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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Jenni Webster Associate Director-Program Services Friends of Children and Families, Inc. 2019


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update Friends of Children and Families, Inc. Head Start and Early Head Start 4709 West Camas Street Boise, Idaho 83705 Phone: (208) 344-9187 www.focaf.org

Disclaimer and Disclosure The information presented in this Community Needs Assessment Update was acquired and analyzed according to the most recent and relevant data available. This 2019 Community Needs Assessment Update was completed and prepared by: Jenni Webster, Associate Director-Program Services Friends of Children and Families, Inc. 4709 West Camas Street Boise, Idaho 83705 (208) 344-9187 www.focaf.org APPROVED BY FOCAF BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND POLICY COUNCIL DATE


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Executive Summary Friends of Children and Families, Inc. Head Start and Early Head Start (FOCAF) is funded to serve 385 children aged 3-5 years old in center-based services and 76 pregnant moms and children up to age 3 in home-based services. During the 2018-19 program year, the program served 571 children and families. The Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment is a tool to help FOCAF make program decisions, to determine the types of services most needed by families and children, to locate resources available to meet those needs, and to set our 5 year Strategic Goals. FOCAF staff review changes in the community on a regular basis and make course corrections as needed to meet the current needs of our children, families, and community. However, the Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment allows for the formal process that allows us to plan and partners with those in the community. The Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment is completed every five years and updated annually. This is an update to our 2018 Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment. You can view our 2018 Comprehensive Community Needs Assessment on our website www.focaf.org or by contacting Jenni Webster, Associate Director of Program Services at jwebster@focaf.org


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Table of Contents COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT UPDATE..................................................................................................... Executive Summary .....................................................................................................................3 Overview of the State of the Grantee.....................................................................................6 History of Head Start and FOCAF …………………………..……………………..………………..6 Areas of Service.................................................................................................................6 Staffing Patterns ..............................................................................................................7 Mission, Vision, and Core Values................................................................................9 Service Area Data.........................................................................................................................10 Total Population of Ada and Elmore Counties …………………….……………….……..10 Children in Poverty in Idaho......................................................................................10 Homelessnes...................................................................................................................11 Foster Care.......................................................................................................................11 Disabilities........................................................................................................................12 Race Composition of Ada and Elmore Counties ………………..……………………….13 Refugees...........................................................................................................................14 Dual Language Learners ............................................................................................14 Family Dynamics............................................................................................................14 Income Sources..............................................................................................................15 Median Income Level...................................................................................................16 Number of Public Assistance Recipients................................................................16 Identified Needs

Education Needs17 Health and Social Services Needs 18 Violent Crimes18 Child Abuse and Neglect18 Domestic Violence18 Substance Abuse18 Teen Pregnancy19 Immunizations19 Prevalent Health Problems19


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Nutrition Needs 19

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Free and Reduced Meals 19 Food Stamps20 WIC20 Food Insecurity20

Housing and Homelessness Needs20 Housing20 Homelessness21

ERSEA Needs22 Community Resources and Strengths Housing and Homelessness22 Child Care Availability23 Transportations and Communications24 Community Partners24 Services Received 27 Observations and Recommendations Emerging Issues27 Five Year Strategic Goals30 FOCAF Birth to Five School Readiness Goals 31 References


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Community Needs Assessment Update Overview of the State of the Grantee History of Head Start and FOCAF In his 1964 State of the Union address, President Lyndon B. Johnson declared “War on Poverty” in the United States. He commissioned a group of experts in child development and sociology to design a program that would help young children overcome the challenges of an underprivileged childhood. The program this group created, Head Start, began in the summer of 1965 and its sister program, Early Head Start, was awarded its first grants in 1995. Together, these two programs address the comprehensive health, developmental, and educational needs of disadvantaged, lowincome pregnant women and children up to age five. Today, Head Start and Early Head Start are federally funded programs; grants are competed for and administered by local non-profits which provide services directly to the communities. In Ada and Elmore counties of Idaho, the non-profit organization that provides Head Start and Early Head Start services is Friends of Children and Families, Inc. (FOCAF). FOCAF began providing Head Start services in 1986 and Early Head Start services in 2002. In the 2018-2019 school year, FOCAF was funded to serve 385 four- and fiveyear-old Head Start children and 76 Early Head Start pregnant women and children birth to age three. The cities that FOCAF serves in Ada County include: Boise, Meridian, Eagle, Garden City, Star, and Kuna. The cities that FOCAF serves in Elmore County include: Glenn’s Ferry and Mountain Home. Areas of Service Friends of Children and Families, Inc. (FOCAF) provides quality, comprehensive, family centered, early childhood Head Start and Early Head Start Services in Ada and Elmore Counties in Idaho. In Ada County, FOCAF has 5 Head Start center-based sites serving 329 children and families, and an Early Head Start home-based program that serves 66 children and families. In Elmore County, FOCAF has 1 Head Start center-based site serving 56 children and families, and an Early Head Start home-based program that serves 10 children and families. Based on Head Start bus routes and enrollment numbers, a large number of the children we serve in Ada County live in Southwest Boise and West Boise. Currently these children are bused 9-10 miles to the nearest Head Start center.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Classrooms are in four buildings owned by FOCAF and two spaces that are rented at two school district buildings. Socialization space is in two buildings owned by FOCAF. Ada County continues to grow and most of the school district buildings are limited on space and there is always the potential that they will need our space for school district children. Affordable and appropriate space for classrooms is very limited due to the fast growth in Ada County. Staffing Patterns FOCAF staffing patterns remain the same with each classroom having between 18-19 children with a Teacher and Assistant Teacher. Family Advocates work with the families in two classrooms, which gives them a caseload of between 36-38 families. Each of our large centers has a bus driver that runs a morning pick-up/drop-off route and an afternoon pick-up/drop-off route. We have one bus driver that runs one pickup/drop-off route at a center that identifies a need for more bus transportation. We work with the Boise and Kuna School Districts to provide busing for our children located at their buildings. We provide breakfast and lunch for AM children and lunch and a snack for PM children at all of our centers. Food is prepared in our center kitchens. Staff at the centers are supported by a Center Supervisor. Center Supervisors directly supervise Teachers, Assistant Teachers, and Kitchen Staff. Meridian Center and Hubbard Elementary share a Center Supervisor. Lolly Wyatt Center and Madison Early Learning Center share a Center Supervisor. Bus Drivers are supervised by the Transportation Coordinator and Family Advocates are supervised by the Family Services Manager. FOCAF has two Education Coaches that provide Practice Based Coaching to staff that are identified through observation, monitoring, and a self-identified Strengths Assessment. FOCAF also has an Education Coordinator and Education Mentor that provide mentoring to new teaching staff. TLC groups are provided to all teaching staff as part of FOCAF’s professional development. Early Head Start offers home-based services in Ada and Elmore County. Early Childhood Parent Educators (ECPE) have office space at FOCAF centers. The Socialization space in Ada County is located at our Lolly Wyatt Center and in Elmore County at our Glenns Ferry Center. ECPEs serve at least 10 families. This may mean they have between 10-12 children on their case load. ECPEs in Ada County are supervised by the EHS Services Manager. The Elmore County ECPE is supervised by the Center Supervisor with support from the EHS Services Manager. ECPEs are also supported by the EHS Health and Nutrition Coordinator and EHS Support Specialist. FOCAF has an EHS Education Mentor that provides TLC groups as part of FOCAF’s professional development and mentors new ECPEs.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Center and Location Judy Kindall Center 4707 W Camas Boise, ID 83705

