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Tatiana Weston-Webb Photo: Pete Frieden


NATHAN FLORENCE VA N S . C O M / S U R F

©2017, Vans Inc.


F R E E

P A R K I N G

Through all the sparkle and glamour, the core of women’s surfing combines strength and beauty into a style of its own, and this issue is dedicated to just that. Photo Dane Grady


TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S / D E PA R T M E N T S

06 Free Parking 14 Editor’s Note 16 News & Events 24 Love on Film 28 Longboard Travel Tips 30 The Wahine of Instagram 48 Aperture 62 She Rips

Ayako Ancheta

Make a Difference!

Skip the Wait Order Ahead with our new APP

66 Pau Hana 70 Surf Art 74 Environment 78 Stuff We Like 80 Industry Notes 82 Last Look


Model: Natalina Photo: Latronic


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Joli

TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S / F E AT U R E S

10 QUESTIONS WITH BETHANY HAMILTON

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Joli

Catching up with the Kauai native on her upcoming movie Unstoppable, motherhood, stardom and her plans for 2017

UP & COMERS

Pete Frieden

Profiling 4 Junior wahine ascending surfing’s competitive ranks

58 BIKINIS, BIG WAVES & BREAKING BARRIERS Examining the evolving state of women’s competitive surfing


Pete Frieden

Editorial

FRESH POKE BOWLS. CUSTOMIZED THE WAY YOU LIKE IT.

Publisher Mike Latronic Managing Editor Cash Lambert Photo Editor Tony Heff Art Director John Weaver Multimedia Director Tyler Rock Ambassador-at-Large Chris Latronic West Coast Ambassador Kurt Steinmetz Staff Photographers Tony Heff, Chris Latronic, Mike Latronic, Tyler Rock, Keoki Saguibo Free Thinkers Tiffany Foyle, Kahi Pacarro

Senior Contributing Photographers

Erik Aeder, Eric Baeseman (outbluffum.com), Brian Bielmann, Ryan Craig, Jeff Divine, Pete Frieden, Dane Grady, Bryce Johnson, Ha’a Keaulana, Ehitu Keeling, Laserwolf, Bruno Lemos, Mana, Zak Noyle, Shawn Pila, Jim Russi, Jason Shibata, Spencer Suitt, Tai Vandyke

Contributing Photographers

John Bilderback, Marc Chambers, Brooke Dombroski, DoomaPhoto, Rick Doyle, Isaac Frazer, Jeromy Hansen, Pete Hodgson, Joli, Kin Kimoto, Dave “Nelly” Nelson, Nick Ricca, Gavin Shige, Heath Thompson, Bill Taylor, Wyatt Tillotson, Jimmy Wilson, Cole Yamane Senior Account Executive Brian Lewis Business Coordinator Cora Sanchez Office Manager Rieka Marzouki

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FREESURF MAGAZINE is distributed at all Jamba Juice locations, most fine surf shops and select specialty stores throughout Hawai‘i. You can also pick up FREESURF on the mainland at Barnes & Noble and Borders bookstores and select newsstands. Ask for it by name at your local surf shop! Subscribe at freesurfmagazine.com Other than “Free Postage” letters, we do not accept unsolicited editorial submissions without first establishing

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Dane Grady

E D

EDITOR’S NOTE By Cash Lambert Beauty, grace, and raw power: these words came to mind when we first laid eyes on the photo of Tatiana Weston-Webb absolutely cracking the lip during a recent freesurf session, and we decided it was the perfect cover photo to kick off our Wahine issue. The photo speaks volumes of Tati’s aggressive style and highscoring skills. It also shows the talent level of women on the World Tour, which is as progressive as ever, as well as continuing to grow at a rapid pace. And it’s photos like this that serve as inspiration for other ladies in Hawaii and the global surf community. “I’m inspired by Tatiana right now,” says Keala Tomodo-Bannert in our She Rips feature, found on page 62. “She’s showed me that even though I come from Kauai, a small island, I can achieve my dreams. She’s very committed to what she does in her surfing.”

Once a year, we commit the pages of Freesurf to showcasing women’s high performance surfing, how it inspires others, along with a wide spectrum of other female lifestyles found in our surf culture, from creatives to longboarders, models and more. In this issue, we catch up with Bethany Hamilton to discuss her upcoming movie, her plans for the year and motherhood (“becoming a Mom has been probably the highlight of my life,” she says. “I already have baby fever. I want to have another one!), we take a look at the junior girls from Hawaii who we can expect big things from in the competitive arena in the near future, and we also look at the evolving state of women’s competitive surfing, thanks to insight from influential women like Carissa Moore, Paige Alms and Alana Blanchard. Beauty, grace, raw power, and everything in between: welcome to our Wahine issue!


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GROMS INFILTRATE QUEENS FOR THE 20TH ANNUAL T&C SURF GROM CONTEST PRESENTED BY CHILI'S

Photos Freesurf Magazine

On May 20-21, groms and families alike packed Queens for the 20th Annual T&C Surf Grom Contest Presented by Chili's, a contest that triumphs family and fun over competition. During the two-day contest, fun-sized aqua surf filled in the lineup, creating memorable surf sessions for the contestants. Since 1997, the goal of the T&C Surf Grom Contest has been to get Hawaii's youth in the water with a non-competition style event, providing surfers ages 12 and

younger a taste of competitive surfing in a mellow setting.

catch waves - the contest creates an arena excitement not just for the kids.

The contest has served as one of the first surfing experiences for so many in Hawaii’s surf community, and as time continues, those who once donned the T&C contest jerseys continue the tradition by bringing their children to the event.

“We see a lot of smiling faces from the parents,” said Craig Sugihara, T&C Surf Founder and Owner. “They’re sometimes more happy than the kids.”

From longboards to shortboards, bodyboards and the ever popular Kokua Division - which allows parents to assist their 3-6 year old keiki and help them

Craig and the T&C staff have continued the contest for two decades because “it’s always about trying to give back. We eliminate the sponsored surfers, so that


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welcomes the new and upcoming surfers, and it’s their first experience in a contest. That’s why we do it.” “This is the last year for my young daughter in the Kokua division, she’s 6,” said renown contest surfer Gregg Nakamura, discussing why he couldn’t resist coming down to the beach on event day. “Today we were trying to backdoor the peak, just having a good time. It’s just the good family vibes, everyone pops up a tent and surfs. Kids are super psyched, parents are twice as psyched, prizes are sick and everyone has a good time.” Besides the waves on hand throughout the day and the games on the beach, something else the children looked forward to were the prizes: goodie bags packed with accessories, along with the opportunity to win surfboards, GoPros, bodyboards and more. “We’re really fortunate to have support from industry sponsors,” said Adam Borello, T&C’s Marketing Director. “It’s

endless swag for the kids, stoking them out. We even gave some GoPros out to some 3-5 year olds.” With the contest in its 20th year, how many more can parents and contestants expect? “Any young child getting that first wave here at the contest, they’re just like me hooked,” said Sugihara. “You’re hooked, you want more. That’s the best part of this event, and as long as the kids and parents enjoy it, it will continue forever.”

For results and photo gallery, visit freesurfmagazine.com.


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LOVE THE SEA, PLASTIC FREE: OCEAN AID FESTIVAL DEBUTS TO RAISE ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS By Tyler Rock Photos Aurelio Ayala / Ocean Aid Hawaii On a damp Honolulu night in late April, an eclectic list of artists lit up the stage of the Waikiki Shell to a packed audience at the first annual Ocean Aid Festival. With generous sponsors stepping forward to buy out tickets, the concert became a free community event for all to enjoy. And the music did not disappoint. Highlighting the list were the rough reggae sounds of Maxi Priest, the funky fresh tunes of Ohio Players and Bootsy Collins, and the Hawaiian rhythms of Henry Kapono. Headlining the night, CeeLo Green brought his special brand of pizazz to the stage with a full band to engulf the air with his hits. Beyond the music and fun, the goal of the event was to spread the message of eradicating plastic pollution from the ocean using the motto “Love the Sea, Plastic Free”.

The Ocean Aid Festival was a complete success, using the global language of music to inform, inspire and enact change on the issues we are faced with today.

In between music acts, video vignettes were shown on large screens to show what particular groups have done to help curb plastic pollution and emphasize the need for everyone of us to get involved and do what we can to keep our oceans clean.

For Hawaii residents - living on an island - the topic of ocean pollution is one that must not be taken lightly, and it’s important to spread the message of reducing waste so that it does not end up in our ocean playground.


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N E W S

#PROTECTHAWAIILIFEGUARDS

DESPITE RALLIES AND SUPPORT, THE LIMITED LIABILITY PROTECTION FOR LIFEGUARDS EXPIRES JUNE 30 In the waning days of April, lifeguards and lifeguard supporters - donned in yellow shirts and red shorts - took to Ala Moana Boulevard, waving signs that read “Support Hawaii Lifeguards”, “we need your help” and “protecting you is what we do.” Truth is, those who have been helping others by acting as the last line of defense on Hawaii’s beaches truly did need public support. Bill SB 562, which granted immunity to Hawaii’s lifeguards from lawsuits involving injuries suffered while on Hawaii beaches (other than blatant forms of negligence), was at the time set to expire. If expired, this would open the door for victims’ families to sue if a lifeguard is negligent. As signs waved in the air, state lawmakers met and decided to change the language in the bill to remove such immunity, taking into effect June 30. What does this mean for the future of lifeguards? The Attorney General will defend lifeguards against suits who work at state beaches, county attorneys will defend lifeguards from other beaches, and overall, the county will have to spend more money towards defending lawsuits.

According to lifeguard Bryan Phillips, that money “should be spent to adding more equipment and adding more lifeguards.” “We can’t thank everyone in the local and global community enough for standing behind Hawaii Lifeguards,” the North Shore Lifeguard Association said in a statement. “We fell short of reinstating the limited liability... Senator Kalani English said he will work to get the liability back next year. While it’s a huge disappointment, at [the] rally we were brought together, which truly shows our passion for our job and we are committed to continue to watch over our residents and visitors alike. Mahalo again for all the support!” “We’re a proactive department, not a reactive department,” Phillips continued. “We’re warning the public, dealing with things that change. We’ve had an overwhelming support from community. The change affects all of Hawaii in every county, so it was nice to see an outpouring of support love, and we’ll continue doing our job and of the best we can do to protect the public.”


N E W S

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SURFING THE NATIONS Surfing the Nations is a non-profit, humanitarian organization, run by an international group of volunteers and is based in Wahiawa. Their motto is “Surfers Giving Back,” and the organization’s goal is to see lives changed on both a local and international level. It’s a charity that we recommend being a part of in some fashion. Here’s their backstory: In 1997, the organization was at a grassroots level in Honolulu. STN grew and expanded, and by 2008, they needed permanent headquarters, but there were no such prospects in Honolulu. They found a 15-unit property in Wahiawa and were contemplating on purchasing it. However, multiple people advised STN to not move into the area, because it was known as a locale for drug abuse and violence. The organization instead vowed to rewrite the history of Wahiawa by “bringing transformation to buildings and reputations.” STN staff and interns soon moved into the apartments and the previously owned bar on the property became known as the Surfers Coffee Bar. Through a series of unforeseen events, STN later acquired three additional properties, further expanding their property.

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Today, Surfing The Nations is “undoubtedly committed” to making a difference in Wahiawa and works with the youth and families of the neighborhood. They also offer outreach trips to locations such as the Middle East, Sri Lanka, the Philippines and Indonesia. Visit Surfingthenations.com for volunteer and donation opportunities.

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LOVE ON FILM

WAYS TO GET YOUR SIGNIFICANT OTHER TO FILM YOU SURFING

“What are you going to be doing while I surf?” “Nothing, just cruising here on the beach.” “Well, since you’re not busy, want to film me in the water? I’ll set you up with the camera and everything. Oh, and try not to miss any of my waves.” If you’re in a committed relationship, with an avid surfer, this might sound familiar. It’s a conversation that can lead to good things. Like solid photos and clips. An edit. A budding surf career. Maybe even a laugh if you’re both in the mood. Or, at the other end of the spectrum, an hour long argument that keeps you on the beach as the offshore winds turn to onshore slop. From the surfer’s perspective, if the other person is just sitting on the beach, why can’t they film? Why not multitask by tanning and shooting? Is it really so much to ask?

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But there’s two sides to every coin, a give and a take. In order to understand what’s the best way to navigate these tricky waters, we asked Makaha-born pro surfer Alessa Quizon, who has a bit of advice on the topic: “I’m currently injured, I tore my MCL so there’s no surfing for a while,” she said. “So Caio [Ibelli] saw the opportunity and said, ’love you... want to film me today? I'll reward you with tacos!’ I wanted to be helpful and feel like I was doing something, so I told him why not, plus I get tacos.” Therein lies the trick, according to Alessa: present offer that can’t be refused. “I actually don't know anything about the camera setting and that sorts,” she continued. “I just pushed the record button and made sure Caio was in the shot with enough background to show the spray in the frame. He was surprised that I did well at filming him since it was my first

time. On a normal day, I wouldn't film him because I would be in the water surfing and we would get a filmer to film us.” How does Alessa feel about girlfriends who say yes to their boyfriends when asked to film? “I am against being the girlfriend who films on the beach, no offense to anyone who does. I think girlfriends who film are amazing, have the best kind of patience there is in the world and a keen eye.” Caio had another trick up his sleeve that Alessa couldn’t say no to as well: “Neither of us don't want each other to sacrifice the time to train and surf because, it's important for both our careers so we don't ask,” she says. “But Caio has offered to film me here and there, so just waiting for when that actually happens.”


Heff

LONGBOARD TRAVEL TIPS WITH HONOLUA BLOMFIELD Traveling is the hallmark of every professional surfer, and it takes a good amount of expertise to know what happens when things wrong and what to do to avoid a damaging and costly board situation. Having traveled the world in search of waves, North Shore professional longboard princess Honolua Blomfield knows a few things about traveling smart and graced us with a few tips to minimize surf trip board obstruction destruction. How do you pack your longboards? Nothing special, I just put them in my DaKine board bag. Since I fly Hawaiian Air, I usually only

bring one longboard, and one shortboard. That's all I really need anyway. Any stories of getting to your destination and having dinged up boards? So far I feel like I've gotten lucky, because I always get my boards right when I get off the plane and there isn't usually a wait. I've never opened my board bag to a board that's broken in half, and I’ve never gotten any major dings. I usually travel with friends though, and they haven't gotten as lucky as me. You can't completely protect your surfboards, but what do you do to make sure

they'll be unharmed? True, you can't protect your boards entirely. I usually try to at least put a towel or two just for padding. Actually, I like a damaged longboard. I feel it adds more character! Any airline you prefer flying? My mom is a Flight Attendant for Hawaiian Air, so that's my preferred airline. