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uptown V 1 4 # 9

SPOT CHECK : SOUTH SHORE # s t i l l f re e

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PROFILE : TOOTS

Kelia Moniz Photo: Tony Heff


F R E E

P A R K I N G

“If it wasn’t for the waves in Town, I probably wouldn’t surf the way I do today. It’s a perfect place for a kid to grow up surfing, because in Town, we get waves for every level of surfing,” says 21-year-old Josh Moniz, sharpening his air repertoire at one of his favorite breaks. “Kewalos is one of my favorite waves because almost every wave offers the same opportunity: it helps me try new tricks and combos.” Photo: Tony Heff


D O U B L E

P A R K E D


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S / D E PA R T M E N T S

06 Free Parking 08 Double Parked 16 Editor’s Note 18 News & Events 70 Grom Report 78 Environment 78 Industry Notes 82 Last Look


Alyssa Wooten Photo: Heff


Tyler Rock

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S / F E AT U R E S

34 SPOT CHECK

50

Heff

Breaking down four of Town’s best waves: Bowls, Queens, Sandy Beach and Kewalos

THE PURIST: THE “TOOTS” PROFILE

Heff

How a 44-year-old Filipino native became one of the South Shore’s most stylish longboarders

60 SHE RIPS: PRINCESSES OF QUEENS Talking story with five wahine who are familiar faces in the Queens lineup: 11-year-old Sophia Culhane, 12-year-old Kelis Kaleopaa, 13-year-old Haley Otto, 13-year-old Keani Canullo and 14-year-old Samantha Rust


Tony Heff

Editorial

FRESH POKE BOWLS. CUSTOMIZED THE WAY YOU LIKE IT.

Publisher Mike Latronic Managing Editor Cash Lambert Photo Editor Tony Heff Art Director John Weaver Multimedia Director Tyler Rock Ambassador-at-Large Chris Latronic West Coast Ambassador Kurt Steinmetz Staff Photographers Tony Heff, Chris Latronic, Mike Latronic, Tyler Rock, Keoki Saguibo Free Thinkers Kahi Pacarro, Kyveli Diener

Senior Contributing Photographers

Erik Aeder, Eric Baeseman (outbluffum.com), Brian Bielmann, Ryan Craig, Jeff Divine, Pete Frieden, Dane Grady, Bryce Johnson, Ha’a Keaulana, Ehitu Keeling, Laserwolf, Bruno Lemos, Mana, Zak Noyle, Shawn Pila, Jim Russi, Jason Shibata, Spencer Suitt, Tai Vandyke

Contributing Photographers

John Bilderback, Marc Chambers, Dayanidhi Das, Brooke Dombroski, DoomaPhoto, Rick Doyle, Isaac Frazer, Pete Hodgson, Joli, Kin Kimoto, Claire Murphy, Dave “Nelly” Nelson, Nick Ricca, Gavin Shige, Heath Thompson, Bill Taylor, Wyatt Tillotson, Jimmy Wilson, Cole Yamane

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Keoki

EDITOR’S LETTER By Cash Lambert Paddling out into the Queens lineup during a recent session, I could feel the mana. Maybe it’s because it was the break where I had learned to surf so many years ago that I could feel it. Perhaps it was because the sun was beginning to sink below the watery horizon, transforming the sky from a deep blue to a glorious explosion of orange and yellow and red. It could have been the fact that given the time of day, the lineup was quickly thinning and a 2-4 foot swell was continuing to vibrate through the area. Though it was likely all the above, and more. As I slid down fun-sized, slowly breaking walls of water, I continued to take in the mana, glancing at Diamond Head and imagining all those who had gazed upon the volcanic cone. Like Hawaiian royalty. Duke Kahanamoku and the lineage of Beach Boys, too. And all those who have come from the corners of the earth to see the idyllic paradise for themselves. After riding back to back waves, I paddled out and took a moment to rest, staring at the multi-storied buildings that lined the horizon. I thought about this contrast created from Diamond Head and the Kalakaua Avenue strip: historical and timeless and vintage clashing with the modern and the technology and the now. But it’s not just Queens where you feel this surreal and contrasting experience in quality waves. In this issue, dedicated to Town, we break down four locales that offer both high performance opportunities and the chance for mellow longboard sessions, intertwined with fascinating historical aspects: Queens, Bowls, Kewalos and Sandy Beach (page 34). We also examine a cast of characters that make the South Shore lineups so interesting, like Arthur “Toots” Anchinges, who is regarded as one of the most stylish longboarders at Queens today (page 50). We also talk story with a close-knit crew of wahines who call Queens their home break (page 60): 11-year-old Sophia Culhane, 12-year-old Kelis Kaleopaa, 13-year-old Haley Otto, 13-year-old Keani Canullo and 14-year-old Samantha Rust. After catching a few more waves, the darkness had turned my wave selection into a guessing game. I caught one more wave in, sliding towards the city lights. My feet touched sand, and after a quick rinse at the beach shower, I stepped onto the street, walking amongst a thick crowd of tourists and locals. The mana gave way to a sensation of a city bustle, two feelings that - when mixed together - exemplify what we call Town.


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Jeff Hubbard

HUBBARD DOMINATION: IN BACK TO BACK WEEKENDS, JEFF HUBBARD WINS HAWAII BODYBOARDING’S SANDY BEACH CHALLENGE AND DAVE HUBBARD WINS CUTTER MAZDA MAKAPU’U JACKSTANCE CHALLENGE

During the first two weekends in August, the Hawaii Bodyboarding Pro Tour ran back to back events on Oahu’s east side. On August 5th and 6th, the Sandy Beach Challenge - a APB 1 Star rated event for the Men’s Division with $5000 prize purse ran in 2-4 foot surf. The Men’s and Master’s Division kicked off on the first day of action. Jeff Hubbard entered the event aiming to defend his 2016 Sandy Beach Challenge title, and after contestants and the audience on hand watched him advance deeper into the contest, it appeared as though no one was going to overtake his arsenal of tricks, which included turns, airs and spins. In the Final, energetic young guns Sammy Morretino and Tanner McDaniel put up a good fight against Jeff, coming in second and third respectively and Kahekili Labatte finished in fourth. The following day saw champions crowned in the remaining divisions: Stand Up, Junior, and Women. In one of the most 18

anticipated Finals of the day - Stand Up - Maui’s Mack Crilley was looking to defend his 2016 title, but was bested by Dave Hubbard’s spray-infused turns and spins. On August 13th, the DropKnee Cutter Mazda Makapu’u Jackstance Challenge ran in 1-2 foot surf, with an occasional 3-foot set wave. A relaxed, homegrown vibe permeated the sand, but once competitors entered the water, it was all about laying down big turns. In the Final, Dave Hubbard carved his way to the win, with Mack Crilley coming in second, Dayton Wago third and Micah McMullin fourth. Visit the Hawaii Bodyboarding Facebook page for updates on the 2017 Tour!


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Danny Black

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SANDY BEACH CHALLENGE RESULTS Men’s Final 1 Jeff Hubbard 2 Sammy Morretino 3 Tanner McDaniel 4 Kahekili Labatte Women’s Final 1 Jessica Becker 2 Karla Costa

Dave Hubbard

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Stand Up 1 Dave Hubbard 2 Kawika Kamai 3 Mack Crilley 4 Dayton Wago Masters 1 Ben Severson 2 John Kamai 3 Cary Kayama 4 Wade Aato Junior Final 1 Kainoa Lono 2 Kawika Kami 3 Ezra Hill 4 Noa Aquino CUTTER MAZDA MAKAPU’U JACKSTANCE CHALLENGE RESULTS 1 Dave Hubbard 2 Mack Crilley 3 Dayton Wago 4 Micah McMullin


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#Hawaiiansweep

CODY YOUNG AND BRISA HENNESSY WIN VANS US OPEN OF SURFING PRO JUNIOR Photos Jimmy Wilson

On Saturday, August 5th, Cody Young and Brisa Hennessy stood atop the podium at the World Surf League Vans US Open of Surfing Pro Junior, holding first place trophies and a Hawaiian flag. In 3-4 foot conditions at the Huntington Beach Pier, Cody, a Maui native, and Brisa, who calls Oahu home, claimed first place in the Men’s and Women’s Pro Junior divisions. “To win this event in my last year as a Pro Junior is the best thing ever,” Cody said. “I’ve done good on the juniors this year, but haven’t gotten a win yet and this is my first major win of my career so far — I’m just so stoked on this right now. This will give me a lot of confidence going to the back half of the year and especially trying to get back to the World Junior Championships since all these guys are there.” Cody opened up the Final with a 8.33, and after multiple lead changes, backed it up with a 7.13. “For Brisa to win this event as well is super special and bring back two wins to Hawaii,” Cody continued. “We’re excited to have that opportunity and showcase what we can do. I’m looking forward to the rest of this year and hopefully carry this momentum into Kiama next year.” In the Women’s Final, Brisa opened up with an 8.67, and battled back to earn a 6.33, handing her the lead as time expired. “All the girls in that heat are amazing and I’ve been pushed by them for so many years to better my surfing,” she said. “I’m just so happy right now. I think the level of women’s junior surfing is getting pushed higher and higher, and I’m excited to see what happens. There’s just no words that describe how I really feel right now, this is so incredible and will never forget this. I can’t thank my family and everyone back home enough for all their support. I couldn’t do this without them.”


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6TH ANNUAL LIVE LIKE SION GROMFEST Story and photos by Marina Miller

The 6th Annual Live Like Sion Gromfest, which took place on August 5th, was a day that started and ended with rainbows. Held at PKs, a fun wave on the South side of Kaua’i, and put on by the Live Like Sion Foundation, 200 keiki signed up for this fun-filled event sponsored by Volcom, Poipu Surf, Derek Kawakami, Kuhio Motors and Garden Island Motorcycle Club. More donations were contributed by Oakley, Nixon, Tamba Surf Company, Keoki's Paradise, Reef and Vans. Families from all over the Garden Isle spent the day celebrating the memory of Sion Milosky, a big wave surfer, fun-loving father, and friend who passed away in 2011. The overall feeling from everyone was of gratitude and aloha for the Milosky family. Throughout the day, prizes of donations from local companies like Malie, Merriman’s, and local artists were raffled off. Present during the day were Awakea and Sariya Milosky, who helped hand screen t-shirts, pass out prizes and operated the surf contest. In the tradition of surfing being a family activity, the most popular division of the day was the keiki push in. Parents, aunties, and uncles helped kids catch small inside whitewash and the crowd on hand saw some of the biggest smiles of the day. Tandem toddler throws were the highlight of the session.

Axel Irons

Lunch was generously provided by Keoki’s Paradise. The line for shave ice - thanks to Tamba, who has been making shave ice at the contest for 6 straight years - went all the way into the water! As the tide rose the waves started to pick up, giving smaller statured surfers the opportunity to get some cover time under the curtain. The Pili Division is something special to this contest: a team of one adult and one kid both surf one heat, and only one wave from each surfer gets scored. It was entertaining to see these groms shred just as hard as the adults. The awards ceremony was held down the street at the Kukuiula Small Boat Harbor. As volunteers Ronny Chen, Kalena Taylor and Rochelle Ballard set up the second location, the beach crowd made its way over to enjoy the family style potluck picnic. With a heart warming pule, the food was blessed and the kids were not shy to race to the kaukau line. As everyone enjoyed the ono food, a smudge of color in the sky slowly grew into a huge double rainbow. With that blessing of beauty, the ceremony began. Everyone in the winners circle got hooked up big time with trophies and back to school gear. Axel Irons won his first ever paddle in scoring heat in the 6-8 division. Six surfboards were awarded to well deserving kids. Contest director Milo Murguia smiled while handing out all the trophies and grand prizes, including local surfboards from makers Aukai Lee, Kamalei Alexander with Modern Hawaiian Collective, Scovel Surfboards, a fun board by Hubboards, and two kid-size high performance boards by Tamba Surf Company. This special event a was a loving community effort for the keiki of Kaua’i in memory of our friend, SI.


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Boys 11 & 12 1 Zaia Kakitas 2 Brayden Padilla 3 Eli Ibbs 4 Jae Woods 5 Fin Buick 6 Aiden Ibbs Girls Longboard 9-12 1 Kawai Graham 2 Tehani Carano 3 Sydney Doi 4 Cameron Haeger 5 Kiana Mertz 6 Lekili Mendonca Boys 9 & 10 1 Evan Padilla 2 Ari Kakitsis 3 Kadin Oiler 4 Legend Leopoldinp 5 Jonah Grubbs 6 Manalanu Leopoldino Girls 6-8 1 Zoie Zietz 2 Malaria Mai 3 Mila O'Rourke

6TH ANNUAL LIVE LIKE SION GROMFEST RESULTS

Boys Longboard 14 & U 1 Kai Mootz 2 Kanoa Nelson 3 Koa Huges 4 Ethan Hoff 5 Luke Nagel 6 Oliver Zietz

Girls Longboard 14 & U 1 Leilani Weber 2 Mahealani Bryan 3 Molly Middlebrook 4 Piper Sheehan 5 Elise Nagel 6 Lililehua Taylor 7 Sarah Burrell

Pili Division 1 Beavers- Rochelle Ballard & Rylan Beavers 2 Tigers3 Skiz4 Dynamic Duo5 Zietz6 Z Abubo-

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Open 14 & U 1 Tiger Abubo 2 Rylan Beavers 3 Victor Hepburn 4 Tahaki Papke 5 Summer Navarette 6 Stone Abubo

4 Anonui Emery 5 True Goodwin 6 Makena Jimenez Boys 6-8 1 Axel Irons 2 Kahanu Rangel 3 West Kelly 4 Chase Parkinson 5 Cheikn Sall


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Kekaula Campbell

33RD ANNUAL CHINA UEMURA LONGBOARD SURFING CLASSIC

Story and photos by Keoki

The 33rd Annual China Uemura Longboard Surfing Classic was an event that holds a place in history on the beach of Waikiki. Roy “China” Uemura, also known as “Uncle China” was inducted to the Hawaii Waterman Hall of Fame in 2013, because of his numerous surfing championships, his willingness to teach many and the impact he has had on the Hawaiian community. China has raised over $200,000 in donations throughout the years from his events. His Longboard Surfing Classic is known to Hawaii’s longboarders as one of the must-do events of the year. Uncle China announced that the 33rd Annual would be the last year he would run the event. Word spread fast, so spaces filled up quickly. There were entries from all corners of Hawaii, California, and Japan, making it the longest running China Uemura Longboard Classic which took four days: running July 27-30.

Samantha Robertson


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Uemura Ohana

Queens welcomed over 300 entrants and 48 teams with a consistent 2-3 foot swell that lingered all weekend long. The Pro division, which was held on Thursday and Friday, saw Hawaii’s Nelson Ahina take top honors with smooth and stylish noserides followed by flowing cutbacks and turns. Waikiki’s own Fritz Belmoro took second followed by Maui’s Mau Ah Hee and Kekaula Campbell. A new division this year was the Hydrofoil division. It was a mindbender watching someone on a board floating through Waikiki without any breaking waves. Uncle China has consistently supported the new and upcoming ways to ride waves throughout his events, showing how much support he has for Hawaii’s talent. Throughout the 33 years, there have been a core of people who have been there for Uncle China and his event who were a big part of its long running. The Eddie Aikau Foundation, Allen Hoshino of AKH Construction, Craig Sugihara of T&C Surfboards, and Gavin Hasegawa have been volunteering since day one. With strong sponsors partnered with Uncle China's heart of gold, the amount

of donations well exceeded the $200,000 mark. Proceeds went to the American Heart Association, The Sex Abuse Treatment Center of Hawaii, Na Kama Kai, and more. Uncle China also started a nonprofit to help local pro surfers make it to international events, as well as countless hula groups. The amount of entrants and positive comments coming from the surf community at the four day event showed how much Uncle China has done for this sport in Hawaii and how many people he has influenced. Having seen the impact that their father had on everybody at the event, his sons Kanoe (38-years-old) and Kekoa (34-years-old) are aiming to take the event on their shoulders and carry their dad’s mission. “With the 33rd Annual China

Uemura Longboard Classic at a close, I’d like to thank everyone who sponsored, volunteered and entered over the years,” Kekoa said. “Without everyone’s participation in the event, it would not have gone on as long as it has. Years of stoking out groms, fueling rivalries, and bringing families together for a weekend of fun in Waikiki was more than my dad could ask for. For now, his health is our main concern, but we look forward to working with friends

and family to possibly bring this event back for another 33 years.” This may be the last year that Uncle China ran his historic contest, but the aloha that he has spread throughout his years has been forever engraved in the history of Waikiki. For a full list of results, along with a photo gallery, visit Freesurfmagazine.com!


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1 Kai Lenny 2 Jamie Mitchell 3 Tom Lowe 4 Billy Kemper 5 Alex Botelho 6 Trevor Carlson

waiting for finally came. Everyone was a little too far in or too deep. I knew that that was it. I did a slow bottom turn and then I knew I had it.”

KAI LENNY WINS THE 2017 PUERTO ESCONDIDO CHALLENGE Maui’s Kai Lenny claimed victory on July 31st at the 2017 Puerto Escondido Challenge after besting a competitive field of 24 of the world’s best big wave surfers in epic 20-to-25 foot surf at Mainland Mexico’s Puerto Escondido. The first event of the 2017 World Surf League Big Wave Tour, the Puerto Escondido Challenge, saw no shortage of excitement as Lenny took on towering conditions to collect his first BWT victory. “I remember coming here last year and being super terrified because I had never been here,” said Lenny. “My goal last year was to make the Final because I missed out last time. There are so many good big wave surfers in the world that when you get called up you really feel like you have to perform and charge. My goal today was to not hold back and, when a good one came, go no matter what. It was a pleasure competing with these guys. Any one of them could have won if they got the waves and I was just grateful to get that last one in the end.” The hour-long Final witnessed multiple lead changes as Lenny, Australia's Jamie 32

Mitchell, Great Britain's Tom Lowe, Hawaii’s Billy Kemper, Hawaii’s Trevor Carlson and Portugal’s Alex Botelho navigated the heavy beachbreak conditions. Mitchell charged out the gates to lock in two massive waves, but his incomplete rides only garnered low scores. Lenny took advantage of a solid set to earn a 6.33 (out of a possible 10) and gained the lead heading into the halfway mark. Under pressure in the second position, Mitchell flew down a steep barrel for a 7.22 to surpass Lenny’s score. With fifteen minutes left on the clock, Lowe and Kemper had also posted solid attempts, but still trailed behind Lenny and Mitchell. The dramatic Final continued all the way to the dying minutes of the heat. Lenny, still in second place, miraculously found the exit on a massive barrel for an excellent 8.60 and the win. “I can’t believe it,” continued Lenny. “I am so stoked. That was awesome. I knew I needed a good score because Jamie (Mitchell) got one. It was hard to get waves out there because they were just so shifty, but then the one that I had been

In his fifth Big Wave event, the win marks Lenny’s career-best result. Lenny, as of August, leads the rankings heading into the Northern Hemisphere season, which opens October 15, 2017. Lenny will look to maintain his frontrunner position by besting his previous 9th place result in Pe’ahi and 13th in Nazaré. The 2017 BWT season is divided into Southern Hemisphere and Northern Hemisphere components. The Southern Hemisphere window, which runs from May 1 – August 31, 2017, is complete after the Puerto Escondido Challenge. The Northern Hemisphere window will open on October 15 and run through January 31, 2018 with event options in Portugal, Hawaii and Mexico. 2017 BWT Puerto Escondido Challenge Final Results 1 Kai Lenny (HAW) 23.53 2 Jamie Mitchell (AUS) 18.64 3 Tom Lowe (GBR) 12.23 4 Billy Kemper (HAW) 8.50 5 Alex Botelho (PRT) 6 Trevor Carlson (HAW) 2.46 2017 WSL Big Wave Tour Schedule Southern Hemisphere: May 1 – August 31, 2017 Puerto Escondido Challenge: Puerto Escondido, Mexico Northern Hemisphere: October 15, 2017 – January 31, 2018 Nazaré Challenge: Nazaré, Portugal Pe’ahi Challenge: Haiku, Hawaii


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C H E C K

Ala Moana Bowls A man-made wave referred to as the “Pipeline” of Town, Ala Moana Bowls is known to some legendary watermen as one of the birthplaces of modern day tube riding. Different swell sizes reveal the varying nature of the wave, which is predominantly a left, along with a right, and on any given day, you can expect to see some of Hawaii’s top surfers pulling into barrels and showcasing power turns, or see longboarders sliding down fun-sized faces.

Kaiwi Berry

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Rock Billy Blankenfield

The left at Ala Moana Bowls is no doubt a world-class wave. With the perfect swell direction, Bowls is a machine.

Mike Akima

Keoki

After that, legendary local boys like Gerry Lopez, Buttons Kaluhiokalani, and Larry Bertlemann were some of the first to really prove its potential while pinging Bowls as a hub of progressive surfing. The Town summers in the 70s were just as progressive as they are today. Ronnie

Rock

Bowls was originally known by the locals as being a very hollow and fast wave that was - at the time - too difficult to surf. But Young Donald Takayama and his crew never stopped pushing the limits of their 9-foot longboards, showing that the bowl could be conquered.

Chris Latronic

Keoki

History: Ala Moana Bowls is in fact a man-made wave. In the early 1950s, construction began to connect Kewalo Basin and the Ala Wai Small Boat Yacht Harbor. Dirt and coral were excavated to join the two harbors, and with that sacrifice emerged the Bowl: the Ala Moana Bowl. Swells then began to hug the reef creating what is now known as the ‘Pipeline’ of the South Shore.


Head

Suicides

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Kaisers Rock Piles In Betweens Threes

The Wave: Bowls is predominantly a left, but there is also right. Under the best conditions, the right can be superb, sometimes A-framing to a consistent open face where you can tag 2-3 sections before punting or bashing a finish. It’s also very natural-footer friendly. The left at Ala Moana Bowls is no doubt a world-class wave. With the perfect swell direction, Bowls is a machine. At 1-2 foot, it’s a fun longboardable crest that’ll take you gliding on a 50-yard ride before you know it. At 3-6 feet, bring out your sharpest blade because Bowls at this size was made for shredding! Bigger swell adds more dominance to the left, but also offers an incredible canvas that has the potential to break deep on the middle outside bowl and peel delightfully down to the furthest capacity of the Bowls reef. The amount of

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You could also park at the Ala Moana Boat Harbor parking lot on the Diamond Head side of Bowls. This area offers access to other spots as well. Bowls is about a 5-10 minute paddle out, depending on your paddle speed. Go to Board: The best shred stick in your quiver.

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Where to Park: Ala Moana Beach Park parking lot on Magic Island is the quickest way to get out to Bowls. With minimal paddle out distance, you have to brave over the murky abyss of the harbor canal and you’re there.

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more opportunity to ride. If you time it just right, especially on a Friday, there’s a fine possibility to miss the crowd, catch some sets, and watch a firework show from the nearby Hilton Hawaiian Village all in one session.

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C H E C K

Queens What was once a playground for Hawaiian royalty is now one of the world’s most iconic surf breaks, where beginners are pushed on their first waves by beach boys and lifelong surfers expertly noseride towards shore, with both Diamond Head and towering skyscrapers serving as a backdrop.


Kai Sallas


Walshy Crystal Walsh

A mellow vibe permeates through the Queens lineup, revealing the nature of the wave. Slow-rolling and playful, Queens is a fun wave to longboard, and is home to many longboard contests throughout the summer.

