lime. It doesn’t taste nearly as strong as it actually is, so be warned; there’s a reason I named this drink the Marigold Muerte (Marigold Death)! 1 oz marigold-infused simple syrup 1 oz Limoncello 6 oz Vinho Verde sparkling white wine Ice Put ice in a highball glass. Add the simple syrup and Limoncello, then fill to the top with Vinho Verde. Stir gently and serve.

MARIGOLD INFUSED SIMPLE SYRUP Marigold-infused simple syrup is a beautiful golden color, with a woodsy, floral nose and a delicate citrus flavor. Take equal parts water and sugar, and heat together with clean, organic marigold petals in a small saucepan. Stir constantly and heat until all the sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and let the marigold petals steep for 24 hours. Remove petals and store the marigoldinfused syrup in the fridge for up to two weeks.

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


Adults enjoy a good party just as much, if not more, than your average kid. But finding fun printables without a kiddie feel? Not so much fun. Frog Prince Paperie has launched a new shop, Frog Prince Occasions on Etsy to give printable party options for grown ups. Pull up a glass, download a printable party and add a little kiss of Frog Prince magic to your next adults-only event.

FROGPRINCEOCCASIONS.ESTY.COM


Memories of holidays past and loved ones gone are cherished. New are memories made, destined to be held dear by those we love. That’s why we do this. So with glue in our hair and flour on our noses and smiles on our faces, let’s go make some memories. Nikki Wills Editor

FESTIVITIES BY TIKKIDO.COM AND FROG PRINCE PAPERIE FALL 2012


festivities magazine

all photographs and writing contained within this document are the intellectual property of Paula Biggs of Frog Prince Paperie, LLC and Nicole Wills of Tikkido.com. Please do not duplicate without express permission.

BACK PAGE


Festivities Magazine Fall 2012