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I N S P I R AT I O N A L LORETO WOMEN


LORETO NORMANHURST

C e l e b r a t i n g 1 2 0 Ye a r s 1897-2017

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Published by: Loreto Normanhurst 91-93 Pennant Hills Road Normanhurst NSW 2076 www.loretonh.nsw.edu.au

Copyright © Loreto Normanhurst 2017

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, write to the publisher.

First printing November 2017

ISBN: 978-0-646-97902-1

Compiled by Loreto Normanhurst Designed by Fresco Creative, www.frescocreative.com.au Printed in Australia by Openbook Howden Print & Design, www.openbookhowden.com.au Photography credits: Page 57: Portrait of Professor Moninya Roughan by Jasper Boer, photoadventure.co.nz Page 74: Portrait of Victoria Pendergast by Australian Paralympic Committee Page 85: Portrait of Ellen Roberts by Sam Donkin Photography Page 89: Portrait of Julie Ewington by Natasha Harth, courtesy of Queensland Art Gallery Page 114: Portrait of Dr Mel Fitzpatrick by Karen Brown Photography Page 190: Portrait of Sarah Treacy by Kelly Barnes/The Australian Page 226: Portrait of Jessica Cerro by Johnny Diaz Nicolaidis Thank you to Anna Zhu photography, annazhu.com This book is published solely for the 120th anniversary celebration of Loreto Normanhurst. In true Loreto spirit, best efforts and good faith have been used in preparing this book and the school assumes no liabilities of any kind with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents. – 2 –


Contents 12 0 I N S P I R AT I O N A L L O R E T O W O M E N Foreword 5 Introduction 7 Mary Ward 9 Teresa Ball IBVM 10 Mary Gonzaga Barry IBVM 13 Barbara Watkins 14 Catherine Livingstone AO 17 Jillian Kilby 18 Kate Eastman SC 21 Annie Crawford AM 22 Judge Kate Traill 25 Libby Rogerson IBVM 26 Genevieve Jacobs (née Ryan) 29 Elise McCann 30 Brigid McLaughlin 33 Fran Hernon 34 Benedicta Fallon IBVM 36 Katie Hardyman (née Stack) 39 Josephine Lonergan AM DCSG 41 Honourable Clare Martin 42 Dr Arlie Loughnan 45 Annie Joseph (née Brady) 46 Rhonda Daly (née Freudenstein) 49 Samantha Devlin and Sarah Warmoll 50 Michelle Leonard OAM 53 Deirdre Browne IBVM 54 Professor Moninya Roughan 57 Bruno McCabe IBVM 58 Noni Mitchell IBVM, AM 61 Robi Stanton 62 Gail Graham (née Garner) 65 Penny Graham 66 Sarah Buggy 69 Naomi Malone 70 Pat Taylor (née O’Sullivan) 73 Victoria Pendergast 74 Margaret Armstrong IBVM 77 Karen Robinson 78 Bernarda Stenson IBVM 81 Tina Kennedy 82

Ellen Roberts Beatrice Hannan IBVM Julie Ewington Elaine Johnson Frances Browne IBVM Catherine Leary Dr Virginia Small The Fernando Family Mary Stanislaus Mulhall IBVM Heather Marano Colette Garnsey OAM Michèle Asprey Neerja Irene Fernandez Denise Desmarchelier IBVM Jane Stanton Dr Mel Fitzpatrick Pauline Prince IBVM Merilyn Burch Carney (née Burch) Emma Christensen Professor Jennelle Kyd (née Doyle) Joy Anderson (née Foley) Anne Anderson IBVM Dominic Jones IBVM Peta Portelli Siobhan O’Malley Mary Poirrier (née McEvoy) Annika Stott Dr Sally-Anne Greenaway Dr Leoni Degenhardt Sabrina Warwar Lora Storey Joan Nowotny IBVM Dr Judy Cunningham (née Makinson) Kate Falzon Tara Hunt (née Barry) Stephanie Lorenzo Dr Melissa Doohan Emma Connell Kim Crawford (née Dunnicliff) Elizabeth Johnson IBVM

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85 86 89 90 93 94 97 98 101 102 105 106 109 110 113 114 117 118 121 122 125 126 129 130 133 134 137 138 141 142 145 146 149 150 153 154 157 158 161 162

The de Teliga Family Jane O’Hara Evangeline Kendall IBVM Deirdre Rofe IBVM Dr Annmaree Yee (née Watharow) The Hollingdale Family Lua Byrne IBVM Rachael McLennan Kevin Maye IBVM Denise Cheng Antoinette Hayden IBVM Sarah Treacy Clare Birrane IBVM Mary Stanislaus Mornane IBVM Jessica McNamee Veronica Reid IBVM James Nicholson IBVM Angela Burford Jo Thomson Diaan Stuart IBVM Monica Cotter (née McGrath) Ethnee Brooks (née McLoughlin) Joseph Michael Ritchie IBVM Dr Jane Gavan Dorothea Frizelle IBVM Toni Matha IBVM, AM Dr Angela Burgett Kerry-Anne Walsh Theodore Gillick IBVM Jessica Cerro Maureen Saunders IBVM Louise Ritchard IBVM Lauren Zolezzi Jennifer Hughes (née Hills) Professor Roslyn Arnold Victoria Rubensohn AM Anna Gaha IBVM Annette Burges (née Curran)

165 170 173 174 177 178 181 182 185 186 189 190 193 194 197 198 201 202 205 206 209 210 213 214 217 218 221 222 225 226 229 230 233 234 237 238 241 242


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Foreword W E N DY H I L D E B R A N D I BV M We know many things about Gonzaga Barry: her personal gift for relationships; her belief in education; her deep faith in God. From an early biographer, we learn something else: ‘Could I have a passion for anything merely earthly,’ she said once… ‘it would be not riches, nor ambition, but land...”. So, it was on that winter morning when she and her companion set out with a view to purchasing a property in New South Wales suitable for a boarding school, both believing a sign would be given to guide them, and so it was: the extensive acreage of land near Hornsby where in July 1896, a rainbow shone. A few years later the General Superior from Ireland visited the newly established community and school. Her take on it echoed the founding instinct that this was a place for a school to flourish: ‘Life in this house is delightfully calm… the surroundings are beautiful and wild and the air bracing. The children love the place.’ How both these women would have delighted in what we witness of life and colour in the Loreto Normanhurst we now know. One click of a computer and we touch into a thriving school community: junior, secondary and boarding. We are into a classroom, on a stage, in a dining area, swimming pool, athletics oval, music room, science lab, chapel. We see visitors being welcomed, speakers, school assemblies, social justice initiatives, sports days and liturgies. It is all there: the

signs of an ever evolving 21st century school community which we also know has earned and maintained academic excellence. Another computer click offers a further reminder. We view one of the earliest visual images to record the school’s beginnings. It is a photograph taken in front of the main building. There are a scattering of trees and shrubs and a sweep of grass. Standing on the grass are three figures: a nun, a child and a dog. The grainy black and white image does not allow for the red brick of the house, nor does it do justice to the small group photographed, too distant to be named and recognised. With little to recommend it artistically, it provides however, an invaluable historical record. Building on a history of 120 years and celebrating it is a wonderful thing. In this multi-layered community there are people who stand out in some way, who we know and speak of and honour. An anniversary always offers a space to record achievements and to savour moments. Another thing anniversaries do, is provide a space for gratitude to those who are unsung and maybe in time, leave few traces. And so we return to the 1897 photograph: anonymous, simple and unadorned, it is what it symbolises: a quiet act of faith in God and in the future. This is what Loreto and Normanhurst are all about. And so it is we give thanks and rejoice on this 120th anniversary!

Wendy Hildebrand IBVM – Loreto Australia and South East Asia Province Leader

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Introduction B A R B A R A W AT K I N S , P R I N C I P A L “It had been raining, but just as the nuns arrived at the site, the sun burst through the clouds and formed a beautiful rainbow over the estate. Rev. Mother gave voice to her delight; her quest was over.” This reflection of Mother Gonzaga Barry’s sighting of a rainbow over the site on which Loreto Normanhurst would be built in 1897 forms the beginning of the school’s rich and dynamic tradition. In celebrating 120 years of excellence in girls’ education this year, Loreto Normanhurst continues to remember and honour the Loreto Sisters who, 120 years ago, set up Loreto as a day and boarding school for girls. The Sisters’ dreams and hopes are the heritage on which the school builds their hopes and dreams today. The remarkable vision of our Foundress, Mary Ward, and the forward thinking of Mother Gonzaga Barry’s ideal of a complete education for girls – a balanced, challenging and

broad education – is a reality Loreto Normanhurst is proud to have achieved and continued to uphold 120 years later. To be part of the Loreto Normanhurst community is a precious gift. Ex-students, staff, members and friends of our community, past and present, have gone on to generously share their gifts with others, making positive contributions across Australia and around the globe. They are Loreto people who are “constant, efficacious and loving”. 120 Inspirational Loreto Women is a tribute to these outstanding women. We honour their achievements, and fondly share in their stories and cherished memories of their time at Loreto Normanhurst. This book is in celebration of all those who have made the colours of our beautiful Loreto Normanhurst rainbow come alive for each and every day of the last 120 years.

Barbara Watkins, Principal – Loreto Normanhurst

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Mary Ward 15 8 5 –16 4 5

Mary Ward was born in 1585, during a time of religious war where attendance at Mass was considered an offence against the state and the harbouring of priests was treason punishable by death. As a young woman, Mary followed her desire for religious life and joined a Poor Clare community in St Omer in Flanders (now northern France). However, it quickly became apparent to her that God was asking ‘some other thing’ of her and, having made a vow to join a Carmelite community - should her confessor so direct her, she returned to London. Here Mary worked tirelessly caring for the sick, visiting prisoners, offering catechesis and supporting those struggling with their faith. A number of women joined her, prepared to associate with her in a new venture. One morning as she was dressing she received a spiritual gift which convinced her she had a mission. ‘I understood that the work to be done was not a Carmelite convent but a thing that would please God far more and give him greater glory than I can say, but I was not told any particulars about what the

work was to be or how it was to be done.’ Mary Ward then strove to establish a radically new way for women to live their commitment to God, and to the Church and its mission, in ‘the first international experiment of active women religious’. Based on the Jesuit Formula, the religious order established by Mary Ward was ultimately called the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (IBVM). The education of girls was, and remains, a core aspect of the IBVM charism. Mary Ward stands as a beacon of hope for our world today. Her resolute and faith-filled spirit shines through all the difficulties of her life. She lived with the true inner freedom she encouraged in her followers. Even when challenged by the Church she loved, she never wavered from her vision of the new way of religious life she was called to develop. And this was to be done with a light, joyful heart. Knowing the great gift of God’s love in her life, she assured her followers that their ‘greatness and strength consists in this, that we have free and open access to God’.

“There is no such difference between men and women that women may not do great things. And I hope in God it will be seen that women in time to come will do much.”

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Teresa Ball IBVM 17 9 4 – 18 61

Frances Ball was born in Dublin in 1794, the daughter of a prosperous silk merchant. There were few Catholic schools and at the tender age of nine, Frances was brought by her mother to the IBVM establishment of Bar Convent, England. Frances returned home when she was 15 however, shortly afterwards, on the night of her Debut, she received the call to religious life. It wasn’t until four years later, in 1814, that Mrs Ball, responding to a sermon on St Thomas Aquinas, allowed her daughter to go to the Bar Convent in

England and enter the IBVM. Sister Teresa Ball was professed in 1816 and spent five more years in York. By 1821 she had become Mother Teresa and had travelled to Dublin where, along with three nuns and thirteen children, she moved into the stately house in Rathfarnham which was to be called “Loretto House”. Mother Teresa Ball’s legacy established the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary in her native land of Ireland. By the time of her death in 1861, she had founded 37 convents across the world.

By the time of her death in 1861, she had founded 37 convents across the world.


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Mary Gonzaga Barry IBVM 18 3 4 – 1915

Mary Barry was born into a large, well-to-do family in Wexford. She was educated at Loreto Gorey and Rathfarnham, joining the Institute herself at the age of 19, and taking the name of the young Jesuit saint, Aloysius Gonzaga. She held various leadership positions over the next 20 years and in 1875, at the invitation of the Bishop of Ballarat, led the first group of Loreto Sisters to the Australian colonies. Mother Gonzaga Barry formed the lnstitute’s first Australian community at Mary’s Mount in Ballarat in 1875. 17 years later, she brought the IBVM to NSW when she established the first Sydney Loreto in Randwick in July 1892. Loreto Randwick taught day students and was home to 30 boarders, under the care of Mother Dorothea Frizelle. Within five years,

however, the nuns were looking for larger premises. Mr Frank Coffee, the father of two students at Aston Lodge, Randwick, took Mothers Gonzaga and Dorothea to see nine hectares of land at South Hornsby, with the possibility of opening a boarding school there. On the way, Mother Gonzaga, concerned about making the right decision, prayed for a sign. It had been raining, but as the nuns arrived at the site, the sun burst through the clouds and formed a beautiful rainbow over the estate. Reverend Mother voiced her delight; her quest was over. Ever after, Mother Gonzaga called it Rainbow Land. It came to be known as Loretto, Hornsby, until the district was renamed Normanhurst in the early 1900s. And so began the Loreto Normanhurst story.

“All around you are possibilities for doing good and making the world richer for your having lived in it.”

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Barbara Watkins P R I N C I PA L

Barbara was born in Sydney, as part of a large family, many of whom are connected with Catholic education and service to the community. Barbara and her two sisters continued the family tradition by attending Loreto Kirribilli in the 70s. Upon completing the Diploma in Teaching from the Australian Catholic University, Barbara began teaching full-time at Christian Brothers Lewisham. Barbara embarked on further study part-time, completing a Bachelor of Education in the early 90s. Her teaching career continued in schools such as St. Joseph’s College, Hunters Hill, and St. Aloysius’ College, Milsons Point, where she worked for 11 years in the role of Year Co-ordinator and then as Director of Pastoral Services (Years 3-12). Barbara was appointed to the position of Deputy Principal at Loreto Normanhurst in 2001, and then as Principal in 2008. During this time, Barbara has led the development and successful

implementation of two Strategic Plans and a Master Plan. A lifelong learner, Barbara has continued to attain further qualifications, gaining a Masters in Educational Leadership from Macquarie University in 2006, and completing executive courses at Stanford University and London Business School. Barbara is a descendant of the Watkins and Brewer families, whose stories are embedded in the Loreto journey in Australia. Her family donated Aston Lodge, the original boarding school in Sydney, and her grandmother and sisters were original pupils at Kirribilli before moving to Normanhurst. Barbara has drawn great strength from her Loreto connections in her time at the school. Throughout her over 30 years in Catholic Education, Barbara has been involved in all facets of school life. Barbara’s love of Loreto Normanhurst and of the Loreto story has been so important to her as Principal of Loreto Normanhurst.

“As Loreto people it is important that we tread carefully on the footsteps of those who have gone before us and do our best to place our footsteps forward for the greater good of all those who will follow.”

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Catherine Livingstone AO C L A S S O F 19 7 2

Catherine is the Chairman of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia and is a highly respected company director and chartered accountant with extensive business and finance experience across a broad range of industries and organisations. Her executive career spans more than 22 years in which she has held general management and finance leadership roles, primarily in the medical devices sector and including six years as the Chief Executive Officer of Cochlear

Limited. Catherine was the former Chairman of Telstra Corporation Limited, the CSIRO and was President of Chief Executive Women. She has served on the Boards of Macquarie Group Limited, Goodman Fielder Limited and Rural Press Limited and has contributed to the work of the Innovation and Productivity Council for the New South Wales Government. In 2008, she was awarded Officer of the Order of Australia.

Catherine’s executive career spans more than 22 years in which she has held general management and finance leadership roles, primarily in the medical devices sector and including six years as the Chief Executive Officer of Cochlear Limited.


Jillian Kilby C L A S S O F 20 01

Jillian loved her time as a boarder at Loreto, coming from a farm near Coonamble in north west NSW. At 25, she started a civil engineering and project management company on a property west of Walgett and won the Australian Young Professional Engineer and Sydney University Young Alumni awards. In 2013, Jillian’s trajectory changed forever when she was granted the Australian Monash Foundation Scholarship to study in the USA. Today, Jillian owns The Infrastructure Collaborative advising

both Australian and USA clients on how to shift infrastructure projects from planning shelves to be shovel ready. Jillian is passionate about mentoring others, connecting people, and keeping fit. Jillian holds very dear her Loreto girlfriends of 20 years and lives by John Monash’s words: “Education is given to one to befit all citizens to make Australia great.” Jillian has a Bachelor of Civil Engineering from Sydney University, and a Master of Business Administration and Master of Public Policy from Stanford University.

At 25, Jillian started a civil engineering and project management company and won the Australian Young Professional Engineer and Sydney University Young Alumni awards.

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Kate Eastman SC C L A S S O F 19 8 4

Kate is a leading human rights barrister in Australia. She commenced her legal career working for Allens, where she provided pro bono assistance to asylum seekers and was seconded to Kingsford Legal Centre, a community legal centre providing free legal advice. Kate co-founded Australian Lawyers for Human Rights (ALHR) and served as its President for many years. In 1995 she joined the Australian Human Rights Commission as a senior lawyer and she also started

teaching international and human rights law at various universities. In 1998 Kate became a barrister and she was appointed Senior Counsel in 2012. Over the past 25 years Kate’s human rights work has taken her to Burma, Afghanistan and Uganda. Kate received a Justice Award for her pro-bono legal work in 2003 and the Women Lawyers Association Award for her work to promote women’s rights and equality for women lawyers in 2017.

Kate received the Women Lawyers Association Award for her work to promote women’s rights and equality for women lawyers in 2017.

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Annie Crawford AM C L A S S O F 19 81

After losing her father to bowel cancer at age 51, Can Too founder Annie knows firsthand the devastating impact that cancer can have on an individual and their family. After ten years as a social worker Annie moved into human resources. In 2003 Annie decided to work on a new project that was all about “making a difference” by combining her passion for running, fitness and empowering

others, with raising money for cancer research. And so, the idea for Can Too was born. Can Too has now trained 13,500 participants to achieve mental and physical goals they never imagined and they have raised $18 million dollars for cancer research. Annie is currently on the Council of Opportunity International which specialises in empowering women in Asia through microfinance loans.

Can Too has now trained 13,500 participants to achieve mental and physical goals and has raised $18m for cancer research.


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Judge Kate Traill C L A S S O F 19 7 9

Kate graduated from Loreto Normanhurst in 1979. She then studied for a BA with Honours in Politics and Fine Arts at Sydney University followed by a Diploma of Law. In 1987, Kate became one of the youngest females ever to be called to the Bar. She has acted in many high profile criminal cases however has a wide ranging practice also in defamation, equity, administrative law and military law. Kate is also a great mentor for young female barristers. She teaches advocacy during the

Readers Course and has travelled to numerous other countries, including Bangladesh, to teach advocacy. Kate has been an elected Councillor on Mosman Council. Some of Kate’s achievements include taking on the role of Specialist Child Sexual Assault Judge of the District Court NSW, Lieutenant Commander of the Royal Australian Navy and Aide-de-Camp to the Governor of NSW. She was also made a Papal Dame of the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre.

“Loreto Normanhurst made me who I am today.”

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Libby Rogerson IBVM C L A S S O F 19 61

Libby is the third of four generations boarding at Loreto Normanhurst and is currently a member of the School Board. After training as a teacher, Libby joined the IBVM, initially in the novitiate at Normanhurst. Libby began teaching at Loreto Portland and then in the parish school at Blackburn. After living at St Mary’s College and studying at the University of Melbourne, Libby went on to teach at John XXIII College Perth and Loreto Normanhurst before taking over as Dean of St Mary’s College. A return to Perth saw her working in the chaplaincy at Murdoch University.

In 1992 Libby was elected to the IBVM General Council and spent six years residing in Rome and travelling to various parts of the world where Loreto Sisters live and work. Working for social justice has always been an integral part of Libby’s life and for the last 20 years as Director of Social Justice for the Diocese of Parramatta, Coordinator of Loreto JPIC and a member of a number of aid and social service organisations, she has been fully engaged in advocating for refugees and asylum seekers, Indigenous Australians and people living with disadvantage.

In 1992 Libby was elected to the IBVM General Council and spent six years residing in Rome and travelling to various parts of the world where Loreto Sisters live and work.

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Genevieve Jacobs (née Ryan) C L A S S O F 19 8 4

Genevieve is the mother of four children, a journalist and community worker. She presents ABC Canberra Mornings, and is one of the few women with this role on metropolitan ABC stations. Genevieve juggles her career with a family farm at Wallendbeen which is sometimes tough, but also fulfilling. “When I began on air, aged 40, I’d hear that listeners don’t like women’s

voices on the radio. But how would they know if they never heard us speak?” Genevieve has worked on building strong connections with her audience so she can do some straight talking about issues like domestic violence, poverty, women’s health and sexuality. Justice and compassion motivate her and she says it’s both a privilege and a responsibility to give a voice to others.

“Loreto Normanhurst taught me to speak up, to stand my ground, and that women can do anything.”

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Elise McCann CLASS OF 2002

Elise is one of Australia’s leading ladies of stage. She is most well-known for originating the role of Miss Honey in the Australian production of the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Matilda for which she won the 2016 Helpmann Award and the 2015 Sydney Theatre Award and was nominated for the 2016 Green Room Award. Elise featured in the Channel Seven miniseries Peter Allen – Not The Boy Next Door playing Peter’s sister Lynne Woolnough and most recently, released her debut album Dahlesque, which she will be performing live in concert with the Melbourne Symphony

Orchestra in April 2018. A graduate of NIDA, some of Elise’s other theatrical credits include Lucille Ball in the critically acclaimed one woman show Everybody Loves Lucy for which she was nominated for Best Cabaret Performance in the 2015 Sydney Theatre Awards. She has also performed in MAMMA MIA!, South Pacific for Opera Australia, the World Premier of Doctor Zhivago, Fiddler on the Roof, Falsettos, Into The Woods for Victorian Arts Opera, Little Women, My Fair Lady, Camelot, Side By Side and in concert with Stephen Schwartz in Conversation.

Elise won the 2016 Helpmann Award and the 2015 Sydney Theatre Award.

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Brigid McLaughlin C L A S S O F 19 8 8

Brigid is a textile and fashion designer based in Sydney. She has worked within the Australian Fashion Industry, as a designer, for over 20 years, designing for Lisa Ho, David Lawrence, Charlie Brown and now her own company. Brigid and her small, highly skilled team strive to work against the current dominating model of the fashion industry today; instead priding themselves on the production of finely crafted clothing – clothing designed and crafted for longevity. Sustainability, ethics and the

preservation of artisan skills are central to the company’s philosophy. Brigid is passionate about “slow clothing” producing quality, modern, yet timeless clothing in natural fibres by the most sustainable practices. Brigid was a student at Loreto Normanhurst from 1983-1988, the first year Textile and Design was an option at Loreto for the HSC. She grew up in central NSW on Merryanbone Merino Stud in Warren where her family are dedicated third generation merino wool producers.

Brigid was a student at Loreto Normanhurst from 1983-1988, the first year Textile and Design was an option at Loreto for the HSC.


Fran Hernon C L A S S O F 19 69

Fran loved English as a subject and was lucky enough to be awarded a journalism cadetship straight out of school. “That year there were 2000 applicants and eight cadetships, only two of which went to women. Thankfully there’s a better balance in newsrooms these days!” Fran became a feature writer, columnist and editor at News Ltd and Editor of New Woman magazine. She then moved to the corporate world and became interested in the revolutionary potential

of technology. Fran was invited to join the School Council at Loreto Normanhurst and was proud to be part of the decision authorising the first substantive investment into technology for students. Whilst working as the manager of Corporate Affairs for Nestle in Australia, Fran joined the Board of Directors of listed technology company Infomedia Ltd, a global software business. In 2014 she became Infomedia’s Chairperson before retiring.

“That year there were 2,000 applicants and eight cadetships, only two of which went to women. Thankfully there’s a better balance in newsrooms these days!”

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Benedicta Fallon IBVM 18 6 3 – 19 4 2

Annie Fallon was born in Albury, 1863, into a wellknown family of winegrowers and at 16, was sent as a boarder to Mary’s Mount in Ballarat. In 1884 she entered the IBVM and in 1886 was professed with the name of Benedicta. Between 1888 and 1891, Benedicta taught music, theory and harmony at Dawson Street, Ballarat. Cardinal Moran invited the Loreto Sisters to Sydney in 1892 and Benedicta requested a piano. Her sister requested a Gasper de Salo violin. The

community moved into Aston Hall which was the first Loreto Convent in Sydney. In 1897, the sisters moved to Normanhurst where Benedicta was Mistress of Schools. Music continued to flourish and the depth of the experience grew. Regular public concerts were held with well-known artists and students, and became an annual feature of life at the school. Benedicta died in 1942. She is buried in the peaceful bush cemetery at Loreto Normanhurst.

Regular public concerts were held with well-known artists and students, and became an annual feature of life at the school.

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Katie Hardyman (née Stack) C L A S S O F 19 8 8

Katie is a multi-award winning songwriter/musician who has won multiple awards across the globe. Katie has won the UK Songwriting contest twice, won a gold medal in the Global Music Awards, and has won the Artist Development Award in the Hollywood

Music in Media Awards. Katie has also received the Rudy Brandsma Award for songwriting excellence at the Australian National Songwriting Awards and she has won the coveted Pop Vox vote in the Independent Music Awards in America.

“I will always have the fondest memories of my time at Loreto Normanhurst as it was here that my love of music ignited a wonderful passion of selfexpression and determination, and a way to make a real difference to someone’s life through music. What Loreto had then that still remains today is that beautiful Loreto spirit that encouraged us, defined us and supported us every step of the way as we prepared for our future life after school.”

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Josephine Lonergan AM DCSG Jo gave thirteen years of distinguished and voluntary service to Loreto Normanhurst. She served on all the school’s sub committees of Council and held the role of Deputy Chair before taking on the role of Chair of Council in 2002, which she held until the end of 2008. Among her many roles, Jo was the Executive Director of the Australian Parents’ Council and Honorary President of the NSW Parents’ Council. She has dedicated over 30 years of service to the education sector. A former solicitor, Jo, with

her late husband Tom Lonergan, has six children. Jo’s service and commitment to education, the Catholic Church and society was recognised in 2005 when Pope Benedict XVI honoured Jo with a Papal Knighthood, a Dame Commander of the Order of St Gregory the Great. Her wisdom, care for the school and love of Loreto has been evidenced by her hard work and enthusiasm for the school. Jo’s generous service is a wonderful example of a Loreto woman who is a cheerful giver.

Among her many roles, Jo was the Executive Director of the Australian Parents’ Council and Honorary President of the NSW Parents’ Council.


Honourable Clare Martin C L A S S O F 19 69

Clare was the first Labor Chief Minister of the Northern Territory and its first female Chief Minister. She led the Labor Party to victory in the Northern Territory in 2001 and then a second time in 2005. Before politics, Clare spent almost two decades as an ABC journalist and broadcaster, working in radio and TV in Sydney, Canberra and Darwin. Following politics, she was the Chief Executive of the Australian Council of Social Service, and then a Professorial Fellow at

Charles Darwin University, where she co-authored a book about Territory politics called Speak for yourself. Clare is currently the Chair of Territory Natural Resource Management, Chair of the Defence Reserves Support Council Northern Territory/Kimberley, Vice President of Northern Territory Cricket and a director of Browns Mart Theatre. Clare first came to Darwin in 1983. Her partner David Alderman is a barrister and she has two wonderful children, Jake and Chloe.

Clare was the first Labor Chief Minister of the Northern Territory and its first female Chief Minister.

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Dr Arlie Loughnan C L A S S O F 19 9 3

Arlie is an academic at the University of Sydney where she specialises in criminal law. She received a Fulbright Scholarship to study at New York University and completed her PhD at the London School of Economics. Arlie is a gifted academic, born teacher and has a huge capacity to give. Professionally, amongst other posts, she mentors young women students and junior colleagues, supporting them

to realise their goals, and encouraging them to aim high but to always pause for reflection on their achievements. Arlie is the author of Manifest Madness: Mental Incapacity in Criminal Law (OUP 2012) and is in the process of completing her second book on criminal responsibility. Arlie is passionate about ideas, history and the role of the law in creating a more just society.

“No one personifies ‘women in time to come will do much’ more than my sister, Arlie.” Jocelyn Loughnan Walsh

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Annie Joseph (née Brady) C L A S S O F 19 7 2

Annie’s artistic life, music and grandchildren help fill the void left after her husband Johnny died in 2013. She belongs to two art societies sharing in the joy of art making; she exhibits in several exhibitions every year, and she’s had three solo and one small group exhibition in the last year. Currently Annie is working towards March

2018 where she will be the Feature Artist at the Portland Art Show and she’s had several commissions. Annie is part of her local Laneways Project which is ‘artifying’ otherwise drab laneways. Last year she was instrumental in the inaugural, and very successful, Lithgow Artist’s Trail where 15 local artists opened their studios to the public.

“Life is a search for truth and beauty. I search for them in art and art making, the love of which I attribute largely to Mother Evangeline and the Art Department at Normanhurst.”


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Rhonda Daly (née Freudenstein) C L A S S O F 19 71

Rhonda has channelled her love of agriculture into a personal crusade to disrupt the status quo and reshape global farming practices for ethical food production, one that is adept at aligning sustainability and economics. During a severe health crisis stemming from exposure to toxic agricultural chemicals, Rhonda gained the inspiration and resolve to ‘heal the soil and help others’. Rhonda co-founded YLAD Living

Soils in 2002 with a vision to supply producers with sustainable biological fertilisers and humus compost posing a challenge to an industry steeped in tradition and resistant to change. A sought-after international educator, speaker and author, Rhonda’s personality reflects her passion for change and her presentations provide solid tools on sequestering soil carbon and mitigating climate change.

“I feel a moral responsibility to create a healthier, greener, brighter future for the next generation. After all, we have only one earth.”

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Samantha Devlin and Sarah Warmoll CLASS OF 2009

Samantha Devlin

Sarah Warmoll

Samantha is the co-founder of The Footnotes, an edutech tool that links school-aged students with university courses. After completing a Bachelor of Commerce (Commercial Law Major) at Sydney University, Samantha moved into media where she worked in television and then in out-of-home (billboards) for four years. Samantha co-launched The Footnotes as a side project, focusing on it at night before taking the plunge to leave her full time job in 2015. Eighteen months later The Footnotes is used by more than 150,000 students a month and Samantha works with universities across Australia. In 2016 The Footnotes was nominated to attend Chatham House’s Royal Institute of International Affairs W20 event in London to discuss the future of education. 

Sarah is the co-founder of edu-tech company The Footnotes, a resource and schools program that enables careers advisors in connecting students to potential pathways after school. After studying a Bachelor of Business at the University of Technology, Sydney, Sarah moved into the world of digital, working in marketing agencies and client side to deliver projects for some great brands. Since jumping into The Footnotes full time, Sarah has had incredible opportunities to travel around Australia and overseas (a notable highlight was being invited to attend Chatham House’s International Policy Forum in London), be featured on television and radio, present at industry conferences and interview some amazing people.

Samantha and Sarah are the co-founders of The Footnotes, an edu-tech tool that links school-aged students with university courses.

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Michelle Leonard OAM C L A S S O F 19 8 8

Michelle is the founder, artistic director and conductor of Moorambilla Voices. This nationally awarded program seeks to give country kids a rare opportunity to sing, dance and create incredible performances with artists of the highest calibre. The friendships, performances and opportunities the children make are life-changing. Under Michelle’s direction, the choirs and annual program have flourished, receiving numerous national and state awards. Michelle is also the founding artistic director and

conductor of Leichhardt Espresso Chorus and its chamber choir, Ristretto. She is widely sought after as a choral clinician on Australian repertoire and appears regularly as a guest speaker, adjudicator and workshop facilitator. Michelle was awarded the Order of Australia Medal for Services to the Community and Performing Arts in 2017. She is originally from Coonamble and boarded at Loreto from Year 9. She has four magnificent children and a well-honed sense of humour!

Michelle is the founder, artistic director and conductor of Moorambilla Voices.


Deirdre Browne IBVM C L A S S O F 19 52

Deirdre is Sydney born and a past pupil of Loreto Kirribilli and Normanhurst. She was Head of Music at Normanhurst between 1964-1973, a creative period for the music department and school, as acknowledged by the ABC, both in radio and television. Deirdre is a gifted communicator and educator, and a teacher at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. Her main area of expertise and her great love is music. She believes passionately in its spiritual impact on individuals and communities. She is well known as composer, conductor and writer for liturgical events and ceremonies throughout Australia and elsewhere.

Her faith in Christ Jesus is her guiding star, and her inspiration is the daring innovator, Mary Ward. Between 1999 and 2005 Deirdre was the Province Leader of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Loreto Sisters) in Australia, and subsequently the writer of the revised Constitutions for the worldwide Institute. Currently she is living in Melbourne, composing, doing occasional writing and lecturing; more than happy to mentor professional musicians and former students, while delighting in the life that they bring her. Her portrait shows her taking a break at a music festival in rural Victoria.

Her main area of expertise and her great love is music. She believes passionately in its spiritual impact on individuals and communities.

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Professor Moninya Roughan C L A S S O F 19 91

Moninya is a physical oceanographer with expertise in the dynamics of coastal ocean circulation. Her research focuses on improving dynamical understanding of the coastal ocean and the biological response, where she uses a combination of modern ocean observations and numerical models to study the oceans off the east coast of Australia. Over the past ten years, Moninya has been instrumental in

the design, deployment and ongoing development of one of the most comprehensive ocean observing systems in the southern hemisphere through her many leadership roles in Australia’s Integrated Marine Observing System. She has received a number of international awards for her research and presently holds joint appointments at the University of New South Wales and MetOcean Solutions.

Moninya has received a number of international awards for her research.

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Bruno McCabe IBVM 18 4 5 – 19 3 6

Ellen McCabe joined the Loreto Sisters in Rathfarnham, Ireland in 1867. She was given the name Bruno and was invited to sail with the pioneer Sisters to Australia, arriving in 1875. At Mary’s Mount school, Sr Bruno attended to the domestic needs of the boarders and the Sisters. In 1892 when the Sisters moved to Aston Hall in Randwick, Sr Bruno was chosen to go as the cook. She kept things running smoothly, despite the poverty. Her freshly cooked Loreto Brown Bread was a treat for the young boarders at breakfast.

When the new Loreto school opened at Normanhurst, Sr Bruno joined as cook. She acquired hens which supplied fresh eggs and chickens. Always wanting the best for her hens, they often escaped into the lush garden on the front drive, much to the exasperation of the Superior. “Out without my leave! Ma’am!” Sr Bruno would reply. Sr Bruno is remembered as deeply religious, very capable with a lively wit, and was regarded as an asset to any community. She rests under the rainbow in the bush cemetery at Normanhurst.

Her freshly cooked Loreto Brown Bread was a treat for the young boarders at breakfast.

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Noni Mitchell IBVM, AM Shirley Mitchell was born in Belmont NSW. Her father was a banker and the family moved often during Sr Noni’s childhood. She and her younger sister were educated at the four Loreto schools of Ballarat, Claremont, Coorparoo and Kirribilli. Sr Noni studied medicine at Sydney University, graduating in 1950, and later completed a Bachelor of Science and Diploma of Education. After working for three years as a doctor with the South Australian Schools Medical Services, Sr Noni entered Loreto in 1954.

Sr Noni was a science teacher at Kirribilli and Normanhurst and in 1970 was Mistress of Schools at Kirribilli. In 1971 she was appointed Principal of Christ College, Melbourne. Sr Noni held positions of leadership in the IBVM, Provincial 1974-1983 and General Superior 1986-1999. On returning to Sydney, Sr Noni serviced on the Kirribilli School council. In 1997 she was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Australian Catholic University and invested as a member of the Order of Australia.

In 1997 she was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Australian Catholic University and invested as a member of the Order of Australia.


Robi Stanton C L A S S O F 19 8 9

Robi is a respected and experienced media executive having held senior roles across Australia, New Zealand and South East Asia. She is currently Vice President & General Manager of Turner Australia. As General Manager, Robi is responsible for developing and driving the company’s strategy, coordinating and leading all company business divisions and overseeing Turner’s global brands including CNN and Cartoon Network. Robi’s first degree was a Bachelor of Arts, Theatre

Studies at UNSW. She completed her MBA in 2001, is a member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and is a director of the national arts producer, Performing Lines. Robi is a member of Chief Executive Women and is a passionate supporter of women in business and the arts. Robi established the Women in TV circle mentoring program to advance the participation of women in the TV industry. Robi is also a member of Scale, a female focused angel investor network.

Robi established the Women in TV circle mentoring program to advance the participation of women in the TV industry.

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Gail Graham (née Garner) C L A S S O F 19 57

Gail started at Loreto Normanhurst in 1951 as a day girl and then boarding after her mother died. The nuns, Mother Antoinette and Mother Joseph Michael nurtured her – they were her mothers! And so began a heartfelt relationship with the Loreto community. Gail’s daughter started in the junior school at Normanhurst in 1971 and the nuns asked Gail to be President of the Ex Students’ Association. She served as President from 1971-1973, 1979-1981 and 19841985. During her time as President, the ex-students funded the transformation of the Reception Room from the school study to the glorious room of today,

raised funds to build a Lecture Theatre, started the farewell luncheon for the Year 12 girls and initiated the Mother Daughter Mass, events that are still held at the school today. In 1985, together with Hornsby Hospital, Gail helped launch a regular commitment to “Meals on Wheels”. The “Loreto Group” ran for more than 20 years serving meals to the local community. Gail attended her first Loreto Federation in 1971 and has attended Federation for 40 years (missing only three!). She was a delegate for Normanhurst for eight years and President of Federation in 1992 when it was last hosted by Normanhurst.

“Through my long involvement with the school I have many wonderful and special friends in Sydney, and through Loreto Federation, all over Australia. Normanhurst has been far more than just a school!”


Penny Graham C L A S S O F 19 8 4

Penny started in the Junior School at Normanhurst in 1972 at the age of five. Normanhurst fostered a love of learning but her passions were formed in the co-curricular activities of drama productions, debating, Mock Trial and public speaking. She tried them all. After completing an Arts/Law degree at the University of Sydney, Penny developed a passion for holistic urban design – liveable cities – delivered and complemented by appropriate infrastructure.

For the past 25 years she has been involved in the development, funding and delivery of major infrastructure projects across Australia, Asia and Europe; projects that change the way we live – new airports, rail and light rail, roads, water power and social infrastructure. The pathway to working in this area was not predefined, with much of Penny’s success achieved by her ability to articulate the vision and bring people along on the journey.

“Just as importantly is the willingness to give things a try, to be open and to be passionate about making a difference.”

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Sarah Buggy CLASS OF 2003

After leaving Loreto, Sarah was fortunate enough to take up opportunities to live in England, study in Canada and return home to practice as a lawyer in Sydney. Since starting her career, she has worked in a law firm where she was honoured to be awarded the ‘Going the extra mile award’ and be named in the top 50 young lawyers by Australasian Law Magazine. Sarah moved to Melbourne for two years to take up an opportunity working as legal counsel for a national financial institution. During that time, she was named as a finalist in the Corporate Counsel category of the

Lawyers Weekly Awards, before returning to Sydney where she has realised that the achievement which she values the most is the relationships she has with her family and friends. Sarah says if she can inspire young girls in any way while they are growing, shaping and discovering who they are, it would be the message that you don’t have to be the top student to achieve your goals. Loreto encouraged self-belief in Sarah and taught her the importance of living with integrity, kindness and positivity which she tries to embody in all aspects of her life.

“One of the teachings at Loreto was ‘Women in time to come will do much.’ Equipped with this belief, I graduated from Loreto Normanhurst with the mindset that I did not want to sit on my hands, because there was so much I wanted to do.”

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Naomi Malone C L A S S O F 19 9 0

With Arts/Law degrees from the University of Sydney, Naomi worked as a lawyer and policy advisor at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. While there, Naomi studied an MA in Public History at the University of Technology, Sydney, and gained an Outstanding Student Award. Naomi went on to be the Accessibility Producer for a universally accessible play, which achieved a national captioning award. From 2011 until 2012, Naomi divided her time between Accessible Arts, managing the Deaf Arts Access Project, and

Macquarie University Accessibility Services. Previously, she worked at Westpac in the diversity space while managing its sponsorship of the NSW Government’s Don’t DIS My ABILITY campaign. Naomi was a board member for the Australian Federation of Disability Organisations. Currently, she participates on the City of Sydney’s Inclusion (Disability) Advisory Panel and the State Library of NSW’s Inclusion Advisory Committee. Profoundly deaf, Naomi has completed a PhD examining the history of deaf education in NSW.

“For my education, sincere gratitude to the Loreto Sisters and teachers.”

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Pat Taylor (née O’Sullivan) C L A S S O F 19 31

Pat attended Loreto Normanhurst in the 1920s and early ‘30s and was highly regarded by Loreto Normanhurst ex-students of all ages. She worked tirelessly for the Ex-students’ Association and, as President, was responsible for writing the Constitution and establishing the Life Membership Fund, ensuring that funds invested by ex-students were directed towards providing bursaries. As President of the Mothers’ Committee, Pat inaugurated the first Mission

Lunch in 1969 to raise funds for those living in poverty in India and this tradition continues to this day. In 1972 Pat was honoured as the Patron of the Ex-Students’ Association. Pat was also a Loreto Federation President and enjoyed travelling to other states, making new friends and seeking new ideas. Pat’s memory is perpetuated at Loreto by the annual presentation of the Pat Taylor Award given to a Year 12 student displaying outstanding commitment to the school.

Pat inaugurated the first Mission Lunch in 1969 to raise funds for those living in poverty in India.


Victoria Pendergast CLASS OF 2008

Tori started skiing with her family when she was in Year 11 at Loreto Normanhurst. In 2010 she was invited to attend an Athlete Development Camp that introduced her to ski racing and she was then selected to attend a camp run by the Australian Paralympic Committee that introduced her to a sit ski. Tori was a quick learner and went overseas to Vail, USA on a two-month training program. Tori started competing in Para Alpine Skiing in 2011 and she won her first World Cup medal

in 2013. She placed 7th and 10th at the 2014 Sochi Paralympics and went on to qualify for the 2015 World Championships where she placed 7th. After the World Championships Tori took time off her skiing success to focus on her career in marketing, working at an agency in Sydney. Returning to skiing in 2016 she went on to qualify for the 2017 World Championships in Tarviso, Italy, where she placed 5th. Tori is currently aiming to podium at the 2018 Winter Paralympic Games in South Korea.

When Tori competed at the 2014 Paralympics in Sochi, she became Australia’s first female sit skier to compete at a Paralympics.

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Margaret Armstrong IBVM C L A S S O F 19 47

Margaret Armstrong attended Loreto Normanhurst from Grade 5, was Head Girl in 1947 and graduated the same year. She entered the IBVM in 1950 and was professed in 1952. The following year she went to Loreto Portland where she was trained as a teacher by Mother Carmel Leonard, well-skilled in the training of teachers. In the years to follow, Margaret taught at a number of Loreto Schools, including Normanhurst from 1976-79, teaching English,

Religious Education, Sport and Music. Margaret was the Normanhurst Community Leader from 1977-79 and kept a link with Loreto ex-students. In later years Margaret was involved in Pastoral Care in the Pymble Parish, was trained as a Spiritual Director by Carina Flaherty and has been a member of the Christian Life Communities for many years. Her spiritual direction and commitment to helping others is highly valued and appreciated by those who know her.

Her spiritual direction and commitment to helping others is highly valued and appreciated by those who know her.

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Karen Robinson C L A S S O F 19 8 6

Karen spent 13 years at Loreto Normanhurst, finishing as School Captain, Tennis Champion and recipient of an Award for Academic Excellence. Involved in many public speaking activities on offer at school, Karen went on to complete an Arts Law Degree at Sydney University. After university, she moved to regional NSW to take up a position as a junior litigation

solicitor. After 15 years in practice, she was called to the Bar, focusing on criminal work in the Local and District Courts. In early 2013, she was appointed to the Local Court of NSW as a Magistrate, where she remains and of which she is “so proud and humbled.” Karen’s daughter attended Loreto Normanhurst and graduated in 2017.

“I loved my time at Loreto and whilst there are so many positives I can mention, the one that has been so important for me has been that feeling of community – a bond of friendship and a support network, automatically assumed amongst those of us who attended the school. That has meant so much to me on so many occasions.”

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Bernarda Stenson IBVM 19 2 2 – 2 012

Rosaleen Stenson was one of the many Irish sisters who left home and family to serve in Australia. She was born in 1922 in Milltown, Dublin and entered Loreto in Rathfarnham in 1943 where she was given the religious name, Bernarda, which she chose to keep for the rest of her life. Sr Bernarda’s first mission was to Balbriggan where she worked in the laundry. In 1948, she volunteered to go to Australia and arrived in Melbourne on 27 January 1949. She cooked for the

communities and students of Normanhurst, Toorak, Portland, Kirribilli and Brisbane and she was well known for her Loreto Brown Bread. In 1978, on returning to Normanhurst, Sr Bernarda had care of the Children’s Dining Room. She also was a regular visitor to Villawood Detention Centre and assisted families there. Late in life Sr Bernarda took on the challenge of a new mission in Melbourne’s Caroline Springs, where she continued her work in the community.

Bernada was one of the many Irish sisters who left home and family to serve in Australia.


Tina Kennedy C L A S S O F 19 9 3

At 21 years old, after graduating from university with a business degree, Tina was recruited to work in the United States for renowned speaker and strategist, Tony Robbins. She went

on to become an entertainment executive and manager, representing international artists Gwen Stefani, Christina Aguilera, Avril Lavigne and Delta Goodrem.

“I remember so clearly, on the first day of Year 7, my Dad gave me the best piece of advice, to put your hand up and be counted. To get involved, be inquisitive and fearless in trying new things. On the first day of Year 7, with nothing to lose and everything to gain, I signed up for diving, tennis and the school band. It was the driving force of how I approached my six years at Loreto and advice I continue to live by today.”

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Ellen Roberts CLASS OF 2009

Ellen is an international professional softball player and current NSW and Australian representative. Her achievements include bronze at the 2014 World Championship and silver at the 2017 Canada Cup and she is currently part of the Australian National Squad. Following her time at Loreto Normanhurst she earned a full athletic scholarship to the University of Memphis, Tennessee, USA. She rewrote the record books over four years, setting 25 school records and obtaining a Bachelor of Science in Education, plus academic awards,

including the Dean’s list and Honor Roll. Ellen has played professional softball for three seasons – for two Italian teams and a Netherlands league, New Zealand and most recently with the Chicago Bandits. Since leaving Loreto, she has played in Japan, South Africa, Netherlands, Czech Republic, USA, New Zealand, Italy and Canada. As a pitcher, her attitude to training and playing are attributed to Loreto values. Ellen has won many national titles and awards and continues to be a ‘Loreto girl’.

Following her time at Loreto Normanhurst, Ellen earned a full athletic scholarship to the University of Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

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Beatrice Hannan IBVM C L A S S O F 19 37

Beatrice Hannan attended Loreto Normanhurst as a boarder in the mid-1930s and graduated in 1937. After some battles with poor eyesight and four years working in an insurance office, she entered the Loreto Sisters for the second time in 1949 and thus began an extraordinary life as a teacher, community leader, provincial consultor, bursar and gardener – all this while studying part time and looking after boarders. Beatrice was a member of the Provincial Council, Community Leader of Loretos Marryatville, Mandeville Hall and Normanhurst, attended crucial

General Congregations and was involved in the changes to religious life brought about by Vatican II. Over a period of many years, Beatrice completed an Arts Degree part time through the University of New England and the University of Melbourne followed by theological studies and finally a Diploma in Reading during her “retirement”. Beatrice will be remembered for her hard work, energy, her sense of humour, walking the 250 kilometres of the South West Trail in Victoria, her legendary working bees and her love of gardening.

Beatrice will be remembered for her hard work, energy, her sense of humour, walking the 250 kilometres of the South West Trail in Victoria, her legendary working bees and her love of gardening.


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Julie Ewington C L A S S O F 19 6 3

Julie is a writer, curator and broadcaster based in Sydney. Trained as an art historian at the University of Sydney, Julie taught in universities and art schools, later working as a museum curator specialising in contemporary art. Between 1997 and 2014 Julie worked in Brisbane at the Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art as the Head of Australian Art, overseeing art from colonial settlement to the present, and on curatorial teams for the prestigious Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary

Art exhibitions. Since leaving Brisbane in 2014 Julie has written essays for catalogues and journals, and reviewed exhibitions in Australia and internationally for magazines including The Monthly and Artforum. Recent projects include a survey by the sculptor Bronwyn Oliver for TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria, in late 2016, and she is currently working towards a major feminist exhibition at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, in December 2017.

Julie is widely known for her support of women artists, including authoritative studies on Fiona Hall (2005) and Del Kathryn Barton (2013).

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Elaine Johnson CLASS OF 2004

After leaving Loreto Normanhurst Lane completed her Bachelor of Nursing at Avondale College in Wahroonga. She then gained a scholarship from NSW Health to complete her Graduate Certificate in Emergency and Critical Care Nursing. She later won two scholarships from the Australian College of Nursing to complete her Graduate Diploma and Master of Midwifery. Lane worked for four years as an Emergency Retrieval Flight Nurse Midwife in the Northern Territory for the charity CareFlight

where her research was published in the Journal of Aeromedical Medicine. Lane’s experiences as a Flight Nurse Midwife were featured in the book Australian Midwives by Paula Heelan. Lane is a lecturer at Monash University, teaching medical students clinical skills and using her position to promote the importance of rural healthcare practitioners. Lane also teaches free community CareFlight programs called Trauma Care Workshops, providing extended skills for rural clinicians, Police, Fire, SES and rescue services.

Lane worked for four years as an Emergency Retrieval Flight Nurse Midwife in the Northern Territory for the charity CareFlight.

