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FRISCHE YOUNG, BRAVE AND

F*CKING FABULOUS.

ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012


artwork by WILLIAM HUNDLEY


FRISCHE MASTHEAD

ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012

Editor-in-Chief, Creative & Art Director WALLY SPARKS editor@frischemagazine.com

Contributors BLAIR PETTY BOBBI PAIDEL BOBBY BOWEN CLAIRE CARTER EMILIE TUUMINEN ISHAMIL KARGBO JACKIE SHAWN JOONATAN ALLANDI MAREK MATWIEJCZUK NATALIE BENNETT OMEN NYC OZZY SHAH SARAH TAYLOR SETAREH KARIMI SOPHIE SÄLEKARI STOJ BULIC TINASHE MUSARA VALERIE BENAVIDES WENDY QUINTANA WILLIAM HUNDLEY

Executive & Fashion Editor BOBBI PAIDEL fashion@frischemagazine.com Features Editor EMILY RAMSHAW Contributing Photographers JUKKA OVASKAINEN LOGAN JACKSON LUIS MORA MAREK CHORZEPA NICO STINGHE PAUL WHITFIELD WALLY SPARKS Visit Us Online: www.frischemagazine.com

Special Thanks Artists by Next Elite Model Management Ford Models Judy Inc Major Model Management Select Model Management Sutherland Models

Frische Magazine Offices 281 Mutual St. Suite 1005 Toronto, ON. M4Y3C4 Copyright FRISCHE MAGAZINE © 2012, the authors and the photographers. Reproduction without permission prohibited.

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Fashion 30 WHO’S THAT GIRL photographed by JUKKA OVASKAINEN styled by SOPHIE SäLEKARI 38 TRUTH BE BOLD photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by MAREK MATWIEJCZUK 46 DARK ROMANCE photographed by PAUL WHITFIELD styled by OZZY SHAH 56 WE OWN THE NIGHT photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by BOBBI PAIDEL 88 BOY EXILED photographed by LOGAN JACKSON styled by OMEN NYC 96 AFTER AND BEFORE photographed by LUIS MORA styled by BOBBI PAIDEL 108 HARLEM’S FINEST photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by BOBBY BOWEN

ON THE COVER KELSEY V @MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT. photographed by WALLY SPARKS. styled by BOBBI PAIDEL. hair and makeup by STOJ BULIC @ARTISTS BY NEXT NEW YORK.

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Features 8 FRANK MAGNOTTA interview by EMILY RAMSHAW 18 JAMES ULMER interview by EMILY RAMSHAW 26 WILLIAM HUNDLEY 66 ROBERTO PIQUERAS interview by EMILY RAMSHAW photographed by MAREK CHORZEPA styled by JOONATAN ALLANDI 80 PEDRAM KARIMI interview by EMILY RAMSHAW photographed by NICO STINGHE styled by TINASHE MUSARA 118 NICO KRIJNO interview by EMILY RAMSHAW 126 LUKASZ WIERZBOWSKI interview by EMILY RAMSHAW Frische Market 132 BLOOD IS THE NEW BLACK BOMBS AWAY THE CRAFT WINTER BONES photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by BOBBI PAIDEL Stockist 144 STOCKIST

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Y O U BRAVE F * C K FABUL 6


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N G , E AND K I N G LOUS. 7


FRISCHE INTERVIEW

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FRANK MAGNOTTA

interview by EMILY RAMSHAW

Looking at a drawing by Frank Magnotta is kind of like experiencing Déjà vu: you know it’s familiar and reminiscent of something that’s already happened or existed, but you can’t quite place what. Magnotta’s large-scale, black-and-white graphite drawings are intricate and almost impossibly detailed in a way that is psychedelic, as in retro, 1960s maaaan. But than that, they are strikingly modern. And with his blatant use of logos that are so a part of our oversaturated consumerist culture you nearly skip over them in the pieces themselves, he is truly making art about what he knows – about what we all know. It is Americana at it’s most honest. – Where did you grow up? What was your path to becoming an artist? Emily

– I grew up in Grand Rapids MI. I always drew as a kid, and my parents would sometimes take us to museums and other things, but I can’t say it was an art-focused upbringing. I did take art classes throughout school and took it seriously. I went to a small liberal arts college called “Hope”. For the first couple of years I was debating between majoring in music, math or art. My level of

Frank

One, 60”x50”, graphite on paper, 2006 8


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The Hood, 50”x42”, graphite on paper, 2005

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BIRDS OF AMERICA, 50”X60”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2008

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“GRAND OPTIMIST”, INSTALLATION, DEREK ELLER GALLERY, 2009

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from different types of social institutions and layered and combined them to make a composite person that is associated with that group. For example I did a doctor and a nurse made from pharmaceutical logos. This was more interesting to me than just drawing a doctor, and I liked how the logos simultaneously formed and deformed the figure. In the end I wanted something solid and believable that looked liked an Early Northern Renaissance portrait of a Garbage Pail Kid.

math skills left me to following formulas, and similarly in music I always felt like I was playing someone else’s score, but in art it was all up to me, which I enjoyed. Hope had an internship program and I went to New York to work as an artist assistant for a semester. Although I can’t say I learned a lot by stretching canvases, as a mid-western kid just experiencing contemporary art in New York and living in the city itself was a great education. From then on I was hooked. – Your drawings have a structural and realist qualities to them, but the content is often out of this world. This may be an impossible question to answer, but where does your inspiration come from? How do you conceive of these subjects?

Emily

– Are you inspired by pop culture or “Americana”? If yes, what about it inspires you? Emily

– Definitely...I mean, you’re supposed to make art about what you know, right? It is a love-hate relationship though, and how could it not be? At times there is a joy and lightness to pop culture that unites everyone and changes us too, but other times there is a baseness to it that can be annoying and insulting. But that tension in and of it self is interesting. I’m most interested in how we personally use pop culture and how it is transformed through our consumption of it.

Frank

– I guess I like to walk the line between the imaginative and reality. I’ve never wanted to work from a strictly representational standpoint, for me the end game in that is just mastery of technique. On the other hand, I think for works to connect to other people they must be rooted in some form of universal reality, and not just a personal fantasy. The most interesting thing for me in making art is attempting to represent some kind of interior state, a state that may never be seen, but it is present. Giving a solid believable form to that is almost like conjuring a ghost... As for inspiration, I’ve always been attracted to logos and graphics. They are so clean, pure, and omnipresent and can represent so much. I’m interested in the tension between the generic form of a logo and what lies behind the symbol. I mean, how can three circles truly represent a chemical company? In a way they are the icons of our culture, much like how crosses functioned in earlier days. For the portrait series I took logos

Frank

Emily

– When are you happiest?

– I’d have to say I’m est when I’m drawing...but it be going well, because if it of the bad days it can be no all....

Frank

happihas to is one fun at

– The portraits that you draw are extremely detailed and often quite grotesque – do you have real people in mind when you are drawing them? Or do you imagine characters behind the portraits? Emily

– Well, the portraits were supposed to represent a type of person

Frank

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THE BANK DICK, 50”X42”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2005

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THE BARONNESS, 50”X42”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2005

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that is associated with a certain institution, be it financial, medical or religious. I can’t say there was a specific person in mind, but there are stereotypes out there that I wanted to incorporate in the drawing. It was a challenge, because the logos really determined the form, and I had to play off that to make a composite person. In the end I liked how it made someone who was somewhere in-between the logos’ strict form and my own warped personal desires.

step outside of reality. I also just really hate colored pencils; I never like how they looked on paper. – How much planning goes into a drawing before you actually commit to the large size and final drawing?

Emily

– I’d say typically I spend a week planning a drawing before I commit to the final form. I usually start by researching and collecting all the graphics and then I’ll play with the forms and combine them in different ways until I’m happy with an overall structure that I can use as the base of my drawing. Once I have the base structure (in some ways the logos become skeletal armatures) I can add a skin and transform it into a somewhat human form.

Frank

– What would you consider to be your biggest accomplishment, in your career or otherwise? Emily

– For me, if I can make a piece that I like, one that surprises me and continues to surprise me, I’m happy. I’m really only interested in on what goes on on that paper. Of course everyone likes recognition, but that is really secondary to the goal of drawing. That being said, I do like it when someone buys a drawing, apart from the validation, it means I can afford to draw more!

Frank

– New York is obviously a Mecca of sorts for artists. How long have you lived there? How has it changed? Do you love the city? If yes, why?

Emily

– I’ve lived in New York for 15 years. When I moved here I wasn’t sure if I’d be able to make it, but I Emily – Why only draw in black and figured I’d stick it out as long as I white? could, at least a year or two. Fifteen years later I’d have to say I’m Frank – I love black and white im- in the same boat! For me it is a place ages, and have always been attract- that I can’t get too comfortable in ed to black and white works. I still for numerous reasons, but mainly I remember the first time I saw one of really don’t feel like I’m from here. Frederick Remington’s black and white It isn’t my city, even though I’ve western paintings. Not only were cow- lived here almost as long as I have boys right in my eight year old wheel- anywhere else. The thing is that the house, the fact that someone made a city and the people change so much black and white painting in a museum that it is difficult to identify with full of color images excited me. We it unless you spend your formative do live in a colorful world, so just years here. That being said, I’m not going black and white somehow removes sure I could live anywhere else – New the image from reality, and restricts York kind of spoils you. And say what the work to a more conceptual/dream you want about the current gallery space. I swear I only dream in black system – where else do you have access and white, so drawing with graphite to hundreds of shows? So what if the makes the work more internal and a receptionist may be a little standoffFrank

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CENTURY 21, 96”X80”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2009

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EL MATADOR, 70”X80”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2009

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SELF, 42”X50”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2008

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ish? It is an amazing resource. – Who are your favourite artists (living or dead)? Who’s work do you admire?

Emily

– I experienced two of the most influential artists to me in the same day. It was on a trip to the Chicago Art Institute with my family as a kid. I remember seeing Ivan Albright and Ed Ruscha in the Modern wing and not being able to forget either of them. I still feel I’m trying to resolve the hot freakish intensity of Albright and the cool intelligent reserve of Ruscha and how they can both be in the same room, and both be art. I mean Ruscha is that smart cool kid that you want to be like, but Albright is the aberrant individual that you can’t help but stare at and ultimately respect. There are some others that will always be important to me, and I like to wonder what it is about the group that unites them and ties them to me. I’m a big fan of Guston, Durer, Bruegel, Phillips, Fornasetti, Saul, Nutt, Lichtenstein, Ensor, Hartley, Memling, Calder, Leger, Witz, Celmins, Gober, Bacon, Shaw, whoever did Alfred E. Neuman’s portrait, crossword puzzles and the classified ads.

Frank

THE HEALER, 50”x42”, GRAPHITE ON PAPER, 2005

xx

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JAMES ULMER

interview by EMILY RAMSHAW

Ink on paper can be, in the right hands, a very powerful thing. Words, symbols, figures – something deceptively simple can leave a message far bigger, more poignant, more permanent than the medium might initially transmit. James Ulmer’s art is a case in point. Tiny soccer players drawn in a grid are uncomplicated, yet, take a closer look and the piece is hypnotic in its repetition and almost imperceptible movement. The literacy here is in the gaze. Herein, a conversation with the artist himself. – Tell me a little bit about your background, where you grew up, and your path to becoming an artist. Emily

James – I grew up in suburbs of Philadelphia. I was a quiet kid [and] my sister and I would draw together and make up stories. Then I got really into collecting comic books [and] toys and I think that’s probably where it started for me. rachel’s party, 8.5”x11”

– Do you plan each drawing before beginning a final “draft” or do you begin each one not knowing where it will end up? Emily

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lots of lots, 14”x17”

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– I use some references and things that I want to draw or include in a specific drawing but it is mostly improvised.

James

– You have a very identifiable aesthetic. How did your work evolve into what it is now?

Emily

– I wanted were more like my sketchbooks looser and more

James

to make drawings that what was going on in – drawings that were immediate.

– Some of your drawings, like “Rachel’s Party”, look like scenes from real life. Do you draw events and moments from your life? Why are you inspired to make a particular moment a drawing? Emily

squares (ink), 8”x10”

– I have used some of my family photos and particularly with “Rachel’s Party” I would take different parts of the photos to make the drawing. There are a few pictures from that time that are really important to me so I wanted to draw them. I don’t know what else to say about it.

James

– How do you conceive your grid drawings or drawings like “Soccer Players” where similar figures are repeated over and over again? Why choose that one particular figure? Emily

– I chose that figure because I thought it would interesting to show the movement of the ball and the differences between each figure. If you look closely none of the figures really look the same. They are all drawn [differently], some better than others.