Number of Children Served Head Start Center-Based – 109 Early Head Start Home-Based – 22

Madison Early Learning Center (MELC) 2215 W Madison St Boise, ID 83702

Head Start Center-Based – 36

Lolly Wyatt Center (LWC) 304 E. 36th St. Garden City, ID 83714

Head Start Center-Based – 74 Early Head Start Home-Based – 22

Meridian Center 321 W Broadway Meridian, ID 83642

Head Start Center-Based – 74 Early Head Start Home-Based – 22

Hubbard Elementary School (Kuna) 311 E Porter Kuna, ID 83634

Head Start Center-Based – 36

Mountain Home Center 1745 American Legion Blvd Mountain Home, ID 83647

Head Start Center-Based – 56

Glenns Ferry Center 104 W Idaho St Glenns Ferry, ID 83623

Early Head Start Home-Based – 10

Number of staff Teachers/Assistant Teachers – 12 Family Advocates – 3 Early Childhood Parent Educator – 2 Kitchen Staff – 3 Bus Drivers – 2 Center Supervisor – 1 Teachers/Assistant Teachers – 4 Family Advocates – 1 Kitchen Staff – 1 Center Supervisor – 1 (shared w/ LWC) Teachers/Assistant Teachers – 8 Family Advocates – 2 Early Childhood Parent Educator – 2 Kitchen Staff – 2 Bus Drivers – 1 Center Supervisor – 1 (shared w/ MELC) Teachers/Assistant Teachers – 8 Family Advocates – 2 Early Childhood Parent Educator – 2 Kitchen Staff – 2 Bus Drivers – 1 Center Supervisor – 1 (shared w/ Kuna) Teachers/Assistant Teachers –4 Family Advocates – 1 Kitchen Staff – 1 Center Supervisor – 1 (shared w/ Mer) Teachers/Assistant Teachers – 6 Family Advocates – 2 Kitchen Staff – 2 Bus Drivers – 1 Center Supervisor – 1 (shared w/ GF) Early Childhood Parent Educator – 2 Center Supervisor – 1 (shared w/ MH)


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Board of Directors

Policy Council

Shared Governance

Leadership Team

Executive Director (5) Associate DirectorOperations (7)

Associate DirectorProgram Services (4)

Administrative Assistant

Fiscal Manager (2)

Maintenance Technician

ERSEA Manager (2.25)

ERSEA Support Speciali st

ERSEA Support Specialist Summer .25

Center Supervis ors 4 – (53)

Transpor t. Coordin ator (4)

Teachers 21

Health & Nutrition Manager (1)

EHS Health & Nutrition Coordinator

(1)

Assist. Teachers 21

Bus Drivers 4

Food Service Staf 11 EHS ERSEA Support Specialist EHS in Glenns Ferry EC Parent Educator (1)

Receptionist

EHS Support Specialist I

Family Services Manager (11)

Family Advocates 11

Children Services Manager (6)

Education Coaches 2 Education Mentors 2

Social Emotional Coordinator

EHS Services Manager (7)

EHS Mentor

Fiscal Coordinator

Program Support Specialist

Early Childhood Parent Educators 6

Special Education Coordinator

Organizational Chart

Mission, Vision, and Core Values The mission of Friends of Children and Families, Inc. is to provide high quality early childhood services by educating, serving, and partnering with families to create life-long learners.

Human Resources Generalist (1)

HR Specialist


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

FOCAF’s Head Start and Early Head Start programs are child-focused with the overall goal of increasing school readiness in order to bridge the gap of opportunity that exists between children growing up in poverty and their more affluent counterparts. FOCAF services are also family-centered, following the tenets that 1) engaged families help children develop in the context of their family and culture and 2) parents are the primary educators and nurturers of their children. In the context of these tenets, FOCAF strives to assist parents in identifying their own strengths, needs, and interests in order to live better lives. Overall, FOCAF is an organization that is empowering our community through early education and family engagement. FOCAF’s core values are Integrity, Compassion, Mindfulness, Innovative, Empowerment, and Passion. FOCAF employees believe that these values are the basis for our mission and vision. Each of these values help FOCAF employees shape their everyday work with children and Families.

Service Area Data Total Population of Ada and Elmore Counties According to 2018 statistics, a total of 496,766 people live in the 4,126.22 square miles defined for this assessment. In 2017 the US Census Bureau estimates were 456,849 for Ada County and 26,823 for Elmore County. Based on the new information there has been an increase in the population in Ada County by 13,117 or 10%. For Elmore County there has been a decrease in the population by 23 or 1%. There has been a drop in population of 3% in Elmore County since 2010. Most of this population loss is due to the shutdown of Simplot food processing factories in the area. Over the last year a factory in Glenns Ferry reopened. There are 29,608 children under the age of 5 in Ada County and 2,331 children under the age of 5 in Elmore County. Report Area

Total Population

Children Under 5

Report Area

496,766

28,939

Ada County, ID

469,966

29,608

26,800

2,331

1,754,208

115,778

Elmore County, ID Idaho Children in Poverty in Idaho


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Based on the US Census the percentage of Idaho children age birth to 5 in poverty is 21%. Another 33% of children age 0-5 fall between the 100%-200% of Federal Poverty Line.

In Ada County 11.4 % or 3,383 children under the age of 5 live in poverty and are eligible for Head Start and Early Head Start services. In Elmore County 18.2% or 430 children under the age of 5 live in poverty and are eligible for Head Start and Early Head Start services. FOCAF serves 11% of eligible children in Ada County and 13% of eligible children in Elmore County.

Idaho Children Age Birth-18 in Poverty 22.3% 19.7% 17.2%

19.3%

19.3%

19.0%

2013

2014

2015

21.0%

21.0% 18.0%

12.6%

2009

2010

2011

2012

2016

2017

2018

Annually, there are approximately 5,023 pregnant women in Ada County and 457 pregnant women in Elmore County. Based on this approximation and the percentage of women in poverty, there are 708 pregnant women in Ada County and 83 pregnant women in Elmore County that are eligible for Early Head Start services. According to the United Way ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constraint, Employed) Report 32% of Ada County Families and 40% of Elmore County Families struggle to make ends meet. Homelessness According to the Administration for Children and Families, 1 in 20 children in Idaho experienced homelessness in 2015. While the National Alliance to End Homelessness reports that Idaho has had a decrease in homelessness, we had an increase in the amount of participants that were homeless for the 2018-2019 school year. This could be an indication that additional support is needed to help families find housing or that more community resources are needed. Ada County is one of the fastest growing areas in the United States. This had led to increased housing prices and a severe decrease in affordable housing. At this time, the Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher are taking pre-applications for the waiting list. Foster Care


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

In 2018, there were 2,936 children between 0-18 in foster care. This is a 50% increase in two years. Last year, 1,241 children left foster care, with 66% reunified with their families. In 2018-2019, Head Start and Early Head Start served 12 children in foster care. This can be difficult when children transition to another foster home or when children enter foster care and the foster family does not want to continue Head Start services. We work closely with foster families and biological families to help with reunification.

Foster Care in Idaho Children 0-18 years old 2018

2,936

2016

1,518

2015

1,351

2014

1,208

2013

1,342

2012

1,234 0

500

1,000

1,500

2,000

2,500

3,000

3,500

Disabilities In 2014 we were struggling to make our 10% enrollment of children with disabilities by the end of the year. To help us with enrollment we began collaboration classrooms with 3 school districts. Since the 2014-2015 school year we have started the year with at least 10% enrollment of children with disabilities. In 2018-2019 we ended the year with 17%. 

Kuna School District (KSD) o 2018-2019 school year – 8 children in our collaboration classroom and 4 children dually enrolled o In the collaboration classroom, all of the IEP services are provided in the Head Start classroom o We currently have 12 children with an IEP who have completed or are scheduled to complete a Head Start application for the 2019-2020 school year.

Boise School District (BSD) o 2018-2019 school year – 8 children in our collaboration classroom and 13 children dually enrolled o In the collaboration classroom, all the IEP services are provided in the Head Start classroom


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

o We currently have 20 children with an IEP who have completed or are scheduled to complete a Head Start application for the 2019-2020 school year. 

West Ada School District (WASD) o 2018-2019 school year – 14 children in our collaboration classrooms and11 children dually enrolled o In the collaboration classrooms, all the IEP services are provided in the Head Start classroom o We currently have 14 children with an IEP who have completed or are scheduled to complete a Head Start application for the 2019-2020 school year.

Mountain Home School District (MHSD) o 2018-2019 school year – 5 children with an IEP were dually enrolled at our Mt. Home Head Start Center o We currently have 11 children with an IEP who have completed or are scheduled to complete a Head Start application for the 2019-2020 school year.

Infant/Toddler Program o 17 children with an IFSP were provided home visiting services through Early Head Start o Early Childhood Parent Educators work with families and Infant/Toddler Case Managers to support families with IFSP goals

There are 5 school districts within Ada and Elmore County. In Idaho the school districts are responsible for providing special education services to children aged 3 to 21 years old and the Infant/Toddler Program is responsible for children under 3 years of age.

IFSPs 2018-2019

IEPs 2018-2019 18.00%

IEP No IEP

82.00%

Race Composition of Ada and Elmore Counties

15.00%

85.00%

IFSP No IFSP


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

The demographic composition of Ada and Elmore Counties mirrors that of the State. The race composition for both Ada and Elmore Counties has remained similar to our last assessment. The race breakdown for the 2018-2019 Head Start and Early Head Start school year was almost identical to the 2017-2018 school year. The majority of children are identified as being white, the next largest identifier is “other�. 32% of families identified their ethnicity as Hispanic/Latino, which is similar to last year. Refugees Idaho is a refugee resettlement state. Since the year 2000, 4,000 refugees have come to live in Idaho. Arrivals to Idaho in 2018 were from Iraq, Bhutan, Afghanistan, Congo, and Syria. Idaho is home to two major refugee resettlement agencies. Due to the cuts in the number of refugees being allowed into the country, World Relief closed their doors in Idaho at the end of May 2017. This has had a huge impact on the number of refugees being resettled in Idaho and the support that is available to this vulnerable population. Dual Language Learners In 2018-2019 Head Start served 125 dual language learners who spoke 23 different languages. Which was about 20 children lower but 5 more languages than 2017-2018. Early Head Start served 28 dual language learners in 2018-2019, who spoke 9 different languages. This was 12 fewer children that 2017-2018. English is the primary language spoken by the families followed by Spanish and Arabic. Other languages include Swahili, Pashto, Somali, Dari, Farsi, Kirundi, Nepali, Russian, Karen, and French.

