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FASHION CLUB GIVES TIPS ON SPRING TRENDS Wednesday, March 29, 2017

FOOTBALL

Fresno State’s Award-Winning Newspaper

CATCHING REDEMPTION

Sophomore running back Bryson Oglesby (#23) runs to catch the ball at Fresno State football’s first spring practice on March 27, 2017 at Bulldog Stadium.

Hungry?

VOUCHERS

Departments rolling out meal vouchers By Judith Saldivar @judithgs__

Several departments at Fresno State now make sure students in a sudden pinch can get a free meal. Offices around campus are purchasing meal vouchers for the University Dining Hall to give to students who are in immediate need of food. How it works: If a faculty or staff member comes in contact with a student who cannot afford to eat, they will give a voucher that the student can redeem for a free meal. “If they say something happened, where they say, ‘I haven’t had anything to eat today or since yesterday,’ we can say ‘Hey, while we connect you with the services why don’t you go get a meal? Get fed and then you can come back and we can help you,’” said Stephanie Annett, the dietitian at the Fresno State Student Health Center. Annett said she has come

across cases where students had been unexpectedly removed from where they were living, or they had an unexpected expense that left them without money for food. “We want to help students succeed if they have these barriers. It’s really focused on student success,” Annett said. “I remember there was classmates of mine who were food insecure, or displaced from their housing and there was just nothing. They just tried as best they could. I remember bringing sandwiches for my lab partner in chemistry so he didn’t faint.” Mazie Moua, the SupportNet coordinator at the Learning Center, has also witnessed students in need. “We have had several stories of students who may have not had a meal in a day or students who are living out of their car,” Moua said. “The meal vouchers have been able to provide these students with a warm meal.”

See VOUCHERS, Page 3

SEE PAGE 4

FresnoState.edu/Collegian

Khone Saysamongdy • The Collegian

COMPETITION

Fresno State Mock Trial going to nationals By Jessica Johnson @iamjesslj

The Fresno State Mock Trial team will head down the California coast next month to compete in the 33rd annual American Mock Trial Association (AMTA) National Championship Tournament (NCT). The team will step foot on the University of California, Los Angeles campus April 21 - 23 to compete against 48 teams. Each will be divided into two divisions of 24 teams each. Those placing first in each division will face-off in AMTA’s National Championship Final Round. Third-year member Kellie Hustedde, a media, communications and journalism major and association president said, “Making it to nationals was a long and hard process.” Her roles on the team have included captain, witness for the plaintiff and closing defense attorney. Before solidifying their spot at the NCT, the team visited many states, universities, courtrooms and invitational tournaments to

Christopher Irwin • Courtesy photo

get the experience they need to continue their success. On March 25 and 26, Fresno State, for the first time, hosted the West Coast Open Round Championship Series – the nationals qualifying tournament. There were 24 teams from

17 schools along the West Coast competing for six bids to the NCT. “Just six teams from each ORCS advance to the National Championship Tournament,” Hustedde said, “There were

See COMPETITION, Page 3


OPINION

GOT OPINIONS? We want to hear them. COLLEGIAN-OPINION@CSUFRESNO.EDU WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2017

2

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Bold New U is for all students

Photo Courtesy of Fresno State

By Rahul Nunna

Special to The Collegian This week, Fresno State students will face an important choice regarding the future of our new student union. With all of the negative attention and falsities surrounding the “Bold New U,” I would like to clarify a few points in favor of this project.

A new student union will provide resources that will benefit all students, not just a ‘privileged few.’ The new union will have more club meeting spaces and an event center that will benefit not only Student Involvement and ASI (two organizations that are open to all students), but also the 200 diverse student organizations whom they serve. But the benefits of this new facility do

not seem to be up for dispute. The issue at the top of all students’ minds is the increase of $200 in student fees. The truth about this fee, however, is that over half of the student population who rely completely on financial aid will also have their grants raised proportionally to the fee increase. I agree that student fees should not be spent on unnecessary expenditures, espe-

cially without student permission. However, I believe that cuts and modifications can be made without sacrificing important projects, like the Bold New U. The Bold New U project addresses many campus needs that affect all of us. Our vote this week will help secure a much-needed addition to our campus, and make Fresno State a more productive and welcoming place for years to come.

When I transferred to Fresno State, I was excited to begin participating in Associated Students, Inc. To my disbelief, I learned that there wasn’t a single position that actively represented veteran students. I then began to talk to many of my fellow veteran students, and I learned the long history of our fight to gain representation. To my knowledge, the closest we came to representation was a veterans position in the ASI president’s cabinet.

With the help of ASI President Tim Ryan, we re-established that position, and I became the veterans and transfer officer in Tim’s cabinet. With the help of Ryan and Blake Zante, as well as many in ASI, we got our resolution to create two new senate positions through the diversity committee. Getting those two senate positions on the ballot was our goal, and we succeeded. This election, if the students vote in fa-

vor, veterans will have an active voting voice in their government. This goal was bigger than just veteran students, however. If this struggle has taught us anything it’s that if there is a group of students that believe they are being underrepresented, the precedent has been set. Go out, tell your campus what you want. Make your voice heard and never forget that our student government exists to be a voice for all students.

Vote in favor of veteran voices

By Cody T. Sedano

Special to The Collegian My name is Cody T. Sedano, and I am a Fresno State veteran student. For almost five years now, veteran students have been attempting to achieve voting representation in their student government. It was not until now that we are the closest we have ever come.

Jordan Bradley • The Collegian

THE COLLEGIAN The Collegian is a student-run publication that serves the Fresno State community. Views expressed in The Collegian do not necessarily reflect the views of the staff or university. fresnostate.edu/collegian

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THE COLLEGIAN • NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2017

PAGE 3

Team hopes to show off skills COMPETITION from Page 1 only 48 bids to Nationals up for grabs, and Fresno State was given the very last bid in the entire nation.” Second-year member Jackson Hadden, a criminology major with an emphasis in forensic behavioral sciences, has had roles on the team including captain and closing attorney for plaintiff council. Hadden was the team captain who was given one of the very last bids. He gives all the credit to his team. “The program who earned the bid was Fresno State. Without our whole program’s effort, it arguably wouldn’t ever have happened,” Hadden said, “But the specific team of 10 who actually scored the points, got the trophy and earned the bid is a good representation of our program’s youth.” Third-year member Nour Basharaheel, a pre-nursing major, played the role of plaintiff witness in the weekend’s ORCS and won the Outstanding Witness Award. “To win an Outstanding Witness Award at ORCS, you needed to have 17 out of 20 ranks. I finished with 18,” Basharaheel said, “I honestly still can’t believe I received an Outstanding Witness Award.” She said she was unsure about

her placement as a plaintiff witness for this particular case, but with encouragement from her coaches and teammates, she persevered. “I thought it was an awful idea. But my coaches and teammates believed I could do it, and with their support, I did,” Basharaheel said. “It’s truly an honor being named one of the top 11 witnesses at the competition.” She added that representing Fresno State on a national level was “surreal” and the team would not have reached this level of success without mutual support within the team. “Advancing to nationals is an amazing opportunity to show the nation just how amazing our family is,” Basharaheel said. The case the team was assigned for NCT is entitled “Alex Taylor v. Trifecta Entertainment.” “The case students are competing with is a civil case of copyright infringement. A fictional plaintiff, Alex Taylor, is suing the fictional entertainment company Trifecta Entertainment for allegedly stealing Alex’s idea for a stage play,” Hustedde said. 2014 was the first and last year the team earned its way to the NCT. A total of 10 members from the team will be selected to compete in the NCT on April 21 - 23.

Christian Ortuno • The Collegian

Fresno State public relations senior Sean Stancill (left) swipes an I.D. card to allow students to eat at the Residence Dining Hall on March. 28, 2017.

Program provides students with a free meal VOUCHERS from Page 1 The Learning Center has participated in this initiative for at least two years. Other participating departments are the Student Success Services, ROTC, Career Development and the Student Cupboard.