James

– Some of your drawings are black and white, some are in colour – what role does colour play in your drawings? Emily

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ups and downs, 12.5”x12”

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soccer player, 20”x24”

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UNTITLED DRAWING, 7.5”X14.5”

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– Most of my new work is in black and white. Again I wanted to simplify my drawings and strip them down to basic shapes and forms.

I also collect toys, which has been a big influence on me. I usually draw with a pen then fill in details with ink and a brush after.

James

– What is it like to live in Emily – What is the scale of your drawBrooklyn as an artist compared to ings? other cities? James – I work in all different sizJames – Brooklyn is a motivating place. es. Some drawings are smaller, like It can be overwhelming at times but the pencil drawings are around 8x10 I feel like there is a [really] sup- [whereas] the grid drawings are bigportive community here and that is ger, maybe around 22x24 inches. important. Emily – How do you conceive a drawing Emily – Who are your favourite artists like “Squares (Ink)”? Why choose to (living or dead)? Who’s work do you juxtapose the different figures all in most admire? one drawing and yet separated by the grid? James – Oh, I am not really sure about this, [there are] too many. A few James – I wanted to make drawing that would be Bill Traylor, the Hairy Who, was like a pattern [on] a map or a Suiho Tagawa. rug, maybe a flag or something, but [also] have these parts that you can Emily – Tell me about the mediums you look at individually. draw on and with. Some of your drawings are done on notepaper. Why? What xx else do you use? Emily

– I like to use all different sorts of things: paper, envelopes, wood – whatever is around. I go to flea markets and buy paper and books.

James

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men, 20”x24”

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artwork by

WILLIAM HUNDLEY

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WHO’S THAT GIRL?

photographed by JUKKA OVAISKAINEN styled by SOPHIE SäLEKARI

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sweatshirt, LAITINEN.

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t-shirt, CTRL. skirt, VINTAGE RALPH LAUREN. hoodie, ADIDAS. belt, HEIKKI SALONEN.

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sweater, SOPHIE SALEKÄRI & HANNA-MAARIA SINKKONEN. shorts, VINTAGE LEVI’S. jeans, TOMMY HILFIGER. hat, ELINA LAITINEN, TIIA SIREN & SIIRI RAASAKKA. sneakers, CONVERSE.

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dress, LOUIS VUITTON. socks, POLDER. sneakers, ELINA LAITINEN, TIIA SIREN & SIIRI RAASAKKA.


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hair and makeup, EMILIE TUUMINEN. model, JASMIN MAKINEN photographed in HELSINKI.

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sweater, MIU MIU. skirt, STYLISTS OWN. jeans, VINTAGE LEVI’S. sneakers, ELINA LAITINEN, TIIA SIREN & SIIRI RAASAKKA.

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skirt & shirt, DAY BIRGER ET MIKKELSEN. jacket & sneakers, ADIDAS. leggings, PHILOSOPHY BLUES ORIGINAL. hat, ELINA LAITINEN, TIIA SIREN & SIIRI RAASAKKA.


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TRUTH BE BOLD photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by MAREK MATWIEJCZUK

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kimono coat, PEDRAM KARIMI. leather jacket (worn underneath) & skirt, AMANDA LEW KEE. belt (worn as head piece), ASHTIANI. gloves, DIOR.

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wool dress, DENIS GAGNON. silk wool top, ARTHUR MENDONÇA. tunic dress (underneath), SARAH KELPIN. gloves (in pocket), LA CRASIA.

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coat, AMANDA LEW KEE. leather top, SARAH KELPIN. trouser, ARTHUR MENDONÇA. mini cape, ASHTIANI. gloves, LA CRASIA. shoes (worn through out), GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI at BROWNS.

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sweater, AMANDA LEW KEE. wool skirt, ASHTIANI. gloves, YUMI YUMI.

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wool hooded vest, DENIS GAGNON. knotted tank top, AMANDA LEW KEE. leather skirt, DENIS GAGNON. leather pant, JEREMY LAING. leather gloves, DIOR.

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wool coat & mini cape, ASHTIANI. dress (worn underneath), DENIS GAGNON. gloves, DANIEL STORTO.

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hair and makeup, JACKIE SHAWN @JUDY INC. model, SAM YPMA @ELITE MODEL MANAGEMENT photographed in TORONTO.

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silk wool top & trouser, ARTHUR MENDONÇA. wool top (worn underneath), JEREMY LAING.

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DARK ROMANCE photographed by PAUL WHITFIELD styled by OZZY SHAH

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dress, MARINA QURESHI. underwear, AGENT PROVOCATEUR.

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dress, AQUA. body accessories, TAMZIN LILLYWHITE.

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blouse, KARL LAGERFELD. shorts, ELLA DUAL. sunglasses, GILES for CUTLER & GROSS. boots, SERGIO ROSSI.

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dress & bracelet, ROBERTO CAVALLI.

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dress, SIMONE ROCHA. coat & bracelet, ROBERTO CAVALLI. tights, PRETTY POLLY. boots, PACO RABANNE.

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rubber bra top, VOICE OF COURSE. suit jacket, CHARLIE LE MINDU. trousers, DIANE VON FURSTENBERG.

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hair by VALERIE BENAVIDES. makeup by CLAIRE CARTER. photography assistant, SARAH TAYLOR. styling assistant, WENDY QUINTANA. model, VITA @SELECT MODEL MANAGEMENT photographed in LONDON.

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top, RAFFAELE ASCIONE. dress (as skirt), gloves & stiletto shoes, DSQUARED.

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bodice, EMILIO CAVALLINI. leather biker jacket, ROBERTO CAVALLI.

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WE OWN THE NIGHT

photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by BOBBI PAIDEL

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dress, CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS. jacket, NICHOLAS K. socks (worn through out), TOPSHOP. shoes (worn through out), CONVERSE.

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hooded sweater, ENZA COSTA. trouser, STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB. knit scarf, VINTAGE. head scarf, CALVIN KLEIN.

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dress, NICHOLAS K. skirt (worn underneath), CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS. vest, STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB. leather clutch, SANDRO. knit toque, STYLIST’S OWN.

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shirt, SOMETHING ELSE. yak bauble coat and toque, TRIBUNE STANDARD. bag, STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB.


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leather studded top, CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS. wool vest, NICHOLAS K.

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dress, NICHOLAS K. shirt, EQUIPMENT. scarf, STYLIST’S OWN.

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knit pants, STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB. jacket, CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS. scarf, STYLIST’S OWN. purse, VINTAGE.