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Frances Browne IBVM Frances was a country girl from Binalong NSW, the youngest of eight surviving children. She was educated at Loreto Kirribilli during World War II and was boarding there when the Japanese submarine came into Sydney Harbour. Frances entered the Loreto Order at Ballarat in 1954 and made her first and final professions at Loreto Normanhurst in 1956 and 1961. She was trained as a teacher in Ballarat by Miss Marjorie Hehir and Mother Mildred Dew and taught at Loreto Ballarat, St Thomas the Apostle, Blackburn, Loreto Marryatville, Coorparoo, and Normanhurst before returning to Marryatville in 1979. Frances attended the University of Melbourne studying Arts and Education, Mount Gravatt College of Advanced Education in Queensland studying Educational

Administration and the South Australian College of Advanced Education studying Theology. She has been Principal at Loreto Marryatville twice and once at Loreto Coorparoo and she was in charge of the Boarding School at Loreto Normanhurst. In 1995 she went to Hay in NSW where she worked with isolated rural families which included Parish Associate, administration of the Parish when there was no priest, baptisms, burials, preparing children for the sacraments, Sunday and weekday liturgies, visiting the hospital and families in remote areas. Frances did much the same at Portland in Victoria and was on the Boards of Bayview College and All Saints Catholic Primary School. Currently, Frances works in the archives at Loreto Normanhurst, along with volunteer work.

Frances entered the Loreto Order at Ballarat in 1954 and made her first and final professions at Loreto Normanhurst in 1956 and 1961.

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Catherine Leary C L A S S O F 19 8 2

Cath’s early background was as an educator in Catholic Primary Schools, enthusing young minds with a passion for learning. Her next career move was as manager of the Global Education Team at Caritas Australia. A role that found her in classrooms, parishes and leading groups to “think globally and act locally”; engaging others in issues of social justice, enabling them to understand less fortunate communities in a way that stayed with them and transformed them. Then, as Mission Engagement Facilitator at the Australian Catholic University she continued fostering a sense of inclusion and justice amongst students. Later roles included International Programs Director and Executive Officer for Mary MacKillop International Mission. Her commitment as a passionate social justice advocate and educator is also

evidenced by having completed a Master’s degree in International Social Development and long standing memberships of the Loreto Normanhurst Council, the Advisory Committee of Mary Ward International Australia and as the Deputy Chairperson of the Mercy Foundation and long term member of their Grants Committee. Cath gave generously of her time and worked tirelessly for and with people who needed a voice: refugees and asylum seekers; aboriginal communities; those in Asia, the Pacific and Africa affected by HIV and AIDS; the poorest communities in Peru and Timor-Leste, in particular working with the women in these communities, using education, passion, good humour, warmth, humility and a sense of fairness as her guides to empowering people to help themselves.

“Peace happens when people have all that they need to live. Peace is vital to the development of any community. It’s about freeing people from poverty and oppression and the hatred each of these can produce. Building peace involves standing in solidarity with the oppressed and empowering people to help themselves to work towards a sustainable way of life.”


Posthumous honours: The Cath Leary Prize for Service to Social Justice – a Loreto Normanhurst annual award The Cath Leary Social Justice Award – a Mercy Foundation annual award

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Dr Virginia Small C L A S S O F 19 7 7

Virginia is a senior communications professional and for much of her career has been in a variety of senior roles at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Her passion for the spoken word saw her awarded her teaching diploma from Trinity College London at the young age of 17. Virginia’s expertise in communications covers broadcast, digital and print journalism, with a

specialisation in economics reporting. She worked in Brunei Darussalam for five years where she trained and mentored journalists. She has two Masters degrees, one in Public Relations, the other in English Literature and was awarded a PhD for examining terrorism and international drug trafficking through the lens of the Australian media.

Virginia has a passion for social justice and lives by Mary Ward’s words, “Be all, to all.”

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The Fernando Family Cherani Fernando – Class of 2006 Cherani expresses her creativity and originality through design. After leaving school, Cherani studied Applied Fashion and Design at Ultimo TAFE where she had the opportunity to cultivate her skills in textiles, winning the Gerber Award. For almost ten years, Cherani has been working at Abbey Archery as a designer and machinist, producing their leather archery accessories. Her interests in sewing, dressmaking and design have burgeoned and she has now developed skills in clothing alterations, patchwork and quilting. Her ambition is to develop her own business to encapsulate her skills and passion for design, fashion and sewing where she plans to develop exciting new capabilities in these areas.

Rashini Fernando – Class of 2007 Social justice and human rights are the driving force in Rashini’s life and she hopes to always be an advocate for others. She has worked in Accra, Ghana as a Law and Human Rights Intern with Projects Abroad, raising awareness on relevant human rights issues in the community and was a selected member of a social enterprise project in Bangalore, India with the 40K Foundation, where she helped establish a social enterprise to fund education programs within the rural

community. Last year, Rashini spent three months in Geneva, Switzerland with DFAT, working at the United Nations Human Rights Council, dealing with issues of international relations and human rights. Rashini currently works in Alice Springs as a lawyer with the Central Australian Women’s Legal Service (CAWLS), working in domestic violence.

Tiyani Fernando – Class of 2011 Tiyani’s passion for drama, public speaking and ‘all things children’ has given her the opportunity to work with children of all ages, backgrounds and capabilities. Tiyani’s eventful time at Loreto has found her right back where she spent her teenage years, now as a staff member, working in the Loreto Normanhurst Boarding School as a weekend boarding assistant. Tiyani has worked as an educator and now as the Assistant Director of Normanhurst Public School’s OSHC. Her love for children has inspired her to work as an active volunteer at Camp Quality, where she spends time working with and assisting kids living with cancer and giving respite to families affected by this terrible illness. Tiyani has also had the incredibly rewarding experience of working at the annual Ignatian Children’s Holiday Camp held at St Ignatius College.

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Mary Stanislaus Mulhall IBVM 18 51 – 19 2 3 Barbara Mulhall was born in 1851 in County Carlow in Ireland. She became a boarder at Loreto Convent, Gorey, in 1863 and was incredibly gifted in literature and music. Barbara entered the novitiate at Loreto Abbey Rathfarnham, Dublin in 1868 and was given the name Mary Stanislaus, after the Polish Jesuit saint. She made her First Profession in 1871. Her first ministry was at Loreto Convent, Gorey where she taught for 14 years. In 1884, Mary Stanislaus and her companions arrived in Australia. She taught at Mary’s Mount, Ballarat, where she took on the role

of Mistress of Music and established the school’s first orchestra. During her 30 years as Novice Mistress, from 1885-1915, Mother Stanislaus trained many of the Institute’s elders in Australia in the religious life. In 1915 she became Provincial of Australia and in 1921 helped establish Loreto Marryatville in South Australia. In 1923 Mother Stanislaus died suddenly at Mary’s Mount, Ballarat, and was mourned by all the Sisters throughout the Province. Mulhall House at Loreto Normanhurst is named in her honour.

In 1884, Mary Stanislaus and her companions arrived in Australia. She taught at Mary’s Mount, Ballarat, where she took on the role of Mistress of Music and established the school’s first orchestra.


Heather Marano CLASS OF 2003

Heather is an inspiration to all who know her and the most amazing role model to young women. She is the director of her own very successful marketing and communications company, Green Door Co, and she

achieved it all before the age of 30. She is intelligent, hardworking and not afraid to take risks with great results. Heather has been the recipient of the prestigious industry award for Marketing & PR, B&T 30 under 30.

Heather has been the recipient of the prestigious industry award for Marketing & PR, B&T 30 under 30.

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Colette Garnsey OAM C L A S S O F 19 7 7

Colette has had a 40-year career in retail, manufacturing, distribution and wholesale. She has served as a director and advisory board member for both NFP enterprises and government boards. Colette has over 30 years’ experience in retail and has held senior roles at David Jones, Pacific Brands and Premier Investments. She has played a key role in the establishment and growth of the Australian fashion industry and many Australian designers. She has served both on the advisory board of Australian

Fashion Week and the Melbourne Fashion Festival. Additionally, Colette has used her unique consumer insights to advise CSIRO, The Federal Innovation Council and the business advisory boards of various Federal Trade and Investment ministers. Colette is now a non-executive director serving on the boards of public companies and continues her role as advisor to the Federal Minister for Trade and Investment. She is married to Andrew Green and they have two children.

Colette has played a key role in the establishment and growth of the Australian fashion industry and many Australian designers.

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Michèle Asprey C L A S S O F 19 7 3

Michèle is a lawyer, plain language pioneer, author, film critic and film historian, tree farmer and drummer. She completed a BA/LLB at the University of NSW and was admitted as a solicitor in 1979 working as a corporate tax lawyer with Freehill Hollingdale & Page (now Herbert Smith Freehills). In 1986, Michèle joined Mallesons Stephen Jaques (now King & Wood Mallesons), becoming National Director of Legal Precedents. She developed a national precedents system, using a plain language drafting style. In 1991, Michèle was inspired to write a book, Plain Language for Lawyers. It was the first Australian text on the subject and is now in its 4th edition. She is an acknowledged world expert in

the field of simplifying legal language. Michèle wrote monthly film reviews for the NSW Law Society Journal for 12 years, while studying the history of cinema under David Stratton at the University of Sydney where she has just been awarded a Master of Arts (Research) with Distinction. Her thesis involved the place of British cinema of the 1950s in legal and social reform – in particular homosexual law reform. Michèle and her husband grow native rainforest timber on the south coast of NSW, and she plays drums to his bass guitar. She is grateful for the liberal education she received at Loreto Normanhurst and the inspiration to achieve, which has never left her.

Michèle is grateful for the liberal education she received at Loreto Normanhurst and the inspiration to achieve, which has never left her.


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Neerja Irene Fernandez CLASS OF 2004

“My parents worked hard and sacrificed to ensure I received the best education, sending me to Loreto.” Irene was one of five per cent of women to graduate from UNSW with a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering. In 2009 she joined a mining services company, working in various locations across Australia. During this period, she successfully advocated to increase

female graduate intake, resulting in an increase from ten per cent to 40 per cent in subsequent years. In 2015 Irene completed an MBA at MGSM/University of Edinburgh and at 28 years old was appointed Site Leader (and the only female in the operations management team) managing over 30 employees from two manufacturing plants.

“My Year 12 physics teacher once said ‘in order to make change you need to be in the position to make it’. I hope I’m making positive change, helping pave the way for women entering the industry.”

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Denise Desmarchelier IBVM Denise’s early years were at Batlow NSW where she identified with country boarders and sought opportunities for boarder and day families to socialise, or for day girls to share a boarder weekend. She grew up in a close family, and was proudly secondgeneration Kirribilli. Her sister, Carmel, was at Normanhurst, with brothers at Riverview and St Aloysius. Denise gained the Dip.Ed. Teaching prize and was appointed as Principal of Loreto Normanhurst in 1989. She was involved in state and national capital grants committees, overseeing the design, building and re-location of John XXIII College in Perth. These experiences proved invaluable, particularly when

Loreto Normanhurst was affected by a tornado-type storm barely two weeks before the start of one school year, causing significant damage. Stability for girls whose lives were upended by the storm was incentive to open on time. After leaving Loreto Normanhurst, Denise commenced Theology and PhD studies while Acting Dean of Studies at Newman College. Her thesis was published as Voices of Women. Women and the Catholic Church. Subsequently she was a member of Loreto Ballarat Council, parish co-ordinator of children’s sacraments, Chair of Board at Bayview, Portland, and facilitated a governance structure in Mauritius for the seven Loreto schools.

“Then and now, my joy lies in relationships, my unapologetic priority is education in faith and social justice, through staff and student roles. Thank you, students, parents and staff, for memorable Normanhurst years.”

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– 111 –


Jane Stanton C L A S S O F 19 8 8

Jane is currently a Vice President of Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CAANZ) and in 2018 is slated to be the first Australian female President. CAANZ has a global membership of approximately 140,000. Jane is a past recipient of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia President’s Prize which rewards outstanding service to the accounting profession. During her period as

an Office Bearer of CAANZ, she focused on raising awareness of mental health issues in the profession, including speaking about her own experiences with anxiety and depression. Jane has leveraged her professional skills to establish a successful governance career, focused on entities aligned to her interests and values, including the University of Notre Dame Australia and the Women’s Alcohol and Drug Advisory Centre.

“In the early 1990s, I spent several months teaching at Loreto Day School Sealdah in Kolkata, India. This was a life-defining experience. I came home determined to make a difference using the opportunities provided by my Loreto education.”

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Dr Mel Fitzpatrick C L A S S O F 19 8 6

Mel is an expert climate scientist and mountaineer with extensive experience communicating climate impacts to both policymakers and the public in the US and Australia. A specialist in polar and alpine research, Mel has spent many seasons as a field scientist and survival trainer in Antarctica, Greenland, Canada and Peru. Mel was the Dux of Loreto Normanhurst in 1986 and was also awarded the Mother Antoinette Hayden Sports Prize. Her education at Loreto was a springboard to an outstanding academic career,

with degrees in Physics and Geophysics from several universities, including a doctorate from the University of Washington in Seattle. Mel was Australia’s first female glaciologist, working for both the Australian Antarctic Program and the US Antarctic Program. She now lives in Tasmania and continues to be passionate about bridging science and policy. Mel is the convenor of the non-profit group Climate Tasmania and has been an expert reviewer for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Her education at Loreto was a springboard to an outstanding academic career, with degrees in Physics and Geophysics from several universities, including a doctorate from the University of Washington in Seattle.


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Pauline Prince IBVM Pauline, originally from Cobar NSW, was educated at Loreto Kirribilli as a boarder in the 1940s and entered the novitiate in 1953. After teaching in South Melbourne, Loreto Kirribilli and Loreto Normanhurst, Pauline moved to Kolkata, India. It was here that Pauline witnessed first-hand the poverty in the community. Together with Samir Chaudhuri, an Indian doctor and nutritionist, they established the Child in Need Institute (CINI). This non-government organisation focuses on the welfare of mothers, believing this to be the most effective way to provide for children in an effort to break the cycle of poverty,

malnutrition and ill-health. After leaving India, Pauline worked in Cambodian refugee camps, the Kimberley region of WA, Mongolia and outback NSW. From 2001-2004 Pauline worked in the Wilcannia Forbes Diocese where she connected with many Loreto ex-students who recall her visits with great fondness. From 2004-2012 Pauline was located in Myanmar where she taught English and established the Myanmar Institute of Religious Studies, Yangon. Today Pauline resides in Sydney and, together with her sister Daphne, an ex-student of Loreto Normanhurst, enjoys her strong connection with the Loreto community.

After leaving India, Pauline worked in Cambodian refugee camps, the Kimberley region of WA, Mongolia and outback NSW.

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Merilyn Burch Carney (née Burch) C L A S S O F 19 59

After school Merilyn studied portrait painting and life drawing at the National Art School with Godfrey Miller then worked in advertising with Guy Warren and Bryce Courtenay. She studied teaching and taught art in Sydney for ten years. One of her noted pupils was 2011 Archibald Prize winner Ben Quilty. In 1991 Merilyn moved to the Mudgee/Gulgong area and taught in local schools as well as joining

local artists in Plein Air Painting. Later she organised artists to come from all over Australia to paint in the Mudgee district. Merilyn has won prizes and awards and her paintings have been hung in in many prestigious exhibitions. She has been published twice in Artist’s Pallet magazine and her work is included in many private collections in Australia, the UK, Germany and the US.

“I was lucky to start at Loreto the same year Mother Evangeline IBVM came to Normanhurst as she encouraged me in the arts from primary school.”

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– 120 –


Emma Christensen CLASS OF 2004

Emma has excelled in the typically male dominated aviation industry since graduating from Loreto Normanhurst. She worked for many years in Australia’s remote Kimberley region including Kununurra and Broome flying local police, teachers, nurses, doctors and other vital community services in and out of the most remote areas in Australia. During this time Emma raised money for numerous charities by swimming yearly in the Argyle Swim (a challenge she still returns

to from her residence in New Zealand to participate annually). The Argyle Swim is a 20km swim through croc (fresh water) infested waters. Emma is now based in New Zealand, first operating on domestic routes, and has recently started training for international flights linking Australia and New Zealand. Emma has forged her way in a challenging environment through hard work, determination and drawing from the inspiration of the pioneers of Loreto.

“As women; it is our time, and we shall continue to do much.”

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Professor Jennelle Kyd (née Doyle) C L A S S O F 19 7 3

Jennelle has combined a very successful academic and research career in Australian universities with an equally successful personal family life. Jennelle is a successful academic leader holding positions in several universities, with her most recent being Senior Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Provost with Swinburne University of Technology. She is also an internationally recognised scientist, researching prevention of respiratory infections, publishing over 100 papers and mentoring many PhD students,

mostly female. She is an experienced coach and mentor with particular interests in the development of strategies to improve the career pathways and promotion of women. She is also a non-executive director and board chairperson, having provided her experience and knowledge to benefit a range of private and not-for-profit organisations. Jennelle recently started her own consultancy business and continues to passionately champion the advancement of women in our society.

“Take chances and be amazed by what you can achieve.”


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Joy Anderson (née Foley) C L A S S O F 19 4 8

Joy came to Loreto Normanhurst in 1943 in Grade 6 as a day girl and then became a boarder. In Joy’s final year there were 12 girls and it was through one of these 12 girls, now Sister Anne Anderson IBVM, that Joy was fortunate to meet her late husband of 60 years, Peter Anderson. Loreto Normanhurst has continued to be an important part of Joy’s life throughout the years. She was President of the Ex-students’ Association in 1963 and was on the Parent Association committee for several years.

She has also been involved with Loreto Federation since 1963. Joy’s two daughters attended Loreto Normanhurst from prep to Year 12 and three of her sons attended from prep to Year 2 when boys still attended Loreto Normanhurst. Joy travelled with Peter to India on seven occasions and was fortunate and privileged to visit Sr Pauline Prince IBVM when she was setting up the Child in Need Institute, an international humanitarian organisation working for poor children in India.

“It is very hard to actually describe the ‘Loreto Spirit’ but we who are part of it know what it is. Loreto has been a great influence in my life. It has laid the foundation for so much that has happened to me. We had the most wonderful nuns who taught us and looked after us in the boarding school.”

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Anne Anderson IBVM C L A S S O F 19 47

Anne Anderson IBVM began her education at Loreto Normanhurst in the 1940s, graduating in 1948. She entered the Loreto Order at Ballarat in 1950 and was professed in December 1952. From there Anne was sent to Ss Peter and Paul’s South Melbourne where she was trained to a high degree of excellence by Mother Joseph Halloran. She attended Melbourne University, qualifying in Arts. Anne taught both secondary and primary in a number of Loreto Schools, including Loreto Normanhurst in 1956-1958. Mathematics and sport were her main

subjects. Later on, Anne pursued a Librarian course and a theology degree at United Faculty of Theology. Anne held the roles of Bursar and Librarian in various schools and institutions, was Principal at Kirribilli in 1971 and Coorparoo in 1973 and Community Leader at Loreto House, Albert Park in 1981-1983. In 1991 Anne was accepted at the Seminary for Late Vocations at Kensington where she was the Registrar and the Dean. Anne, with her amazing organisational skills, was able to bring St Paul’s to a high level of Educational proficiency.

Fr Paul Cashen MSC wrote, “Your talents as secretary, data processor, filing clerk, recruiter, administrator, counsellor, advisor, and the many others we have experienced, further enhance your ready smile and sense of humour and commitment to the service you have provided.”


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Dominic Jones IBVM 19 0 8 – 19 8 7

Muriel Jones was born in Oaklands on South Australia’s Yorke Peninsula in 1908. Educated at Loreto Convent Marryatville, she received her Leaving Honours and matriculated in Science. In 1926 she entered Loreto and obtained her Teacher’s Registration in 1931. Sr Dominic taught at Ss Peter and Paul’s in Albert Park, Loreto Coorparoo,

Toorak, Kirribilli and Claremont, where she was Principal from 1962–1967. She was Superior of the Normanhurst Community in 1968–1972, where she taught mathematics, taking extra Saturday morning classes for those in need. Her pupils knew her for her patience and concern for every student. Her final years were spent at Marryatville.

She was Superior of the Normanhurst Community in 1968-1972, where she taught mathematics, taking extra Saturday morning classes for those in need.

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Peta Portelli CLASS OF 2004

Fashion designer, businesswoman, entrepreneur – Peta Portelli is the Founder of COU I TECH – a shoe company at the intersection of design, health and technology. Her love for design and technology was discovered under the tutelage of Loreto teacher, Mrs Minto. At the age of 16, she gained early entry into the prestigious Whitehouse Institute of Design. Peta worked alongside iconic Australian Designers Lisa Ho, Kit Willow and Carla Zampatti and she won numerous awards, including a scholarship to Florence, Italy, where she completed a Masters in

‘Fashion as Art’ and interned at Giorgio Armani, Roberto Cavalli and Emilio Pucci. During the Global Financial Crisis of 2007-2008, Peta witnessed many creative businesses become insolvent, prompting her to question sustainable business models. She returned to Australia, completed a Business degree and became an insolvency accountant specialising in retail markets. Since completing her MBAe, she has spoken at many conferences about the need for more polymaths. Peta is currently commercialising science at the CSIRO’s Data61.

Peta won numerous awards, including a scholarship to Florence, Italy, where she completed a Masters in ‘Fashion as Art’ and interned at Giorgio Armani, Roberto Cavalli and Emilio Pucci.

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Siobhan O’Malley C L A S S O F 2 016

Siobhan has been a competitive swimmer for 12 years. She holds multiple State Champion Titles and she is a State Level Medallist and State Record Holder. Additionally, Siobhan is a National Age Level Finalist and a National Open Level Semi-Finalist. In 2016 Siobhan had the opportunity to compete at the Australian Open Olympic Trials and was delighted to walk away with 15th in the 400 Individual Medley. In February 2018 she will be competing at the Australian Open Commonwealth Games Trials, with the goal of

achieving her first open level final which will place her within the top eight in Australia. Siobhan credits the kindness and generosity of the Loreto community for helping her to develop her ambitions and values, and says that, thanks to that supportive environment, she continues to strive for excellence every day. Siobhan’s passion and dedication in her pursuit of her dreams is only possible because of the incredible support that helped her become the Loreto woman that she is proud to be today.

Siobhan credits the kindness and generosity of the Loreto community for helping her to develop her ambitions and values.

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Mary Poirrier (née McEvoy) C L A S S O F 19 5 6

Mary has had a long and rich association with Loreto Normanhurst. She attended Loreto from junior school until the Leaving Certificate and she has continued her very special connection with Loreto since her own schooldays. Mary’s three daughters, attended from 1979-1987, and her grandchildren and two sistersin-law are also a part of the Loreto Normanhurst

family. Mary was the President of the Mothers’ Club for several years in the ‘80s and has always been an active member of the Ex-Students’ Association supporting school, parent and ex-student initiatives. Mary’s connection and commitment to her school has remained strong since she first arrived as a young girl. Loreto is very much a tradition for Mary and her family.

Mary’s connection and commitment to her school has remained strong since she first arrived as a young girl.


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Annika Stott CLASS OF 2005

After graduating from Law and Commerce in 2010, Annika says that she had little idea about what she wanted for her career. For two years she travelled the world; working on sailing yachts in the Caribbean and Mediterranean Seas and climbing mountains in the Himalayas. Along the way, she learnt about sustainability; balancing economic prosperity, a healthy environment and social justice. She knew she had found her purpose. Annika studied at the Centre for Sustainability Leadership, and since then has promoted all of this in her work, both in the UK and in Sydney.

In 2013, she moved to Oxford and had the privilege to work with food waste experts. She learnt about changing people’s behaviours to save food, money and reduce our environmental impact. Annika is inspired to raise awareness that wasting food really wastes so much more – labour, love, fuel, money, land and time. Now, Annika works at OzHarvest, a brilliantly heartwarming organisation, as a Sustainability Strategist. She is committed to creating a movement to reconnect people with the value of food and develop a moral philosophy around not wasting it.

Annika is inspired to raise awareness that wasting food really wastes so much more – labour, love, fuel, money, land and time.

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Dr Sally-Anne Greenaway C L A S S O F 19 7 7

Sally was influenced by her teachers at Loreto Normanhurst and left school with enduring passions for social justice, the arts and sciences and a deep interest in the ethical foundations of health, and how we live in society. She was in the foundation year of the University of Newcastle’s medical faculty and after graduating Sally worked at RPAH in Camperdown for six years commencing physicians training and specialising in clinical haematology. She then spent a few years undertaking leukaemia cell biology research before going back to clinical medicine. Sally combined her long term interest in end of life care and how

medicine and society can help patients with diseases we cannot cure by working in both palliative medicine and clinical haematology at Westmead Hospital and Mount Druitt Palliative Care Unit. Sally is now the Director of Supportive and Palliative Medicine and a senior staff specialist in clinical haematology at Western Sydney Local Heath District – whose hospitals take students from several universities so teaching is also a wonderful part of her life. Sally regards her happy family life with her wonderful husband Warwick, her three step children and their three younger children as her greatest achievement.

“My grounding from Loreto in Ignatian spirituality and the Catholic tradition of social justice remain with me and inform every aspect of my life. I am forever grateful that I had my years at Loreto Normanhurst and that we had the privilege of educating our daughter Madeleine there as well.”

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– 140 –


Dr Leoni Degenhardt Leoni taught in government and non-government schools in rural, urban and suburban areas; co-founded a Montessori pre-school in her years as a full-time mum; held regional and head office positions in the Catholic Education Office, Sydney; was deputy principal of a highly multi-cultural inner-city Sydney school and principal of a large co-educational Catholic systemic school in south-west Sydney, before her appointment as the first lay Principal of Loreto Normanhurst in 1994. Leoni’s PhD in Educational Leadership was based on the documentation and analysis of the reinvention process which she led at Loreto. Her book Dancing on a Shifting Carpet: reinventing traditional schooling for the 21st century (2010), co-written with Professor Patrick Duignan, is based on her PhD study and includes an extended case study of the reinvention of Loreto Normanhurst. After leaving principalship in 2008, Leoni worked across and beyond Australia with corporate and not-for-profit organisations, as well as with schools

and school systems, in areas related to 21st century learning, leadership, strategy and organisational change. In 2011 she was appointed the inaugural Dean of the AIS Leadership Centre, whose purpose is to support current and future school leaders from across Australia to lead and manage the complexity of contemporary educational environments. Over the years, Leoni has been involved in a range of voluntary activities, including teaching English to new immigrants, as well as membership of a range of boards, commissions and committees. Among these were the National Catholic Education Commission (NCEC), the National Council of Caritas Australia, and the Loreto Education Council. Leoni is a Fellow of the Australian College of Educators (ACE) and of the Australian Council for Educational Leaders (ACEL). She has published papers in a number of journals and presented keynotes and workshops at national and international conferences. She lives with her husband in Gerroa NSW. They have two adult daughters and are delighting in their first grandchild.

“‘Normo’ and its people – especially the Loreto Sisters, Council members, staff, parents and exstudents I have known – have shaped me and will always have a special place in my heart.”


Sabrina Warwar C L A S S O F 2 012

Sabrina recently returned from a two-month internship in Uganda, living in a remote rural village in the most impoverished region of Iganga. The internship was with an NGO that provides various health projects and advocacy work to provide rural health care and promotion of public health on a village level. Through community organising and mobilisation, this approach targets the primary health risks of the

region by providing education, training and appropriate interventions to village health team members, health centre workers, local community leaders, and the general population. Sabrina is currently completing her Masters of International Public Health at the University of Sydney. She has received an Endeavour Asia Postgraduate Mobility Scholarship from the Australian Government to the Philippines at the end of the year.

“After a short-term study stint at Cambridge University last year I feel that many of my opportunities have occurred due to the strong social justice values instilled in me as a student of Loreto Normanhurst.”

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Lora Storey Lora is the 2017 NSW and ACT Women’s 800m State Champion, the 2017 Women’s 800m Australian National Champion, the 2017 IAAF World Relay Championships Bronze Medallist (Women’s 4x800m), and the 2017 IAAF World Championships Representative (Women’s 800m). Lora was awarded the prestigious Ron Clarke Middle Distance Athlete

Elite Scholarship for 2017 by Athletics International (AUS). Lora has been working at Loreto Normanhurst in Student Services and with the track and field team since 2014. She also assists the Independent Girls Schools Sports Association athletics team and has travelled with them to Melbourne and Canberra for national events.

Lora was awarded the prestigious Ron Clarke Middle Distance Athlete Elite Scholarship for 2017 by Athletics International (AUS).

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Joan Nowotny IBVM 19 2 5 – 2 0 0 8

Joan was born in Melbourne in 1925, the eldest of four children. When the family moved to Queensland Joan attended Loreto Convent Coorparoo. Back in Melbourne, after training as a primary teacher, Joan taught at Ss Peter & Paul’s South Melbourne. She felt called to religious life and entered with the Loreto Sisters in 1947 and was given the name Miriam. A gifted educational leader and teacher, Sr Joan was appointed Principal of Loreto Kirribilli 1955-1956 and then Loreto Normanhurst 1957-1964. Sr Joan completed a Master of Arts in Philosophy at Toronto University and began

her doctoral studies. She studied at the Sorbonne in Paris in 1968. Her doctoral thesis, completed in 1974, focused on Gabriel Marcel’s philosophy of hope. A brilliant academic, she was appointed Principal of St. Mary’s College University of Melbourne in 1980-1989, Principal of Ena Waite College University of Tasmania and Dean of the Yarra Theological Union 19801989 (the first female dean of a theological college in Australia). Sr Joan loved words and puzzles, and contributed cryptic crosswords to the Jesuit magazine, Eureka Street, for 14 years which she also edited.

Sr Joan loved words and puzzles, and contributed cryptic crosswords to the Jesuit magazine, Eureka Street, for 14 years which she also edited.


– 147 –


Dr Judy Cunningham (née Makinson) C L A S S O F 19 76

After graduating from Loreto Normanhurst, Judy studied in the Faculty of Applied Science at UNSW, where she received a Bachelor of Science (Honours 1) in food science and technology, followed by a Doctor of Philosophy degree. After moving to Canberra in 1988, Judy began a long career as a regulatory scientist in the area of foods and complementary medicines. This included a period managing and editing Australia’s tables of the composition of foods NUTTAB, while

working at Food Standards Australia New Zealand. Since retiring, Judy has worked as a scientific consultant. She has published a large number of scientific papers and, in 2011, was awarded an Australian Public Service medal for her dedication and leadership in developing food composition and databases and dietary exposure modelling nationally and internationally. Judy believes her greatest achievements are her two adult children, who are both pursuing their own rewarding careers.

Judy has published a large number of scientific papers and, in 2011, was awarded an Australian Public Service Medal.

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Kate Falzon C L A S S O F 2 014

Loreto Normanhurst shaped and inspired Kate’s life during her six years as a student, her year as a staff member, and continues today. Kate always aims to reach out to others and to make herself the best person she can be. Kate found that life after school

can be challenging in many ways, however, her Loreto education opened a lot of opportunities for her future and reminds her to always recognise and believe in the values of Christ and the potential of every woman, and this gives her strength.

“When I think of Loreto, I think of the strong community and the love shown to each and every member. I am proud to be a part of the Loreto Normanhurst community and will always cherish my time there.”

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Tara Hunt (née Barry) C L A S S O F 19 8 0

Tara was a boarder from 1975-1980 and was deeply influenced by Sr Veronica Reid IBVM, who invested an enormous amount of time and energy into the boarders, and in later years to her community in Ballarat. Sr Veronica’s generosity of spirit remained with Tara, and partly shaped Tara’s inspiration to give back to society. Tara established The Hunt Foundation in 2004 and initially

focused on critical indigenous and environmental projects, improving the health and nutrition of indigenous mothers and children. Tara was also concerned about climate change, and in 2011, Tara joined, and later became joint CEO of 1 Million Women, an organisation that is fighting climate change through teaching women how to make simple, daily choices in their lives that make a difference.

Tara’s philanthropy was a powerful tool for her and husband, Warwick, to help instill the joys of giving into their three children and the broader community.


Stephanie Lorenzo CLASS OF 2002

In 2009, at 21 years old, Stephanie Lorenzo founded PROJECT FUTURES, an Australian non-profit organisation that creates meaningful experiences to connect, educate and empower the next generation to combat human trafficking. Her ‘purpose equals action’ leadership approach has enabled her to mobilise young professionals to engage in creative, innovative and sustainable fundraising initiatives. Since its inception PROJECT FUTURES has raised over $4.6 million dollars for anti-human trafficking projects in the Asia Pacific

region. In 2017 Stephanie successfully transitioned out of the CEO role to pursue other activities and will serve on the Board. In 2013 Stephanie was nominated as Australian of the Year, in 2014 she was named one of the Financial Review and Westpac’s 100 Women of Influence and in 2016 Stephanie was a finalist in the Qantas and Women’s Weekly ‘Women of the Future Award’. Stephanie currently sits on the Emerging Leaders Advisory Board for the Institute of Managers and Leaders (IML) and the Loreto Normanhurst Board.

In 2013 Stephanie was nominated as Australian of the Year.

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Dr Melissa Doohan C L A S S O F 19 7 9

Melissa Doohan graduated from Loreto Normanhurst as Dux in 1979. She was a boarder from Years 7-10 and then a day student. She is still close to several of her Loreto friends. Melissa studied Medicine at the University of Sydney, graduating with Honours in January 1985. She then undertook Physicians training and went on to specialise in Cardiology, also completing a PhD in 1993. Melissa has been working as a cardiologist on Sydney’s North Shore since 1993. She consults at Sydney Adventist and North Shore Private Hospitals and has her own

rooms close to each. Melissa sees one of her biggest achievements as helping to forge a way for women in this previously strongly male dominated branch of medicine. She was the first female to be selected for cardiology training at RNSH and the first to work in private practice. Melissa considers that having female cardiologists is most important given that heart disease is equally common in women as in men, a fact which is under recognised. Melissa has two daughters and is proud to say that they have both had a Loreto education.

Melissa was the first female to be selected for cardiology training at RNSH and the first to work in private practice.