Languages in HS

Languages in EHS

9.00% Engl is h Spani s h Arabi c Swahi l i Other

4.00% 4.00% 11.00% 72.00%

3.00% 7.00% 3.00% 11.00%

76.00%

Engl is h Spani s h Pa shto Swahi l i Other


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Family Dynamics

For the 2018-2019 school year the majority of children lived in a two parent household. The percentages for two-parent, single, foster, relative are similar to last year. These numbers match the community make-up of family households

HS Parent/Guardians 2018-2019 0%10%20%30%40%50%60% Two Parent

EHS Parent/Guardians 2018-2019 0% 10%20%30%40%50%60%70% Two Parent

56% Single Parent (mother)

Single Parent (mother) Single Parent (father) 4% Grandparent/other relative 2% Foster Parent 1%

61% 38%

37% Single Pa rent (father) 0% Gra ndparent/other relative 1% Foster Parent 0%

Income Sources Idaho is a service industry state, most jobs are minimum wage and many entry level jobs that require a degree pay slightly more than minimum wage. Major employers in Ada and Elmore County are Regional Medical Centers, Universities and Colleges, Military, Manufacturing, and Farming. Work schedules vary based on the job. Many service industries are opened 24 hours, so shifts range from early morning, swing shift, night shift, over-night. Based on parent report, the majority of our families in 2018-2019, worked MondayFriday between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

2018-2019 HS Family Employment

20.00%

10.00%

22.00% 8.00%

2018-2019 EHS Family Employment

Both Parents Employed One Parent Employed Both Parents not Employed

40.00%

Single Parent Employed Single Parent not Employed

22.00%

7.00%

18.00% 8.00%

Both Parents Employed One Parent is Employed Both Parents not Employed

45.00%

Single Parent Working Single Parent not Working

The 2018-2019 percentage of employed parents (two-parent and single-parent) enrolled in Head Start and Early Head Start was similar to 2017-2018. Total unemployment in the reported area for June 2019 was 3%. Although unemployment is relatively low, our parents still report that financial and employment concerns are their biggest stressors. Median Income Level Ada County’s median household income increased $2,000.00 to $60,858 and Elmore County increased $1,000.00 to $45,154. The U.S. Federal Poverty Guidelines for a family of four is $25,750. According to the United Way ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed) Report a family of four would need to earn $59,208 in Ada County and $52,620 in Elmore County to make ends meet. Number of Public Assistance Recipients Region 4 which is the most populous region and contains more than a quarter of the state population had the lowest use of benefits in the state. At least 90% of Head Start and Early Head Start children received Medicaid and at least 60% received SNAP benefits in 2017-2018.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

2018-2019 HS Families Receiving Public Assistance Families Receiving Medicaid/CHIP

403

Families Receving SNAP

270

Families Receiving SSI

56

Families Receiving TANF (Cash Benefits)

6 0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

400

450

2018-2019 EHS Families Receiving Public Assistnace Families Receiving Medicaid/CHIP

106

Families Receving SNAP

83

Families Receiving SSI

20

Families Receiving TANF (Cash Benefits)

3 0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Identified Needs Education Needs In Idaho 89.5% of residents over the age of 18 have at least a High School Diploma. Residents with a Bachelor’s Degree or higher is 25.9%. Ada County has a higher percentage of residents with a high school or college degree than other counties. It also has a higher rate than the state or the nation. In Idaho 79.9% of high school students graduate. The number for Hispanic graduates is lower at 73.3% and slightly lower for students with limited English proficiency which is 73%. Students living in poverty have the lowest graduation rate at 71.9%. Idaho has been pushing the idea of “go-on” to increase the number of high school graduates that enroll in higher education within one year of graduation. While the rate of high school graduates going on to higher education has dropped, enrollment in higher education has increased sharply. Idaho’s 1.6% enrollment increase is the fifth highest in the country. The percentage of parents in Head Start and Early Head Start with Some College or Higher is about the same as last year.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

2018-2019 HS Parent Education Level 17.00%16.00% 33.00%

Adva nced or Ba chel ors Degree As s oci ates or Some Col l ege Hi gh School Graduate Less tha n Hi gh School

34.00%

2018-2019 EHS Parent Education Level 12.00% 18.00%

34.00%

36.00%

Adva nced or Ba chel ors Degree As s oci ates or Some Col l ege Hi gh School Graduate Less Tha n Hi gh School

There are multiple options for post-High School education. Boise State University, College of Western Idaho, College of Southern Idaho, Treasure Valley Community College, and University of Idaho all have campuses in or near Ada and Elmore County. These colleges and Universities define themselves as non-traditional with flexible schedules for working students. This area also has a variety of trade schools (health, dental, electrician, and beautician) that are geared towards working students. Idaho ranks 30th out of 50 states in Education and ranks 45th out of 50 states in early childhood education. 64% of fourth graders and 37% of eighth graders are not proficient in reading. Studies show that children age 0-3 years old from mid to high income families are exposed to 30 million more words than children living in poverty. This puts children in poverty at a disadvantage when entering school.

Health and Social Services Needs Violent Crimes For violent crimes, Idaho ranks seventh to last in the nation, making Idaho one of the least dangerous places to live. Violent crimes numbers are similar last year.


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Child Abuse and Neglect

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare reports that there has been an increase in child abuse and neglect reports, especially sexual abuse. In 2018, the Idaho Child and Family Services received 23,599 reports regarding allegations of child neglect or abuse. This is a 50% increase in 2 years. The number of calls made by FOCAF staff to Child and Family Services has increased over the last two years. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recognizes Head Start and Early Head Start as promising practices for early intervention and prevention of child abuse and neglect due to the whole child approach taken by Head Start/Early Head Start and the connection to community resources that are provided to families. Domestic Violence In Idaho, more than 514 victims of domestic violence and their children seek safety each day. This is slightly down from last year. Nationally one in four women will experience domestic violence over her lifetime. In 2017, there were 15 domestic violence related fatalities in Idaho. Substance Abuse While Idaho has a smaller population than most other states, it has not been immune to substance abuse. According to recent surveys 1 out of 5 high school students admitted to trying opioids without a prescription. The number of families enrolled in Head Start/Early Head Start that received substance abuse education or treatment doubled in 2018-2019. Teen Pregnancy Teen pregnancies in Idaho have been decreasing slightly over the last ten years. Teen moms tend to receive inadequate health care and are more likely to have babies born with low-birth rates. This can lead to birth defects, developmental disabilities, failure to thrive, and other health and developmental conditions. Immunizations According to the Child National Immunization Survey completed in 2016, 73.9% of children ages 19-35 months had the primary seven vaccination series completed. This was the highest level ever reported in Idaho. On the down side, Idaho had the highest School Immunization Exemption rates in the country. In Ada County 6.8% of students have an immunization exemption. Elmore County has a much lower immunization exemption rate, which is 3.2%. Prevalent Health Problems