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mohair sweater, ACNE. pants, JOE FRESH. scarf, NICOLE MARCIANO. holsters, NICHOLAS K.

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hair and makeup by STOJ BULIC @ARTISTS BY NEXT. model, KELSEY V @MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT photographed in NEW YORK CITY.

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dress, THEORY. shirt, CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS.coat, JOE FRESH.

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I CAN`T STAND THE RAIN interview by EMILY RAMSHAW photographed by MAREK CHORZEPA styled by JOONATAN ALLANDI

Roberto Piqueras’s collection is a trippy mix of Londonbased, pop culturereferences, psychedelic colours, and super-current, Photoshop-created silkscreens – all printed on oversized, street-ready separates.

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On Fredrika: sweater, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. trousers, BALMAIN. sandals, ASOS. temporary tattoo, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. On Pav: sweater, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. trousers, ASHER LEVINE. sandals, ZARA. socks (worn throughout), MODEL’S OWN.

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Okay, enough with the hyphenated adjectives, but Piqueras himself could be described in so many ways, that one such word – designer or artist or youth-in-revolt – simply won’t do. Claiming to design each collection as inspired by his current city (London, most recently), this Tumblr, Facebook, and Twitter connected creator is taking on the world, one cheeky post at a time.

What fashion designers and artists inspire you? Who do you admire and look up to?

Emily –

Roberto – About designers: Moschi-

no [and] IRL LDN; graphic designers Joe Hamilton and Shaun Bass. Today, I really look up to Dennis Rodman – he is an icon – and [also the] cholo/boyo guys around Hackney.

– Why work and live in LonEMILY – Where did you grow up and don? What is it like to work in Lonwhat lead you to becoming a design- don as a young designer compared er? What was your path? to other cities? Emily

– I grew up in Sabadell, a little city next to Barcelona. I think that was the best point to [become] a designer: be born next to a big city [that was] so important during [the] 90s [and for] design. After high school, I knew my passion [was for] arts and design, so I decided to study at high fashion institute Felicidad Duce in Barcelona. My real first step in fashion was when I moved to Madrid [at] 21 and I knew people working [at] fashion magazines, like stylists or journalists.

Roberto –

I think something is happening with networks, but I think the best city understand [this shift] in an artistic way is London. I’m walking on the street and I see Tumblr inspiration on street wall. Or sometimes when I’m partying in East Bloc [it] is like meeting [all] your Facebook friends in one night.

Roberto

The prints in your collection are out of this world! Do you create the prints yourself? How do you fabricate them? How did you conceive them? Emily –

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jumper, PRADA. shirt, TOPMAN. trousers & hat, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. plastic vest, STYLIST’S OWN. cuff, TESSA EDWARDS.

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coat, dress & shoes, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. leather kilt, JESSICA WALSH. socks, MODEL’S OWN.

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plastic sweater, AIDEN WEAVER. tank top, NIKE. scarf & hat, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. shorts, JESSICA WALSH.

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sweater & temporary tattoo, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. long-sleeved shirt, JC DE CASTELBAJAC. skirt, ELLY CHENG. shoes, ASOS.

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t-shirt & blazer, MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA. shirt & leggings, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. trousers, AIDEN WEAVER. sandals, MICHAEL JORDAN.

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– Yes, I do it myself. Right now I’m very focused on graphic print design. I just work with Photoshop and Illustrator and I use my own pictures or Google pictures with modifications.

Roberto

Emily – A diamond-eyed Queen Eliz-

abeth is featured prominently in your collection. What is the message behind this?

– [With] every collection I do a tribute to the city I’m living [in] or [the city] I was born [in]. This time was London, but I wanted to be focused on the London [that] just tourists know. This Queen, diamonds, fries and Big Ben is not the London I’m living [in].

Roberto

Emily – Does your inspiration change

from season to season?

– Yes, I’m growing up and I think [it] is a kind of evolution.

Robert

What kind of person do you imagine when designing the collection? Who is the ideal person to buy and wear Roberto Piqueras? Emily –

Roberto – 74

Myself. Someone is con-


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nected to Tumblr or Facebook 24 hours [a day], [someone] with good sense of humor. I read somewhere that Burger King sponsors you. How did this happen? What does it mean for your label and designs? Emily –

Roberto – That was just for a season.

They helped me to move to London [for] six months and I wrote a daily blog for them about my experiences in the city. It was great for my label.

– What are your favourite things to wear other than your own designs? Emily

– [Anything that] is oversized, sporty, and [a] grey color without print. [And] football tees.

Roberto

– How would you describe your personal style? Emily

– How Die Antwoord say: “I fink you freaky and I like you a lot”

Roberto

Emily – Fill in the blank: “If I wasn’t a

designer, I would be ____________.”

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tank top, ELLY CHANG. trousers, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. belt, TESSA EDWARDS.

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hair and makeup by NATALIE BENNETT. models, FREDRIKA & PAV @SELECT MODEL MANAGEMENT photographed in LONDON.

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trousers & temporary tattoo, ROBERTO PIQUERAS. sandals, MICHAEL JORDAN.

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Roberto

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– Happy.

Emily – You sell your designs online.

Where else is the collection available to buy? What’s one store where you would love to have your collection sold? – Yes, I’m selling online [and] I’m selling in Tokyo (Wut Berlin), Los Angeles (L.A. Substance), Soeul (KWIN), Taipei (Saturdayguy. com) and London (Primitive London). I want to sell [at] Dover Street Market or Selfridges.

Roberto

– What’s next for your brand and for you? Is there anything you’re especially looking forward to? Emily

– For my brand right now we are expanding in Tokyo thanks to Wut Berlin Showroom. For me, I’m looking [forward to] working with other brands [and] print designers.

Roberto

Emily – Where do you see yourself in

10 years?

– I don’t have a clear idea [for] 1 year... so I don’t know in 10.

Roberto

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PEDRAM KARIMI interview by EMILY RAMSHAW photographed by NICO STINGHE styled by TINASHE MUSARA

Take a look at Pedram Karimi’s designs and you might think of them as being almost harsh in their minimalism. Talk to the designer himself and you will come to realize that they are romantic, idealistic, and full of a youthful drive and energy. 80


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The same can be said of the designer, who has more lived experience in his thirty-four years than most of us will have in a lifetime. Now working in Montreal, Karimi is the kind of designer that the Canadian fashion elite would love to claim as its own – he is innovative and talented and his back story would fit neatly into a high school social studies class – yet this is a man who refuses to be pinned down. And the last thing he will ever do is conform to the rule. Tell me a little bit about where you grew up and your path to becoming a fashion designer. EMILY –

PEDRAM – I was born in Iran, in Tehran on June 17th, 1978, to very young, working class parents. My family moved to the south of Iran for four and a half years during the Iran and Iraq war and moved back to Tehran when it was over. About a year or so after, along with my parents and younger sister, I moved to Austria. I spent my teen years there. I was 19 when we moved to North America. After having tried Dallas and Vancouver I finally settled in Toronto alone and lived there for about 5 years.

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designing clothes and I needed to somehow get back to it. Since LaSalle College, which has had a fashion design program for over 50 years, accepted some of the courses that I had done at London College of Fashion, I moved to Montreal and have been living here ever since. EMILY – In your look book, you explain that urban living, subcultures, and our continued efforts in betterment inspired your collection. How does this translate into the clothes? PEDRAM – I find that the “new” youth is the

fusion product of styles which come from different backgrounds or heritages and are all combined and translated as this new look or this new way of being. Of course, I blame most of this on the internet. The internet has made the world super tiny, [which is] quite amazing. So much information is so easy to access and make yourself familiar with.

Popular music plays the biggest role in youth culture. All these new sounds are just a breath of fresh air to me. Whether it’s a combination of metal and electro or any other mix of genres that have created I started thinking about fashion after I had a totally new sound; it’s literally turning moved from Toronto to London for an our world upside down and inside out in so 8-month long Vidal Sassoon hair-cutting many [ways]. course. I fell in love with the city and wanted to stay there longer so I applied for a I’ve been told my clothes are clinical but one year long fashion design and market- yet romantic; complex yet not complicated ing certificate program at the University of looking. I am very sensitive of not destroyArts. That was the very beginning of my ing the world around me in the process of journey in fashion design. Finally I ended getting my clothes produced. I am not a up starting a degree in fashion design and big fan of exploiting people and the envipattern cutting technology at London Col- ronment to succeed. To me this would be lege of Fashion. Halfway through the pro- the beginning of an end. I can only hope gram, having run out of all the money I that this approach brings something good had, I moved back to Toronto and did hair back to my brand and that it can inspire and cutting until I realized that my passion was evoke the good in people.

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EMILY – Who would be your dream to dress and why? PEDRAM –

Rooney Mara. She is simply everything. Or David Beckham because of his playful and youthful personality.

You design for both men and women, but the pieces are quite similar for both. Do you think clothes should be defined by gender? EMILY –

PEDRAM – My design process starts usually

with quick sketches just to get the rough idea down. Couple of years ago I developed a clearer style that felt right to me. I didn’t have the “unisex” concept in mind. The overall aesthetic is minimal and unfussy, and because of that most of the designs would work for both genders. That was a subconscious act in the beginning. Later on, friends and people the industry kept telling me that [my] stuff could work for both sex-

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es. When I started designing the first collection I trained myself to exclude certain shapes that are more feminine, such as the hourglass silhouette. Women have always had a more radical approach to fashion; I guess all the social issues throughout history have conditioned them to push the envelope and take a stand. I’m really not worried for my designs appealing to women. It’s the men who have a paranoid and uncomfortable reaction to unisex or androgynous clothes. The majority of men don’t want to be ‘demasculinized’ and that’s where I need to [be] creative and make the clothes translate easily for them and make it look and feel relevant to their attitude. EMILY – What would you consider your big-

gest accomplishment so far, in your career or otherwise?

– [In my] career, I just got accepted and funded by the Montreal Fashion PEDRAM

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Week committee to show my second collection S/S 2013 during September Fashion Week. To me, being scouted and featured in such stylish city is pretty fantastic. Otherwise, I’ve lived in 11 different cities, this gave me the opportunity to dive into a culture and get a good feel for it. As a child I resented my parents for moving around, but today I am grateful to them for that.

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and unlike so many North American cities, Montreal has so much culture and style. Since I launched my first collection I am starting to get a lot of press within Canada, especially in Montreal. Also when you are from Montreal the rest of Canada finds you cool and has a certain kind of respect for you. I’m lucky I live here.

EMILY – What is it like to live and work in EMILY – Who are your favourite designers Montreal as a designer? (living or dead)? Whose work do you most admire? PEDRAM – I love Montreal. It’s over 400 years old, which is pretty grand for a North PEDRAM – Cristobal Balenciaga is my faAmerican city. It probably will be my city vourite of all for being so amazingly minias long as I live in Canada. To me, Montreal mal at a time when it was all about being is the [New York] of Canada. It’s probably extravagant and over-the-top. I also find the most progressive and most socialist city Raf Simons quite fantastic in his approach in Canada. It’s gone through so many so- to design. Uncomplicated, architectural and cial changes and you feel all that when you uber-modern. I am a big fan. live here. I like living in a city that works to live and enjoys life. It produces many artists

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all clothes, PEDRAM KARIMI. shoes (on SABIN), ALDO. shoes (on WILL), URBAN OUTFITTERS.

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EMILY – I read a quote from you saying, “Canada doesn’t make fashion; it makes clothes.” Can you explain what you meant by this? What do you think of Canadian ‘fashion’? Do you consider yourself to be apart from this?

percentage, and I am okay with that. I don’t care for spreading like a contagious virus. I’d rather stay small yet appeal to the modern-minded consumer, who appreciates art and design in world-class cities. And when the look starts to catch on and become more popular, I just have to move on and forward PEDRAM – Unfortunately being so close to and challenge my work and keep pushing [the] US, Canada has become, or maybe al- the boundaries of fashion design. ways has been, very lazy in producing globally known designers. Except [for a] very EMILY – When are you happiest? few successful Canadian designers, we only have “clothing” companies such as Le Cha- PEDRAM – When I am busiest. teau, Buffalo Jeans, and Bedo or such… and to me they only make clothes for the EMILY – Where do you see yourself in 10 years? masses. But by having companies such as H&M or ZARA in every small or big city in Canada, which are the biggest sharks and are consistently on top of their games in terms of trends, style, and [delivery], most of our local chain clothing stores have zero chance to compete let alone survive. I’d say part of it must be because they are not current with trends on a global level. I don’t want to sound too visceral, but I’ve [done] my research and have been to interviews [with] so many Canadian clothing companies. Most of them looked at my look book and gave the impression that I was an irrelevant freak. As long as they try to compete within themselves and not keep up with global fashion market they will be losing out.

