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12TH ANNUAL REAL ESTATE FORECAST

LET’S

Rock&Roll 2015

The Essential Connection

Rock&Roll

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

1


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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Table of

Contents Real Estate Forecast EDC Business

10 Multi-Family Investments 12 Residential 16 Industrial

4

Charles Tingey Tribute

5

Message from the President/CEO

7

Message from the Chairman

9

Introducing our Moderators

34

Business Expansion & Retention

36

Business Attraction Services

38

California High Speed Rail

40

Rapid Response Program

58

Our Investor Community

60

Board of Directors

61

EDC Staff

City Updates

20 Agriculture 24 Office 28 Commercial Investments 30 Retail Rock&Roll

41

City of Clovis

42

City of Fowler

43

City of Firebaugh

44

City of Kerman

45

City of Fresno

46

City of Kingsburg

47

City of Mendota

48

City of Orange Cove

49

City of Parlier

50

City of Reedley

51

City of San Joaquin

52

City of Sanger

53

City of Selma

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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Charles L. Tingey 194

0

01 -2

5

Charles Tingey loved his community and served it well. A Fresno native, Charles spent his entire life in Fresno, leaving only for four years while attending UC Santa Barbara. In 1968, he founded Charles Tingey Associates, changing the landscape of commercial real estate in the San Joaquin Valley forever.Today that firm, Colliers International, has grown to three offices—in Fresno, Bakersfield, and the Central Coast— with forty agents and employees. Charles strongly believed in giving back to his community and over the years served several organizations in leadership roles. He was a founding member of the Economic Development Corporation serving Fresno County in 1981 and spent many years on its board. Additionally, he was a founding board member of the Bank of Fresno, served on the Fresno Business Council’s Governing Board, and was an avid supporter of Fresno State and the Craig School of Business. Charles Tingey’s impact on our community and the real estate industry in Central California will last well beyond his years with us and provide inspiration for many future generations of business and regional leaders.

NEVER

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015

Forgotten


Fresno County EDC President/CEO | LEE ANN EAGER conomic recovery has been the focus since the 2008 Recession hit our local, state, national, and ultimately our global economy. Last summer, we turned a corner in California, having regained those lost jobs and finding ourselves once again in a position of true growth. The Fresno region and its leaders have made it clear, with dedication and decisive action, we intend to take advantage of this momentum and remain at the forefront of economic development and growth in the Central Valley and beyond. Unemployment in Fresno County is projected to decline steadily over the next three years at a faster percentage rate than the state as a whole. Both new entrants to the workforce and those eager to return to full employment can once again look forward to finding good jobs in growing industries like health services, computer technology, food processing and construction—including the high-speed rail construction that broke ground right here in Fresno in January 2015. With the support of Member Investors and Economic Development Partners, the Fresno County Economic Development Corporation is out in the business world every day touting the way our community has found advantages where others only see disadvantage. Fresno has the Water, Energy, and Technology Center promoting and nurturing conservation through innovation and branding our region ‘Bluetech Valley’ – which is an important asset during this time of water shortages. Exuberant job growth in Northern California

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has strained new commercial and residential construction in that area. As such, we expect overflow into the Central Valley, where we still have room to grow and the will to build. Single-family housing construction has been slow to respond to the recovery - we can and will be the region to change that direction.

MAKING ESSENTIAL CONNECTIONS

California is seeing exciting growth with projections of 50,000 new health service jobs, another 40,000 per year in professional scientific and technical services, and 50,000 per year in construction. How much of that growth will come to Fresno is up to us. The Economic Development Corporation is ready to assist in building those industries and making essential connections to ensure that Fresno County is the best place to work, live and grow our businesses. Let’s rock and roll!

Lee Ann Eager

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Chairman of the Board | WALT PLACHTA hen the Fresno County EDC brought the annual Real Estate Forecast to our business and economic development community in 2014, we pressed the message that “The Time Is Now” to rebuild the prosperity of Fresno County. A year later we see total unemployment down one and a half percent, with nonfarm employment having risen three percent. As California lauds gains in the health care, technology, and construction sectors, our region likewise finds that the fastest growing demand has occurred in electronics engineering and assembly, information security analysis, and construction while our health care sector has become the source of our highest wages. Although residential construction is still regaining its footing, the median sale price for a home in Fresno has increased by one-third, and traditional equity sales now account for ninety percent of home sales. Fresno County’s economy is moving again, thanks to its civic leaders, entrepreneurs, educators, and its agile and productive workforce. On the horizon, ready to add to our regained momentum, is the California High-Speed Rail Project, bringing with it immediate construction jobs. With Fresno being an excellent candidate for the HSR heavy maintenance facility and educa-

tional campus, we anticipate permanent jobs in engineering and design, operations, and maintenance. The Fresno County EDC’s recent success with its Central Valley partners in joining the Global Cities Exchange, administered through the esteemed Brookings Institute, means that our region will have expert guidance in 2015 to develop an export plan to strengthen the presence of San Joaquin Valley businesses in the global marketplace and to generate foreign investment for local jobs. Both the business attraction and business retention teams at the EDC are expanding to redouble their efforts as these and other opportunities head our way, including those prospects presented by companies looking elsewhere as our neighbors in Northern and Southern California exceed their available space for commercial and housing development. Now is the time for our region, so often left behind in the prosperity of previous decades, to show our state, our country, and global markets all that Fresno County is doing and all that we can be. Show time—let’s rock and roll.

Walt Plachta

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Introducing our Moderators MATT RENNEY • California Realty Capital, Inc. DOUG CORDS • Commercial Retail Associates LET’S

Rock&Roll hankfully, the news is guardedly optimistic. If slow and steady really does win the race, we’re well-positioned for the future. All real estate sectors, on a national, regional, and local level, benefited from a favorable macroeconomic environment in 2014. From a commercial real estate standpoint, fundamentals strengthened as demand for space advanced across all property types, driving vacancies lower and rents higher. With capital availability rising and sources broadening, investors pursued deals across markets. All the key drivers for property demand are trending in the right direction. Housing markets are recovering nicely. Home sales, housing starts, and pricing are rising in most markets. These values, down as much as 60 percent during the 2008-09 recession, are now nearing levels in place pre-recession. Jobs are back past prior peak levels and growing sharply. There have been more jobs gained in 2014 than in any year this century. The unemployment rate in Fresno County is currently hovering around 11 percent, down from nearly 17 percent in September 2010. Consumers, whose activity is responsible for more than twothirds of the economy, are happy again because they're back at work, their debt levels are down, and they've regained their wealth as home values and equity values have risen. All of which translates to more consumer spending.

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Credit markets remain benign, with interest rates and inflation both extremely low due to the slack in the labor and commodity markets, which is a great foundation for both business and financial investment. All of these factors are driving demand for all types of real estate, which means absorption is strong and growing for all sectors, even if it is below long-term averages, especially for a growth period. Meanwhile, despite the strong demand, supply remains quite tame by historical standards. Construction is well below average rates. More than five years have elapsed since the official end of the Great Recession. The question is, how much longer can the recovery continue? The expansion already exceeds the postWWII average. However, this is balanced by the benefits of lower energy prices and continued low interest rates, which provide important upside thrusts to the economy. Dare we say “let’s rock and roll” in 2015…

Matt Renney

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

Doug Cords

9


Multi-Family Investments Snapshot of the Multi-Family Sector

Will the Pendulum swing back to homebuying?

Urban Trends

• Perfect Storm: % rates, debt/equity strong, strong captive renter demand. • Renters are more mobile, delaying marriage/ children, more debt, less secure with the job picture. • More conservative, saw what happened to their parents housing.

• Growth is in urban centers reversing a 65-year trend to the suburbs. • 44% previously owned a home in 2014, up from 33% in 2012. • CA homeownership is 54.2%, a low not seen since 1990.

• • • • •

Trulia:78% of renters plan to purchase a home. Roadblock #1: Home prices Roadblock #2: Difficult to obtain loans Roadblock #3: Rent increases Roadblock #4: Stagnant wage growth

ROBIN KANE Housing Cycle Disrupted Senior Vice President Hendricks-Berkadia Robin C. Kane is Senior Vice President with Hendricks-Berkadia, a national apartment advisory firm. Prior to joining Hendricks, Robin was the founding partner of RCK Organization. Client list included the FDIC, Sentinel Real Estate, State Street Bank, Bank of America, Lend Lease, Heitman Financial, Legacy Partners, AIMCO, Downey Savings, UDR, Inc. and America First. Since he appeared last year, Robin has transacted on over 1,500 units totaling more than $150,000,000.

“Renters are more mobile, delaying marriage/children, have more debt and are less secure with the job picture.”

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Normal Housing Cycle

Current Housing Cycle

Economy bottoms, home sales/prices fall

Historically low % rates forced investors to seek higher yields

Newly formed households buy starter homes using FHA

Investors acquire REOs, starter homes beating out 1st time buyers

Move-up market begins to recover

Loan requirements not friendly to 1st time buyers

Builders start to build larger homes as more moveups enter the market

Prices rise due to investor demand, stalling the move-up market

Land, labor and material costs increase as demand heats up.

New home construction under pressure due to MF demand, fewer homebuyers

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Fresno/Madera Sales 1995-2014 (w/ 10y, 6mCD & cap rates*) 250,000

10.25% Sales 10yrT 6mo CD Cap Rate

200,000

8.25%

14

13

20

12

20

11

20

10

20

09

20

08

20

07

20

06

20

05

20

04

20

03

20

20

20

20

20

19

19

19

19

19

02

0.25% 01

0 00

2.25%

99

50,000

98

4.25%

97

100,000

96

6.25%

95

150,000

* Cap rates: “A” Class assets in Core Mkts Source: Hendricks-Berkadia, Federal Reserve, Moody’s/Real Capital Mkts

An Overview from the Expert he multi-family sector is at the intersection of low interest rates, aggressive lending, strong rent growth and falling vacancy rates. The result is unprecedented sales volume and record-breaking price levels, both exceeding the 2007 peak. This surge has been further fueled by a dysfunctional housing market which is delaying the normal trend of renters converting to homebuyers. This delay is caused by four factors. First, lenders are unwilling to take on the riskier end of the lending spectrum.

Second, prices for starter homes have increased too quickly, due to investors crowding out first-time homebuyers. Third, stagnant wage growth has hindered renters’ ability to accumulate the dollars necessary to buy a home. This trend undermines the confidence of renters to take the ownership leap. And finally, to compound the problem, rents have begun to rise, further straining renters’ efforts to put together a down payment. The net result is the homeownership percentage has been falling to levels not seen since the 70’s.

What will the future look like? • Apartments will benefit from a dysfunctional housing market. • Rent increases will lead the way to new construction. • Renting will grow both as a lifestyle choice and the ONLY choice.

Family Inv i t l est Mu me nts Rock&Roll

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Residential

Equity Sales Lead the Way

COLLEEN WIGINTON

Tradi&onal

President Fresno Association of REALTORS®

A graduate of Fresno State University, Colleen has also earned the GRI (Graduate of Real Estate Institute), SFR (Short Sale and Foreclosure Resource), and CRS (Certified Residential Specialist) designations. This is her sixth year serving as a Director for the California Association of REALTORS®. She has chaired both the Education and Membership Committees at the Fresno Association of REALTORS® and was named REALTOR® of the Year in 2012. Real estate is a Wiginton family tradition. Colleen works together with her husband, Bob, and they have consistently been among the top producers in the greater Fresno-Clovis area. Their three children and/or spouses are also involved in residential or commercial real estate/finance.

Q4 Housing Affordability Index

23% 48% 28%

Tradi&onal

REO 2013

Short Sale  

16% 16%

67%

Tradi&onal

REO 2014

Short Sale  

8% 9%

83%

Traditional

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010 Q4

12

Short Sale  

2012

Colleen is the 2015 President of the Fresno Association of REALTORS® and a Broker-Associate with Realty Concepts, Ltd. Prior to Wiginton Properties joining Realty Concepts in 2008, Colleen managed the family business since 1977.

80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

REO

2011

2012

2013

2014

Short Sale

All statistics are for Fresno County and limited to residential single family.

Source: California Association of Realtors

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

REO

All statistics are based on information from the Fresno MLS for the period of January 2004 – December 2014.

2015


Months of Inventory

Outlook

(Based on Closed Sales)

8.0

• Affordability will continue to define single-family sales growth

7.5

7.0

• Balanced market resulting in fewer multiple offers

6.0

6.0 5.0

4.1

4.0

4.1

3.8

2.8

2.7

3.0 1.7

• Slight increase in both inventory & number of sales

1.7

1.6

1.0

• Gradual and steady appreciation 14 20

13 20

12 20

11 20

10 20

09 20

08 20

07 20

06 20

05 20

Inventory All statistics are based on information from the Fresno MLS for the period of January 2004 – December 2014. All statistics are for Fresno County and limited to residential single family.

Median Price

150,000

209,000

170,000

155,000

144,000

200,000

158,000

152,000

229,500

250,000

284,500

300,000 209,500

“The combination of first-time buyers, move-up buyers, and re-entry buyers isn’t only a return to normalcy, but is essential for a healthy market.”

294,500

350,000

269,500

Fresno County Median Homes

100,000 50,000

14 20

13 20

12 20

11 20

10 20

09 20

08

07 20

06 20

05 20

04

0 20

20

04

0.0

20

2.0

• Increasing number of millennials purchasing homes

4.0

Dollar Value

en Resid tial Rock&Roll

All statistics are based on information from the Fresno MLS for the period of January 2004 – December 2014. All statistics are for Fresno County and limited to residential single family.

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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75 CELEBRATING

YEARS FRESNO HOUSING

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Innovative. Imaginative.

Inspired. Granville Craftsmanship in Clovis Unified School District. Starting in the high $200s.

belterra

A Granville Community Rock&Roll

DRE License #01258537 | Contractor License #586845

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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Industrial

ETHAN H. SMITH, CCIM Vice President Newmark Grubb Pearson Commercial

Construction and Deliveries

Construction and Deliveries Square Feet, thousands

Square Feet, thousands

300

240

60

Deliveries

Under Construction

15 20

14 20

13 20

12 20

11 20

10

0

20

Ethan is a proud dad of two amazing kids and a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin where he earned a Bachelor of Business Administration in Marketing, with concentrations in Finance and Philosophy.

120

09

During Ethan’s tenure, he has been involved in hundreds of transactions representing local, regional and national clients. Ethan has focused on the sales and leasing of industrial buildings on behalf of owners and occupiers throughout the Central San Joaquin Valley as well as working on numerous ground-up industrial developments.

180

20

Ethan H. Smith, CCIM, began his commercial real estate career in 2003 and is a Vice President at Newmark Grubb Pearson Commercial focusing on industrial properties.

Projected Deliveries

or the first time in six years, the Fresno market saw a limited amount of speculative industrial projects in 2014. The construction of new industrial buildings and projects is expected to intensify through 2015. With an increasing number of new projects comes an increase in industrial land sales. Consequently, industrial land acquisitions occurred in 2014, and more are expected in 2015. Overall, the outlook for Fresno’s industrial market is promising. Increased product inventory on the horizon, combined with low interest rates and demand from buyers and tenants, is a recipe for a prosperous 2015. 

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Asking Rent and Vacancy

Asking Rent and Vacancy $0.50

12.5%

$0.40

10.0%

$0.30

7.5%

$0.20

5.0%

$0.10

2.5%

$0.00

0.0% 4Q09

4Q10

4Q11

4Q12

4Q13

Asking Rent (Price/SF/mo.)

Finishing Strong, Looking Forward to 2015 It was around this time one year ago that data began supporting the narrative that the market had “bottomed out.” Since then, vacancy rates have fallen, from 10.0% in fourth-quarter 2013 to 6.8% in fourth-quarter 2014, and market absorption has been positive; even rental rates have risen slowly. The past year reflects a changing dynamic, with tenants and buyers adjusting from a market that favors them to a market that favors landlords and sellers. There is less available industrial product in all space sizes and market corridors, which will likely result in developers speculatively starting new projects in 2015. Deliveries of these properties are expected throughout the year.

4Q14

Vacancy (%)

Absorption

Absorption

1,000,000 600,000 200,000 -200,000 -600,000 -1,000,000 4Q09

Key Indicators

4Q10 4Q11 4Q12 Net Absorption (SF)

4Q14

Key Indicators

Total Inventory (SF) Asking Rent (Price/SF) Vacancy Rate (%) Under Construction (SF) Net Absorption (SF) Deliveries (SF)

4Q13

65,392,424 4Q14 $.41

3Q14 $.41

4Q13 $.38

6.8% 270,620 4Q14

6.6% 270,620 3Q14

7.4% 45,508 2014 -YTD

-119,608 0

238,974 0

198,267 0

tri Indus al Rock&Roll

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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Serving Fresno County for 110 years!

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


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12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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Agriculture

STANLEY J. KJAR 2014 Agriculture In Review Commodity Prices

He specializes in the representation of clients selling and acquisitioning farm properties in the greater Fresno, Madera, Kings and Tulare counties area. Since joining Pearson in 2010 Stanley has been involved in numerous Ag-real estate transactions totaling more than $110 million and 5,700 acres.

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GRAPES ROW/FEED CROPS

Stanley served on the Dealer Board of Directors for the Massey Ferguson division of AGCO Corporation, based in Duluth, GA. He graduated from CSU Fresno in 1999 with a Bachelors Degree in Agricultural Business and also holds a California Department of Real Estate Broker’s license. In addition to his extensive Agricultural Business knowledge, Stanley has also directly farmed grapes, almonds and row crops in Kings and Fresno Counties.

DAIRY

Stanley has been a member of the Pearson Realty Farm Department since November 2010. Prior to his time with Pearson, he served as Vice President and Operations Manager for Kings Equipment Company, Inc., his family owned farm equipment business. Stanley helped grow the business during his 13-year management from a single store operation to three locations in Hanford, Selma, and Madera. Kings Equipment Company was consistently in the top 25 dealers for Massey Ferguson in North America for over 37 years and awarded top volume dealer for 6 of their last 10 years in operation.

ALMONDS

Senior Vice President Pearson Realty

Market prices passed the $5.00/lb. level during harvest but softened by 18% on average by year end. Exports overall drop -16% 2014 vs. 2013 China India Total for Asia Europe Middle East/Africa

-32% +38% -10% -21% -16%

Wine • Market decreases for Central Valley varietals • Long term contracts hard to find Raisins • Lighter than average raisin crop • Exports decrease • Corn and grain prices down 20% on average • 300,000 acres of hay out of production due to drought • Milk price drops below $14.00/CWT, lower feed prices help soften the blow for the dairy farmers

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Farm Land Values

FARM LAND VALUES (avg. price with goodand soil,crop water, and crop history) production (avg. price with good soil, water, production

history)

45,000 PISTACHIO

40,000

ALMONDS

GRAPES

TREEFRUIT

CROPLAND

35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000

Price Per Acre

15,000 10,000 5,000

Price Per Acre

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Snow Pack Levels

2006

2007

Level (AF)

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Pine Flat Reservoir Storage Levels

Northern Sierra 14% of Normal Central Sierra 18% of Normal Southern Sierra 19% of Normal

culture i r g A Rock&Roll

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


cra_05_14 / fresnoedc ad / quarter page / cmyk

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Office

BRETT TODD Commercial Real Estate Agent Colliers International

Brett Todd has been a member of the Colliers International Office Properties Team since April 2012. Prior to joining Colliers, he served as Regional Vice President in Central California for Enterprise Holdings, a privately held multi-national corporation. Brett helped grow the Central California market during his 18-year management, from seven locations to over forty locations from Bakersfield through Stockton. The Central California Region continually out-performed company numbers, consistently ranking in the top 25% overall through his tenure; Brett earned numerous Exceptional Achievement Awards, President’s Awards and distinction for continual Best Practices contributions. Since joining Colliers International, Brett has focused his efforts on office properties – sales and leasing, tenant representation, landlord representation and investment properties. Brett has been an up-and-coming producer on one of the most successful office property teams in Central California. In 2014, he was named a “Colliers International Top Performer”.

FRESNO/CLOVIS METRO AREA Fresno/Clovis Metro Area is divided into eight submarkets: 1. West Herndon/Northwest 2. East Herndon/Woodward Park 3. Northeast/Clovis 4. West Shaw 5. East Shaw 6. Central 7. Airport/Southeast 8. Downtown

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


MARKET COMPARISONS FRESNO/CLOVIS

SUBMARKET! WEST HERNDON/NORTHWEST! ! EAST HERNDON/WOODWARD PARK!  ! NORTHEAST/CLOVIS!  ! WEST SHAW!  ! EAST SHAW!  ! CENTRAL!  ! AIRPORT/SOUTHEAST!  ! DOWNTOWN!  ! TOTALS:!  !

TOTAL

DIRECT

SUBLEASE

TOTAL

INVENTORY

SQ. FT. AVAILABLE/

SQ. FT. AVAILABLE /

SQ. FT. AVAILABLE /

SQ. FT.*

DIRECT VACANCY RATE

SUBLEASE VACANCY RATE

DEC. 2014 VACANCY RATE

3,192,516 5,148,432   1,354,113   2,308,468   1,825,339   2,013,716   1,757,465   3,288,444   20,888,493  

412,657 12.93% 632,297 12.28% 142,775 10.54% 319,221 13.83% 368,629 20.20% 251,866 12.51% 150,979 8.59% 390,618 11.88% 2,669,043 12.78%

16,235 0.51% 33,655 0.65% 3,315 0.24% 4,919 0.21% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 3,249 0.18% 1,418 0.04% 62,791 0.30%

428,892 13.43% 665,952 12.94% 146,090 10.79% 324,140 14.04% 368,629 20.20% 251,866 12.51% 154,228 8.78% 392,036 11.92% 2,731,834 13.08%

*Note: Total inventory does not include government-owned office buildings, which represents an additional 4,800,000 s.f. in the Fresno/Clovis Metropolitan Area.

Vacancy Rate Comparison Sacramento Fresno Los Angeles 2014

US Average

2013 2012

San Diego San Jose/Silicon Valley Bakersfield 0.00%

4.00%

8.00%

e Offic Rock&Roll

12.00%

16.00%

About the Market We were bullish on an active market for the year at this time last year, and that prediction proved true as 2014 sales and leasing activity were robust, surpassing the exceptional year we experienced in 2013. What’s somewhat surprising is that the overall vacancy factor did not improve. In fact, it was virtually unchanged, increasing slightly from 12.83% to 13.08%, indicating that the activity was a continuation of real estate musical chairs as tenants and buyers/users migrated to a new location while leaving vacant space behind. We continued to see few new tenants/buyers come into the market and few new projects being built.    For 2015, we are again bullish and expect the market to continue to flourish. Nationally, economists are saying that the U.S. Economy is poised for the best year in a decade in 2015. Closer to home, the Central Valley is expected to see solid job growth and growing consumer confidence fueling the region’s recovery from recession. Of course, looming over us is the prospect of an on-going drought with a fourth straight year of lackluster rainfall and snow and the potential effects on our agricultural base. Without significant rainfall in the coming months, this will impact all of us. We’re off to a strong start for 2015, and are confident that the coming year will build upon the momentum created over the past two years.

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation in a collaborative partnership with the Department of Social Services Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS, ENERGY CONSULTANTS, AND BUILDERS: The Fresno Energy Watch, a local government partnership administered by the Fresno County EDC, the City of Fresno and the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, assist businesses with energy efficiency building compliance measures and access to no-cost training and energy efficient solutions.

POWER LOAN:

The Fresno Energy Watch, in collaboration with the Fresno County Economic Development Corporation, the Fresno Community Development Financial Institution’s (CDFI), and Richard Heath and Associates (RHA), designed a retrofit financing tool, the POWER Loan, addressing the needs of small and medium business owners to finance the cost of energy efficiency upgrades.

Visit our website for valuable information

FresnoEnergyWatch.com

BUSINESS ENERGY TUNE-UP:

The Business Energy Tune-up is offered through the City of Fresno, providing low-cost comprehensive analysis of business energy use that helps business owners understand how to: increase building occupancy and/or marketability through improved measures, qualify for numerous rebates and incentives, reduce energy-related risks, lessen vulnerability to future mandates, document the building’s reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and benchmarking requirements, and gain experience with AB 1103 / AB 758 benchmarking and compliance applications.

ENERGY FITNESS PROGRAM:

Pacific Gas and Electric Company and Richard Heath and Associates (RHA) provides outreach, energy assessment, customer education, direct installation of a tailored package of low-cost measures, personalized technical assistance, and additional program referrals.

THIS PROGRAM IS FUNDED BY CALIFORNIA UTILITY CUSTOMERS AND ADMINISTERED BY PG&E UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION. “PG&E” REFERS TO PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY, A SUBSIDIARY OF PG&E CORPORATION. ©2013 PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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Commercial Investments 2015:

I N V E ST in Fresno

The Strongest Year for Investment Sales Downward Pressure on Cap Rates • Increase in Capital Allocated to CRE • Low Interest Rates • Low Supply Interest Rates Expected to Remain Low Increased Demand for Properties in Secondary/Tertiary Markets • Increase Values • Lower Cap Rates

BRETT VISINTAINER Brett Visintainer, CCIM Vice President Investment Division Newmark Grubb Pearson Commercial Brett Visintainer leads the Visintainer Investment Group, a division of Newmark Grubb Pearson Commercial. In 2007, Brett joined the firm, where he began specializing in leasing and selling office buildings to occupants/users of property. After gaining a solid base in the tenant and occupant market – understanding the perspective of the user - he transitioned his focus to work solely on investment properties. Brett’s vision of creating a top tier investment team has come together by obtaining his CCIM designation and attracting a world-class team of real estate industry experts. His team has been involved in over $2 billion of investment real estate transactions and have over 70 years of experience. They provide investors with property valuations, financial analysis, acquisition advisory, pre-disposition advisory, leasing strategies to maximize value, and project repositioning. Brett grew up in San Ramon, CA before moving to Fresno in 2000 to attend California State University, Fresno. He was the kicker for the Bulldogs from 2000 – 2004 and then with the Dallas Cowboys in 2005 – 2006 where he had an injury which resulted in career-ending back surgery. Brett is married to wife Andrea and has one son, Beau.

Sellers • “Trim Fat” in Portfolio • Opportunity to Sell at Record Low Cap Rates Buyers • Take Advantage of Low Interest Rate Environment • Look for Value-Add Opportunities: Knowledgeable Broker

US Investment Transaction Volume ($2.5M+) 2006 - 2014 $700

billions

$600 $573

$500 $400

$427

$424 $362

$300

$298 $234

$200 $175

$146

$100 $68

$0

'06

'07

'08

'09

Source: Real Capital Analytics

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14


US Average Cap Rates Compared to 10 Yr US Treasury 9.00%

10 Yr UST

Today

6.93%

6.65%

7.00%

5.00%

7.96% Recession

Peak

8.00%

6.00%

Average Cap Rate (Office, Industrial, Retail)

474 bps

202 bps

4.00%

439 bps

An Overview from the Expert This year could be one of the strongest years ever in volume and transactions for investment sales. Fresno County will experience high demand from investors searching for higher yields than those found in larger markets such as San Francisco and Los Angeles. Because of the increased demand, prices should see upward pressure, and cap rates should stay at historic lows. Three factors will drive the market in 2015:

1. An increase in investors’ capital allocations to commercial real estate

4.63%

3.00%

3.22%

2.00%

2. Low interest rates will further enhance investors’ leveraged returns

2.54%

1.00% 0.00%

'06

'07

'08

'09

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14

Source: Real Capital Analytics

Demand will continue as long as real estate market fundamentals continue to strengthen and commercial real estate remains the preferred alternative to cash, stocks, and bonds. As a seller, it is a great time to sell properties that don’t fit long-term hold strategies. As a buyer, it is a great time to lock in long-term debt and buy value-add properties.This will be an excellent year for the commercial real estate investment market.

US and Fresno Average Cap Rates Since 2006 (Office, Industrial, Retail) 9.50%

United States

Fresno Investment Transaction Volume

Fresno | Multi-Tenant 8.97%

9.00%

millions

7.79%

8.00% 7.96%

7.50%

$300 $250

$311 $277

$281 $239

$200

6.79%

7.00%

6.00%

($1M+) 2006 - 2014

$350

8.50%

6.50%

3. Investment property demand exceeds supply of available properties

$197

6.93%

6.65%

$150 $133

$100

'06

'07

'08

'09

'10

'11

'12

'13

'14

$83

$95

'11

'12

$70

$50

$44

$0

'06

'07

C

Source: CoStar

ial Inves c r e m tme m o nts Rock&Roll

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'08

'09

'10

'13

'14

In 2012, two transactions accounted for $95m, 40% of the total transaction volume that year.

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Retail

PETER ORLANDO Senior Vice President Retail California

Peter J. Orlando is a commercial real estate veteran with over 27 years of retail leasing, tenant representation, and investment opportunity experience.

Stores with Omnichannel Strategies will continue to Thrive

Mobile will continue to grow in all Directions

Retailers that localize their Product Mix and Store Formats will Win

Social Networks will serve as Shopping Platforms

Retailers will adopt and experiment withTechnology Solutions

More Retailers will take control of their Value Chain to improve Order Fulfillment

Peter’s career started in 1985 with Grubb & Ellis Company. Peter later founded Commercial Retail Associates (a commercial real estate brokerage firm specializing in retail properties) in 1990 and was a shareholder for 10 years. Currently, Peter is Senior Vice President and partner of Pearson Companies/ Retail California, the largest independent commercial real estate company in the Central Valley. Pearson Companies (Retail California and Newmark Knight Grubb) named Peter Sales Person of the Year in 2013. Peter specializes in ground up development, projects and tenant representation. Peter has long-term relationships with developers, tenants, and brokers alike. He helped create and lease over 4 million square feet of retail space throughout the Central Valley. Peter has also worked with investment properties acting as both an agent and a consultant. He has sold more than $ 50 million in shopping center space in his career. Peter is an active participant with ICSC and has served as past Program Chair of the Monterey, ICSC convention. Peter has also a regular panelist at numerous regional real estate forums.

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Annual Retail Sales for the United States

An Overview They say the only constant is change. Nothing could be more applicable to the current Retail Market. The ever-changing wants and needs of the individual consumer have resulted in a market that is forever evolving. More importantly, the Retail Market is becoming far more responsive to these demands. With the ever-growing practices of big data collection and pin point analysis and interpretation, the consumer is firmly in charge of their shopping experience, and the Retail Market is constantly changing to meet these needs, which has resulted in THE BRAVE NEW WORLD OF RETAIL

The Brave New World of Retail The convergence of customer shopping patterns and technology has resulted in a rich, rewarding and highly personal consumer experience.

Go Pros

Aerial Photography

Selfie Sticks

Shopping Efficiency

Mobile Apps

Recorded Activity

Drones GPS Charging Stations Garmin Band

What’s HOT! Quick Serve Restaurants Off-Price Apparel Specialty Grocery Entertainment Outlet Stores

Taking Selfies Electric Car Travel Fit to Learn Site Selection

Retail Rock&Roll

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What’s NOT! Department Stores Office Supply Conventional Grocery Lifestyle Tenants Electronics

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Global Capabilities, Local Decision Making.

32

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Put Chase to work for you. Chase Commercial Banking is committed to helping mid-sized businesses across Greater Fresno and the Central Valley achieve their goals. Chase offers you the local delivery of global capabilities and award-winning industry expertise. Just like you, your dedicated Chase banker is a part of Greater Fresno and understands the unique needs of the businesses that operate here. Through our partnership, we will deliver tailored financial solutions and first-class client service that will position you for success. Chase takes pride in strengthening the communities we serve by helping local businesses thrive. Let us do the same for you. Robert Amaro, Executive Director Middle Market Banking - Fresno (559) 490-0516 Erik Langeland, Central Valley Market Manager Middle Market Banking (916) 491-3321 Visit chase.com/commercialbanking for more information.

COM M E RCIAL BAN KI NG

© 2015 JPMorgan Chase & Co. All rights reserved. Chase is a marketing name for certain businesses of JPMorgan Chase & Co. and its subsidiaries worldwide (collectively, “JPMC”). Products and services may be provided by commercial bank affiliates, securities affiliates or other JPMC affiliates or entities. 16500

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Business

EXPANSION & RETENTION B E A R AC T I O N N E T WO R K

BEAR Action Network BEAR Action Network program is designed to enhance the stability and growth of Fresno County’s existing companies by connecting them with specific resources, information, and services offered through the Network. Our primary objectives are to assist businesses with expansions, survive economic difficulties, and make them more competitive in the wider marketplace.

The BEAR Action Network is a local business support network comprised of service providers from various professional agencies, nonprofits, educational institutions and government programs administered by the EDC Business Expansion and Retention staff. Companies that meet with one of our staff members, participate in an operational analysis and are connected with those programs, services or information that prove to be beneficial based on any identified opportunities or needs of the company during the analysis process. Companies that participate with the operational analysis can expect to receive information about the following referral services:

Referral Partners Provide: • Workforce Development, Screening, and Employee Recruitment Services • Financing and Microloan Programs

CONTACT US:

• Customized Training Program Development

FRESNO COUNTY EDC WWW.FRESNOEDC.COM

• Internship Program Information and Referrals

559.476.2500

• Performance Enhancement/Skill Building/ Skill Attainment Training Programs • Building/Contracting • Strategic/Marketing/Formal Succession Planning • Lucrative Business Tax Incentive Information • Utilities: Incentives, Rebates, Special Programs, and Energy Rate Analysis Assistance • Structure Deterioration & Blight Aversion and Improvement of Existing Infrastructure • CPA Services

15 CITIES.

• And more….

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SERVING THE COUNTY OF FRESNO AND EACH OF OUR

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Business

EXPANSION & RETENTION B E A R AC T I O N N E T WO R K

The Essential Connection

Business Incentives: We are a collaborative partnership program - The EDC BEAR Team

We are a collaborative partnership program featuring a world-class business support matrix that has enhanced the stability and growth of existing businesses, resulting in increased job creation and more capital investment that has helped elevate the local tax base by connecting local businesses in Fresno County with public and private business resources. Whether it be directly connecting an employer with hiring incentives, providing FREE business consulting services, or promoting beneficial programs, the ‘BEAR’ department works for our local business community!

HIRING INCENTIVES: New Employment Opportunities (NEO) Program New Employment Credit (NEC) Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) Employment Training Panel (ETP)

LO C A L I N C E N T I V E S : PG&E Economic Development Rate (EDR) Incentive available through PG&E in partnership with the State. Available throughout Fresno County, the program is designed for businesses with high energy loads (at least 200kW/month) that are considering locating within California and have other out-of-state options, California businesses that are considering relocating to other states, or businesses in danger of closing their existing operations entirely.

• Qualifying businesses in Fresno County will receive a 30% Enhanced Rate reduction for 5 years on their monthly electricity costs

Recycling Market Development Zone (RMDZ) Incentive available to businesses throughout Fresno County that use recycled or recovered materials as raw materials in their manufacturing processes or reduce the creation of solid waste. Benefits include:

• Low interest micro-loan program (up to $2 million) • Development and permitting assistance • Waiver or reduction of development/permit fees

County of Fresno Fee Deferral Program County of Fresno incentive available to qualifying job-producing projects. Projects may defer 75% the County’s Plan Review/Building fees, with a maximum of $50,000 deferment per project.

• Fees repaid 25% annually for three years • Project must create at least 20 jobs, either directly or indirectly

S TAT E I N C E N T I V E S : California Competes Credit Manufacturing Equipment Sales & Use Tax Exemption CAEATFA Sales & Use Tax Exclusion Research and Development (R&D) Credit

CONTACT US:

Industrial Development Bond (IDB) Financing Program

FRESNO COUNTY EDC WWW.FRESNOEDC.COM

559.476.2500

FEDERAL INCENTIVES: Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) HUBZone (Historically Underutilized Business Zone)

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Business ATTRACTION SERVICES

Ground Shipping

Fresno County Economic Profile Located in the heart of California, Fresno County has an unmatched diversity of natural beauty, recreational amenities, and business opportunities, not to mention its proximity to three national parks. Including an area of more than 6,000 square miles, Fresno County is California’s sixth largest county. Within its boundaries are some of the world’s most fertile agricultural land and most majestic mountains, lakes, and forests. County farm trails feature the bountiful harvest of the nations #1 agricultural county. Fresno County also supports a variety of core industries including manufacturing, logistics and distribution, alternative energy, healthcare, water technology, food processing, and biotechnology. From Fresno County, all of California and Nevada can be reached within one day; most of the Western Region can be reached within two days. More than 500 trucking and warehousing firms operate in the area. Two major railways, Union Pacific and BNSF Railway Company, operate several intermodal facilities with connections to all outbound destinations. The nation’s largest parcel carriers – UPS, FedEX, and OnTrack operate out of Fresno Yosemite International Airport, with guaranteed next day service available anywhere in California.

2 Day Delivery

Butte

Portland

Boise Jackson

Next Day Delivery

Reno

Cheyenne

Salt Lake

Sacramento San Francisco

Denver

1/2 Day Delivery

FRESNO Los Angeles

Las Vegas Phoenix

Albuquerque

San Diego

Next Day Delivery

Tucson

2 Day Delivery

Population Population

2010

2014

Clovis

95,631

102,188

Coalinga

13,380

16,467

Firebaugh

7,549

7,809

Fowler

5,570

5,883

• Data

Fresno

494,665

515,609

• Site Selection

Huron

6,754

6,843

Kerman

13,544

14,339

Kingsburg

11,382

11,685

• Workforce Training

Mendota

11,014

11,225

• Permitting & Regulations

Orange Cove

9,078

9,410

Parlier

14,494

15,019

Reedley

24,194

25,122

• Real Estate Information

Sanger

24,270

24,908

• Utility Cost Analysis

San Joaquin

4,001

4,056

Selma

23,219

23,977

Unincorporated

171,705

169,500

Fresno County

930,450

964,040

Business Development Services

• Incentive Calculation

• Financing

• After-Care Services

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Seattle

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Business ATTRACTION SERVICES

ore than any other region in California, for businesses siting a new operation or expanding, Fresno County offers affordable choice. We have everything from a younger and more adaptable workforce to significantly less expensive housing, commercial, and industrial space. These factors are providing productivity and costs benefits several of our key industries have used to grow and prosper. Sectors like manufacturing, which have struggled in other parts of the state and nation, hold steady in Fresno County. The median age in Fresno County, for both genders, skews about five years younger than in California as a whole. That younger workforce is more adaptable, more mobile, and ready to learn new processes. Companies hiring in Fresno County have numerous programs available to them to assure local labor. For highly skilled labor, local companies are able to draw upon the graduates from CSUF and Fresno Pacific College and their widely respected programs in agricultural sciences, business, and biomedical research, to name a few. The newly opened California Health Sciences University is expanding its program offerings to meet the demand for healthcare professionals in the region. Our local community colleges also serve more than 50,000 students with associates and certification programs.

The construction, education and healthcare, administrative support, retail, government, resource extraction, and transportation/warehouse sectors have all been actively hiring in Fresno County. With the California High-Speed Rail project having broken ground in Fresno in January of 2015, and with the entire Central Valley region joining the Global Initiatives Exchange to study and promote export potential among Valley businesses, economic development in Fresno County is poised to gain momentum and to grow in directions previously unrealized. It’s an exciting time to do business in Fresno County. Our businesses have space to grow. Our workforce is at the ready and improving its skills. Programs and centers promoting technology—in agriculture, energy, water, biomedical, and information sciences—are building a reputation around brands like the Water, Energy, & Technology Center’s BlueTech Valley. The Fresno County EDC, as the Essential Connection for business in the region, remains dedicated to serving our local businesses and helping them bring better jobs to our community.

Fresno County offers real estate affordability that no other large metropolitan region in California can match. The city of Fresno is the fifth largest city in the state and yet has a median housing cost 75% the cost of Sacramento, 52% the cost of Los Angeles, and 20% the cost of San Francisco. Industrial space in Fresno County is available at 66% the cost of Los Angeles for general industrial, 85% for R&D flex, and 64% for warehouse/distribution space. Fresno County retail space averages 61% the cost of Los Angeles and just 34% the cost of San Francisco, and Class A office space in Fresno is 72% the cost of L.A. and 42% the cost of similar space in S.F.

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CONTACT US: FRESNO COUNTY EDC WWW.FRESNOEDC.COM

559.476.2500

37


California

HIGH-SPEED RAIL PROJECT ON TRACK TO BEGIN CONSTRUCTION t will be the first of its kind in the nation, a sleek 800-mile highspeed rail capable of 200+ mph as it races the length of California. Imagine traveling without the stress and delay of freeway congestion from Fresno to San Jose in fifty minutes, Merced to Palmdale in two hours, and Los Angeles to San Francisco in three hours. The first segment connects Fresno to Merced, but the California HSR project is ultimately the first phase in a revolutionary mode of transportation that will crisscross the U.S. In doing so, it will bring construction jobs, permanent employment in operations and related industries, and once-in-a-generation opportunities for communities who establish themselves as centers for this twenty-first century industry. With the project groundbreaking on January 6, 2015, the future has come not only to Fresno but to the entire Central Valley.

Once HSR construction is complete, the jobs shift to permanent, high-wage employment in maintenance and operations. These are the jobs—the careers—that change the future not just for workers but for entire families. More jobs will emerge in industries supporting rail and with businesses that use the system for greater access to labor and operational sites. Fresno County, through the efforts of the private-public partnership Fresno Works, is also poised in 2015 to win its bid for the California Heavy Maintenance Facility and Operation Center and its 1500 skilled, high-wage jobs.

Already, this $68 billion project has brought money and employment to hard-pressed economies in the Valley. Dozens of local companies are among the certified small businesses awarded $296 million in contracts. Hundreds of new full-time jobs have been created. That’s real prosperity we can feel at home as dollars in our pockets, spent at local businesses, generating local tax revenue for improvements to Valley communities.

Fresno County’s government, education, and business leaders have readied plans and programs to ensure our community takes full advantage of this opportunity. Today, training programs prepare residents to work on rail construction. Tomorrow, those programs will educate people to build the trains, run them, and maintain them. The train manufacturer that obtains the contract to provide California’s first high-speed rail cars will also be in the best position to provide train sets for the first cross-country American high-speed rail system, and that company—whether it is American, Asian, or European—will need an American workforce. Let’s make sure it is a Fresno County workforce, with the best training programs and the most experience with the system, having been here for the birth of HSR in the U.S.

From its position in Downtown Fresno, the Fresno station will become a center for transportation and economic development with a land use plan crafted to foster commercial, industrial, and housing projects worthy of a vibrant metropolitan hub.

Photos By: The California High-Speed Rail Authority

38

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


HIGH SPEED

The Essential Connection

Rail

SUPPORT SERVICES SITE SELECTION SERVICES To identify potential requirements and locations for displaced businesses, the EDC conducts market analysis and utilizes the following resource: • Commercial and Agricultural Real Estate Firms • Professional developers and landlords • LoopNet and FresnoCountyCities.com • Off-Market Inventory site searches

STREAMLINED ENTITLEMENTS The EDC works closely with the City and County of Fresno to coordinate consistency and clarity in: • Expedited Permitting, Conditional Use Permits, and Site/Floor Plan Reviews • Zoning Uses (Industrial, Warehouse, Office, Retail) • Compliance with City and County Ordinances

BUSINESS SUPPORT SERVICES In partnership with the City and County of Fresno, the EDC has been assisting many businesses and property owners impacted by the High-Speed Rail (HSR) alignment throughout Fresno County. The needs have varied from coordinating meetings with the HSR Authority and permitting agencies, to relocation site assistance, and connecting growing businesses with resources to succeed in an economy swelling with the demands and opportunities that this project is creating in our region.Whether a relocation property is currently in existence or requires build-to-suit adaptation, the commercial, retail, and industrial real estate opportunities are abundant. Additionally, the workforce that has come to Fresno County to participate in this monumental project has needed and will continue to need housing, which is helping our local real estate market rebound.

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL PLANNING The EDC coordinates with local partners to assist with business planning, unconventional financing, and tax incentives. • Multi-Agency Collaboration • To estimate equitable treatment of impacted businesses, the EDC collaborates with all agencies

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CONTACT US: FRESNO COUNTY EDC WWW.FRESNOEDC.COM

559.476.2500

39


FRESNO COUNTY

OPEN FOR BUSINESS ANNOUNCING FRESNO COUNTY’S Rapid Response and Building Plan Check/ Permit Fee Deferral Programs

Do I Qualify? The following requirements must be met in order to participate in either or both programs:

Participation must be pre-approved for qualifying projects, specifically: construction of a new business or expansion of an existing business resulting in the creation of at least 20 new full-time jobs either directly by applicant or indirectly in support businesses;

The job creation identified must be realized within two years after building occupancy is granted.

If you are interested in pursuing these programs, please call (559) 600-4497 and ask to speak to William M. Kettler, Manager, Development Services Division.

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND PLANNING DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DIVISION

Are there other requirements I should be aware of? Yes. In order to participate in the Building Plan Check/Permit Fee Deferral Program, there are program provisions/requirements that are listed below:

40

The maximum amount of the deferral is $50,000 per project;

A fee deferral payment agreement must be executed between the applicant/property owner and the County;

The terms of the applicant/property owner fee deferral payment agreement must include the deferral provisions including, in the event fees are unpaid, a lien against the property recorded for the delinquent amount until the fees are paid.

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


city of

s the City of Clovis continues to look to the future, the City Council has adopted two important documents in 2014. In July, the update of the City’s Economic Development Strategy was approved; The City’s 2035 General Plan, the guiding blueprint for development for the next 20 years, was approved in September.

Clovis SIX TARGET INDUSTRIES

These documents work together to provide a plan for Clovis’ growth and sustainability. The Fiscal Analysis of the City’s General Plan makes it clear that Clovis cannot continue “business as usual” if it is to be fiscally sustainable in the future. Land must be reserved for job generating uses, investment in economic development, and provision for the development of destination retail centers. The Land Use Element of this plan identifies locations for job generating uses, and the Economic Development Strategy identifies the key areas of focus and action steps to work toward that sustainable future.

• Health and Wellness

THROUGH AN EVALUATION OF ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES, SIX PRIMARY TARGET STRATEGY AREAS EMERGED:

• Education

• Agile Manufacturing • Information Processing • Tourism • Water Technology

• Business Retention and Expansion to proactively address the needs of existing businesses for continued operation, growth, and expansion • Business Attraction and Start-up to bring new businesses to the community for increased jobs and sales tax revenue • Industrial Development strategies to strengthen and increase job-generating business opportunities • Commercial Development strategies to establish retail and office environments to attract new businesses • Tourism Development to create an interesting dynamic location with unique goods, exciting places, and high-quality events • Workforce Development Strategy to proactively address the workforce needs of existing and new businesses For each of these six areas, the Strategy provides a detailed explanation of issues, identification of the key areas of focus, and action steps. Community partners are also identified in the action steps. The City of Clovis is clearly part of a regional economic system; the City’s economic success is linked to the economic achievement of the region. For the greatest overarching economic success, the City, neighboring jurisdictions, businesses, educational organizations, and the community must be aligned in their strategic initiatives. One of the great benefits of the Economic Development Strategy update process is that it brought the City together with citizens, community stakeholders, and regional partners to discuss our economic futures and how we can better work together to make the most of our resources. The Strategy will help leverage strengths and capitalize on opportunities as well as assist and partner with educational and medical institutions, other agencies, and businesses to achieve success.

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Blossom Trail City! city of

Fowler Fowler, California, is a small community located in the San Joaquin Valley approximately 5 miles south of Fresno. Fowler is considered one of Fresno County’s best kept secrets. With its distinct “Americana” atmosphere, friendly citizens, close proximity to Sequoia and Yosemite National Parks, and being just a few hours’ drive to San Francisco, the Central Coast, and Los Angeles it’s a great place to live and work. Fowler is unique - while it offers a small town charm, it is also a progressive community on the move. It is an ideal place for new businesses due to its prime central location and proximity to Southern Pacific railroad, major highways and business routes such as Highway 99, Golden State Boulevard, and Manning Avenue. It also offers plenty of land for business expansion projects and economic development in its large industrial corridor. Fowler is also known for its well-kept neighborhoods, attractive downtown, highly acclaimed school district, and its quality affordable housing.

WHY Choose Fowler? • • • • • • • David L. Elias City Manager delias@ci.fowler.ca.us 559-834-3113 ext 101 www.fowlercity.org

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Great place to do business Superb quality of life Close Proximity to Highway 99 Ready to work labor force Local hiring incentives Recycling Market Development Zone Foreign Trade Zone “From City Management through all departments and staff, they understand the concept that time is money”. Jeff Wolpert, Vice President Newmark Grubb/Pearson Commercial

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


city of

Firebaugh Land Availability Firebaugh has over 800 acres of available land designated for industrial development and nearly 50 acres available for commercial development.

Tax Incentives To encourage economic development, Firebaugh participates in a number of business tax incentive programs in Fresno County including: • Foreign Trade Zone • Federal Research and Development Tax Credit • New Market Tax Credit • Rural City Revolving Loan Fund • Recycling Market Development Zone

A Hardworking Family Town After experiencing a slowdown in business development during the economic depression of the last several years, Firebaugh is showing signs of rebuilding. As one would expect, agricultural-related businesses have led the way in Firebaugh’s recovery. The city’s largest business, TomaTek, continues to thrive and grow in Firebaugh. TomaTek is one of the largest tomato processors in the Central Valley and a very important regional business. Another regionally significant business in Firebaugh is the Seasholtz’s family company, Sweetwood Farm, Inc. doing business as Red Rooster Sales. In 2012, the company processed nearly 45,000 tons of fresh tomatoes, which means they packed and shipped 2,656,000 boxes. In addition, Red Rooster operates a ripening, cold storage, and shipping facility at its Firebaugh site. On an annual basis between packing, shipping sales, tomato production, and harvesting, the company maintains a nearly $6 million payroll and spends $1 million with local businesses. Signs of commercial/retail growth are also appearing in town. An 8,240-squarefoot Family Dollar Store has opened, along with Auto Zone, in 2013. The Family Dollar is expected to fill an important retail need in the city and boost sales tax. Most exciting for the city and the northwestern region of Fresno County, West Hills Community College District is making MAJOR INVESTMENTS in the Firebaugh Community College Center and has been finalizing plans for a campus expansion. This excellent education resource for the community is scheduled to begin construction in 2016.

Kenneth McDonald City Manager (559) 659-5907 www.ci.firebaugh.ca.us citymanager@ci.firebaugh.ca.us

West Hill Community College, North District, Firebaugh Center has spent the past six years renovating their present campus. This includes purchasing new furniture, replacing carpets, building new men’s and women’s restrooms, installing a surveillance camera system, and establishing a new video camera system to teach videoconference courses. Included in the Firebaugh Center’s Facility Master Plan is a 40,000-square-foot two-story main campus building. Future improvements include a joint College-Fresno County Library, additional science labs, faculty offices, and a multi-purpose room. It is anticipated that these facilities will be completed within the next five years.

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city of

Kerman Focused on the Future Investment in critical public infrastructure, a business-friendly environment, and easy access to major transportation networks position your business to thrive in Kerman. Home to several medium and large companies, Kerman is an ideal location for your business. Come visit Kerman and see what we have to offer.

WHY Choose Kerman? • Available water and wastewater capacity to accommodate new and growing businesses • “Shovel-ready” industrial property • Job placement and training programs • Available finished residential lots ready to build on • Expanding retail development opportunities • Easy access to State Route 145 and 180, Highway 99, and Interstate 5 • 15-minute drive to Fresno Luis Patlan City Manager LPatlan@cityofkerman.org 559-846-9387 cityofkerman.net

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Business Friendly Fresno streamlines your development

city of

The Business Friendly Fresno (BFF) initiative streamlines and enhances customer service for development projects. Launched in 2014, the BFF targets site plan review and concurrent permit submittal for thirty-day turn-around, to get businesses up and running on budget and on time.

The iDIFER Program reduces or eliminates your impact fees Last year, the City passed the Industrial Development Impact Fee Elimination/Reduction (iDIFER) Program that allows the City Manager to eliminate or reduce all city-wide impact fees for qualifying industrial projects. A typical 155,000sf industrial building can save up to $176,000 with this program.

The Enhanced Economic Development Electrical Rate lowers your operating costs Fresno, in collaboration with PG&E, won final approval from the California Public Utilities Commission for the Enhanced Economic Development Electrical Rate. This program allows qualified new or expanding businesses to receive up to a 30% reduction in their industrial energy rates.

Business concierge service walks you through the City process The City of Fresno is committed to your business success. The Office of Economic Development provides concierge services for business expansion and attraction. The City is ready to work with businesses to provide tailored, targeted, and flexible incentives for business expansion and attraction. For expanding or growing your business in California, Fresno’s focus on industrial economic development means the sum total is greater than the parts. Fresno is ready for you!

Fresno Committed to Your SUCCESS Service, incentives, and flexibility are the touchstones for business expansion and attraction for the City of Fresno in 2015 and beyond. A variety of programs and incentives proves Fresno stands ready to help your business achieve success.

Larry Westerlund Director of Economic Development Larry.westerlund@fresno.gov 559-621-8355 www.fresno.gov

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city of

Kingsburg Faster Permits a streamlined 21-day administrative approval permitting process.

Lower Fees 25% reduction in the City’s Capital Facilities Fees.

New Incentives 50% rebate of the City’s real estate property taxes and sales taxes for three years.

The program has been so successful that the City Council has extended it for three additional years.

Alexander J. Henderson City Manager (559) 897-5821 cityofkingsburg-ca.gov ahenderson@cityofkingsburg-ca.gov

46

Incentive Program Reaping BIG Rewards for Kingsburg Kingsburg’s Open For Business incentive program has contributed to several new businesses opening up, creating over 600 new jobs. Developed with the aid of a survey of area brokers, developers, and commercial real estate owners, the program consists of three prongs: Faster Permits, Lower Fees, & New Incentives.

SUCCESSFUL ANNEXATION

Kingsburg’s highway commercial and industrial footprint just got much bigger with the annexation of nearly 431 acres along Highway 99, from the current city limits to Mountain View. According to Mayor Chet Reilly, “We are pleased that the long-awaited annexation was recorded recently. While much of the land that was included in the newly annexed property is developed, and includes operations for major companies like Sunmaid, Guardian, and Vie-del, the agreements made with the Consolidated Irrigation District and Fresno County Fire as part of this process cleared many of the hurdles that developers once faced. We are committed to land-use policy in the annexed area that will encourage retail and commercial development while preserving the ability for the large industries that are there now to expand their operations and thereby increase job opportunities in the area.”

BUSINESS PLAN COMPETITION

The Launching Pad business plan competition is intended to entice entrepreneurs to start their business in Kingsburg, and the City has successfully implemented a second round of this innovative challenge. The winner will receive $25,000 in goods and services to help make their dream of opening a business a reality. Economic Development Coordinator Jolene Polyack said, “Sherman Dix came up with the contest, and it was perfect for Kingsburg. We focus on fostering the small start-up businesses, and this is a way to get the word out that we really do want those types of businesses here in Kingsburg. Starting a new business can be daunting. If we help navigate would-be owners through the maze of start-up bureaucracy, they can shift their attention to the actual business itself and increase their odds of success.” The City continues to help entrepreneurs every step of the way as part of their economic development program. Located on Highway 99, Kingsburg is midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. On average, 59,000 cars travel this highway each day, making for great visibility and accessibility. Kingsburg has 57 cumulative acres of shovel ready land within the city limits with access and visibility to the highway, plus newly annexed acreage, much of which is available for development. The attributes of being an upscale community with low crime, a low cost of living, and a family-oriented culture make Kingsburg a desirable location for any business. Couple location and lifestyle desirability with an excellent incentive program and everyone wins.

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


city of

Mendota

DEVELOPMENT HUB

of the West Side

he community of Mendota continues to grow and prosper under the direction of its experienced City Council, with the main focus being the creation of an atmosphere wherein residents and businesses can thrive. We continue to move forward with an encompassing economic development strategy that supports business and residential development. Check out a small sample of the projects that are included in our plan:

Economic Incentive Zone

Permit and Code Streamlining

New Commercial Developments and Infill Projects

Increased Housing

The City Council is in the process of establishing an incentive zone along the main business corridors of Mendota. Two state highways (State Routes 180 and 33) are included as well as our main downtown district, 7th Street. The incentives proposed include more flexible development standards, significant reductions of development impact fees, and expedited permit processing, among other measures.

Popular brand-name chains have been contacting the City of Mendota to establish stores in our community. They have been attracted by the low cost of doing business here, the availability of a trained workforce, and the increase in income within the community thanks to the revenue from pistachio and almond orchards in the area.

The City of Mendota is working with a number of companies with plans for moving to our area and is assisting them with site selection.There are lots in commercial zones ready for development. If your company is interested in developing its business and its future in Mendota, or you have questions about other opportunities, don’t hesitate to contact us.

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The City of Mendota is also taking steps to make it easier for individuals, groups, and businesses to start and maintain their businesses here. We have undertaken an analysis of our municipal code in order to make it easier to understand and navigate and to facilitate smart development. The City Council has also requested that the permitting processes be optimized so that sincerely interested parties can cut through the red tape and rapidly finish projects that will be beneficial to the community as a whole.

The City is currently updating its housing element to fulfill the needs of our growing community. Mendota’s largest housing development ever, Las Palmas, continues to sell homes before they are even built, with future phases of development already approved. The demand for housing is so high that local realtors recently reported there was no inventory available in the city of Mendota.

Matt Flood Planning & Economic Development Manager (559) 655-7313 ci.mendota.ca.us

12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

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city of

Orange Cove

Honoring our past, Embracing our future. Come grow with us.

he city of Orange Cove is a fertile agricultural community located along the eastern foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Eastbound of State Route 99, Orange Cove lies 35 miles southeast of Fresno and is approximately a 4-hour drive between Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area. The city proudly offers a year-round harvest of abundant citrus fruits over hundreds of acres, including many varieties of orange and lemon, with major packing operations surrounding the community.

Samuel A. Escobar City Manager (559) 626-4488 cityoforangecove.com samescobar@cityoforangecove.com

In 2014, the City of Orange Cove partnered with the Office of Community and Economic Development (OCED) at Fresno State to develop a community-based Economic Development Strategy that included participation and input from an advisory committee representing a cross-section of community stakeholders. This 8-month process generated a plan that was adopted by the City Council in September 2014. The plan serves as the guiding document for the City’s economic development activities. Components of the plan are already in the process of implementation in 2015. The City of Orange Cove, the Orange Cove Chamber of Commerce, and OCED are conducting a 5-month curriculum of training workshops designed to equip entrepreneurs and small businesses in the community with the knowledge and skills to capitalize on e-commerce, financing, and water/energy efficiency opportunities. The three entities are also developing a “Buy Local” campaign in the community that will encourage local business patronage among Orange Cove residents. Signage will also be strategically situated along main entry points into the community to encourage additional tourist traffic into Orange Cove from neighboring national parks. The goal is to capture added tourist dollars by encouraging and facilitating entry into the community.

The City will continue to identify high-value businesses, prioritize target industries, capitalize upon community strengths, and seek out and assist industrial development and expansion. Orange Cove’s goal is to act confidently and decisively to develop and implement policies, programs, and activities that will stimulate business start-up, continue to facilitate the expansion of existing businesses, and encourage the location of new operations in order to create new jobs, expand the city’s economic base, and enhance the quality of life enjoyed by our citizens and visitors.

“Come see what all the buzz is about” 48

AVAILABLE LAND: The City of Orange Cove has 14.4 acres of industrial land with infrastructure in place to expedite the construction of a new facility, a total of 44 acres designated for industrial development, and 25 acres of available commercial property. Municipal outreach has led to the creation of a streamlined building and planning permitting process. The City of Orange Cove is also dedicated to providing incentives by waiving or deferring certain impact fees for new developments within the city.

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


city of

Parlier Mosquito Abatement Building

The Mosquito Abatement District Agency has purchased approximately eight acres in the Parlier Industrial Park located just south of Manning on Mendocino Avenue, where the District will be locating their corporate headquarters in Parlier. The Parlier Industrial Park currently has several other prime parcels available for businesses seeking a Central California location with room to expand.

Apartment Renovations

In 2014 an investment group purchased the 17-unit apartment complex at 350 Fresno Street. The group is now nearing 90% completion on a major rehabilitation of the existing complex that will include a brand new parking area with carports and security fencing. The new owner will bring approximately $100,000.00 in improvements to the site.

Avila Apartment

The Parlier Avila Apartment Phase II is now under construction with a 24-unit apartment project located just north of City Hall. The project will consist of three- and four-bedroom affordable apartments and is a Tax Credit Project.

Manning Avenue Growth

Manning Avenue, which is a main corridor for the city, has been the focus for several commercial developments within recent years. One commercial development, at the northwest corner of Manning and Newmark Avenues, is approximately 50% complete. There are also available sites on the southeast and southwest corners of Manning and Academy Avenue which are zoned for commercial development.

he city of Parlier is nestled in the heart of the fertile San Joaquin Valley and is home to 14,865 residents. Parlier is ideally situated in Central California 210 miles north of Los Angeles and 199 miles south of San Francisco. From its inception as an agricultural-based community and its transition to a diversified economy, Parlier continues its steady growth by taking advantage of its position in the emerging new economy. City of Parlier staff is dedicated to helping business grow here; new companies are increasingly discovering that Parlier is the place to be in California.

Maxco

Located in Parlier, Maxco is a privately-owned company and one of the leaders in agricultural packaging in California. The company is wellknown for its technological innovation and timely delivery. Since its founding more than 35 years ago, Maxco has concentrated on one market, a decision to which the company attributes its success and predominance in the industry. Maxco is one of the largest employers in Parlier, employing nearly 400 people.

Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center

Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center is the University of California’s largest off-campus agricultural research facility. The site is located 15 miles southeast of Fresno in the city of Parlier, which is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. The center includes 330 acres, where it grows over 40 different crops. Kearney is the only one of nine Research and Extension Centers with certified organic land set aside for research.

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12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

Israel Lara City Manager ilara@parlier.ca.us (559) 646-3545 www.parlier.ca.us

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EARS 100l groY wing bus

and stil

inesses!

city of

Reedley We’ve dusted off the cobwebs and have been busy polishing our city and readying ourselves for the next 100 years. With tens of millions of dollars in infrastructure construction happening in 2013, Reedley is the place to plant your business and grow. • Streamlined permitting processes & low building fees • Ample water and wastewater capacity • Easy access to Freeways 99 and 180 • Among the lowest crime rates in Central CA • Rail spur lines in industrial areas • Full service hospital with ER • Diverse, family-oriented community • In the exceptional Kings Canyon Unified District • Reedley College Job Training Opportunities • Quaint downtown with over 90% occupancy • Recreational beaches, historic Reedley Opera House

Nicole Zieba City Manager (559) 637-4200 www.reedley.com nicole.zieba@reedley.ca.gov

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


An O

asis Poised

for G

row th

San Joaquin city of

The City of San Joaquin continues its focus on quality of life, safety, and future economic opportunities for its residents. The City has adopted a responsible approach to development and sustainability by enacting several resource conservation methods as well as ensuring the community’s overall safety with its broad, citywide security surveillance system.With an expanded surveillance system accessible by the Fresno County Sheriff’s Department, the city continues to have the lowest crime rate in Fresno County. Residents and businesses alike enjoy the small town atmosphere and camaraderie found in the oasis that is the city of San Joaquin.

CITYWIDE GROWTH

To further strengthen the city’s character, the current General Plan includes community design standards addressing new construction and a regeneration of downtown. Creating open and inviting public spaces that encourage the continued growth and further enhancement of the downtown area are important aspects for economic, community, and individual development. With the help of its residents, in collaboration with neighboring communities, and with the input and support of local businesses, San Joaquin has prepared itself to become a key player in the Central Valley’s economic and civic development.

EMPHASIS ON COMMUNITY

In addition to its focus on growth in the business sector, the City will continue to construct improvements to the local landscape including: greenscape, walking trails, city park updates, street improvements, installation of water meters, and a community garden. The updated General Plan addresses the use of vacant parcels to accommodate additional parks, stores, and housing. All aspects of city governance are geared to maintain a family-oriented community that possesses genuine small town charm – making San Joaquin an oasis for its residents and its businesses alike. Looking beyond city borders, the City Council and staff recognize the need to work in unison with nearby communities for mutual benefit. Under the leadership and vision of San Joaquin’s elected officials, professional staff, and civic-minded citizens, the community stands ready to grow and prosper. Chad McMullen City Manager chadm@cityofsanjoaquin.org 559-693-4311 ext. 18 www.cityofsanjoaquin.org

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city of

Sanger JOBS, JOBS & JOBS anufacturing and Food Processing pushed to record-high job numbers in 2014, as Sanger also led the way in new home production. New commercial growth, especially along busy Academy Avenue, has pushed sales tax revenues past pre-recession highs.

of quality poultry products. You will find their products, Mary’s Free Range Chicken and Mary’s Free Range Organic Turkey, at Whole Foods and other high-end food markets and restaurants across the West. At last count the Pitman workforce had increased 1600%!

ally-zoned land in the city. Utilizing these incentives, an industrial project could completely eliminate all development impact fees when constructing new factories and food processing operations. Plus, the City continues to guarantee a 21-day turnaround on new site plans.

Two start-up food processors have grown strong in Sanger’s fertile business climate and now employ hundreds of Sanger residents year-round. Initiative Foods purchased a defunct Glacier Foods plant in Sanger in 2002 and, after a total rehabilitation, began using locally-grown fruits and vegetables to produce natural and organic baby food. The initial production staff has increased by more than 400%, and Initiative is now ranked as the 3rd largest producer of baby food in the United States.

Sanger worked with both Initiative Foods and Pitman Family Farms over the years to make sure that they had opportunities to stay and grow in Sanger. As economic developers know, existing businesses are our greatest source of economic growth, and both Initiative Foods and Pitman Family Farms are illustrations of this fact.

With the continued addition of attractive and affordable homes from some of the nation’s largest builders, dramatic year-overyear reductions in crime statics, one of the highest-rank school districts in California, and the continuing creation of well-paying jobs in thriving industries, Sanger is poised to be the Fresno County community of choice for business and home buyers through 2015 and beyond.

Pitman Family Farms is another huge food processing success story. Company owners Rick and Mary Pitman and Family had a long history of growing poultry on their farms in Madera County when they decided to vertically integrate and add processing to their business plan. Starting in Sanger in 2003, the Pitmans initially focused on the niche Asian market but rapidly expanded to become a truly main street supplier

52

Sanger’s manufacturing has also experienced phenomenal growth during the past year. One business in particular, California TrusFrame, has been a key contributor to the resurgence of single-family and multi-family housing projects and, as a result, has experienced a 10-fold increase in the number of local employees. In order to build on past successes and accelerate industrial development in 2015, Sanger’s City Council has approved a comprehensive package of industrial incentives applicable to every piece of industri-

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015

Dan Spears, Manager, Community & Economic Development dspears@ci.sanger.ca.us (559) 876-6300 Ext.1520 www.ci.sanger.ca.us


city of

Selma WE WILL WORK WITH YOU TO DEVELOP YOUR PROJECT ON TIME AND WITHIN BUDGET hether you are interested in developing a commercial, industrial, or residential parcel or utilize existing property, the City of Selma will work with you to complete your project on time and within your budget. Selma has an inventory of industrial property that can accommodate your project, whether you require lease, purchase, or built to suit. The properties available are perfect for the company that wants to develop a presence on the West Coast, expand its business, or relocate. The City has a proven track record of processing applications efficiently, allowing the client to meet their deadlines in a cost-effective manner. Many parcels have close freeway access to allow maximum exposure for your business. The City does not have a set incentive schedule—we work with each client on an individual basis. Golden State Industrial Park, located at 1775 Park Street, caters to manufacturing businesses. The development is located in Foreign Trade Zone #226 (Merced County Regional Foreign Trade Zone) and a Recycling Market Development Zone, and some manufacturing businesses may qualify for the PG&E Economic Development Rate, as well as other benefits. Buildings of various sizes are currently available, including manufacturing, office, and warehouse space ranging from 4,160±SF to 90,624±SF. The Park is very close to the Second Street interchange of Freeway 99, as well as having access to Golden State Blvd. (old Highway 99). Contact Ethan Smith (559/447-6256), Ron Stoltenberg (559/447-6227), or Nick Audino (559/447-6270) at Newmark Grubb Pearson Commercial for information.

Shovel-ready land is available at Selma Industrial Park II, a development which features build to suit or property for sale. There are 29 industrial parcels zoned for manufacturing. Parcel sizes range from 0.48 to 5.95 acres. Lot line adjustments can easily be accommodated to create larger parcel sizes. For more information, contact agent Ken Jelladian at 559/277-3355.

For retail operations, there are two new commercial projects that will have retail leasing space available soon. There are also buildings at existing properties that can accommodate immediate retail needs. Selma is a regional retail shopping hub with a shopping population of 152,817 within a 15-minute drive time. If you are interested in residential real estate development, there is land available for development in many areas of the community, as well as within the City of Selma’s sphere of influence.

Kenneth Grey, City Manager or Roseann Galvan 559-891-2200, ext. 3106 www.cityofsanselma.com

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Your Local Sports Leader! Home of Fresno State Athletic’s, 49er & Raider Football, Giants & A’s Baseball, Lakers Basketball, Sharks Hockey and local High School Sports… Listen to Fresno’s Paul Loeffler, Ryan Williams, Coach Q, Cameron Worell, Christian Lukens, and Tony D as they keep you up to date on your favorite past times!

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


LESSONS WELL LEARNED REMEMBERING CHARLES TINGEY

CA

Superior market knowledge, teamwork, integrity, and community involvement. Work hard but have fun along the way. These are a few of the principles Charles Tingey practiced and preached, and what has been the foundation for our success for the past 47 years. While we’ve lost our partner, mentor, and friend, his spirit and truths live in and guide us every day. COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL Fresno | Bakersfield | Central California Coast colliers.com/fresno

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The 4 Biggest Catastrophes in Corporate Event Planning And How To Avoid Them

How to Pull off the Perfect Event Without the Stress. Call us today for a free assessment of your upcoming event (a $500.00 value) www.msieventproductions.com

559-346-1020

NICHOLAS J. AUDINO, SIOR Senior Vice President BRE License #01231272

Industrial Real Estate Specialist  Industrial Real Estate Valuation  Real Estate Leasing  Title  Research  Site Design  Purchase & Sale Analysis  Contract Negotiation  Real Asset Repositioning Industrial Division naudino@pearsonrealty.com 559.447.6270

Mr. Audino has 19 years of experience in industrial real estate with CBRE, Inc and now at Newmark Grubb Pearson Commercial. Professional Affiliations: 

Member, Society of Industrial & Office Realtors, (SIOR)



Board of Directors, Cen-Cal Small Business Finance



Committee member, City of Clovis Economic Development Strategy Update 2013-2014



Board of Directors, Fresno County Economic Development Corporation FRESNO OFFICE: 7480 N. Palm Ave. Suite 101, Fresno, CA 93711 559.432.6200 - www.pearsonrealty.com Independently Owned and Operated

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


One Putt Broadcasting 312,000+ Weekly Listeners on 7 locally owned radio stations!

OFFICIAL HOME OF FRESNO STATE ATHLETICS

Be Local, Buy Local Rock&Roll

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Investor COMMUNITY

The Essential Connection

P LAT I NUM $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 + California State University, Fresno Civic Center Square Community Medical Centers Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board

JP Morgan Chase & Company Pacific Gas and Electric Company Valley Wide Beverage Company Wells Fargo

GO LD $ 5 ,0 0 0 + Alert-O-Lite

Dowling Aaron Incorporated

Kaiser Permanente

Baker Manock & Jensen, PC

Fowler Packing Company

Newmark Grubb/Pearson Commercial

CEI Engineering Associates, Inc

Fresno County Economic Opportunities Commission

Precision Civil Engineering

Central California Health Sciences University

Quiring General, LLC

Fresno Housing Authority

Central Valley Community Bank

Fresno Flood Control District

Colliers International

Fresno Unified School District

Comcast

Gestamp Solar

CORE Business Interiors

Granville Homes

Diversified Development Group

Greater Fresno Area Chamber of Commerce

RaboBank Saint Agnes Medical Center Sol Development Associates, LLC Tangram Interiors Van-G Trucking, Inc Wiebe Hinton Hambalek, LLP

SILV E R $ 2 ,5 0 0 +

58

AT&T

First Solar

The Penstar Group

BNSF Railway Company

Fowler/Helsel/Vogt

San Joaquin Valley College

California Bank & Trust

The Grand 1401

Chevron U.S.A. Inc.

Kaplan College

State Center Community College District

Cushman & Wakefield

Manco Abbott, Inc

E & J Gallo Winery

Moore Twining Associates, Inc

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

True Organics Products, Inc US Cold Storage Valley Yellow Pages

2015


Investor COMMUNITY

BRO NZ E $ 1 , 5 0 0 + ATAS Insurance Services

Dumont Printing

Real Goods Solar

BioFiltro USA, Inc.

Media Solutions, Inc.

Rosa Linda’s Fine Mexican Cuisine

Borga Steel

Mid Valley Disposal

Sebastian

Brown Armstrong Accountancy Corp.

One-Putt Broadcasting

Valley Children’s Healthcare

The Business Journal

Premier Valley Bank

Wawona Frozen Foods

Diverse Signs

Kings Canyon Wood Products

Downtown Fresno Partnership

Mantra House

Electric Motor Shop

MBS Accountancy Corporation

Fresno Association of Realtors

MJ Avila Company, Inc

Fresno First Bank

Philippe Dwelshauvers, A Law Group

Guarantee Real Estate and Home Loans

Processes Unlimited

Harris Construction Co., Inc

Proteus Inc

Heald College #11112

Provost & Pritchard Consulting Group

Central Valley New Markets Tax Credit Fund LLC

Initiative Foods

Realty Concepts, Ltd.

Imhoff Sunland Insurance

Security First Bank

CookLand Company

Jack’s Butane Service

Stantec Consulting Services, Inc

Derco Foods

Johanson Transportation Service

Tri Counties Bank

DiBuduo & DeFendis Insurance Group

John Hans, SIOR

Union Bank

Don Pickett & Associates

CO PPE R $ 7 5 0 + Asian Real Estate AssociationCentral Valley Bank of the Sierra BMY Construction Group, Inc. Brooks Ransom Associates C. Curry Design Cen Cal Business Finance Group Central California Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

P U B LI C I N V E STO RS AmeriCorps VISTA

City of Fresno

City of Orange Cove

City of Sanger

City of Clovis

City of Kerman

City of Parlier

City of Selma

City of Firebaugh

City of Kingsburg

City of Reedley

County of Fresno

City of Fowler

City of Mendota

City of San Joaquin

Five Cities EDA

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59


Board

OF DIRECTORS FRESNO COUNTY EDC

CHAIR Walt Plachta CEI Engineering Associates, Inc. VICE CHAIR Ed Dunkel Precision Civil Engineering IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIR Al Solis Sol Development Associates, LLC SECRETARY Tina Sumner City of Clovis TREASURER Robert Wiebe Wiebe Hinton Hambalek LLP AT- LARGE DIRECTOR John Brelsford Diversified Development Group

Richard Aaron Dowling Aaron Incorporated

Thomas Jones Pacific Gas & Electric

Brian Angus Fresno County Economic Opportunities Commission

Blake Konczal Fresno Regional Workforce Investment Board

Nicholas Audino Newmark Grubb/Pearson Commercial

Kurt Madden Fresno Unified School District

Anna Borgeas Greater Fresno Area Chamber of Commerce

Doug Marmolejo JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Florence T. Dunn Central California Health Sciences University

AT-LARGE DIRECTOR Kenny Amendola Valley Wide Beverage

David Elias Five Cities EDA Designee

DESIGNATED DIRECTOR Bruce Rudd City of Fresno DESIGNATED DIRECTOR John Navarrette County of Fresno

Luis Patlan Westside Cities Designee

Councilman Steve Brandau City of Fresno

AT-LARGE DIRECTOR Bobby Fena Colliers International, Inc.

AT-LARGE DIRECTOR Leland Parnagian Fowler Packing Company

60

DIRECTORS

Supervisor Henry Perea Fresno County Board of Supervisors Kenneth J. Price Baker Manock & Jensen, PC Preston Prince Fresno Housing Authority

Derek W. Hayashi Granville Homes

Paul Quiring Quiring General, LLC

Debbie Hemker Kaiser Permanente

Gary D. Quisenberry Central Valley Community Bank

Alan Hofmann Fresno Metropolitan Flood Control District

Kellie Reed Tangram Interiors

Debbie Hunsaker Alert-O-Lite, Inc.

John Taylor Community Medical Centers Tom Zimmerman CORE Business Interiors

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015


Staff VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

CONTROLLER

Joe Garcia 559.476.2519

Esther Cuevas 559.476.2507

jgarcia@fresnoedc.com

ecuevas@fresnoedc.com

PRESIDENT/CEO

Lee Ann Eager 559.476.2513 leager@fresnoedc.com

BUSINESS SUPPORT SPECIALIST, HSR

Will Oliver 559.476.2518 woliver@fresnoedc.com

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANALYST, HSR

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANALYST

Janet Dailey 559.476.2520

Sergio Hernandez 559.476.2511

jdailey@fresnoedc.com

shernandez@fresnoedc.com

RECEPTIONIST/ OFFICE MANAGER

BUSINESS SUPPORT SPECIALIST, HSR

BUSINESS EXPANSION & RETENTION COORDINATOR

Shelly Davis 559.476.2501

Dave Jones 559.476.2500

Andrea Reyes 559.476.2506

sdavis@fresnoedc.com

dljones@fresnoedc.com

areyes@fresnoedc.com

BUSINESS EXPANSION & RETENTION SPECIALIST

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANALYST

INVESTOR & PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER

Shawna Glazener 559.476.2502

Margo Lerwill 559.476.2510

Karena Riley 559.476.2505

sglazener@fresnoedc.com

mlerwill@fresnoedc.com

edcevents@fresnoedc.com

FISCAL & HR COORDINATOR

BUSINESS SUPPORT SPECIALIST, HSR

CONTRACT COMPLIANCE MANAGER

cgonzalez@fresnoedc.com

Mike Miguel 559.476.2517

Veronica Salas 559.476.2503

mmiguel@fresnoedc.com

vsalas@fresnoedc.com

BUSINESS SUPPORT SPECIALIST, HSR

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST

AMERICORPS VISTA LEADER

Laura Hall 559.476.2500

Jose Mora 559.476.2516

lhall@fresnoedc.com

jmora@fresnoedc.com

Carmen Gonzalez 559.476.2519

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12th Annual Real Estate Forecast

EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Merritt Pacini 559.476.2501 mpacini@fresnoedc.com

Lavell Tyler 559.476.2508 ltyler@fresnoedc.com

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Ad Index Inside Cover

Precision Civil Engineering

6

Wiebe Hinton Hambalek, LLP

8

North Pointe Business Park

14

Fresno Housing Association

15

Granville Homes

18

Fresno Association of Realtors

18

Community Medical Centers

19

Central California Health Sciences University

22

Dowling Aaron Incorporated

23

Commercial Retail Associates

23

California Realty Capital

23, 56

Newmark Grubb/Pearson Commercial

26

Ready to Work! Ready to Hire?

27

Fresno Energy Watch

32-33, Back 54, 57

Raising the standards where people live, work and play

JP Morgan Chase & Co. One-Putt Broadcasting

54

CEI Engineering Associates, Inc.

55

Colliers International

55

Dumont Printing

56

Media Solutions, Inc.

56

MBS Accountantsy Corporation

62

Manco Abbott

62

Fresno County EDC

63

Tangram

MancoAbbott.com 559.435.1756

Global Local

Partnerships Resources

EDC Membership Matters to my business

Real Estate Forecast Publication, 2015: Coordinated by the EDC: Karena Riley, Investor & Public Relations Manager

Design & Layout by:

CONTACT THE EDC TODAY!

to explore how partnering with us can positively affect your business

Catherine Curry McNally, C. Curry Design

Photography provided by: Individual Cities of Fresno County, Fresno County EDC, Real Estate Professionals, & stock by Shutterstock, Inc.

The Essential Connection The Economic Development Corporation serving Fresno County is not responsible for the content and accuracy of data provided by the various outside contributors to this publication.

62

Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

559-476-2500 • www.fresnoedc.com

2015


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Chase Mortgage Cash Back

can save you thousands There are thousands of reasons to get your mortgage with Chase. Thousands of dollars, that is. Have your new mortgage payment automatically deducted from a Chase personal checking account and get cash back, up to $500 annually for the life of the program. You can take the cash at the end of the year or use it to pay down your principal to save even more. The choice on how to save thousands is up to you. Call me to learn more!

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Chase Mortgage Cash Back: Geographic and other restrictions and limitations may apply. Learn more at chase.com/MortgageCashBack. All home lending products are subject to credit and property approval. Rates, program terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all states or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations apply. Š2013 JPMorgan Chase & Co. 21505I 1013

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Fresno County Economic Development Corporation

2015

2015 Real Estate Forecast  

The Real Estate Forecast Publication highlights the current Fresno County Real Estate market, including forecasting, statistical data, and i...

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