– 157 –


Emma Connell CLASS OF 2007

Emma attended Loreto Normanhurst from 20022007. Throughout her time at school she exhibited a passion and talent for mathematics and science, and went on to obtain a Bachelor of Engineering (Mechanical (Biomedical)) and a Bachelor of Science (Advanced Mathematics) from the University of Sydney, graduating in 2012 with first class honours. Emma then commenced her career with a position at ResMed, a world leader in the design and manufacture of sleep and respiratory care medical devices. Less than five

years out of university, she now works as a Senior Engineer at Cochlear, the world leader in implantable hearing solutions. She works as part of a team developing innovative products which enable people to hear, and empowering them to connect with others and live their fullest life. Emma is passionate about utilising her engineering skills to develop solutions which have a meaningful impact on society, and is a strong advocate for encouraging the next generation into careers in science and engineering.

“Attending Loreto Normanhurst instilled in me values, resilience and confidence in my abilities – all of which have been instrumental to the development of my career, particularly in a traditionally male dominated profession.”

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Kim Crawford (née Dunnicliff) C L A S S O F 19 5 3

Kim was an extraordinary person who had a positive impact on anyone who was lucky enough to meet her. She had a generosity of spirit that shone through and meant she had the capacity to create friendships with people with a warmth and caring that is hard to measure. In 1961 Kim married Gruff Crawford and together they had seven children. Six of those children, including three

sons, attended Loreto. When Gruff died at the age of 51 it was a defining moment in Kim’s life and it showed her what an incredibly strong and resilient person she was. Kim worked all through her marriage and was the most amazing wife and mother as well. Kim is missed so much by her children and her friends, but what she taught them about how to live a full life, lives on.

“She had a generosity of spirit that shone through and meant she had the capacity to create friendships with people with a warmth and caring that is hard to measure.”


19 3 0 – 2 016

Elizabeth Johnson IBVM C L A S S O F 19 47

Elizabeth grew up in Sydney, the fifth child and only precious daughter in her family. When she was five years old she began school at Loreto Kirribilli and at the end of Year 6 she boarded at Loreto Normanhurst to complete her secondary education. At 19 she began her novitiate in Ballarat as Sister Paula. She completed Teacher Training, followed by studies in education and later again, English as a Second Language. Elizabeth had a long life of dedication as an accomplished and much loved teacher who could eventually say she had taught in every State in Australia! She was often given the role

of Sports Mistress and she thrived on the adventures of school excursions. In 1980 Elizabeth offered to help overseas and spent five years teaching in Kenya. Ever after she never missed the opportunity for a “Kenya story”. Strong and energetic, and an avid reader, Elizabeth was a woman of wide interests: history, long walks, test cricket, the ANZAC Dawn Service; all these and more she kept doing till the end of her very long life. Her chosen motto, Thy Will Be Done, was clearly the source and inspiration of all her apostolic involvements for over 60 years.

In 1980 Elizabeth offered to help overseas and spent five years teaching in Kenya. Ever after she never missed the opportunity for a “Kenya story”.

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The de Teliga Family REFLECTIONS OF LORETO NORMANHURST

Rae de Teliga (née Abotomey) – Class of 1945 Loreto Convent has been a constant cherished thread throughout my life. At the age of five I began boarding at Loreto Marryatville. When my family moved to Sydney in 1940 I went to Loreto Normanhurst, which was listed on the gate as ‘Loreto Convent Boarding School for Young Ladies’ and was described as a school in the country! There I made several very dear friends who are still my

friends today. I remember the air raid siren went off once during the war and we all rushed down to the refectory. (How that would have helped I am not sure!) I became Head of the School in my final year and Captain of one of the sports teams, as I was a keen tennis, cricket and basketball player. When we moved to Sydney in the early 60s, with six children, we revisited the Loreto tradition. My four daughters went to school there, so we have quite a network of Loreto women from several generations today.

When my family moved to Sydney in 1940 I went to Loreto Normanhurst, which was listed on the gate as ‘Loreto Convent Boarding School for Young Ladies’ and was described as a school in the country!

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The de Teliga Family REFLECTIONS OF LORETO NORMANHURST

Jane de Teliga – Class of 1967

Sarah de Teliga – Class of 1971

As a teenager of thirteen I was a latecomer to Loreto Normanhurst life, however it was a school that I very much enjoyed. When I met my best friend Kit Hopkins, who had come from America, and her lovely sisters, I felt like I belonged there. A few of the nuns on the teaching staff proved so inspirational for my later life. Such spiritual, independent and intelligent women with a passion for their subjects! Who could forget Mother Evangeline with her sparkling eyes? She inspired a love of beauty and art history and my later career as a curator. Or Mother John Bosco (later Sister Noni, who became Head of the Loreto Order) with her fierce intelligence and handsome face, who made me realise that one could be brainy, beautiful and independent. I have gone on to be a mother of two lovely girls, curator, stylist, writer and lecturer and the foundation of my ‘brilliant’ career has come from the days spent with such inspiring women.

The tilting of memories of a place and a time. I loved my dear little bedroom overlooking the rooftops, as a boarder in my final school years, which I drop into many literary imaginings. The shiny morning faces of my sisters, pigtails and uniformed. I remember the benevolent guidance and accepting gentleness of Rae’s school friends. And the fierce brilliance of the women educators; Deirdre Rofe IBVM, Noni Mitchell IBVM, Miss Beris B Little, amongst others, who left time-release packages to nourish and guide us along life’s way. Learning to sing in the choir, to compete, and to play together: together through all, the ripple of bright friendships lighting the fuse that detonates the gelignite of a life. For 26 years I’ve been living in Paris with my family, Robert and my sons Linus and Nestor, creating paintings and designing gardens and interiors.

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The de Teliga Family REFLECTIONS OF LORETO NORMANHURST Martha Regnault (née de Teliga) – Class of 1977

Emma de Teliga – Class of 1981

My most pervasive memories of Loreto are of walking to the chapel through the Mary Ward passage in the mornings before school as a five or six year old. I would often meet Mother Mildred or Sister Brigid, the oldest nuns in the convent, who liked to sit there in the peace and stillness of that place. They were wonderful women, beautiful, loving models for the meditative life. They were both no more than five feet tall and must have realised back then that I wasn’t going to break any height records. I remember them saying to me “good things come in small packages”. Though I’ve questioned my goodness often I’ve never had a hang-up about being short! I have carried them as a template for my own life and meditation has become my foundation as well as the foundation of my work as a qi-gong and yogalates teacher and a cranial sacral therapist.

I am the last in the line of ‘Loreto Ladies’ in my family. My mother, Rae de Teliga was the first at the age of five. Rae was Head of the School – a pinnacle my sisters Jane, Sarah, Martha and I never reached! I can thank my family and Loreto every day for giving me a rounded education, for giving me a sense of independence and acknowledging the strength of women, and for allowing me to learn what I loved – Latin, Music and Science even Yoga, which was almost unheard of in the 70s! I now speak four languages (not very well) made easy by learning Latin, I am a qualified Yoga teacher (Ashtanga, Yin and Anti-Gravity) and my career has been in advertising as a Senior Producer of Photography, based in Hong Kong. Loreto allowed my inquisitive mind its freedom, which is a precious thing in education and for that I will always be grateful.

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Jane O’Hara C L A S S O F 19 7 2

Jane is a highly regarded and awarded Australian painter who has held many successful solo exhibitions in Australia and overseas where she lived for several years. Her life at Loreto began as a new Year 6 student in the Junior School where she met the renowned Mother Evangeline Kendall IBVM, an inspirational teacher and artist who created and ran a remarkable art department organised along professional art studio lines, and employing professional artists. Jane hardly imagined that Mother

Evangeline would eventually seek her out to replace her as Head of the Art Department when she retired. It was a great honour and Jane, in league with her marvellous colleagues, held this position until she resigned to live and work as an artist in China. Jane painted from life the portrait of Mother Evangeline, now hanging proudly at Loreto Normanhurst. Later she painted a portrait of the late Mother Gonzaga Barry commissioned by the Loreto Normanhurst Ex-students’ Association.

Jane has won numerous awards and has held many Australian and international exhibitions throughout her career. She has been published numerous times in Australian and international publications and her works are in private and corporate collections world-wide.


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Evangeline Kendall IBVM 19 0 7 – 19 9 6

Evangeline Kendall was born Monica Cecilia Kendall at Stawell in 1907. Her love of art was fostered whilst a boarder at Loreto, Portland. She entered the IBVM at Loreto, Mary’s Mount in Ballarat in 1927 and took vows in 1930. She trained as a primary teacher and taught between 1930-1947 in Loreto schools in Western Australia, South Australia and Victoria. In 1948 Evangeline arrived at Normanhurst and under her tenacious leadership an astonishing development took place. By the early 1970s a magnificent Art Department

had evolved with a comprehensive timetable of Art disciplines taught by specialist teachers. A showpiece for Art Education in Sydney, it produced many highachieving artists winning National Awards. Evangeline was a member of the State Examination Board and a member of the judging panel for the prestigious Blake Prize. A well-known Australian artist who donated two paintings to the school described Evangeline as “a feisty little atom”. Evangeline died peacefully in 1996 and rests in the bush cemetery at Normanhurst.

By the early 1970s a magnificent Art Department had evolved with a comprehensive timetable of Art disciplines taught by specialist teachers.

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Deirdre Rofe IBVM 19 4 3 – 2 0 0 2

Deirdre Ann Rofe was born in Sale, Victoria, in 1943. She attended Loreto Marryatville and was elected Head Prefect, Sports Captain, and Captain of Barry. In 1961, Deirdre started Law Studies at the University of Adelaide. Deirdre entered the IBVM in 1962 at Loreto Convent, Normanhurst, with her first profession in the Chapel in 1965 and her final profession in 1970. During this time she graduated in Arts with a BA (Hons). In 1971 Deirdre was appointed as the Principal of Loreto Normanhurst at only 27 years of age. The students who attended Loreto Normanhurst during the 70s speak with great affection of Sister Deirdre; how she would spend time with them, listen to them – a very precious gift – play tennis with them and, above all, set about developing a deep love of literature and the arts within each one. One very prominent contribution Deirdre made to Loreto Normanhurst was the revival of debating and public speaking. She inspired a new enthusiasm which resonated through the school and built within

the girls an amazing self-possession and confidence. In 1990 Deirdre was appointed as the 11th Australian Provincial of the IBVM, a position she was to hold until 1995. She formally constituted school councils for each of the Australian Loreto schools and established a central School Governance which introduced the Loreto Education Board. In 1993 she completed her Bachelor of Theology degree. From 1996-2000, Deirdre was Assistant to the Provincial in matters of Education. She established the Loreto Education Office, from which emerged the Loreto Education Advisory Committee. Deirdre’s final appointment was in the realm of Tertiary Education when she became the Principal of St Mary’s College from 1997 until the year of her death in 2002. In 2000, in recognition of her achievements in education, Deirdre was made a Fellow of the Australian College of Educators and in April 2002, was awarded the highest honour of the Australian Catholic University, a doctorate for her long and inspirational leadership.

In 1971, Deirdre was appointed as the Principal of Loreto Normanhurst at only 27 years of age.

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Dr Annmaree Yee (née Watharow) C L A S S O F 19 7 8

Annmaree attributes her love of learning and her ambition to the six years spent at Loreto Normanhurst. It never occurred to her or anyone else at Loreto that a severe hearing impairment would limit her career options, and she went on to study medicine at the University of Sydney. Annmaree was diagnosed with a degenerative condition and began to lose her sight. Thus began her determination to adjust her career to accommodate growing disablement. Having already

completed three degrees, Annmaree has returned to university to study for a PhD to try and change outcomes for deaf–blind people in hospitals. The reality of having complex disabilities means not everything is possible, but still good things can be achieved. Sharing experiences makes others aware of what they too can do. Annmaree hopes to develop communication tools to help those with sensory impairments have better experiences in hospitals and health care settings.

It never occurred to Annmaree or anyone else at Loreto that a severe hearing impairment would limit her career options, and she went on to study medicine at the University of Sydney.


The Hollingdale Family REFLECTIONS OF LORETO NORMANHURST

“Our great aunts, Mollie, Eileen and Lua Hollingdale attended Loreto Normanhurst. The grotto is dedicated to Lua. Our grandmother, Del Butler, and cousin, Nadine Hollingdale, were also ex-students, having attended Loreto Normanhurst in their time. Our parents, Patricia and Peter, wisely decided to continue this family tradition for their nine children, seven of whom attended Loreto Normanhurst at some stage as day girls or boarders, in junior or secondary school. Michael, together with Harry Hopkins, was the first old boy of the school. They were in 2nd Class in 1963 before moving to St Aloysius’ College. Loreto provided us with a broad, progressive, Catholic education. It fostered in us a love of art (Mother Evangeline),

literature (Sister Deirdre Rofe), Music (Mother Lua, Sister Deirdre Browne and Miss Bernadette Allam), sport and the outdoors. We recall recorder picnics in “the bush” with Mother Stella, St Patrick’s Day cricket matches “down the hill”, singing litanies and hymns whilst processing around the cloisters and grounds, Sister Kevin’s soda bread and her cat, Timothy Mary. Friendships formed at Loreto Normanhurst continue today. Many boarders remember spending Sundays with our family and we had wonderful holidays in their country homes. May we continue to follow in Mary Ward’s footsteps doing what we have to do well and doing it cheerfully.”

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– Words by Camille Hollingdale, Class of ‘70


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Lua Byrne IBVM 19 0 3 – 2 0 0 8

Leone Byrne was born at Byrnside, Victoria. Her father died when she was only five years old and her mother and four children moved to Tatura and then to Ballarat, where Leone attended Loreto Convent Dawson Street and Loreto Mary’s Mount. She was part of Mother Gonzaga Barry’s funeral guard of honour in 1915. Sr Lua entered Loreto in 1923. A gifted musician, she taught and studied in Ballarat, Perth and Toorak where she sat for her licentiate exam. After 12 years at Toorak, Sr Lua was missioned to Normanhurst

from 1945-1963 where she took an active part in implementing new music programs. In 1964 she moved to Adelaide where she taught many famous musicians and guided the building of a new music department. In Melbourne from 1979 and in her 90s, Sr Lua entertained the residents of Nazareth House Camberwell. At the age of 92 she moved to Ballarat, continuing to teach music and taking part in the Music Scholarship program. Sr Lua died at the age of 104 after a long lifetime of sharing her music.

After 12 years at Toorak, Sr Lua was missioned to Normanhurst from 1945-1963 where she took an active part in implementing new music programs.

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Rachael McLennan C L A S S O F 19 9 4

Rachael has volunteered and consulted extensively for some of the most recognisable organisations including Greenpeace, Paul Ramsay Foundation, Google, Camp Quality, Social Ventures Australia, Cure Brain Cancer, The Butterfly Foundation and State Street. She has helped individuals and organisations clarify their purpose; to lead and govern effectively, as well as to create greater social impact. Rachael co-founded People for Purpose, an organisation that unleashes the potential of skilled professionals to create social impact by providing access to career and volunteer

opportunities, learning & development programs and networks. Prior to establishing People for Purpose, Rachael was founding CEO of Australian Philanthropic Services, an organisation that exists to help high net worth individuals and their families establish giving structures to enable them to strategically support their favourite charities and work to solve complex social problems. Rachael has served on the board of the National Centre for Childhood Grief and was recently appointed an Ambassador. Rachael lives in Sydney with her husband and three children.

“What’s important to me is a sense of purpose; feeling connected to my family and friends and the world around me. I’m very aware that we all have had fortunate and unfortunate experiences that have shaped our lives and that both can influence who we are and what we do.”

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Kevin Maye IBVM 19 0 0 – 19 7 5

Sister Kevin Maye was born Ann Jane Clarke in 1900 in County Sligo in Ireland. Ann heard the call and travelled to Australia on a troop ship in 1919. She always said she came to Australia to “work for God and do it well”. Ann entered the IBVM in 1920 at Loreto Abbey, Ballarat and was given the name of Kevin. She received the Order in 1921 and made her first profession in 1923 at Mary’s Mount. In 1924 Sister Kevin joined the domestic staff at the newly

established Loreto Mandeville Hall in Toorak and was finally professed in 1929. In 1930 she was sent to Loreto Convent, Normanhurst which became her home for the next forty-five years until her death in 1975. Her gentle, caring presence had a remarkable influence on generations of boarders. In commemoration The Sister Kevin Shield was named for her interest in tennis and in 1998, Maye House at Loreto Normanhurst was named in her honour.

She always said she came to Australia to “work for God and do it well”.


Denise Cheng C L A S S O F 19 9 7

Denise completed a Bachelor of Business at UTS which included an international exchange in Canada in 1999. After university, she entered the corporate world – trying out roles in customer service, marketing and business development in the telecommunication and professional services sectors. In 2008, Denise had the opportunity to join the Loreto Normanhurst Development and Fundraising Committee, followed by a Board position

(2009-2015). During this time, she also chaired the Development Committee from 2011-2015. It was during this time of “giving back” to the Loreto community that inspired Denise to explore a different path, and find a career that better matched her passion and purpose. As a result, in 2013 Denise started her fundraising career in the not-for-profit sector. Currently, Denise is Partnerships Manager for a youth charity, The Reach Foundation.

“The power of felicity, sincerity, verity, justice, freedom… it’s these Loreto values that allowed me to follow my purpose into the not-for-profit sector after many years of corporate life.”

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Antoinette Hayden IBVM 1 9 11 – 1 9 7 4

Muriel Laura Hayden was educated at Loreto Convent, Dawson Street, Ballarat and Mandeville Hall, Toorak, where she later became Head in 1928. In 1933 she entered the IBVM at Mary’s Mount in Ballarat, taking the name of Antoinette, and was professed in 1935. In 1936, she was missioned to Mandeville Hall and continued her Arts Degree at Melbourne University. An inspiring and gifted teacher and administrator she was Mistress of Schools between 1943 and 1960 at Loreto Normanhurst and then Mary’s Mount. Famed for her sporting administration in 1959 she helped found Ballarat Girls’

School Sports Association and introduced shorts to the sports uniform. From 1961-1969, she was Superior at Mary’s Mount and in 1970 became the 8th Provincial of the IBVM. Making important contributions to education at local, state and national level, Antoinette was also passionately interested in the destitute. Hers was an energetic yet serene spirit – with deep sensitivity and understanding. Antoinette died suddenly whilst in Rome. Her last words were, “Whatever He Wants”. The new library in the Mary Ward Centre in Ballarat was named in her honour in 1975.

Hers was an energetic yet serene spirit – with deep sensitivity and understanding.

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Sarah Treacy C L A S S O F 2 012

Sarah proudly graduated from Loreto Normanhurst in 2012 as the first recognised Aboriginal woman to do so. She spent three years as a boarder on an Australian Indigenous Education Foundation scholarship. Now in her third year at Macquarie University studying to be a primary school teacher,

Sarah hopes to use her passion for education to bridge gaps between non-Indigenous and Indigenous people through working in the field of Aboriginal education. She also hopes to inspire all children, particularly Aboriginal children to use their education as a platform for success.

“Loreto Normanhurst changed my life in many ways. Prior to attending Loreto, I didn’t value the importance of education. Although my parents emphasised and modelled its importance, I had little belief in my ability to succeed in my studies. My time at Loreto challenged me in many ways however each challenge opened a new door for me to realise my full potential.”

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Clare Birrane IBVM 19 0 0 – 19 9 2

Mary Birrane was born at Woodend, Victoria, in 1900 and studied at the Loreto Teachers’ Training College at Albert Park. In 1923 Mary joined the IBVM at Mary’s Mount, Ballarat and was given the name of Clare. In 1926 she joined the Loreto Community at Mandeville Hall, Toorak. A Bachelor of Arts degree was achieved at the University of Melbourne followed by a few months at the Sorbonne University in 1929. From 1931-1946 Clare taught Maths, French, Latin, English and Christian Doctrine, and was missioned to Western Australia then returned to St Mary’s Hall, Melbourne. In 1948 she

became Superior of Loreto Normanhurst, overseeing the upgrading of the Junior School and Senior School classrooms, as well as the creation of the Chapel of the Sacred Heart. In 1955 she was transferred to Mary’s Mount as Mistress of Schools. Clare returned to Normanhurst as Superior between 1961-1962, before relocating to Marryatville. Between 1965-1970 Clare was the Sister Superior at Loreto Claremont in Western Australia, returning again to Normanhurst in 1971 as assistant to the Superior then as Bursar. In 1992 Mother Clare passed away at Loreto Abbey, Mary’s Mount.

In 1948 she became Superior of Loreto Normanhurst, overseeing the upgrading of the Junior School and Senior School classrooms, as well as the creation of the Chapel of the Sacred Heart.

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Mary Stanislaus Mornane IBVM 18 57 – 19 4 3

Anastasia Mornane, born 1857, grew up in Melbourne. She attended ‘The Academy’, the first Catholic School for young ladies in 1873, before becoming a senior boarder at Loreto Abbey, Mary’s Mount in Ballarat. In 1878, Annie entered the IBVM at Mary’s Mount as Sister Mary Stanislaus, the first Australian to enter the Loreto Order. Her first Profession was in 1881 and for many years she taught in Ballarat and Melbourne primary schools. She was remembered for her discipline and mathematical accuracy which she combined with a generosity of character. In 1915, Mary was appointed the Superior of Loreto Normanhurst, and in 1924 she was appointed the

Superior of Loreto Kirribilli. Her last years were spent at Normanhurst as the Sacristan. Mary Stanislaus Mornane gave up wealth and comfort to embrace a life of service and hard work in the following out of her call to the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary. She was ready to go anywhere and everywhere and was wholehearted in her giving to others. Mornane House at Loreto Normanhurst has the motto, “Brave Heart”, a reminder of Stanislaus Mornane’s courage and indomitable zeal as she approached every new venture in her life. She brought prayerful insight, wisdom and compassion to her teaching, to her leadership and all areas of her ministry.

She was ready to go anywhere and everywhere and was wholehearted in her giving to others.


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Jessica McNamee CLASS OF 2004

Jessica is an actress best known in Australia for her work as Sammy Rafter on the much-loved TV show Packed to the Rafters. She has also played roles in Home and Away and ABC’s The Time of our Lives. Jessica moved to Los Angeles after her first breakthrough role in the 2012 movie The Vow, starring Rachel McAdams and Channing Tatum. Since then she has found success playing Australian tennis legend Margaret Court in the 2017 critically acclaimed film, Battle of the Sexes, opposite Emma

Stone as Billie Jean King and Steve Carrell as Bobby Riggs. Other notable TV/film credits include roles in CHiPs (2017), Sirens (2014-2016) and The Neighbor (2017), opposite William Fichtner. Jessica has recently finished production on the sci-fi thriller Meg, opposite Jason Statham, which is slated for a 2018 release. She is a passionate advocate against gender inequality particularly within the entertainment industry and is a proud ambassador for the San Filippo Foundation.

Jessica moved to Los Angeles after her first breakthrough role in the 2012 movie The Vow.

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Veronica Reid IBVM 19 2 2 – 2 0 0 9

Veronica Reid grew up in Footscray, Melbourne. At the age of 14, she went to work at her grandparents’ hotel at Rokewood and at 24 studied at William Angliss College. Veronica entered the IBVM at Mary’s Mount, Ballarat, in 1947. She was given the name Marie Reparatrice and made her first profession in 1949. In 1955 she received her final profession. In 1969, following the Second Vatican Council, she returned to her baptismal name and ‘Sister Veronica’ became a household word to all. Veronica taught in various Loreto Schools throughout Australia from

1950-1968. From 1969-1988 at Normanhurst – then Marryatville – she took on the care of the boarders. The ‘Dragon’, as she was fondly known, was a firm disciplinarian. Veronica took a keen interest in sports and the grounds at Normanhurst and was a regular sight on her tractor accompanied by her two dogs. In 1989 Veronica travelled around Australia visiting the boarders and was to continue her support, and her encouragement as well, as the marginalised in Ballarat. She died peacefully in 2009 surrounded by members of her Loreto family.

The ‘Dragon’, as she was fondly known, was a firm disciplinarian. Veronica took a keen interest in sports and the grounds at Normanhurst and was a regular sight on her tractor accompanied by her two dogs.

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James Nicholson IBVM 18 9 7 – 19 8 7

James Nicholson was one of three sisters who entered the IBVM; the other two sisters, Alacoque and Pius opted to go to India. James’ motto was “My life is hidden with Christ in God” and those words truly sum up ‘Jamesie’ as she was called. Jamesie was gentle, humble and worked very hard behind the scenes. She entered the IBVM in January 1924, from a life in the Victorian Mallee region and was professed in 1925. She would have dearly loved to teach music and had a deep love of music. She also loved the opera and wrote to Joan

Sutherland. Unfortunately her eyesight was very poor so she chose to do domestic work, looking after the dormitories, the parlour and the children’s dining room. One Open Day at Normanhurst Jamesie was tidying the dormitories when visitors arrived with the Principal. James ducked into a cupboard and the Principal, keen to show the parents the available storage, opened the cupboard! Jamesie was at Normanhurst from 1943-1979 and was greatly loved by all the girls for her kindness, care and ability to listen to their stories.

“James’ motto was ‘My life is hidden with Christ in God’ and those words truly sum up ‘Jamesie’ as she was called.”


Angela Burford CLASS OF 2009

Angela is the Regional Administration Coordinator for the NSW Rural Fire Service. She has experience with emergency services both in administrative and operational capacities, previously managing District Membership Services and coordinating District Learning and Development, as well as running operational incidents. Angela manages the finance, human resources and broader administration matters for the Region East team. In addition, Angela gives her own time to her local, and wider community, as a volunteer firefighter, deputy captain and training officer of her Brigade. She

dedicates many hours to help skill fellow volunteers and she also engages the public to prepare themselves and their properties for the potential threat of catastrophic incidents. Angela acts as a mentor for newer members and displays her caring and encouraging nature to all. She has also assisted in major incident management teams for fire and storm events in areas including the Hawkesbury, Dubbo, the Central Coast and Hornsby. In what is typically a male-dominated sector, Angela has persevered and achieved much in her operational capacity, and encourages other young women to do so.

She dedicates many hours to help skill fellow volunteers and she also engages the public to prepare themselves and their properties for the potential threat of catastrophic incidents.

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Jo Thomson C L A S S O F 19 7 9

Jo is the co-founder of Learning4Development, an organisation that directly assists civil society organisations and governments to foster better international development practice, better partnerships and stronger civil society organisations. Jo says that her years at Loreto Normanhurst instilled in her a deep interest in social justice. She started her international development career as a registered nurse working as a volunteer in street clinics in the slums of Calcutta. Since then she has worked passionately with civil society organisations in the international development sector for over 25 years. Following her time in India, Jo worked with youth and community development initiatives in the Solomon Islands and remote Aboriginal communities in Western Australia. Knowing then that this was her career, Jo undertook

further post graduate studies in International Development and Public Health. Jo then worked with the Fred Hollows Foundation throughout Asia, Africa and the Pacific developing public eye health initiatives with the governments in those countries. After starting a family 15 years ago, Jo began working as an independent consultant, providing advice to the Australian government aid program and Australian development and humanitarian NGOs. Her work involves a range of inputs including policy advice on Australian government/civil society programs, designing and evaluating civil society programs, designing and advising on government health programs and analysing and advising NGOs on strategy, governance, policy, operational procedures, partnership and program management.

Jo worked with the Fred Hollows Foundation throughout Asia, Africa and the Pacific developing public eye health initiatives with the governments in those countries.

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Diaan Stuart IBVM Diaan, born and raised in Brisbane, completed her secondary schooling at Loreto Coorparoo. Following school she attended the Queensland Teachers’ College and on graduation taught for a short time in a public school. In 1964 Diaan entered the Loreto novitiate which at that time was at Normanhurst and so began her Loreto teaching career, teaching Year 10 mathematics in the school. Following novitiate, Diaan taught in a number of Loreto schools and was principal from 1974 until the end of 2000 (Adelaide, Ballarat, Normanhurst). It was in 1981 that Diaan returned to Normanhurst as Principal. In 2001 she was appointed the CEO of the Loreto Province

Education Board, a post she held until she left in 2006 for East Timor along with Sr Anne Byrne, as a foundation member of the Loreto mission in Baucau. In Baucau Diaan worked alongside the Marist Brothers in the Catholic Teachers’ College responsible for the masters’ program and the early childhood accreditation. In 2015 Diaan moved with Sr Margie Bourke to the village of Gari-uai to continue and expand the Loreto mission in East Timor. During 2017, Sr Ai-Thien Nguyen took over Diaan’s role as Director of the Loreto Preschool in the village and Diaan returned to Australia. Her portrait shows her walking to the college in in Baucau.

Diaan was appointed the CEO of the Loreto Province Education Board, a post she held until she left in 2006 for East Timor along with Sr Anne Byrne, as a foundation member of the Loreto mission in Baucau.

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Monica Cotter (née McGrath) C L A S S O F 19 4 3

Monica attended Loreto Convent, as it was known, from 1940-1943. She boarded for those four years, in fact all 100 students were boarders with only three day girls amongst them. Monica has fond memories of Maestro Alstrovandi who came weekly to train the choir and Cyril Monk who trained the orchestra. Monica had a love of music and after completing the Leaving Certificate returned to the school each week for piano lessons, gaining her A.MusA as a result. In

1947 Monica became the Secretary of the Ex-students’ Association, a position she held for the next seven years before moving to Scone. In the following years Monica twice held the role of President of the Exstudents’ Association as well as Treasurer of Loreto Federation in the 1970s. Monica’s four daughters attended Loreto Normanhurst – Monica-Mary, Virginia (deceased), Gabrielle and Elizabeth. Her granddaughter Samara also attended the school.

“I loved Loreto Convent from the day I walked inside the door and they were a wonderful four years. My love affair with Loreto has continued to this day.”

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2 6 . 0 9.19 4 6 – 0 4 . 0 9. 2 015

Ethnee Brooks (née McLoughlin) C L A S S O F 19 6 3

Ethnee was a Loreto Normanhurst boarder from the Upper Hunter Valley. She became a nurse and midwife at St Vincent’s Hospital and Royal Hospital for Women, a profession she worked in for 40 years. For many years she worked as a highly respected and much loved community nurse based in the Hills District. Ethnee worked for many charities. For her, the most rewarding was raising money for oncology treatment at Westmead Children’s Hospital with the

Intrepid Travelling Troupe (ITT), a group interested in dance and theatre. She also lent her support for underprivileged people and refugees through Josephite Community Aid. Ethnee had a long association with the Loreto Normanhurst Ex-students’ Association and, along with her husband Kerry, was very closely involved with Loreto while her daughter, Kate, was a student. In her retiring years Ethnee worked as a marriage celebrant.

“All who knew her, especially her classmates from the Class of ’63, will remember Ethnee’s zest for life, her theatricality, and the commitment and determination she put into achieving her goals.” Lyn Elliot (née Conolly) – Class of ‘63


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Joseph Michael Ritchie IBVM 1910 – 19 9 6

Monica Ritchie was born in Launceston in 1910. Her mother was a past pupil of Mary’s Mount where Monica was also educated in 1926 and 1927. Straight after school, she entered Loreto and was given the name Joseph Michael, reflecting a strong devotion to St. Joseph. Sr Joseph Michael taught at Loreto Albert Park and Toorak Mandeville Hall before becoming Mistress of Schools at Normanhurst in 1939, where she mothered the boarders who were so far away

from home. Gifted at crochet and needlework, Sr Joseph Michael helped boarders knit many socks for soldiers during the war. She was a keen gardener and cared for a garden wherever she went, decking the altars with flowers. Past pupils and family remember her for the letters and cards that she always sent. She left Normanhurst in 1973 to go to Ballarat where she taught until 1982 and then returned to Normanhurst for a few years before retiring to Ballarat.

Gifted at crochet and needlework, Sr Joseph Michael helped boarders knit many socks for soldiers during the war.

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Dr Jane Gavan C L A S S O F 19 8 0

Jane is an artist and senior academic at the University of Sydney. Through her work in higher education visual arts and corporate communities, she has enabled many people to realise their professional and creative potential. Jane exhibits her work across Australia and in the US, France, the UK, Belgium, China and Vietnam and is internationally recognised as a leader in the field of Creativity and Contemporary Glass using sustainable approaches. Jane was awarded the

ANZ Glass Prize in 1989 and the Art of Management Cambridge Scholars Exhibition Award in 2012 in the UK. Jane’s commitment to student engagement in the visual arts was recognised with her appointment as Associate Dean, Learning and Teaching at Sydney College of the Arts, a role she held from 2006–2012. She has been a leader of major curriculum changes in creative art approaches to university education in Australia and internationally.

Jane was awarded the ANZ Glass Prize in 1989 and the Art of Management Cambridge Scholars Exhibition Award in 2012 in the UK.

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Dorothea Frizelle IBVM 18 5 0 – 19 3 5

Katherine Frizelle was born in 1853 in Dublin, Ireland. She entered the IBVM at Rathfarnham in 1870 and took the name Dorothea of Jesus. Admitted to the novitiate in 1871 she made her first profession in 1873. Dorothea was one of the pioneering sisters of the IBVM in Australia arriving into Port Melbourne in 1875. Between 1875-1892, Dorothea taught at Mary’s Mount and in 1892 she and the community moved to Sydney into Aston Hall, Randwick. In 1896, Mother Gongazga Barry and Dorothea purchased the site which became Loreto

Normanhurst and by 1897 the sisters took residence. In 1904 Dorothea was made Superior of Loreto, North Sydney. In 1907, Dorothea attended the General Chapter of the Loreto in Dublin. She then travelled to Rome with the petition for Mary Ward who was then publicly declared as the Founder of the IBVM in 1909. Dorothea was acting Provincial in 1923 and from 19261929 was Superior of the Loreto Day School at Dawson Street in Ballarat. She died in 1935 and is buried in the bush cemetery at Normanhurst.

In 1896, Mother Gongazga Barry and Dorothea purchased the site which became Loreto Normanhurst and by 1897 the sisters took residence.

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Toni Matha IBVM, AM C L A S S O F 19 52

Margaret Matha was born in the country town of West Wyalong. Sr Toni spent six years as a boarder at Normanhurst and was a prefect in 1952. In 1954 she entered the novitiate of Loreto. Sr Toni taught secondary and primary levels at Ballarat and was Principal of the Toorak’s Junior School from 1960-1972 as well as youth chaplain at Winlaton. In 1968 she began her formal studies in social work. She worked with Catholic Social Services in Melbourne where she was inaugural Executive Officer, worked at the

Royal Women’s Hospital and was on the board of the Victorian Council of Social Services. Sr Toni returned to Sydney in 1986, establishing a Solo Parent Group and was a member of the board of the Australian Council of Social Services. In 1993 Sr Toni returned to Melbourne and worked as a volunteer with the Ozanam Community (St Vincent de Paul Society) and was appointed Chairperson 1998-2003. In 2007 Sr Toni was appointed a Member of the General Division of the Order of Australia (AM) for service to the community.

In 2007 Sr Toni was appointed a Member of the General Division of the Order of Australia (AM) for service to the community.


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Dr Angela Burgett C L A S S O F 19 9 8

The Mary Ward philosophy of “Women in time to come will do much” describes Angela perfectly. Angela had an unshakable desire to become a doctor, but with insufficient marks to start, she pursued nursing, graduating with merit. She then worked as a registered nurse at Westmead Children’s Hospital while studying medicine. Angela began her internship at the Gold Coast University Hospital before moving to Cairns where she commenced training with The Australian

College of Emergency Medicine and in 2014 she commenced joint Paediatric Emergency training. She moved back to the Gold Coast University Hospital where she was elected, by her peers, for the Rising Star award. Angela has just passed the written component of the Emergency Medicine Fellowship and will sit the clinical component in the coming months. Perseverance and hard work have led Angela to achieve her dream and passion – to become a doctor.

“My aim in life is to achieve what others say I cannot.”

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Kerry-Anne Walsh C L A S S O F 19 71

Kerry-Anne (Kerry) is one of the most respected political journalists of her time and an awardwinning author. From 1984-2009 she worked in the Australian Parliamentary Press Gallery as senior political correspondent for outlets such as the Bulletin magazine, the Sun-Herald, ABC Radio National Breakfast and Channel Ten. She became Bureau Chief of the Daily Telegraph in the late 1980s when only two other women in the Gallery held such senior positions. Kerry is the author of the best-selling The Stalking of

Julia Gillard, which won General Non-Fiction Book of the Year at the 2014 Australian Book Industry Awards. Kerry left full-time journalism in 2009 to establish her own consultancy and share her experience with people and organisations whose voices need to be heard. She is a political and media advocate for Cape York Indigenous communities and the organisations that represent them, and has been a writer and strategic media advisor for the World Health Organisation and other not-for-profit organisations.

Kerry-Anne is the author of the best-selling The Stalking of Julia Gillard, which won General Non-Fiction Book of the Year at the 2014 Australian Book Industry Awards.

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Theodore Gillick IBVM 1 9 11 – 1 9 9 0

Theodore came from a large property in South Australia in the Flinders Ranges. She was a boarder, educated at Loreto Marryatville in South Australia. She entered the IBVM at Ballarat in 1934 and was professed in December 1936. Theodore taught in Loreto schools across Australia: Mary’s Mount in Ballarat where she did her teacher training, Portland, Kirribilli, Nedlands, Normanhurst and Claremont and retired to Marryatville. She was mainly a primary school teacher, a pianist and music teacher. Theodore was Superior at Nedlands from 1953-1958, Normanhurst 1959-1961 and Mary’s

Mount, Ballarat from 1970-1975. The Centenary year of Loreto in Australia was in 1975 and Theodore loved celebrations and revelled in the organisation of significant occasions. She was an energetic and enthusiastic friend who inspired all to give their best and had a great love for and interest in the boarders. Theodore had a great sense of fun, was a good listener and always had time for everyone under her care. She loved walking, bush walks in particular. She sewed and crocheted with some beautifully finished products. During the final weeks of her life she crocheted a complicated rug for the homeless.

The Centenary year of Loreto in Australia was in 1975 and Theodore loved celebrations and revelled in the organisation of significant occasions.


Jessica Cerro C L A S S O F 2 015

Jessica (also known as Montaigne) was a finalist on national broadcaster triple j’s competition, Unearthed, with her song ‘Anyone But Me’ while still at school in 2012. It was the beginning of a string of musical successes, landing high rotation play on triple j, a feature on hip hop giants Hilltop Hoods’ three times platinum single ‘1955’, and her first album debuting at #4 on the ARIA charts. Jess’s achievements are widely acclaimed. She has been

nominated for Cosmopolitan’s ‘Fearless Woman of the Year’, triple j’s ‘j award’ for Album of the Year, and of course the ARIAS where she won Breakthrough Artist and was further nominated for Best Female Artist. Now, Jess frequently sells out national tours, is a favourite on the festival circuit, and uses her profile to advance social and environmental justice initiatives. She is slated to release her second album in 2018.

Jess has been nominated for Cosmopolitan’s ‘Fearless Woman of the Year’, triple j’s ‘j award’ for Album of the Year, and of course the ARIAS where she won Breakthrough Artist and was further nominated for Best Female Artist.

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Maureen Saunders IBVM 19 2 9 – 19 9 6

Maureen Saunders introduction to Loreto began at SS Peter and Paul’s South Melbourne where she was teaching. She entered the IBVM at Mary’s Mount in Ballarat in 1954 and made her first and final professions at Loreto Normanhurst in 1956 and 1961. As Maureen was a fully qualified teacher, in 1957 she was missioned to the foundation community at Blackburn in Victoria and she became the Principal there in 1966. An excellent teacher, Maureen taught at Kirribilli, Normanhurst and Toorak. At Loreto Normanhurst as Principal in 1976, she established four streams in the Secondary school, set up the School Advisory Board,

increased employment of lay staff, financed the present sports oval, implemented an extended curriculum, appointed a bursar, formed the Staff Association, organised the Loreto Parents Advisory Committee and phased out the Junior School. Maureen was an inspired teacher of Religion and English, a capable mathematician, historian and proficient in languages. She was the Superior of Kirribilli in 1985 and Marryatville in 1993. Maureen was a highly talented person, a gifted organist, poet, artist and musician and she organised liturgies and designed Loreto publications and displays. Her early death in 1996 was a great sorrow to her many friends.

Maureen was a highly talented person, a gifted organist, a poet, an artist and musician, organised liturgies and designed Loreto publications and displays.

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Louise Ritchard IBVM Louise was born in 1937, the second of three children. She was a niece of Cyril Ritchard, the actor, and was very proud of her actor uncle. She was educated at Loreto Kirribilli, leaving school at the end of 1953. After working at the Commonwealth Bank for five years, a job she loved and where she made many good friends, she entered the IBVM in 1957 and became known as Sr Austin. Louise was always bright and cheerful, loved meeting people and was always ready to welcome whoever came her way. She attended most of the Provincial Chapters/Congregations and was the chief secretary for each one. Despite her surprise at becoming a teacher, it became a large part of her life. Much of her teaching life was spent in Catholic Primary and Loreto Junior Schools, in various states of Australia. She learnt computer skills in the very early days of computers, taking computer courses whenever

she was given the opportunity and passing her skills to her students. She brought her information technology skills with her to Loreto Normanhurst. Another area of expertise was Louise’s care and devotion of the boarders. At Marryatville, she looked after their health and welfare, sleeping in the dormitories with them. She loved the boarders and followed up with their parents whenever they came to Adelaide. Louise’s years at Loreto Normanhurst were very happy ones. She loved the staff, the day students and the boarders. Her dog, Buster, was her constant companion after school and at weekends. In 2009, Louise celebrated her Golden Jubilee of 50 years since entering the IBVM. That year, she also went to Rome with Loreto Normanhurst Principal Barbara Watkins, to celebrate 400 years since the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary was started by Mary Ward.

In 2009, Louise celebrated her Golden Jubilee of 50 years since entering the IBVM.

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Lauren Zolezzi CLASS OF 2006

A passionate performer and opera singer, after graduating from Loreto Normanhurst, Lauren went on to complete a Bachelor of Arts (Languages) at the University of Sydney. She then moved to the UK to further her musical studies, where she completed an MA (Performance) at the Royal Academy of Music and The Opera Course at The Guildhall School of Music and Drama, both on full scholarship. In 2008, she was invited to perform as the solo cantor for the World Youth Day Friday Night Vigil, attended by Pope

Benedict XVI and 400,000 spectators at Randwick Racecourse. Since then, she has gone on to perform as a soloist in venues such as the Sydney Opera House, the City Recital Hall Angel Place, and London’s Wigmore Hall, St. John’s Smith Square, St. Martinsin-the-Field, the Royal Shakespeare Theatre and the Barbican Concert Hall. She has also featured on In Tune for BBC Radio 3, Fine Music 102.5 and FBI 94.5. Lauren performs regularly with companies such as Garsington Opera, Pinchgut Opera and English Touring Opera.

In 2008, she was invited to perform as the solo cantor for the World Youth Day Friday Night Vigil, attended by Pope Benedict XVI and 400,000 spectators at Randwick Racecourse.


Jennifer Hughes (née Hills) C L A S S O F 19 8 8

Jennifer was Dux of Loreto Normanhurst in 1988 and her participation in the Mock Trial competition at school resulted in a keen interest in the law. After school Jennifer obtained Science and Law degrees at the University of Sydney and went on to become an

environmental lawyer. She is now a partner at Baker McKenzie where she advises multi-national companies of their obligations under Australian and international environmental law. Jennifer is married with two children and a very proud mother of a current Loreto girl.

Jennifer is a partner at Baker McKenzie where she advises multi-national companies of their obligations under Australian and international environmental law.

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Professor Roslyn Arnold Roslyn has an ongoing connection with Loreto education. When she was 11 she boarded at Loreto Marryatville for one year then moved to Loreto Mandeville Hall Toorak. At Toorak Roslyn came under the wise and inspiring influence of gifted teachers who were women of intelligence, grace and courtesy and their teaching methods were ahead of the times. The values of a Loreto education resonated with those of her family background and heritage. Throughout Roslyn’s academic life at the University of Sydney for 30 years, and then at the University of Tasmania as Dean of Education, much of her

teaching, research and engagement in leadership and governance reflected the qualities and attitudes first developed at Loreto. As Chair of the School Council at Loreto Normanhurst, then Chair of the Loreto Education Board governing all the Loreto schools in Australia, Roslyn says that she was able to witness first hand the robustness of a Loreto education and its ability to adapt to change, transform lives, prepare students for the future and quietly but resolutely affirm and exemplify all the sound and wide-ranging qualities and aspirations of the founder Mary Ward and her followers through the ages.

Much of Roslyn’s teaching, research and engagement in leadership and governance reflected the qualities and attitudes first developed at Loreto.

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Victoria Rubensohn AM C L A S S O F 19 6 4

Victoria has had extensive experience in the legal, policy, compliance and operational aspects of media and communications regulation in Australia and overseas and has overseen the creation and operation of Codes of Practice and Statutory Codes in Broadcasting, Value Added Telecommunications, Mobile services, Telecommunications Consumer Protection and the Classification of films, computer/ video games and publications. Victoria also has extensive experience of the Advertising Industry Codes of Practice. Victoria is currently Consumer Director of Communications Compliance Ltd (overseeing the compliance of telecommunications entities with the Telecommunications Consumer Protection Code), Independent Reviewer for the

Advertising Standards Bureau and Principal of Omni Media (international communications consultancy specialising in regulatory policy and operations). She is a director of Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN), Media Access Australia and the Communications Law Centre Ltd and she is a Consumer Member of the Digital Marketing Code Authority. She is former President of the Communications and Media Law Association and former Chair of the National Film and Sound Archive. Victoria holds an MA in Government from Sydney University, a Bachelor of Laws from the University of New South Wales and a Master of Human Rights degree from Sydney University.

Victoria was the inaugural winner of the Sancta Sophia College award for Leadership which she was awarded in 2013.


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19 3 7 – 2 017

Anna Gaha IBVM C L A S S O F 19 5 3

Sr Anna Gaha IBVM, was baptised ‘Gregory Anne’; named for her mother’s friend who, as their Priest, had prepared her to become a Catholic. Anna began her school life at Loreto Kirribilli in 1944 and moved to the boarding school at Loreto Normanhurst in 1949, later entering the novitiate at Normanhurst in 1957. Her motto, “To Worship the Father in Spirit and Truth”, captured her feisty nature and in 1960, after her first profession, was missioned to Ss Peter and Paul, South Melbourne. A qualified and confident graduate of Sydney Kindergarten Teacher’s College, her teaching methods did not always conform to her Superiors. From 1965-1971 Anna was based in Western Australia using her energy and creativity establishing parish schools in the growth areas of Perth. Over the next ten years

she was in leadership positions as Principal at various Loreto schools including Normanhurst. From 19821994 Anne worked at the Parish Pastoral Ministry in Melbourne, as well as attending Mary Ward conferences and retreats overseas. She returned to Sydney as Principal of St Nicholas of Myra Parish School in Penrith. In 1998 Anna joined the Kirribilli Community and was invited by the Melkite Community to establish the school, Holy Saviour in Greenacre. Anna then began her long involvement with the Loreto Junior School at Kirribilli until 2016, working mainly in the area of literacy and staff support. Between 2000-2012 she visited South Africa to work with children in the township of KwaGuqa, volunteered in Sydney and Dubbo, as well as being honoured for her literacy work in Broome.

Anna began her school life at Loreto Kirribilli in 1944, and moved to the boarding school at Loreto Normanhurst in 1949, later entering the novitiate at Normanhurst in 1957.

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Annette Burges (née Curran) C L A S S O F 19 5 3

Loreto Normanhurst has played a very significant part in the lives of four generations of the Bridge, Curran, Burges, Russell and Dallen families. Marie and Teddie Bridge (Curran) were pupils in the 1910s and 20s and passed their affection for the school and the nuns on to the next generation. The Curran Theatre is named in honour of Teddie and the family were very touched when the nuns offered the School Chapel for her funeral in 1992. Teddie’s daughters Annette (Burges) and Louise (Byrne) have their own happy memories of being students at the school in the 40s and 50s. They have enjoyed continuing friendships with many of their contemporaries. Annette’s daughters Catherine (Russell), Jane (Leete) and Sarah (Dallen) Burges attended the school in the 70s and 80s. Catherine’s daughters, Emily (presently teaching at Loreto Toorak) and Sophie Russell, attended Loreto Toorak in Melbourne and Sarah’s daughters, Grace and Prudence Dallen, attended Loreto Kirribilli with Prudence currently in Year 9 with another one of Annette’s granddaughters, Annabelle Burges, who is in Year 8. Whilst the fourth generation were educated at other Loreto Schools, the long-held family connection to Normanhurst is maintained by their grandmother Annette, through her commitment to, and involvement with, the ex-students, her friendships with the Sisters of the IBVM and her enthusiasm for the activities of the school, which has ensured that it has remained an

important place for each of them. Annette remembers with great affection and admiration the nuns who were at Normanhurst during her years at the school, including Mother Clare, Mother Antoinette, Mother Miriam, Sister Genevieve, Mother Lua, Mother Evangeline and Mother Perpetua. They and many others were at the centre of their lives when Annette and her classmates were boarders at Normanhurst. They were capable and caring women who educated their pupils to meet the challenges of their time. Many of these pupils remained their lifelong friends. Annette went on to study Kindergarten Teaching at the Sydney Kindergarten Training College with a fellow pupil and great friend, Greg Gaha. After graduation, Annette married Kevin Burges. They have six children, seventeen grandchildren and one great grandchild and recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. Greg was a bridesmaid at their wedding before she entered the IBVM where she was known as Sister Anna. Anna, a devoted Loreto educator, and Annette, remained lifelong friends and rejoiced in the fact that for the latter part of Anna’s life, she was living at Kirribilli and Annette at Neutral Bay. They were almost neighbours and were able to spend many happy times together. Sadly, Anna died in June 2017 and is greatly missed. For over a century, Loreto has been a guiding influence on successive generations of Annette’s family. Normanhurst will always hold a special place in their hearts.

“Loreto has been a guiding influence on successive generations of our family.”


Annette and Sr Anna remained lifelong friends and rejoiced in the fact that in the latter part of their lives, Anna was living at Kirribilli and Annette at Neutral Bay – they were almost neighbours and had many happy times together.

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C e l e b r a t i n g 1 2 0 Ye a r s O F L O R E T O N O R M A N H U R S T E D U C AT I O N

Profile for Fresco Creative

Loreto Normanhurst > 120 Year Anniversary > 120 Inspirational Loreto Women > Coffee Table Book  

Loreto Normanhurst is a school in northern Sydney which produces a school magazine and a range of collateral for events and special occasion...

Loreto Normanhurst > 120 Year Anniversary > 120 Inspirational Loreto Women > Coffee Table Book  

Loreto Normanhurst is a school in northern Sydney which produces a school magazine and a range of collateral for events and special occasion...

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