PEDRAM – That’s very, very far for me to look ahead but I hope that I can make a difference in the way we dress or see clothing. I’d rather make pieces that you can keep for longer rather than a season. I don’t care much for being filthy rich, but I hope that through design my voice becomes more powerful so that more people give it a chance and hear what I have to say. I don’t want to change the world, but I hope I can introduce refreshing ways in [how] we dress and ultimately in the way we simply can be.

I also want to stay close to my two sisters whom I love and adore. They are my rock and my comfort. Whenever I fly away and become detached from reality they give me Do I see myself apart from that? Yes! As a reality check and bring me back to Planet a small niche brand I’ve experienced that Earth. They are a big part of why I’ve come my designs mainly appeal to a very small this far.

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– Describe your design aesthetic in make some pieces feel primitive yet futuristic. But I don’t mean to design for the futhree words. ture. PEDRAM – Modern, playful, ambiguous One of my favorite things to do while putEMILY – Would you consider your designs ting a collection together is to combine to be futuristic? If so, how is it that you are harder, starchier materials with more poetic looking ones. I think that combination of designing for the future? stillness and movement can be pretty magiPEDRAM – That the designs translate to cal. some as “futuristic” has been said to me bexx fore, but it definitely does not come from a conscious place. EMILY

They are structured and some of the volumes are put in unexpected places such as in the back (the hunch back dresses). Maybe that element and the fact that the pieces are very minimal and somewhat stationary

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BOY EXILED photographed by LOGAN JACKSON styled by OMEN NYC

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shirt, HIGHLAND. trousers, TOPMAN. chain (worn throughout), MODEL’S OWN.

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jacket & pants, HIGHLAND. shirt & shoes, MODEL’S OWN.

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jacket & pants, HIGHLAND.

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jacket & pants, HIGHLAND. shirt, VINTAGE.

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jacket & hat, HIGHLAND.

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model, BIU @MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT photographed in NEW YORK CITY.

shirt & hat, HIGHLAND.

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shirt, HIGHLAND.

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AFTER AND BEFORE photographed by LUIS MORA styled by BOBBI PAIDEL

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ON DJ: shirt, JEREMY LAING. jeans, J BRAND. ON ALEX: shirt, JEREMY LAING. jeans, TIGER OF SWEDEN/JEANS.

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one piece, GANNI. shirt, PINK TARTAN. belt, STYLE STALKER.

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ON DJ: tank, AMERICAN APPAREL. sweatpants, JAMES PERSE. coat, AGYNESS DEYN x DR. MARTENS. hat, BIG IT UP. shoes, AGYNESS DEYN x DR. MARTENS. ON ALEX: t-shirt, AMERICAN APPAREL. sweatpants, 5PREVIEW. jacket, RELIGION. shoes, DR. MARTENS.

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knit sweater, RELIGION. blazer, TIGER OF SWEDEN. trouser, PINK TARTAN.

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ON DJ: shirt, JEREMY LAING. denim jacket, STYLIST’S OWN. jeans, TIGER OF SWEDEN/ JEANS. jacket, COMME DES GARCONS x JUNYA WANATABE. ON ALEX: denim vest, VINTAGE RALPH LAUREN. leather jacket, MUMBA. jeans, TIGER OF SWEDEN/JEANS. hat, BIG IT UP.

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shirt & trouser, TIGER OF SWEDEN. top jacket, JEREMY LAING. hat, BIG IT UP.

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leather dress, JEREMY LAING. vest, TOPSHOP.

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hair and makeup by BLAIR PETTY @JUDY INC. models, DJ @SUTHERLAND MODELS, ALEXANDER @ FORD MODELS photographed in TORONTO.

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leather shirt & trouser, JEREMY LAING. blazer, BROSE.

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ON DJ: dress, CALVIN KLEIN. fur top, PINK TARTAN. pants, STONES. ON ALEX: dress, GESTUZ. top, JEREMY LAING. pants, JOEFFER CAOC.

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HARLEM`S FINEST photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by BOBBY BOWEN

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varsity jacket, JEREMY SCOTT x ADIDAS. oversize shirt, JEREMY SCOTT. pants, SIR NY. shoes, BERNHARD WILLHELM.

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sweater, JEREMY SCOTT.

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shirt, HOOD BY AIR FOR VFILES. pants & sleeveless mesh hoodie, SIR NY. shoes, JEREMY SCOTT x ADIDAS.

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top, pants & shoes , JEREMY SCOTT x ADIDAS. button down shirt, SIR NY.


shirt, JEREMY SCOTT. jacket, SIR NY. pants, JEREMY SCOTT x ADIDAS.


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plastic jacket, JEREMY SCOTT. shirt, HOOD BY AIR FOR VFILES. pants & hat, SIR NY. shoes, BERNHARD WILLHELM.

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model, NICK MADRID @MAJOR MODEL MANAGEMENT photographed in NEW YORK CITY.

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jacket, SIR NY. pants, JEREMY SCOTT. long sleeve shirt & shoes, JEREMY SCOTT x ADIDAS.

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NICO KRIJNO

interview by EMILY RAMSHAW

is a photographer. But he also seems to be (at least to me) a bit of a poet. His photographs are intimate and colourful and have a studiousness about them – as though each shot has a specific, premeditated purpose. The following interview further proves the poet hypothesis: here is a thoughtful artist who makes beautiful and uncompromising images. They are devoid of pretension, and superficial (in the way that great art must be) in a way that makes you want to drink it in. Nico Krijno

– Tell me a little bit about where you grew up and your path to becoming a photographer. Emily

– I grew up in a small town in the middle of South Africa. It was beautiful to be a kid there, but when I became a teenager I left to go to an art school in Pretoria, then [to] Cape Town where I studied acting as well directing. Thereafter I worked in the film industry as cameraman, editor and director. I got bored of the industry and left to live in London for a few years. I’ve always taken pictures casually – but for the past eight years I’ve been focusing my skill and building a career.

Nico

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Emily – I’ve seen your photos before and Tumblr’d a few from Dazed Digital because I loved them so much. What are your thoughts on people re-blogging your work? Is it a positive or a negative?

– Oh, I don’t really mind. Isn’t that what the Internet is about, sharing and appreciating? I don’t mind it at all. It’s a great social gauge.