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Idaho ranks 5th in the nation for Infant Health but drops to 32nd for overall children’s health. Idaho has a higher rate of SIDS related deaths than the United States average but the infant mortality rate is lower. Idaho hospitals have been stressing the importance of breastfeeding and have seen a 68% increase in breastfeeding exclusively for the first six months. Obesity is on the rise across the country. Idaho’s numbers continue to climb. Children 0-17 years old that are overweight or obese is 15%. Mental Health was a top stressor for Head Start and Early Head Start families in 20182019. We have seen an increase in the number of children and families dealing with trauma. Idaho continues to struggle with mental health services. There are too few qualified clinicians, long waitlists, services not covered by Medicaid for young children, and stigmatism related to seeking help. Idaho still has one of the country’s highest suicide rates. Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for 15-34 year olds in Idaho. 1 in 5 high school students reported they seriously considered suicide and 1 in 10 reported making at least an attempt at suicide.

Nutrition Needs Free and Reduced Meals According to the Idaho Department of Education 45.3% of students received free or reduced meals for the 2018-2019 school year. This is a 3% drop from the previous year.

Free and Reduced Meals 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

45.3%

50.1%

24.9%

34.0%

46.9%

FOCAF Head Start provides CACFP funded breakfast and lunch to morning classes and lunch and snack to afternoon classes at no cost to families. Snacks are served at all Early Head Start socializations at no cost to families. Food Stamps 90% of enrolled families received food stamps. The average SNAP benefit in 2018 was $1.23 per meal.


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WIC

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

WIC is a supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children for lowincome pregnant, infants, and children up to age five. In the 2018-2019 school year 50% of enrolled children received WIC services. Food Insecurity and Lack of Access to Nutritional Food In Idaho 1 in 7 residents and 1 in 5 children are food insecure.  49% have incomes below 130% of poverty and qualify for food stamps, free school meals, WIC, and other government assistance  19% have incomes between 130% and 185% of poverty and qualify for WIC and reduced-price school meals  32% have incomes above 185% of poverty and do not qualify for public assistance, so must rely on private charities.

Housing and Homelessness Needs Housing In Ada County, 31.5% of households are occupied by renters. The median rent is $1,159 a month which is a 12% increase over last year. 49.5% of renters are overburdened (paying more than 30% of their income on rent). In Elmore County, 39% of households are occupied by renters. The median rent is $840 a month with 34.7% of renters being overburdened. Ada County is one of the fastest growing areas in the United States and this has left a severe shortage of affordable housing. Many families have said that when their lease is up it is not renewed and their rent goes up monthly until they are forced to move. Boise recently completed a container home community to address the affordable housing crisis. There are a few other planned communities in the works. The Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher and Public Housing is taking pre-applications for the waiting list. The Southwestern Idaho Cooperative Housing Authority Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher and Public Housing waiting lists that serves Elmore County are open. Homelessness While homeless has decreased, 1 in 20 children in Idaho experienced homelessness in 2015. While reports show that Idaho has had a decrease in homelessness, the homeless shelters have seen an increase in families who have lost their homes due to rising rent costs.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

In 2018-2019 Head Start had 63 homeless families with 23 acquiring housing. Early Head Start had 26 homeless families with 10 acquiring housing. This was an increase of 12 families in Head Start experiencing homelessness.

Head Start Homelessness, 5 Year Trend 63

55

51

51

31

22

23

2017-2018

2018-2019

14 2014-2015 9

2015-2016 12

2016-2017

Homel es s at Enrol l ment

Acqui red Hous i ng

Early Head Start Homelessness, 5 Year Trend 26 18

16 9

7

0

2014-2015

26

2015-2016 6

2016-2017 5

Homel es s at Enrol l ment

2017-2018

10 2018-2019

Acqui red Hous i ng

ERSEA Needs FOCAF follows the Head Start Program Performance Standards to create Selection Criteria and identify eligible families. Our ERSEA team works with community partners to recruit eligible families by phone and events. Every year FOCAF looks at the Community Assessment, family input, recent research, and the National Income Guidelines to update the Selection Criteria to ensure families with the most needs are served first. Based on current enrollment numbers, Head Start and Early Head Start will be fully enrolled by the first day of services and will have a strong waiting list. Based on data over the last few years, FOCAF has had a steady reduction in the number of Spanish-Speaking families. However, there has not been a reduction in the SpanishSpeaking population in Idaho. In 2013, 33% of our families were Spanish-Speaking. For the 2018-2019 school year, only 10% of our population were Spanish-Speaking. This is an area that FOCAF has been looking into, to find out how we can better serve this population and to identify recruitment efforts to support their enrollment.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

For Early Head Start, FOCAF continues to have low numbers of pregnant mothers enrolling. FOCAF will be working with the State Collaboration Director to better identify and connect with local OB/GYN’s to get them to identify and refer pregnant mothers that would benefit from EHS services.

Community Resources and Strengths Input from our community partners, state the top reasons for living in Ada and Elmore County are:  Outdoor Recreation  Friendly Community  Top Ranked Schools  Safety  Religious/Faith-Based Programs  Art and Culture Housing and Homelessness As discussed previously, housing prices have increased 12% in the last year. Affordable housing is limited in the area and this has created barrier for families living in the community. One of the great things about Idaho is that it still has an “it takes a village” mentality. Many families are finding places to live with family members and friends rather than homeless shelters. Homeless shelters have seen an increase in the number of homeless families due to rent increases. The Interfaith Sanctuary in Boise is now offering day services that provide child care so families can meet with social workers, job search, and improve their employment skills. Corpus Christi House in Boise is the only year round day shelter that provides a way for homeless people to get out of the weather, take a shower, do their laundry, pick up mail, and be a part of the community. The Boise City/ Ada County Continuum of Care is a local system for helping people who are experiencing or are imminently at risk of experiencing homelessness. It is a coordination of housing and services providers, from homeless prevention to emergency shelter to permanent housing. As well as, other community programs that provide supports for families experiencing homelessness. The vision of the Continuum is to prevent homelessness and move those who are experiencing homelessness through the continuum to permanent housing. Child Care Availability Idaho is now, 1 of only 4 states that do not have state funded preschool. The other states are Wyoming, South Dakota, and New Hampshire. According to the 2017 Idaho


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Kids Count, 62% of 3 and 4 year olds in Ada County and 65% of 3 and 4 year olds in Elmore County are not enrolled in any early childhood program. The Idaho Head Start Association received a grant to educate the legislature of the importance of early childhood education and work with them to create opportunities for Idaho’s children and families.

Head Start programs in Idaho receive money from the State TANF fund to serve children and families receiving TANF benefits. As of July 1, 2017, FOCAF Head Start receives money for 14 slots for a total of $145,264. The Boise School District is partnering with the City of Boise to offer Pre-K classes to 80 children at two Title 1 elementary schools. There is no cost to families for this service, however families must participate in school at least 2 hours per week. To qualify children must be 3 by September 1 and independent in bathroom use. There are no income requirements but 50% of children at the two elementary schools qualify for free or reduced meals. Transportation must be provided by the family and 90% attendance is required. There is an academic assessment that is used to identify children with the most academic need for entrance into the program. The focus of the program is literacy. Central District Health has a Parents as Teachers Home Visiting Program that serves Pregnant moms and children up to age 5 in Ada County. To qualify for the program a family must be below 150% of the poverty guidelines. They serve 38 families with a total of 56 enrolled children. They have the capacity to serve 50 families and will increase by about 20 families over the next 2-3 months. Currently FOCAF has an Interagency Agreement with Central District Health. Central District health refers families to us that fall below 100% of the poverty guidelines. We refer children to them that are on our waiting list and are not likely to get into our program because of our selection criteria. Kindergarten is not mandatory in Idaho and it is 1 of 5 states that allows local school districts to decide whether or not to offer Kindergarten. In most districts Kindergarten is 2 ½ hours, five days a week. West Ada, Boise, and Mountain Home School Districts offer full day tuition Kindergarten at select schools. In the 2018-2019 school year, Kuna School District offered full day Kindergarten for the first time at no cost. Mountain Home is looking in to providing full day Kindergarten during the 2019-2020 school year. Finding quality, affordable child care is a struggle in Idaho. Few cities have their own regulations regarding early care, so most follow the state regulations. In Ada County and the surrounding areas, infant care waitlists are up to 2 years long. The annual average cost of child care in Idaho is $7,300 or $608 monthly for one child. Due to the high cost of child care many families share child care responsibilities with other family members, friends, or families work opposite schedules. Transportation and Communication


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Transportation was a top stressor for our Head Start and Early Head Start families. Our community survey listed transportation as the number one need in our communities. The United Way of Treasure Valley identified transportation as a need in their community assessment.

Boise City has a busing system within the city limits. The outlying areas do not have a busing system. Ada and Elmore County are areas where access to a car is necessary to work, shop, attend school, etc. This lack of other transportation options adds a burden to families already living in poverty. The majority of our Head Start families have access to a Smart Phone. However, their phone plans often limit their call time and data. In Ada and Elmore County internet access is limited to three companies. This limits competition and affects prices for internet access. Community Partners We are lucky to be a part of Idaho, which has a very generous community and giving is a way of life. There are also many services to low-income children and families in the community. 

Literacy Partners: o Jan Williams is our “Book Fairy.” She retired a few years ago and wanted to give back to her community in regards to literacy. Along the way, she found Friends of Children and Families, Inc... She donates new books to every child in our program at least four times a year. This allows us to give the children books for their home at home visits and family/staff conferences. o Carol Hendershot spends the year collecting books and a matching toy/stuffed animals that she donates to our families each year. o We participate in the Book It Forward program through the United Way of Treasure Valley. This is another opportunity for us to increase our families’ access to books in the home. o Each of our centers works with a local library to participate in the Read To Me program. Every month a librarian visits our classrooms for story time. At this time each child received a book to take home. We also have the librarians attend a Family Fun Night to teach families how to read aloud to their children, how to choose quality books, and how to access their local libraries.

Capital Christian Center has been a wonderful partner. They provide Thanksgiving meals to families in need at our Meridian and Madison Centers. They also donate new coats for our children.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Toys for Tots is an annual toy drive that provides toys for underprivileged children. We work with Toys for Tots to provide our children with toys.

The Boise Bike Project takes old bikes and makes them new again. They then provide these bikes at no cost to children who apply.

Boise is a refugee resettlement community. We work closely with the Office of Refugees and Agency for New Americans to schedule application appointments for new and current refugee families. We reach out to each other when we are struggling with finding translators. We have also received staff training from both agencies.

The homeless shelters have seen an increase in the number of homeless children. They invited us to attend their Homelessness Summit and talk about Head Start Services. We also began setting monthly application appointments at the Interfaith Sanctuary and Corpus Christi House.

We work closely with WIC. We attend their Quick WIC meetings, which allow us to share information about Head Start and Early Head Start and schedule families for application meetings.

The Central District Health Department also partners with us in a couple of ways. One of their dental hygienist sits on our Health Services Advisory Board. They also provide fluoride sealants three times a year at each of our centers.

The Women’s and Children’s Alliance (WCA) provides opportunities for our families to participate in their Financial Literacy classes. They also refer eligible children and families to us.

We work closely with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW). They provide training to our staff on Child Abuse and Neglect. They also provide us with a list of families that would be eligible for our program. The Infant/Toddler Program is a part of IDHW and we partner to provide quality services to our children and families that qualify for Individual Family Service Plans.

We work closely with all four of our local education agencies. Currently we have collaboration classrooms with West Ada, Boise, and Kuna School Districts. We have been partnering with the Boise School District to strengthen our Kindergarten transitions. This year, the Boise School District will be helping us take what we have learned and work with the other local School Districts.

Deseret Industries is a thrift store that is run by the LDS Church. They provide us with vouchers for our families to utilize to get items they need. This has benefited new refugee families, a couple of families who had house fires, families who


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

have found housing after being homeless, and families that just need some basic items. 

Tidwell partners with us as our Mental Health Consultant. They also provide training for our staff on Mental Health issues and working with families from different cultures.

For many years we have had the privilege to work with the Lee Pesky Learning Center. They have provided free training to our staff on Literacy and Math. Last year and the upcoming year, they have received a grant to work with our teachers to provide literacy training. This has been a great partnership and has allowed us to receive high quality training at no cost.

We partner with our local colleges and universities. College of Western Idaho and Boise State University utilize our program to place their students for practicum and student teaching.

We work with the Learning Lab, which helps families learn English and gain computer skills. We refer families to them and in return they refer eligible families to us.

Food Insecurity happens in every community. Currently we work with the Meridian Food Bank to provide weekend food packages to go home with our families. This service is also available to our Kuna families through the Kuna School District and Kuna Food Bank. We are working with the Boise Food Bank to try and make this possible at our Boise centers.

Services Received We saw increases in the number of families that received Substance Abuse Treatment, Child Abuse/Domestic Abuse Services, Health Education, Assistance to Families Incarcerated, and Parenting Education.


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

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Observations and Recommendations Emerging Issues: This Community Needs Assessment Update gives Friends of Children and Families, Inc. the new data and perspective it needs to continue planning strategically and make course correction as needed. It guides decisions making, and it provides FOCAF with the insight it needs to make changes that will have the greatest impact on the lives of the children and families it serves. By assessing the needs of the community in this way, FOCAF is able to identify the emerging issues and stay in tune with the needs of the community. Following is a list of the emerging issues: Poverty Rate:  Child poverty in Idaho is substantial.  Children between 0-5 years old living in poverty in Idaho is 21%.  We only serve 11% of eligible children


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Recommendation: continue to seek additional funding to expand number of children served

Financial Security:  Idaho’s minimum wage has remained the same ($7.25/hour) since 2009. Most of the surrounding states have higher minimum wages.  Unemployment across Idaho is low. The data does show that unemployment is consistently higher in Elmore County than Ada County.  The increasing cost of living, coupled with a relatively low minimum wage, means that Ada County is a more expensive place, which is problematic for low income children and families.  Recommendation: expand work with community partners to provide resources to families Population:  Ada County, Idaho is one of the fastest growing areas in the country.  Despite the varying growth trends in Idaho, data routinely suggests that it is a particularly difficult place for low-income families to live.  Recommendation: expand work with community partners to provide resources to families Demographic and Ethnic Composition:  Head Start Ethnic demographics do not match Idaho, with only 55% of enrolled families self-identified as being “White.  During the 2018 – 2019 Program Year, families with twenty-four different primary languages were enrolled in the program.  The diversity of families in the FOCAF Head Start program is not only seen in the racial breakdown of enrollees, but also by the primary language spoken by the families. Serving such a diverse population in a community with limited resources makes providing quality services to children and communicating effectively with families a challenge.  FOCAF has seen a decrease in the number of Spanish speaking families. In 2013, 33% of the families served were Spanish speaking. In 2018-2019, 10% of the families were Spanish speaking. The Spanish population has not decreased in the area. The current political climate has created a fear of deportation or harassment for Hispanic families who seek out services. Local Spanish radio and TV are advising Hispanic families to not enroll in federal programs.  Recommendation: expand recruitment efforts to Hispanic and Refugee communities Political Affiliation:  Idaho lags behind most states in Early Childhood Education. Education is funding is one of the lowest in the country.  Legislation for Publicly Funded Preschool has not made it past Committee and has not been presented to the Legislature.


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 

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Legislation to increase Kindergarten hours and make it mandatory have not passed the Legislator. Recommendations: support families in becoming advocates for themselves, their children, and learn to tell their stories

Pre – Kindergarten Education:  A current poll of Idaho Voters showed that 76% were in favor of publicly funded preschool.  Kindergarten readiness is identified as a critical challenge of the community based on the Community Survey results.  FOCAF exceeded National CLASS Score averages in 2018. Because of the existence of FOCAF Head Start and Early Head Service, children were prepared for kindergarten in Ada and Elmore counties.  Recommendation: continue to look for funding to increase the number of children served Food Insecurity:  1 in 7 children have food insecurity in Idaho.  Access to nutritious foods was identified as a concern in the St. Luke’s Hospital Community Assessment.  Recommendation: work with other food banks to create weekend food backpacks for families in need Child Care:  Ensuring that children have access to quality child care is an important challenge in the State of Idaho  Most communities do not have child care quality standards and follow the state Standards. Boise City has more stringent child care quality standards.  The lack of adequate, affordable, full-time child care in Idaho reflects a greater need for more quality child care options in Ada and Elmore Counties and throughout the State.  Recommendation: support families in becoming advocates for themselves and their children Disabilities and Mental Health:  FOCAF began the 2018-2019 school year with more than 10% of the children with IEPs. We ended the year with 17%.  All 5 school districts that FOCAF works with has seen an steep increase in the number of children 3-5 who qualify for special education services. This has put a squeeze on school buildings that are already bursting at the seams. The Infant/Toddler program has also seen an increase in the number of children 0-3 who qualify for special education services.  In addition to the increasing severity of mental health issues and/or disabilities of the children, FOCAF is serving more parents that have mental health issues and


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

concerns. This creates a different dynamic for FOCAF employees working with parents and meet their needs. Recommendation: provide training to staff on Trauma Informed Care and work with school districts to expand collaboration classrooms

Child Abuse:  The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, has reported an increase in the number of child abuse and neglect calls, especially sexual abuse. This increase has put a burden on an already stretch foster care system.  During the 2018 – 2019 school year, 35 families received child abuse and neglect services. Additionally, calls to CPS made on behalf of the Head Start child increased.  During the 2018-2019 school year, 12 children were in foster care at some point in the year.  Recommendation: provide high quality parenting education classes and provide staff with Trauma Informed Care training Transportation:  According to the Community Survey, transportation in FOCAF’s service region is one of the main identified community challenges.  FOCAF also identifies transportation as a need for families. During the 2018 – 2019 school year, nearly 48% of Head Start children rode the bus to Head Start.  Meeting the needs of families while maintaining buses along with ensuring safety and providing transportation to children and families that are cost effective is an ongoing challenge for FOCAF.  Recommendation: ensure bus routes are reaching the most children possible within the time restraints and bus capacity Homelessness:  According to the National Alliance to End Homelessness Idaho has had a decrease in homelessness.  Local homeless shelters are seeing more families due to loss of homes because of increase rent prices.  FOCAF has had an increase in the number of homeless families over the last few years. In 2018-2019 we served ten more homeless families, an indication our recruitment efforts may be helping target this population.  Recommendation: continue partnerships with homeless shelters and the CATCH program Substance Abuse:  Idaho has not been immune to the opioid crisis. In 2014, 212 people died in Idaho of drug overdoses, most related to opioid use.  The number of Head Start/Early Head Start families that received Substance Abuse Education or Treatment doubled in 2018-2019  Recommendation: expand community partners to include more substance abuse education and information


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Five Year Strategic Goals As part of the new continuing 5 year grant, FOCAF developed new 5 year Strategic Goals to start in 2019. Strategic Goal 1: The program will create more innovative and efficient systems that ensure safe and healthy environments and enhance positive outcomes for children, families and staff. Objective 1.1: Improve the overall mental health of children, families and staff by providing trauma informed services. Objective 1.2: Expand staff knowledge of intentional planning to ensure quality interactions. Objective 1.3: Increase family participation in parenting education opportunities provided by the program. Objective 1.4: Increase father and male role model engagement in program events Objective 1.5: Increase understanding of the importance of health, wellness and nutrition by implementing the UCLA Health Initiative Training. Strategic Goal 2: The program will promote Early Childhood Education by delivering high quality services, leveraging partnerships and increasing public awareness to positively influence children, families and the community. Objective 2.1: Enhance partnerships with local education agencies to increase positive outcomes for children ensuring school readiness. Objective 2.3: Expand recruitment strategies to ensure enrollment of targeted population and increase public awareness of the program. Objective 2.4: Increase family engagement at the parent center committee (Parents Active with School- PAWS) Strategic Goal 3: The program will enrich the professional development system by providing training and support to staff, enabling them to acquire and enhance the skills necessary to foster school readiness. Objective 3.1: Enhance practice-based coaching to increase quality teaching practices and positive outcomes for children. Objective 3.2: Create and implement a comprehensive Leadership Development Program Objective 3.3: Design and implement a Staff Wellness Program Objective 3.4: Increase staff awareness on safety, comprehensive emergency response and management systems As required by the Head Start Program Performance Standards, FOCAF Head Start and Early Head Start has developed School Readiness Goals that align with the Head Start Early Learning Outcomes Framework, the Idaho Early Learning eGuidelines, the Creative Curriculum/TS GOLD (curriculum/assessment used in Head Start), and the Parents As Teachers Curriculum (curriculum/assessment used in Early Head Start).


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

The School Readiness Goals were developed with Parents, Staff, School District Staff (including Kindergarten Teachers), University/College Personnel, and members of our School Readiness Collaboration Committee. The School Readiness Goals are reviewed and approved by Policy Council and the Board of Directors annually. FOCAF Head Start and Early Head Start Birth-5 School Readiness Goals Domain Goals Social and 1. Children will develop and 2. Children will begin to develop Emotional engage in positive a sense of self and of Developmen relationships and interactions belonging to a community. t with adults and/or peers. Language and Literacy Developmen t

3. Children will demonstrate receptive and expressive language skills and communication strategies in their home language.

4. Children will engage with stories and books.

a. Dual language learners will increase their proficiency in English (center-based only) Approaches to Learning

5. Children will demonstrate interest, curiosity, and persistence in exploring and learning about the world around them.

6. Children will begin to develop and demonstrate control over their feelings and behaviors.

Cognitive and General Knowledge

7. Children will learn and use math concepts during daily routines.

Perceptual, Motor, and Physical Developmen t

9. Children will develop control of large and fine muscles for movement, navigation, balance, and manipulation of a variety of objects.

8. Children will develop and demonstrate the ability to remember and connect new and known experiences and information. 10. Children and their families will demonstrate an understanding of healthy and safe habits by following basic health and safety practices and by participating in their own preventative health care.

References U.S. Census Bureau Quick Facts: Idaho: https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/id


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2019 Community Needs Assessment Update

Idaho Kid’s Count: https://datacenter.kidscount.org/about/state-providers/details/13idaho-kids-count National Center for Children in Poverty: http://www.nccp.org/

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Facts, Figures, and Trends: https://healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/Portals/0/AboutUs/Publications/FFT2018_2019.pd f Idaho Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence: https://idvsa.org/ Child Care Aware of America: http://www.childcareaware.org/state/idaho/ Administration for Children and Families: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity: https://spotlightonpoverty.org/states/idaho/ Talk poverty: https://talkpoverty.org/poverty/ America’s Health Rankings: https://www.americashealthrankings.org/learn/reports/2018-health-of-women-andchildren-report End Homelessness: https://endhomelessness.org/ Idaho Office for Refugees: http://www.idahorefugees.org/ Idaho State Police: https://www.isp.idaho.gov/ Feeding America: http://www.feedingamerica.org/take-action/campaigns/childhunger/child-hunger-psa.html Idaho State Department of Education – Special Education: http://www.sde.idaho.gov/sped/ Idaho State Department of Education – Child Nutrition: http://www.sde.idaho.gov/cnp/ FOCAF ChildPlus PIR Data 2018-2019 Parent and Community Surveys

Profile for Friends of children and families inc

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update  

2019 Community Needs Assessment Update  

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