Jessica Medina, the coordinator for the Food Security Project, said students have other services available to them through the Food Security Project – these include the Student Cupboard and the Good Samaritan Fund. “The Good Samaritan Fund was created to assist Fresno State students, who encounter an un-

foreseen financial emergency,” Medina said. Students can apply at the Fresno State Health Center. The Student Cupboard provides free food and hygiene products for students as well. If a student is in need of any of these services, they should contact Medina at 559-278-0866.

HEALTH AND WELLNESS

Taking steps to prevent suicide By Yesenia Candelaria @yesiamanda6

Several departments at Fresno State now make sure students in a pinch can get a free meal. Offices around campus are purchasing meal vouchers for the Resident Dining Hall to give to students who are in immediate need of food. How it works: If a faculty or staff members come into contact with a student who cannot afford to eat, they can give a voucher that students can redeem for a free meal. “If they say something happened, where they say, ‘I haven’t had anything to eat today or since yesterday,’ we can say, ‘Hey, while we connect you with the services, why don’t you go get a meal? Get fed and then you can come back, and we can help you,’” said Stephanie Annett, the dietitian at the Fresno State Student Health Center. She said she has come across cases where students had been unexpectedly ousted from where they were living, or they had an unexpected expense that left them without money for food. “We want to help students succeed if they have these barriers. It’s really focused on student success,” Annett said. “I remember there were classmates of mine who were food insecure or displaced from their housing,

and there was just nothing. They just tried as best they could. I remember bringing sandwiches for my lab partner in chemistry so he didn’t faint.” Mazie Moua, the SupportNet coordinator at the Learning Center, has also witnessed students in need. “We have had several stories of students who may have not had a meal in a day or students who are living out of their car,” Moua said. “The meal vouchers have been able to provide these students with a warm meal.” The Learning Center has participated in this initiative for at least two years. Other participating departments are Student Success Services, ROTC, Career Development and the Student Cupboard. Jessica Medina, coordinator for the Food Security Project, said students have other services available to them, including the Student Cupboard and the Good Samaritan Fund. “The Good Samaritan Fund was created to assist Fresno State students who encounter an unforeseen financial emergency,” Medina said. Students can apply at the Health Center. The Student Cupboard provides free food and hygiene products for students, as well. If students are in need of any of these services, they should contact Medina at 559-278-0866.


ARTS & ENTE

4 FASHION

Springing into ne

“To me, spring is really bright and fun. I noticed a lot of the trend is two-piece dresses. The colors are all bright and pastel colors.” Krystal Smith Major: Theater Arts - Costume Design Year: Junior

“I would definitely, in spring, wear more of a popping, bright kind of look. More like bodysuits or crop top kind of outfits, or even long cardigans with skin-skimming clothing. For me, if I had to put together an outfit for springtime, I would probably wear a cute crop with maybe high-waisted ripped jeans and some heels with a little platform on them and a cute hat.” Ashlyn Davis Major: Theater Arts-Acting Year: Sophomore

By Marina McElwee @MarinaMashelle

As temperatures rise and the sun shines on Fresno State’s campus, students are breaking out their sandals and tank tops to enjoy the springtime heat. One club on campus is especially excited about this weather because it means shopping, styling and designing. Fashion Inc. creates a space for students to explore fashion from all aspects. From styling to modeling and PR to design, the club provides an outlet for every student to express his or her creativity. Ashlyn Davis is a sophomore theater arts major who is focusing on acting.

When she added her minor in fashion merchandising and joined Fashion Inc. this semester, Davis said she found a way to bring acting and fashion together. “With acting, I feel like you do have to have some sense of style,” Davis said. ”I just want to have styling as a side career of my acting career, and I would like to style celebrity types of actresses.” Davis said she is especially excited for the upcoming Fashion Inc. fashion show, “Lights, Camera, Fashion!” which will feature over 80 models. Each stylist or designer that is showing a collection has drawn inspiration from a specific movie. Davis was inspired by “Boys in the Hood” because it was set in her hometown. “I felt like I was better off going [with

the film set in Los Angeles] because I have more experience with LA fashion,” Davis said. Fashion is more than a career choice for Davis. She said fashion can enhance a person’s self confidence. “Fashion is very important to me because I feel that when people are dressing themselves, it’s a way of representing themselves to other people,” Davis said. “I feel that when I’m styling someone, I like to dress them in an outfit they feel confident in. I feel that it can boost people’s self-esteem.” Many people do not know the difference between styling and designing, but the terms are not interchangeable. Carolyn Maxwell, senior fashion merchandis-

ing major and president of Fashion Inc., said original styles and designs will be featured in the fashion show. “Designing is starting from scratch. They come up with the concept, and then they create their garments from scratch. They get the material, cut the material and then sew the material,” Maxwell said. “A stylist is someone who takes pieces that are already existing and puts them together in a fashionable way that looks good.” Maxwell said designers, stylists and models will be featured in the fashion show. Since she specializes in jewelry, Maxwell said she is most excited for the upcoming trends in accessories this spring.


ERTAINMENT

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2017

5

ew fashion trends “The major trending styles we can expect to see for the spring season are lots of floral prints, bell sleeves/bottoms, silk garments and off-the-shoulder tops.”

“Spring, for me, is a lot of denim, but with floral. I like those little slip dresses that are floral print. There are so many at the thrift store. Being able to do a lot of pastel colors, but dark colors with it. I really like black, so just pairing those together.”

Daena Mendoza Major: Criminology Year: Sophomore

Taylor Castro Major: Fashion Merchandising Year: Senior

Photos by: Christian Ortuno • The Collegian

“Coming from an accessories standpoint… the biggest, hands down, trend for spring is hoop earrings. I have been seeing girls putting them in their second hole of their ear and a stud in the front, so kind of backwards styling of the hoops,” Maxwell said. “Other accessory trends for spring are, of course, florals. We’ll be seeing more small floral prints, I think, for this season – versus last season we saw bigger floral prints.” After more than three years in Fashion Inc., Maxwell has developed a strong connection to the club that she said has helped her express her individuality. “Fashion is important to me because it provides someone the chance to show their personality without really having to

say anything,” Maxwell said. “It gives me a chance to be more edgy without having to change my lifestyle. It’s a good way to express yourself.” Another student who will feature her work in the fashion show is Krystal Smith. She is a junior costume design major who is making all of her pieces from scratch. “My connection to fashion is through costuming,” Smith said. “I’m really bad at following trends, per se, but I am really good at research and finding out what looks good on certain people.” Though it usually takes months for the average costume designer to create a new piece of clothing, Smith said her training in the Fresno State costume shop has taught her to work fast.

“Usually it takes a few months [to make something] but since I just joined the club this spring, I have to make everything [for my collection] in the time that I had,” Smith said. “It takes me about four to six hours to make each outfit. I’m really fast because I work at the costume shop at Fresno State, so I’m sewing constantly.” Many costume and fashion students are interested in becoming professional stylists and designers for human clothes. Smith has a different idea. “I would like to be a costume designer for TV shows, but what I really want to do is work for Matel and design Barbie dolls,” Smith said. Taylor Castro, a senior fashion mer-

chandising major, doesn’t style or design clothes. Her job in the club, and career goal, is to serve as the fashion public relations coordinator. “Every time someone finds out you’re in fashion merchandising they think ‘Oh, you want to design clothes or you want to be a stylist,’ but not really,” Castro said. “I really fell in love with [public relations].” Castro is in charge of the club’s social media accounts. She said she has been busy promoting the fashion show, so she won’t be showing a collection at this years show. The seventh annual “Lights, Camera, Fashion!” will be free to students on April 1 at 6:15 p.m. in the Satellite Student Union.


NEWS

6

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2017

VOTING

ASI elections kick off Polls close Thursday at noon

By Hayley Salazar @Hayley_Salazarr

After months of campaigns, informational forums, and social media marketing students are at the polls. The Associated Students, Inc. (ASI) elections kicked off on Tuesday with a Ballot Bash outside the Kennel Bookstore. Polling stations were set up with laptops for students to cast their votes while a Dutch Bros drink truck parked nearby to increase voter participation. Destiny Armendariz, the elections commissioner for ASI, tabled alongside her team and Student Involvement, encouraging students to vote. “I think it’s important because you want to know who is going to represent your school, you want to know who is going to be your president,” Armendariz said. “It’s really important to know who is going to help you advocate for better student life on campus.” Students could vote at the polls or through digital ballots sent via email until Thursday at noon. Each ballot provides a brief informative message of each candidate. For Armendariz, events like the Ballot Bash not only encourage students to vote, it provides an opportunity for the student body to become better informed about ASI. “We’re going to be here explaining who we are, letting [students] know what’s going,” Armendariz said. “This is for next year. This is going to affect students. It’s a chance for everybody to kind of get to know us better.” The race for president of ASI picked up within the last week after all three presidential candidates met for the Presidential

Candidates Debate hosted by The Collegian on March 24. In addition to the presidential candidates and the senator-at-large positions, students will vote on two referendums. The first is the addition of two senator positions, including senator of diversity, equity and inclusion and senator of veteran and transfer affairs. The $200 Bold New U tuition fee increase to pay for construction of a new student union is the second referendum on the ballot. John Hunt, a graduate student who came out to vote and pick up a cup of Dutch Bros planned to vote on his cell phone. He was still on the fence on voting yes or no on the Bold New U. “Part of me feels we don’t use the student union that we have to its full capacity, but at the same time when they say that the old one or the one we currently have is only fit for a certain amount of students and we’ve increased [student population], that makes sense,” Hunt said. “I would just hope it’s not just a cosmetic thing.” Other students, like Heather Goldman, a senior majoring in advertising, wore a “I voted yes on the Bold New U” sticker to show their support for the referendum. “I think it’s important for the university to grow, and I know in order to do that we would need funding,” Goldman said. Elections will continue through Thursday. Polls stations will be set up Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and again on Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon. Winners will be announced later on Thursday, March 30.

Khone Saysamongdy • The Collegian

Top: Fresno State student Tony Zotea votes during the Associated Students Inc. elections near the Kennel Bookstore on March 28, 2017. Bottom: Linda Geis (right) helps inform students on candidates running for the Fresno State Associated Students Inc. near the Kennel Bookstore on March 28, 2017.

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ASI ELECTIONS

Brandon Collet, Class of 2009 deputy City attorney

Sally Moreno, Class of 1995 Sr. deputy district attorney

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2017

THE COLLEGIAN • SPORTS

PAGE 7

SPORTS MEDICINE

Provider’s driving force lands her in Fresno State Athletics By Sean Johnson-Bey @TheCollegian

Suzy Corgiat, a manual therapy provider, uses nontraditional therapeutic techniques to help Fresno State athletes’ bodies recover after intense daily workouts. Corgiat lives by one belief: “I will grow until this body perishes to help as many people as possible.” Corgiat was born and raised in Modesto, California, where she attended Beyer High School. She graduated in 2002. She started off musically driven, playing the piano as an 8-year-old. Those musical practices would continue up until college, where she focused more on becoming a trumpet player. After experiencing problems with her body and witnessing the death of two of her teachers, Corgiat decided it was time to rethink her career path. “Maybe I should rethink what I’m doing,” Corgiat remembers thinking after realizing playing music may not be the best career path for her. Corgiat made the biggest career switch of her life when she decided to enter therapeutic work. “I’ve always wanted to help people. Once I understand how something works, I want to show other people how it works,” Corgiat said. “That’s kind of been my driving force.” Having a passion for helping peo-

ple eventually led Corgiat to the Meyers Sports Medicine Building at Fresno State and the Fulton Yoga Collective. At Fulton Yoga Collective, Corgiat is currently the liaison for all correspondents – doing all of the marketing and promotions. She also teaches a Thai yoga class where she has over 2,000 hours of training by her mentor, who has been a great influence to her. As she has built knowledge and a following, Corgiat has started to host her own workshops where she would certify practitioners. Now, with countless knowledge and a background in sports massage, Corgiat is able to incorporate all the techniques she knows with the Fresno State athletes. This includes myofascial techniques and Thai yoga, which can help an athlete’s recovery process. “These athletes do such amazing things with their bodies,” Corgiat said, citing the importance of body recovery after intense physical athletic workouts. Instead of utilizing common Western techniques, Corgiat enjoys using techniques used in other parts of the world. One technique is called Ayurveda. Corgiat said that using different techniques makes sure that no muscles are missed. She enjoys being a part of the team at Fresno State, and she wants to continue to serve others and spread as much knowledge as she possibly can.

April 14, 2017 @ 3 p.m.

Contributed by Clovis Roundup • Diana Giraldo

Fresno State Athletics manual therapy provider Suzy Corgiat performs Thai yoga on a client at Fulton Yoga Collective in Fresno in February 2017.


SPORTS

8

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29, 2017

FOOTBALL

Tedford era springs forward

Khone Saysamongdy • The Collegian

Fresno State football coaches create pressure for redshirt freshman quarterback James Quentin Davis (#2) with pads at the team’s first spring practice on March 27, 2017, at Bulldog Stadium.

By Daniel Gligich @danielgligich

Spring football is officially underway. The team practiced Monday at Bulldog Stadium for the first time under new head coach Jeff Tedford as the Bulldogs prepare for the upcoming season. “It’s great to be out here, no doubt,” Tedford said. “To get out here and see them in action – a lot of kinks for sure. Everybody is getting used to how we practice and what our system is and things like that. But good energy, and the guys worked hard.” The first few practices are without pads, only helmets, as the ‘Dogs familiarize themselves with the new coaching staff and the different offensive and defensive schemes. Tedford said that no players stood out to him at practice, but that was because it was the first day. “It’s the first day with just helmets on, so it is difficult to evaluate anything,” Tedford said. “We’ll go in and watch the tape and look at certain things and continue to improve every day. When the pads get on, it will be more like real football.” Sophomore quarterback Chason Virgil was excited to be back on the field practicing with his teammates in front of the coaches. Along with Tedford, every other coach is in their first season with Fresno State.

“It’s been a smooth transihead coach Tim DeRuyter, to the tion,” Virgil said. “I think pro-style offense. this group of players that we “We’ll use some of the spread have – we’ve kind of got used concepts at times, and today to seeing new faces come in we were probably in more and out. So we’re kind of good spread than what you’d at adjusting, and we just be considering proreally want to win bad. We style,” DeBoer said. know coach Tedford has “But a lot of it is just won in the past, and just a matter of what our giving us a vision. We’re personnel can do.” just ready to follow his Switching the ofplan and his leadership fense presents a fair and just lead us to where amount of challengwe want to go.” es, especially when it Junior wide receivcomes to the players’ er KeeSean Johnson capabilities and skills said that the first on the field. practice started off “I think we need to a little faster than adapt what we do to what last year, and it is our guys can run,” DeBoer challenging with the said. “We don’t want to complete coaching make our players that we staff turnover. have right now have to fit “It’s definitely an adjustment, a system. Let’s make our because you have to get to know system fit the players we every coach over again, and that’s have.” always a tough thing to do when you DeBoer said that the have school and football to worry starting quarterback will not about,” Johnson said. be named in the spring. The offense, under the guid“It will be something we ance of Tedford and offensive do going into the fall,” DeBocoordinator Kalen DeBoer, is er said. “We want to narrow it switching from the spread, down. It gives those guys Khone Saysamongdy • The Collegian which was used under former that we think have a chance

Sophomore wide receiver Frank Dalena (#19) doing drills at Fresno State football’s first spring practice on March 27, 2017, at Bulldog Stadium.

to be our starter the ‘one’ reps, and rotate them, but you don’t want to sell anyone short. You want to give them all the chance here early on.” Virgil said that all four quarterbacks competing for the starting job expect to win it, and that they all need to prove themselves to the coaches, build relationships with the players and coaches and become team leaders. Even though Virgil recently had surgery on his left shoulder, his non-throwing arm, he said he is feeling great and is almost completely healthy. Fresno State has 15 spring practices in total. The team practices Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from now until the Spring Game on April 29. Practice is off during Spring Break. Coming off three straight losing seasons, the ‘Dogs have a fresh start with Tedford, and have a chance to turn the program around. “Regardless of the last three years, each year is a new year,” Johnson said. “So you’ve got to come out with a new mentality each year and just go 1-0 by the day.”

WATCH: For video on this story, visit our website: http://fresnostate.edu/collegian

Khone Saysamongdy • The Collegian

March 29, 2017  
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