Nico

– Some of your photographs are composed almost like still life paintings – how do you conceive and create these images? Emily

– I don’t know how I conceive these things, they really just happen, I’m constantly responding to instincts…things I feel and see. My work comes to me through imagining, and just observing my world. I’m constantly deeply involved in my work, documenting, and I guess just processing my surroundings, and these images are a sort of filter. I never want to really know what the image will look like...there always has to be the element of surprise, and an improvised spontaneity. Photography is like a performance for me, I like to set up situations that you might not always find in everyday life, so it’s all about the thought behind the situation, constructing a scene.

Nico

– How spontaneous are your photographs? Do you prefer to create the image that you take, so to speak? Emily

– I would say it’s a mixture of setup and spontaneous images. A lot of my work is constructed because I want to create situations that one might not see in everyday life.

Nico

– Who or what is your favorite subject to photograph?

Emily

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– Feelings, situations, people, animals, plants, fruit. In that order.

Nico

– What is it like to live and work in Cape Town as a photographer compared to other cities? How does the city impact or reflect in you work?

Emily

– I love it here. Although I mostly get commissions from European magazines, this is home, and this is where I do my best work. Of course,

Nico

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your milieu is a huge influence in your work, so is travel and being exposed to new and exciting things and people. I would like to travel more, and not have to leave my girlfriend behind. I do my best work in transit, moving through space. Emily

– When are you happiest?

– When I’m working. I can’t really go on holidays, and really switch off. I’m constantly looking and devouring with my eyes. Always working. This is not work, it’s my life.

Nico

Emily – Who are your favorite photographers (living or dead)? Who’s work do you most admire?

– Eggleston...Araki...Teller... Tillman’s...I really love Baldessari.

Nico

– What would you consider to be your biggest accomplishment, in your career or otherwise?

Emily

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– My solo show at Musuem Gallery in 2011 and my first book of photographs, On How to Fill Those Gaps.

Nico

– Have you ever dabbled in other art forms? Why is photography your medium of choice?

Emily

– I’ve always worked with either video or still imagery. I don’t know why, I just always knew that’s what I would do.

Nico

– Many of the photographs of yours that I’ve seen are super saturated in colour. What role does colour play in the creation of your photographs?

Emily

– Colour represents this reality best. Black and white has its place, but for now colour is my medium.

Nico

– Your photos are incredibly graphic – is there an impact beyond the immediate beauty of each particular image that you are trying to create?

Emily

– I like to bring contrasting elements together, and with this I would like to create new meaning, a new way of looking at images. I’m fascinated by a certain self-aware vulnerability in people and moments, even objects – a vulnerability I might be feeling at the time. It’s a result of an ongoing, fractured and subconscious, but active, routine of searching for a new “pure” way of looking at the interconnectedness of things.

Nico

xx

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LUKASZ WIERZBOWSKI

interview by EMILY RAMSHAW

A girl is standing in a grassy field, pulling her tiger-print shirt up to cover her face. A cross cut out of a concrete wall has a small hand grasping at its base as though reaching through the age-old symbol from the inside. A mirror on a whitewashed wall reflects a beautiful woman, braids pinned haphazardly to her head, who herself appears to be in a state of reflection. But you have to look at the photos, because as some genius said, and many more less-than-clever people have repeated, “a picture is worth a thousand words.” My description does Lukasz Wierzbowski’s photographs no justice – they illustrate intangible qualities of the subjects’ young lives. They are singular in their ability to communicate themselves, and yet somehow represent the isolation, fragmentation, and alone-we-are-togetherness that is universal within our Tumblr generation.

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– Tell me a little bit about where you grew up and your path to photography.

EMILY

– I grew up in small city on the south of Poland called Lubliniec. – [a] lovely place of amazing people, surrounded by woods. I moved to Wroclaw to persuade my dream of becoming a social psychologist. I was hoping to become a copywriter in advertising agency. As third year student I started taking photos and soon realized that it actually brings me a lot of joy.

Lukasz

– What would you consider to be your biggest accomplishment so far, in your career or otherwise?

Emily

– Finding [out] what I really want to do in my life is probably my biggest accomplishment so far.

Lukasz

Emily

– When are you happiest?

– When I’m with people that I love and care about.

Lukasz

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– Where do you live? Why is it a great city to work as an artist? Emily

– I [fell] in love with Wroclaw, the city I currently live in, almost immediately. It’s packed with kind people, inspiring architecture; and the laid back feeling is almost overwhelming.

Lukasz

– Who or what is your favourite subject to shoot?

Emily

Lukasz

– People surrounded by nature.

– Do you try to convey captured moments or full narrative with your photos?

Emily

– I try to tell a different story with each photo. It’s more about finding the spots and just capturing moments. Each session is a journey and how it’s going to go usually depends on many factors.

Lukasz

– Fashion and photography are often conflated – how important is fashion to your photographs? Or are your photographs apart from fashion?

Emily

Lukasz – I find fashion to be an inspiring addition, it fulfills the photos, but still the model itself and the situation play the main role. Working on more fashion-oriented project gives me [the] opportunity to show fashion in a different context. Typical fashion photography can often be boring and uninviting, it just makes you want to skip the pages of a magazine. I like when the photo captures my attention, it just has to have this secret factor that will make me remember it.

– Women are featured as your subjects almost exclusively. Why?

Emily

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– It’s not really a rule as I have a few male models that I work with quite frequently. I don’t like giving much direction, I like [the models to] just be true to their nature. Girls are just a little better [at] losing the level a bit quicker while men tend to control themselves a bit longer.

Lukasz

– If you could live and work anywhere in the world, where would it be?

Emily

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– I like cities, they are filled with [the] creativity of good people. I always enjoy London, but New York has always been a Holy Grail for me. Hopefully one day...

Lukasz

– Who are your favourite photographers (living or dead)? Who’s work do you admire? Emily

– Wolfgang Tillmans, Guy Bourdin and William Eggleston have always been among my all-time favourites. There are quite a lot of young photographer whose work I enjoy: Ren Hang is definitely one of them. Lukasz

xx

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BLOOD NEW BOMBS THE WINTER photographed by WALLY SPARKS styled by BOBBI PAIDEL

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IS THE BLACK. AWAY. CRAFT. R BONES. 133


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leather hand bag, BADGLEY MISCHKA. lipstick (from left to right), SMOKED PURPLE, DIVA, PRINCE NOIR all by MAC COSMETICS. matte lip pencil, TRAIN BLEU VELVET by NARS. nail varnish, MANICURE COUTURE by YVES SAINT LAURENT.

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leather boot, SAM EDELMAN. mohair bootie, VINCE CAMUTO. velvet creeper, AGYNESS DEYN x DR. MARTENS.

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LEFT: leather trench style, MUMBA. RIGHT: suede with gold zippers, 5PREVIEW.

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soft leather, GESTUZ.

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embellished leather bomber, MUMBA.

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gold jacket, GANNI.

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iphone cases, FELONY CASE.

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all jewelry, ARMED. felt hat, DIESEL. corset bra top, OPENING CEREMONY. leather belt, PRADA. studded collar, TOP SHOP. black collar, ECHO at HOLT RENFREW. black leather gloves, HOLT RENFREW.

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FRISCHE MARKET

ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012

silver mesh sweater, DIESEL.

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FRISCHE MARKET

ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012

wool hat, HOLT RENFREW.

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ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012

5PREVIEW – info at www.agencyone.ca ACNE – www.acnestudios.com ADDIDAS – www.addidas.ca AGENT PROVOCATEUR – www.agentprovocateur.com AIDEN WEAVER – www.aidencweaver.co.uk ALÖE – www.aloeloungewear.com AMANDA LEW KEE – www.amandalewkee.com AMERICAN APPAREL – www.americanapparel.com AQUA – www.aquabyaqua.com ARMED – www.upandarmed.com ARTHUR MENDONÇA – www.arthurmendonca.ca ASHER LEVINE – www.asherlevine.com ASHTIANI – www.ashtiani.co.uk ASOS – www.asos.com BALMAIN – www.balmain.com BERNHARD WILLHELM – www.bernhard-willhelm.com BIG IT UP – www.bigitup.com BREEYN McCARNEY – www.breeyn.com BROSE – www.marikabrokse.com CALVIN KLEIN – www.calvinklein.com CHARLIE LE MINDU – www.charlielemindu.com CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS – www.chloecommeparris.ca CHRISTIAN DIOR – www.dior.com COMME DES GARÇONS X JUNYA WANATABE – www.comme-des-garcon.com CONVERSE – www.converse.com CTRL – www.ctrlclothing.com CUTLER & GROSS – www.cutlerandgross.com DANIEL STORTO – www.danielstorto.com DAY BIRGER ET MIKKELSEN – www.day.dk/eu/en DENIS GAGNON – www.denisgagnon.com DIANE VON FURSTENBERG – www.dvf.com DIESEL – www.diesel.com DR. MARTENS – info at www.lotusleaf.ca DSQUARED – www.dquared2.com ECHO – info at www.holtrenfrew.com ELINA LAITINEN, TIIA SIREN & SIIRI RAASAKKA – www.laitinen-raasakka-siren.com ELLA DUAL – www.store.gisellescloset.com ELLY CHENG – ellissellielly@gmail.com EMILIO CAVALLINI – www.emiliocavallini.com ENZA COSTA – www.enzacosta.com EQUIPMENT – www.equipmentfr.com FELONY CASE – www.felonycase.com GANNI – info at www.agencyone.ca GESTUZ – info at www.agencyone.ca GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI – www.brownshoes.com HANNA-MAARIA SINKKONEN – unavailable HEIKKI SALONEN – www.heikkisalonen.com HIGHLAND – www.highlandus.com HOLT RENFREW – www.holtrenfrew.com HOOD BY AIR FOR VFILES – www.hoodbyair.com JAMES PERSE – www.jamesperse.ca JBRAND – info at www.slavinraphael.com JC DE CASTELBAJAC – www.jc-de-castelbajac.com JEREMY LAING – www.jeremylaing.com

JEREMY SCOTT – www.jeremyscott.com JESSICA WALSH – www.jessicawalsh.com JOE FRESH – www.joefresh.com JOEFFER CAOC – www.joeffercaoc.com KARL LAGERFELD – www.karl.com LA CRASIA – www.lacrasiagloves.com LAITINEN – www.laitinencollection.com LOUIS VUITTON – www.louisvuitton.com MAC COSMETICS – www.maccosmetics.com MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA – www.maisonmartinmargiela.com MARINA QURESHI – www.marinaqureshi.com MICHAEL JORDAN – www.footlocker.com MIU MIU – www.miumiu.com MUMBA – www.mumbafashion.com NARS COSMETICS – www.narscosmetics.ca NICHOLAS K – www.nicholask.com NICOLE MARCIANO – www.winners.com OPENING CEREMONY – www.openingceremony.us PACO ROBANNE – www.pacorabanne.com PEDRAM KARIMI - www.pedramkarimi.com PHILOSOPHY BLUES ORIGINAL – www.pbo.creativeicon.dk PINK TARTAN – www.pinktartan.com POLDER – www.polder.fr/designers.htm PRADA – www.prada.com PRETTY POLLY – www.prettypolly.co.uk RAFFAELE ASCIONE – www.raffaeleascione.com RELIGION – info at www.agencyone.ca ROBERTO CAVALLI – www.robertocavalli.com ROBERTO PIQUERAS – www.robertopiqueras.com SAM EDELMAN – www.samedelman.com SANDRO – www.us.sandro-paris.com SARAH KELPIN – www.sarahkelpin.blogspot.ca SERGIO ROSSI – www.sergiorossi.com SIMONE ROCHA – www.simonerocha.com SIR NY – www.sirnewyork.com SOMETHING ELSE – info at www.agencyone.ca SOPHIE SALEKÄRI – unavailable STOLEN GIRLFRIENDS CLUB – www.stolengirlfriendsclub.com STONES – info at www.agencyone.ca STYLE STALKER – info at www.agencyone.ca TAMZIN LILLYWHITE – www.tamzinlillywhite.co.uk TESSA EDWARDS – www.tessaedwards.co.uk THEORY – www.theory.com TIGER OF SWEDEN – info at www.slavinraphael.com TOPMAN – www.topman.com TOPSHOP – www.topshop.com TRIBUNE STANDARD – www.tribunestandard.com VIKTOR & ROLF – www.viktor-rolf.com VINCE – www.vince.com VINCE CAMUTO – www.vincecamuto.com VOICE OF COURSE – www.void-of-course.com YUMI YUMI – www.yumiclothes.com ZARA – www.zara.com

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ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012

artwork by WILLIAM HUNDLEY

FRISCHE STOCKISTS

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www.frischemagazine.com

FRISCHE magazine ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012  

FRISCHE magazine ISSUE NO.2 — FALL/WINTER 2012

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