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The Crowd: Paddle out on Queens on any given day, and you’ll History: Queens is located in the heart of Waikiki, near the Bluebirds Public Rice Bowls Kewalos Big find yourself in a lineup of surfers on longboards, SUPs, soft tops bronze statue of Duke Kahanamoku welcoming Rall with open ights Bomburas Baby Haleiwa Courts arms. The wave is named after Queen Lili’uokalani, who had C o n c e s s i o n s F l y s P o and i n t shortboards. P a n i c C l i f f sBecause the break is so accessible and user friendly, a beach house and pier near Walls, a break found south of B l u e b i r d s C u n h a s T o n g s C h ithe n a lineup W a l l s is usually heavily crowded. If you’re looking to score a session Queens. It’s also the site where Duke Kahanamoku, in 1917, S e c r e t s B r o w n s D i a m o n d H e a d S u i c i d e s with few others out, the best bet is an early r a v e y-afrom r d s W a l l s B omorning w l s K a i s or e r ssunset R o c k session on a weekday, or, if there’s a full moon, achieved the longest ride in surfing lore - over aG mile i l e s I n at B e t w e e n s T ha r enight e s F o usurf. rs Canoes outside Castles to Publics, Cunhas, Queens andP ending Queens Walls Castles Bluebirds Public Canoes. Rice Bowls Kewalos Big Rights Bomburas Where to Park: There are multiple parking garages along Baby Haleiwa Courts Concessions Flys Kalakaua Avenue, along with less expensive street parking near The Wave: A mellow vibe permeates through the Queens Point Panic Cliffs Bluebirds Cunhas lineup, revealing the nature of the wave. Slow-rolling and playful, B o w l s K a i s e r s R o c k Pthe i l e Honolulu s I n B e t wZoo. eens Tongs China Walls Secrets Browns Queens is a fun wave to longboard, and is homeTD hito many rees Fours Canoes Queens Walls amond Head Suicides Graveyards Walls C a s t lbigger e s B l u esouth b i r d s P Go u b l ito c Board: R i c e B o8’0”+ wls Longboard longboard contests throughout the summer. During Bowls Kaisers Rock Piles In Betweens w a l o s the B iinside g Rights Bomburas Baby swells, when waves range from shoulder to headKT hehigh, rees Fours Canoes Queens Walls ramp section is prime for progressive surfing. H a l e i w a C o u r t s C o n c e s s i o n s F l y s P o i n t Panic

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C H E C K

Sandy Beach Located on Oahu’s southeast shore, about 12 miles from Waikiki, is Sandy Beach, a favorite among locals and visitors alike. Sandy Beach boasts a variety of breaks along its shoreline, suited for different types of wave riding. Sandy’s is also a hangout hub for those looking to escape the nearby city and enjoy a day at the beach.

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The nickname “broke neck beach� is no joke, as the shallow inside is well known for serving up spinal injuries.

Liam McTigue


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The Crowd: Sandy Beach gets crowded, whether it’s the beach History: With deep roots as the “birthplace ofP progressive iles In Betweens Threes Fours Canoes or the other reef sections. As a very well bodyboarding”, according to 9-time Bodyboarding Q u e e n sWorld W a l l s C a s t l e s Bitself, l u e b i the r d s shorebreak Public known and popular spot, people young and old, local and Champion Mike Stewart, Sandy Beach has been R i cthe e B osite w l s of K e wmany alos Big Rights Bomburas visiting, all flock to the sunny golden sand to enjoy a day at the aby Haleiwa Courts Concessions Flys pioneering bodyboard contests, seeing many Bbodyboarding P o i n t P a n i c C l i f f s B l u e b i r d s C u n h a s beach. Thus, the lineup and especially shorebreak can get a bit innovations throughout the years. Tongs China W a l l s congested. Secrets Browns iamond Head Suicides Graveyards Walls The Wave: The shorebreak is always the mostDcrowded, with Bowls Kaisers Rock Piles In Betweens Where to Park: The parking lot along the stretch of beach holds swaths of bodyboarders, bodysurfers and swimmers frolicking in Threes Fours Canoes Queens alls many stalls Wfor cars. The prime spots right in front of the main its often powerful and dangerous shore pound. The nickname Castles Bluebirds Public Rice Bowls shorebreak section tend to go quickly and people will post up all “broke neck beach” is no joke, as the shallow Kinside is well ewalos Big Rights Bomburas Baby day. But there is more parking past the bathroom and showers known for serving up spinal injuries. Moving upH athe beach to leiwa Courts Concessions Flys Point and overflow parking on the grass out near Kamehameha a small reef outcropping just out from the sandP aisn iHalf c C lPoint. iffs Bluebirds Cunhas Tongs Highway, so getting a spot is never much of an issue. While often frequented by bodyboarders and Cthe h i nsite a W of a l lpro s Secrets Browns Diamond bodyboarding events, the shallow reef provides H e aadshort S u i c but ides Graveyards Walls Bowls K a iis s e Full r s RPoint, o c k P i l e s I n Go B e t to w e e Board: n s T h r e For e s Sandy’s, your best bet for fun is a bodyboard, punchy barrel and ramp section. Further outside F o u r s C a n o e s Q u e e n s W a l l s C a s t l e s swim fins to bodysurf the shorebreak. or a good pair of a softer but longer ride that is more suited for a shortboard or B l u e b i r d s P u b l i c R i c e B o w l s K e w a l o s B i g longboard. On rare huge east swells, the way outside has seen a Rights Bomburas Baby Haleiwa Courts fast running left that has potential for towing in. Concessions Bluebirds Secrets

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C H E C K

Kewalos Kewalos is the go-to South Shore spot for high performance surfing on any given summer day. A hot bed for Hawaii’s emerging talent, the left and right A-frame is a favorite surf locale for a unique group of surfers native to Oahu such as Carissa Moore, Zeke Lau, Seth and Josh Moniz, Alessa Quizon, and Kaito Kino to name a few. The adjacent beach park of Kewalo Basin is host to several summer-time surf competitions as well as a great place to meet up with friends for a surf. But it wasn’t always that way.

Seth Moniz

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History: Kewalo can be translated from Hawaiian as “the place of wailing.” In ancient times, this area contained a spring which was used as a place for human sacrifices. Here, kauwa (outcasts) were first drowned before being taken to the Heiau of kanelaau (temple) on the slopes of Punchbowl Crater for burning in the imu ahi (fire oven). The harbor area at Kewalos was once a shallow reef that enclosed a deep section of water that had been used as a canoe landing, fishery and anchorage during preindustrial Hawaii. Originally know as the fishery of Kukuluae’o, this unique place was a beacon of sustainability and provided a bounty of seafood for the early Hawaiians of Honolulu. During the first quarter of the 20th century, the Kaka’ako area of Honolulu became home to Honolulu’s heavy industries such as iron works and lumber yards. Due to its proximity to these warehouses,

ESPN

A wave some may call “man-made,“ Kewalos breaks left and right along a shallow reef during south / southwest swells and works best from 2-6 foot.


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The Crowd: As with most South Shore spots, you’re going Kewalo Harbor was regularly used to unload massive amounts of Rights Bomburas Baby Haleiwa Courts timber and other goods, which would be usedC oto build the city’s n c e s s i o n s F l y s P o i n to t have P a n i c toC deal l i f f s with a crowd. Kewalos can be exceptionally crowded with on the outside and groms on the inside, growing infrastructure and housing. DredgingB of the harbor area l u e b i r d s C u n h a s T o n g s C h i n a W a l lUncles s throughout the years continued to shape the Swave e c r e tat s Kewalos B r o w n s D i a m o n dand H e aeveryone d S u i c i d ein s between. Don’t despair though. Be polite, wait G r a vas e y the a r d sKewalo W a l l s B o w l your s K a iturn, s e r s and R o c you k may find that even the so called “scraps” at and the 8-acre swatch of adjacent land emerged P i l e s I n B e t w e e n s T h r e Kewalos e s F o u r s can C a n ooffer es up the best rides. Try to catch it uncrowded Basin Park we know and love today. Q u e e n s W a l l s C a s t l e s B weekdays l u e b i r d s Pduring u b l i c work hours, or early morning on weekends. Rice Bowls Kewalos Big Rights Bomburas The Wave: A wave some may call “man-made,” Kewalos breaks Baby Haleiwa Courts Concessions Flys Where to park: If you can’t find parking in the adjacent beach left and right along a shallow reef during south / southwest Point Panic Cliffs Bluebirds Cunhas park, you may have to find a pay spot in the lot near Ala Moana swells and works best from 2-6 foot. The left is a slow churning Tongs China Walls Secrets Browns Blvd. reform crawling along the deep water channelD iof the harbor, amond Head Suicides Graveyards Walls and offers up multiple sections for big turns. The right either Bowls Kaisers Rock Piles In Betweens stands up and lets you hit it, or runs fast towards Diamond close to your height or a bit shorter. Threes Fours C a n o e s Go Q uto e e nboard: s W a l lSomething s Head, ramping up to a launch section with a pillowy whitewater Castles Bluebirds Public Rice Bowls landing. In other words, it’s the perfect training K e ground walos Bfor ig Rights Bomburas Baby polishing today’s most progressive repertoire.H a l e i w a C o u r t s C o n c e s s i o n s F l y s P o i n t Panic

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T H E P U R I S T:

THE ARTHUR “TOOTS” ANCHINGES PROFILE How a 44-year-old Filipino native became one of the South Shore’s most stylish longboarders By Cash Lambert Photos Tony Heff

Have you seen Toots surf? Have you seen him double stroke into the lineup on his knees atop a longboard, wearing old school Birdwell boardshorts? Have you seen him paddle, stand on a wave, wait a moment and then methodically begin his silent dance, walking towards the nose, spinning once there, lifting a foot and returning to the middle of the board? Have you seen him walk to the nose, sit down and stand back up? What about when he paddles into a wave backwards? Or when he stands on a wave and casually wipes his eyes as he waits for the energy to develop, then glides effortlessly across the blue Waikiki wall? Ah, it is all so poetic! It is mesmerizing! It is timeless! Have you seen it?


If you ask Matriarch Tammy Moniz, a mainstay at Waikiki, if she has seen it, she will say “he is my favorite person to watch surf at Queens, other than my kids of course. He is such a free spirit who dances with the waves, and it is the most refreshing experience to watch him surf. He knows Queens like a man who knows his woman and loves her, and she gives him the best of her.” John Michael Van Hohenstein, 14-years-old and already a familiar face at Queens, has seen Toots’ dance and this is how he describes it: “His style is so old school. His style is so classic.” What does Toru Yamaguchi, owner of Surf Garage, have to say about about Toots’ style? “He is both the best noserider and the most stylish guy at Queens.”

Tammy, Johnny and Toru and so many others have seen Toots’ demeanor out of the water as well. He is quiet. He is humble. He let’s his surfing do the talking, though he doesn’t particularly want to say anything. His watery dance has one purpose and that purpose is cliche and sounds cheesy but it is sincere: to have fun. To have fun has been the driving force for Toots to learn how to surf, which he did in his 20s; It gave him the idea to track down old Longboard magazines and the Endless Summer film, mimicking and putting his own touch on what he had studied; It propelled him to begin experimenting with board designs, and it created his purist mindset, a mindset that values a

traditional style: older style moves on older style boards while wearing older style boardshorts. So who is Toots? Who is the soul behind a surfing style that so many describe as the essence of South Shore surfing? Where did he come from? Is he outspoken or reserved? How did he create such an interesting longboarding style? What do his tattoos mean? I spent a few days with the 44-year-old to find an answer to each of these questions. What follows is a tale of talking story, of drinking, of examining tattoos, of laughing, of stepping foot into his apartment and a shaping bay and, at the very foundation, an example of how curiosity and simple interest has created one of the South Shore’s most

fascinating characters who has a surfing style that you simply have to see.

Tuesday, 5:45 pm @ Surfjack Hotel & Swim Club I am late. Forty-five minutes late to be exact. My first words to Toots, standing with his tattooed arms on a bar chair at Mahina and Sun’s, the restaurant found inside of the groovy Surfjack Hotel & Swim Club, are “I’m sorry” and I explain my case: there was standstill traffic on H1 and McCully Street was backed up and the cars on Kalakaua Avenue moved at a snail pace and as I say this, Toots smiles and replies softly: “No worries. You want to sit?” I do. I do want to sit because the atmosphere in Mahina


and Sun’s is so relaxed, so unlike the traffic outside of the Surfjack’s walls. There is live jazz music playing in the background and the bar chairs look so comfortable. “That’s why I don’t drive,” Toots says, taking a seat. His eyes are brown and he is clean shaven. The bartender floats over and Toots orders a beer and I say “I’ll have what he’s having.” I continue: “So you don’t drive? Because of the traffic?” “No. Never,” he says. Beers arrive and I take a sip of what Toots has ordered us. It is called Lagunitas Little Sumpin Sumpin and it tastes good. “You’ve never driven here in Hawaii in all the years you’ve been here?” “No, since I live in Waikiki,

everything I need is close,” Toots says. “I bike or walk where I need to go, and if I surf somewhere else, I get in a friend’s car. But I usually just surf right out here.” I marvel at his simplicity. “So how long have you been in Hawaii?” Thus begins the genesis and exodus of Toots’ life story. Born and raised in the Philippines, he moved to Honolulu in his early 20s, which was in the fall of 1995. After landing on this bustling isle with his pregnant wife, he immediately looked for work and - a fast learner immediately found a job. It was before and after his daily job that he would see figures perched atop longboards sliding down walls of water in Waikiki. He was intrigued. “I paddled out on a borrowed

boogie board for the first time,” Toots says, describing his humble beginnings. A family friend later gave him his first surfboard: “A 5’8” twin fin, so I paddled it out, caught a wave and went straight. I could barely move on it, but I began to learn the mechanics of how to surf,” he says. “If I was free, I would surf three times a day. Other times, I would paddle out so early in the morning, because that was really the only time I could go out before the baby woke up.”

surfed for like, four hours, maybe five...but eight?”

I drink, and then I ask: “Is there a certain amount of time you’d stay out in the water? Maybe two or three hours?”

“When you start, yeah,” he says. “You think, forget this. People were yelling at me... but I got the bug. I was always in other people’s way. Lance Ho’okano, I seen him slap some people out there, and I remember thinking that I didn’t want to get in his way. Rabbit Kekai was always in the water, even Doc Paskowitz.”

Toots cracks a small grin. “The longest session I’ve had is 8 hours.” He takes a sip while staring at my reaction. “Eight? You’re kidding...I’ve

“I would paddle in and walk to the beach showers, turn them on and drink the water, then paddle right back out,” he says. I imagine what that looked like and shake my head and say “how’s that for commitment. Incredible! And when you started surfing in your 20s, were there some frustrating times?”


“Queens is so crowded, and you’re not one to yell at someone else for dropping in on you,” I say. “Is that because you know what it’s like to be a learner at Queens?” “Yeah, I just tell people it’s just like driving a car or bicycle. You don’t pull out in front of someone on the road, and you shouldn’t do it in the water,” he says. “What is it like for you when people comment on your surfing?” “When people want to talk about my surfing, I may come off standoffish sometimes because I’m shy. But I’m always tripping out because it’s all about just enjoying yourself. Surfing is a personal and private endeavor me. I’m not surfing for anyone but myself.” I say that he doesn’t seem standoffish. He’s actually the opposite: warm and friendly. More beers arrive, along with pizza and poke. We eat and we laugh and I begin to wonder the meaning of his tattoos - he’s covered from neck to toe in words and objects and colors - so I ask. Just as he puts one arm forward for me to examine, I notice two women entering the restaurant. Walking past where we’re sitting, one of the women - unequivocally gorgeous, wearing a dark outfit with dark eyes - notices Toots, and keeps her eyes locked on him until she passes. He doesn’t notice. “Slow and low,” Toots says, pointing at one tattoo written on his arm. “All of these are done by me or my friends. When we get together, we do it with my machine. You only live once man. Here’s a pirate ship” - he continues pointing

while narrating - “a skull and crossbones, a snake, a molotov cocktail, a t-rex dinosaur with a crown. This one I did in my daughter’s handwriting, it says I heart dad. Here’s a diamond, here’s...a chicken or a bird, whatever it is.” I examine each arm, admiring the excellent artwork and finding his relaxed attitude towards so much permanent ink interesting. We keep eating and he tells me about some of his favorite Queens sessions. He tells me about surfing by himself in Norway and worrying about a killer whale swimming into the lineup. And he tells me about his favorite longboards. After the tab is paid, I ask the bartender where the nearest ATM is and he points me in the direction of the nearest ABC Store. Toots asks why I need an ATM and I tell him that I valet parked but, despite my namesake, I have no cash to pay them and I need $10, so he hands me $15 and I say thank you and hand him the $5 back and he hands it to the bartender. We step out of the bar and see the voice and guitar behind the soft music that has been playing the entire time. A woman is singing Billie Holiday’s God Bless the Child, a jazz song written in 1939 that transports my mind into a different era, an era that I would expect to see Toots, with his timeless surfing, captured in a grainy black and white photo longboarding with Diamond Head in view. Toots points towards a hotel shop near the exit. We approach and I see the photo he is pointing at: himself framed on the wall, in art form, on a longboard. He slowly

smiles and I can see emotion in his eyes. We then step out into the busy street and Toots says we’ll talk soon. He shakes my hand and crosses the street and unlocks his bike and I watch him ride away until he disappears into the thick Waikiki crowd. Minutes later, I turn on Billie Holiday’s 1939 classic and as I put the lights of Waikiki in my rearview mirror, I get a text. It’s from Toots. “Get home safe brah” it reads.

Wednesday, 6:45 pm @ Waikiki

room and I’m staring at his quiver: fishes and longboards laid horizontal as traffic zooms just feet away. He shows me his favorite board - a fish - and we’re back in his living room. “Where did your nickname Toots - originate?” “My dad used to call me that when I was little, and then when I started surfing, I was practicing my crosswalk so much and the proper way of getting to the nose and someone called me Toots. It just stuck.”

In between throngs of tourists, I finally spot Toots. He is sitting by himself near the Prince Kuhio Statue and if I wasn’t looking for him, I probably wouldn’t have noticed his still figure, facing the 1-2 foot swell funneling into Queens. I ask if we can talk story for a bit, and he offers to show me his apartment. I point to the glowing horizon. “This sunset though...it is incredible.” “We can stay here,” Toots says, “but I’ve got whisky.” With that, we’re off on a cement vein of Waikiki and we stop at his apartment. Slippers are left at the door. I step inside and the first thing I notice is a shaping respirator splashed with pink color hanging near the couch. The second thing I notice is how the apartment is absolutely immaculate: No dust or sand is on the floor. Every object has a place. The shelves are neatly organized. The third thing I notice is the whisky. He hands me a glass and burns my throat but it tastes good. He leads me to his back patio, through another immaculate

As he talks, I notice a tattoo of words written in his palm. So I ask. Toots smiles and opens his palm. There is a definition about four lines long: FREEDOM (N)! TO ASK NOTHING, TO EXPECT NOTHING, TO DEPEND ON NOTHING “But yourself,” Toots adds. “It’s an Ayn Rand quote about freedom. I’m grateful when my friends help, but I like to do everything myself. Have you read her books?”


“No,” I say, while thinking that Toots is unlike anyone I have met on multiple levels and wondering what the (N)! stood for. “Noun,” he says, as he reaches under the table - next to the tattoo machine - and pulls out two thick Ayn Rand books. I hold them close to my eyes and flip through hundreds of pages of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. “Read these,” he says. “They changed my whole perspective.” I say thank you and take a sip and feel a good burn in my throat and change the subject.

“Shaping? What was the first board you shaped?” Toots grins noticeably more and says “I still have a photo of it.” He walks to the fridge, takes a picture off a magnet and hands me the photo. “It’s a 9’4”,” he says as I stare at the waxed up longboard in the photo. There’s also a cute little girl sitting next to the board with a beaming smile.

planned dinner date, I leave my unfinished whisky and tell him I’ll see him in the shaping bay.

Saturday, 11:45 am @ Kapahulu An industrial hum reverberates throughout an older neighborhood located off Kapahulu Avenue in Waikiki. It is the sound of a planer slicing foam and I use the noise as a

He tells me that shaping began out of curiosity as well as a way around the expensive cost of 10’0” longboards: “I can make my own for a fraction of the price,” he says, and then tells me that he began shaping about 5 years ago, but has been refining the craft consistently for the past 2 years. “Nobody taught me how to shape. It’s trial and error,” Toots says, wiping his black-rimmed glasses.

“Can you talk to me more about where you derive your surfing style from? You mentioned reading some old longboard magazines and Endless Summer…”. “Endless Summer, when I saw that. Wow. That’s when I said that’s what I want to do. The walking, the hand movement…”. He takes a sip. “And the hand movement, it’s not for looks. When you’re trying to control big heavy boards, you have to do some of that. It comes off stylish, but it’s part of controlling the board. In the movie, it’s crazy, seeing these 30-40 pound boards they’re riding on big days, but they were pulling it off. Here in Town, it doesn’t get that big. It’s mellow. Yeah, Endless Summer...that’s what started it. Shaping, too”

barely visible and as he moves, chiseling a 9’5” blank, his slipperless feet glide through the snow-like dust covering the ground. His black hair, now mixed with the dust, takes on a gray color.

I ask more about the quality of his earlier shapes, and he says: ‘A friend bought one of my first surfboards and sent me a photo from Japan, saying he loves it. I was thinking ‘are you serious?’ That board was a dog. And I made a board for my ex-wife, she now lives in Norway. She has the board displayed in her yoga studio, and she says that people admire it.” I hand him back the photo and he smiles again looking at it. “My daughter helped me wax it up, but that board was a dog.” The apartment goes silent. Toots then tells me about his plans for the weekend and those plans are to surf and shape and I receive a verbal invitation. Looking at the time and remembering a previously

guide to find Toots: he’s inside of a shaping bay that is hidden in a storage area underneath a wooden, two story house. Stepping underneath the house and into the cool shade, I notice Toots is wearing camouflage boardshorts, has on the pink respirator I first noticed in his apartment and is covered in white foam dust. Because of this, his tattoos are

He continues with his respirator around his neck: “When I got back to shaping again two years ago, Todd Pinder let me into his shaping room, and I shaped a couple of boards. First one….it was a dog. I had my own tools, my own planer. Just gouging the hell out of it. But the more you do it, the better you get.”


“What are some characteristics of your boards?” I ask. “And how have you refined your shapes?” “All my logs are reverse rocker, and that helps to turn faster,” he says. The terms hydro hull and double concave are also mentioned, but the noise of him sanding drowns out his explanation. I don’t press further because I don’t want to create any form of a distraction. Minutes later, he stops sanding, and continues: “I like thinner boards, too. I let people try my boards in the water and they trip out, saying ‘wow’ and I say ‘see, you don’t need all that thickness for sitting and catching waves.’ It’s trippy how much lift is generated with these shapes, and it kind of changes people’s mind.” “When you’re in the lineup and you tell someone he or she can ride your board, is there any hesitation on their part?” “Sometimes they’re scared they’ll ding it, but I tell them it’s ok,” Toots says. “It happens.” I continue to question: “And since you don’t drive, how do you get these massive blanks here?” e laughs. “When I started, I would go to Fiberglass Hawaii on my bicycle - it’s about 15 minutes one way - and I would load two or three onto the side with surfboard straps. I would have to ride sideways to help with the weight!” I laugh and cough - due to a steady inhale of foam dust -

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and realize the commitment needed to perform multiple trips while leaning towards the side opposite of the blanks on a bicycle, all the while navigating traffic and street lights. “But I got the bug. When I’m surfing, I’m thinking about the next board, especially if I have a blank waiting,” he says. “My mind is always going.” For Toots, just like his surfing, shaping is an activity born

of curiosity and fun. After picking the tail of the blank up and examining it, he tells me that he thinks he’s shaped somewhere around 100 boards, with some of those for the groms who call Queens their homebreak. “What the kids are doing today makes me proud,” he says. “I like making their boards and helping to get them back to the traditional way.” After a three hour stint in the shaping bay, Toots slides into his slippers and steps into the afternoon sunlight. He brushes foam dust off his tattooed arms, he rubs the gray out of his black hair and when he leans down to brush the

dust off his legs, he notices a boardshort-induced foam tan line. Leaving the board inside the shaping bay to finish the following day, Toots says that the tide is dropping and the plan is to get back into the Waikiki water and that I’m welcome to come cruise with him and his friends at the beach. I tell him I’ll see him down there, and he races down Kapahulu Avenue, beating the standstill mid day traffic. After arriving at Queens, he grabs his board and paddles out into the heavily crowded lineup, where two and three surfers are standing on each wave. Minutes later, Toots is up and riding alone on a funsized right hander, beginning his watery dance. I watch him bottom turn and gain momentum and further understand why Tammy Moniz calls him a “free spirit”, why Johnny says he’s “so classic” and why Toru makes the claim that he is “the most stylish” out at Queens. Although it is 2017, his silhouetted figure atop a longboard could be a sight from any era, with Diamond Head watching from afar. And as his legs and knees and arms move in poetic unison across the wall of water, I realize that I’m not the only one observing. The majority of surfers sitting in the Queens lineup have turned their heads to watch. pau


Princesses of Queens

Heff

SHE RIPS /

By Cash Lambert

Sophia Culhane

Paddle out into the blue, mana-filled waters of Queens on any given day and there’s a chance you’ll share the lineup with a pack of 5 girls, known as the Queen's Crew: 11-yearold Sophia Culhane, 12-year-old Kelis Kaleopaa, 13-year-old Haley Otto, 13-year-old Keani Canullo and 14-yearold Samantha Rust. Before you see them, you’ll probably hear their infectious giggles and cheers as they paddle and slide down fun-sized, slowly breaking walls. Even though the girls are just entering their teenage years, their longboarding

skills are well refined and will catch your attention as you wait for waves: effortlessly gliding across faces, long noserides, frontside and backside spray-infused wraps. In an era where progressive and high performance surfing is the norm, Haley, Kelis, Samantha, Keani and Sophia are products of their Waikiki environment, seeking and enjoying timeless, mellow rides atop boards far taller than their own height. We sat down with the girls to talk about how they all met, what


Keoki

Kiani Canullo

happens if someone drops in on another and what they do when the waves go flat (hint: “shop!”). So how did each of you begin surfing Queens? Kelis: My mom surfed with me in her belly, and I've been surfing Queens ever since! Keani: Kelis actually gave me my first longboard and I instantly fell in love with it! Waikiki has always been one of my favorite places to longboard. It’s an amazing place to be raised. There are so many amazing people and things to see there. Haley: I live in Waikiki, so Queens is super close for me. Waikiki is one of my favorite places to surf because it’s a good longboarding wave and everyone looks out for one another. I caught my first wave when I was 8 at Baby Queens and then I eventually started surfing Queens. Sophia: I started surfing the sandbar in Waikiki when I was 4, my

mom and dad would push me on the waves. Then at 5, I started catching my own waves and I progressed to Canoes. I was about 8 when I first had the courage to surf Queens and have been surfing there ever since! Samantha: Queens is my favorite place to surf because it is a dream wave! It’s where my friends and family all are, and there’s so many places to eat when you take a break from surfing. Most of all, it’s such a beautiful place. Waikiki is my second home. Today, most of the younger generations are focusing on high performance surfing. Everyone wants to be like John John Florence and do crazy airs! Why have you chosen to focus on longboarding? Sam: I focus on longboarding instead of shortboarding because it’s where my heart is. I was originally a shortboarder, and then I watched longboarding videos and it looked like so much fun! So for Christmas, I got my first longboard and immediately fell in love. I watched more videos and copied what I saw. Waikiki is


PROVEN BOARDS FROM THE PROVING GROUNDS

Go to the source NORTH SHORE OAHU


the perfect wave for longboarding and where I became the surfer I am now.

Keani: I met Haley through Kelis when I first moved to Waikiki. I met Sam and Sophia at one of the surf contests in town and we all became really close!

Keani: I love shortboarding, but longboarding will always have my heart. Watching longboarding is so beautiful, graceful and stylish. And being on the nose is the best feeling ever!

Sam: I met these girls through Instagram and through my first longboard contest, which was the T&C Gromfest.

Kelis: My whole family longboards, so I do too! I like to shortboard for fun too though. My favorite thing about longboarding is the feeling of flying while you're on the nose. Sophia: I love the gracefulness and style as you move along the board and the wave when you’re longboarding. It's like dancing on water. My favorite thing about longboarding is hanging my toes over the nose.

Haley: I first met Kelis when I was 8-years-old and I thought she was such a graceful surfer and amazing friend. Even though she is a bit younger than me, I still look up to her. The rest of girls push me to try my best and I think we all challenge each other to become better and better. We have one of the best surfing crews ever! Sophia: We have such an amazing surf Ohana! How often do you surf together?

Haley: I actually shortboarded for a whole year before even touching a longboard. My Auntie Lori gave me a longboard for my 9th birthday and I fell in love. My favorite thing about longboarding is you get to utilize different parts of the board. The best part is the nose. I feel free when I hang ten! Talk us through how each of you first met, and how you became the Queen's crew.

Kelis: We surf together almost every day! Sometimes we send each other messages and a lot of times we just show up and know that someone will be out. Sam: Yeah, we surf together almost everyday whether its after school or on the weekend. We text each other asking if anyone is at the beach. There is always someone we know

Sammy Rust


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at the beach like some grom, auntie or uncle. These girls are my very best friends and I am so grateful to have met them because they are the most amazing people you could know. Haley: We usually Snapchat each other and see who is going to the beach. Sometimes we meet at Moku Surf Shop.

And if there’s a big swell and the waves are huge? Kelis: Whenever there are really big waves, we grab some wavestorms and head out to Queens. We always try to get party waves and usually end up running into each other, getting tumbled and our boards going sky high! Sky high? Sounds like fun! So what do you talk about while in the lineup while you’re waiting for waves?

What about when the waves are small? Or if it’s flat? What do you guys do then? Kelis: If it’s flat, we go to Currents during the high tide and play around on the beach. Or shop!

Sophia: We talk about everything, like food and what we are going to eat when we get out. We talk loudly about food hoping others will get hungry and leave the lineup. More waves for us!

Haley: When the waves are small, we like to mess around on Wavestorms and go tandem with paddle boards.

Kelis Kaleopa’a


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Heff

Haley Otto

Kelis: Usually we talk about funny videos we've seen on the internet! What does it mean to be a wahine? Kelis: Wahine to me means powerful Hawaiian woman, like both of my grandmas. Keani: A wahine is a beautiful young woman who is strong and loves everyone and everything.

Keani: I know all of the uncles and aunties out at Queens. When anyone tries to drop in on me, they yell at them! If you have respect for people, they will give it right back. My friends all catch a lot of waves, but we give the uncles and aunties the sets. If one of your friends is already surfing on the wave of the day, would you drop in on her? Haley: Sharing is caring!

There’s always a crowd at Queens! How do you find waves with so many people out?

Sophia: If it was the wave of the day, I would have to drop in. Waikiki groms share everything. We are like family!

Sam: Queens is the most crowded place I have ever surfed! I catch waves either by sitting on the outside waiting for sets or staying on the inside of everyone and catch the little waves everyone misses.

Kelis: I would drop in on the boys. Especially the ones we know, because they're always getting the best waves!


VIC

M O C . Y R D E DY TORYKOR D THE WIN

ST

E WET H T N I M R AY WA

AN


G R O M

R E P O R T

It’s German. I think it mean’s like…tall rock? [Jumping in, John’s 15-year-old brother Michael, who is equally frothing, tanned and long-haired, corrected him: “Strong rock!”] Strong rock! Did you grow up in Waikiki? I grew up in the Philippines. Then Thailand, then here. My dad brought me here because he wanted me to be a surfer and have better waves. I was 6-years-old. What’s the first wave you remember riding?

JOHN MICHAEL VAN HOHENSTEIN DOB: August 7, 2003

Sponsors: Moku Hawaii, North Shore Surf Shop, Chance Em, Kai Coffee, Reezen Eyewear, Ezko, Matunas Wax, Carve Visionaries, Kuleana Sun Protection, Organic Amazon Acai, Aluminati Boards, Aloha State University, Robin Johnson Surfboards John Michael Van Hohenstein is barely 14-years-old, but his style as he works his 9’0 Robin Johnston longboard is easily 40years-old. Nimble cross walking to toes on the nose and riding backwards to full-coverage barrels... every minute this long-haired grom spends in the water is spent grinning ear to ear — and people watching him from the beach or on his perfectly curated Instagram (@johnnytheripper) don’t look much different. A meandering pathway led Van Hohenstein and his family to Hawaii through Southeast Asia, thanks to a father willing to chase swell to offer his kids the best waves possible to hone their skills. John’s prowess on a shortboard — which won him his first contest at the age of nine at the 2014 T&C Surfer Magazine Grom Contest — soon gave way to his true passion: classic logging. Even his skateboard is a longboard. John’s most recent competitive victory was at the 33rd Annual China Uemura Classic in Waikiki in July. At the annual fundraising

70

longboard contest (which Johnny has surfed in at least four times) that has helped many keiki develop their competitive skills while raising money for local charities, Van Hohenstein’s team once again got first place. John took first place in Menehune Boys 13 and Under.

It was over here [points towards Queens and Pops]. I was on my shortboard, I caught a small wave, I stood up, I was happy. Then I just kept doing it. You chose not to do the home schooling thing — you actually go to school every day.

When he’s not in the water at Queens or mastering 8th grade at Kaimuki Middle School, there’s only one place to find this grom-to-watch: inside his main sponsor’s home of Moku Surf Shop, cruising with all his friends, a tight-knit group John excitedly listed by name without a moment’s hesitation when asked about his longboarding inspirations. Friends who surf together stay together, and this Waikiki grom gang is for life.

Yes, so I can go with my friends, play with my friends. Then after school I just surf with all my friends.

I have to ask you about your last name — it sounds like royalty or something, it’s epic.

Kani Salami! [laughs] His name is Kaniela Stewart, and Kai Sallas, Lala and her ohana, Nelson Ahina III, and Kaimana Takayama.

Who was your first sponsor and how old were you when you got signed up? Moku [Surf Shop], I was 10-years-old. I was happy, then I started knowing everyone here. Who are your longboard inspirations?


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G R O M

R E P O R T

/

What’s it like when you’re on the wave, finding your line, and deciding what moves to flow together during the ride? It’s like dancing. Like walking on water! What are your favorite maneuvers to do on your longboard? Hanging ten, roundhouses, tail threes, and helicopters. There’s a lot. Oh, and getting barreled! Right out here, it was perfect. Who are your favorite surfers besides your crew? Kelly Slater, John John Florence.

J O H N N Y

T H E

R I P P E R

What are your goals in surfing? I want to go on the longboard tour and travel a lot longboarding. What’s your advice for catching waves in the very crowded Queen’s lineup? You have to know everyone, and just share the waves with everyone else. They’ll give you some waves. How did you get into shooting GoPro videos of yourself while surfing? When I got Instagram, I was looking at videos and I saw these people shooting with GoPros on the selfie sticks. Probably like two years after,

I got sponsored by Kai Coffee and they said they could get me something. So I asked for a GoPro and they got me one, and I started doing it. I was doing it before because I had an old GoPro, but it broke, so… What are you like on a skateboard? When I’m skating, it’s just like when I’m surfing. I’m nose riding on the skateboard. What do you want to be when you grow up? A pro surfer. What’s your favorite thing about being a grom? All the uncles, they let me go on all the waves. Everyone here [at Moku] takes care of me. I get treated like I’m family. What are your last words for the Freesurf audience? Thank you Jesus for everything and God bless everyone.


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E N V I R O N M E N T

THIS IS AWAY

HOW YOU CAN HELP CLEAN UP HAWAII’S MOST POLLUTED BEACHES By Kahi Pacarro Photos @hokuhikiandthesea

Summer conjures visions of relaxation, peace and sun, but this summer has been more about escaping obsessive heat and trying to find relief from the lack of summer swell by groveling in ankle slappers. For some, a surf trip far away to the southern hemisphere resulted in a bounty of perfect waves and tourist-free beaches this summer. For those of us left behind, the dream of getting away remained out of reach. Yet, millions of tourists got away to Hawaii this summer. Not only is Hawaii the getaway in the vacation context; Hawaii is also away in the physical realm as the final destination of mankind’s garbage as a result of overconsumption, poor waste management and industry’s externalities. The irony I’m trying to reinforce here is that although people see Hawaii as away, the Pacific Ocean does too. As if a call for help falling on deaf ears, the ocean shows us at every high tide that when we throw something away, it could end up on a beach in Hawaii. Trash that floats downstream into the Pacific Ocean gets into the gyre, is broken up into smaller pieces and is then regurgitated onto Hawaii’s eastern coastlines. The gyre is similar to a baby albatross facing a similar issue, regurgitating the plastic that was force fed to it by its parents. Before the madness of the Winter surf season arrives and while we still have time to kill, we at Sustainable Coastlines want you to experience the other side of away: the beaches that need your help. Despite the polluted beach photos you’ve seen on @ sustainablecoastlineshawaii and elsewhere, the magnitude of our 74

situation is not truly understood until you see it firsthand. Here’s a list of beaches across our Island chain you can visit, along with organizations that are aiming to make a difference. So grab a bag, a reusable water bottle, some reef-friendly sunscreen and get away. Hawaii Island - Kamilo Beach / Hawaii Wildlife Fund / www. hawaiiwildlifefund.org / @wildhawaii Hop into a 4x4 and venture down to the Southernmost point of the United States at Ka Lae. If you’ve got the balls, jump off the cliff for a refreshing dip. From there, head left and enter Hawaiian Home Lands and past Green Sands Beach. This multiple hour journey through a lava desert ends at Kamilo Beach. There you will witness what was once called the dirtiest beach in the world. Maui - Kaehu Beach / Sharkastics / www.sharkastics.org Just a quick ride from the airport, this is Maui’s dirtiest stretch of coastline. Head towards Waiehu and stop short at Kaehu Beach. For those that like driftwood, this is your spot. But mixed amongst it is a nauseating amount of plastic regurgitated by the North Pacific Gyre. Molokai - Mo’omomi Beach / The Nature Conservancy / @ tnchawaii / nature.org From Ho’olehua, head down the red dirt road to the pavilion. Park there and hike left towards Mo’omomi Beach. One of the only accessible beaches on the entire North Shore of Molokai, the beach is home to nesting sea turtles and basking monk seals.


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Lanai - Shipwreck Beach / Pulama Lanai / www.pulamalanai.com Down a long arduous road, lined with stunted brush due to the strong tradewinds, a left at the bottom, and you’ll eventually end up at Shipwreck Beach. For similar reasons to the abundant amount of debris, this coastline is also littered with Shipwrecks. Oahu - Kahuku Beach / Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii / @ sustainablecoastlineshawaii / www.sustainablecoastlineshawaii. org Take a walk along Kahuku Beach from Kahuku Golf Course along the James Campbell Wildlife Refuge and end at Marconi Road. Recent reintroductions of Albatross and decoys meant to attract other Albatross give an additional opportunity to see the largest flying animal in the world. This is Oahu’s dirtiest stretch of beach but yet not a soul in sight. Kauai - Donkey Beach / Surfrider Foundation / @surfriderkauai / www.surfriderfoundation.org The Garden Isle snags so many commercial fishing nets that there is a weekly net patrol hosted by Surfrider Foundation. If you can’t join them on their Wednesday journeys, then hit up Donkey Beach and have your mind blown by what the North Pacific Gyre has done to the remnants of the the plastics we threw away. Ground up as if through a blender, the plastic looks like confetti and is just as difficult to cleanup. While away, you’re going to find items that you use in your everyday lives. If you use less, or eliminate use altogether, it will mean less debris getting the chance of ever choking our ocean and ending up on our beaches.

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The locations of the state's dirtiest beaches are not the easiest to access. Yet, if you were to venture to the opposite sides of the island, you’ll find resorts, pristine beaches, wealth and ignorance to the plight of away. Out of sight, out of mind and a full throttle mentality around consumption, it seems like we still have a long way to go. Would we be in such ignorant bliss if the winds switched for good and the debris started washing up in Waikiki, Wailea, Waikaloa, Lahaina, Manele Bay or Kaunakakai? Kahi Pacarro is the Executive Director of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii.


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Kona Brewing Company donated $25,000 to two Jack Johnson benefit concerts at the Waikiki Shell on August 4th and August 5th, which supported environmental education in Hawai‘i. The donation builds on Kona Brewing Company’s long history of supporting local organizations committed to sustainability, protection of resources, community, and culture on the Islands.

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Kona Brewing applauds Johnson’s greening efforts to keep his shows plastic free by serving drinks in cans instead of cups and forbidding single use plastic bottles. The singer/surfer from Oahu’s North Shore paves the way in green touring, sustainability, and plastic free initiatives and donated all concert proceeds in support of environmental education and garden programs in elementary schools through his non-profit, Kōkua Hawai‘i Foundation.

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Kona Surf Film Festival announced it will hold the Tombomb Wahine Classic, Kona’s own all-girl, team set-up surf contest and beach cleanup, an event that will take place on Saturday, September 30th at Kohanaiki (Pine Trees). The Tombomb Wahine Classic began to promote women's surfing and encourage community involvement. The goal of the Classic is to have a wahine surf contest and beach cleanup in Kona aimed at encouraging teamwork and camaraderie between women surfers. With the event’s past success, event organizers hope it helps maintain momentum promoting wahine surfers and protecting beaches. To register for the event, visit eventbrite.com/e/tombombwahine-classic-2017-registration.

After 13 years on the Championship Tour, Bede Durbidge announced his retirement in August. “I just wanted to thank everyone that has supported me in my career over the last 13 years. It has been an amazing journey but next year I'll be finishing up on tour WSL and starting a new chapter in my life,” the Australian said. “I’m very excited to be working with the best Australian surfers and their coaches heading into the 2020 Olympics.”


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Although most summer Town sessions involve paddling out into crowded lineups, there are a few uncrowded gems to be found if you’re willing to get creative. Noa Mizuno finds his own slice of paradise somewhere between the south and eastern shores of Oahu. Photo: Tony Heff


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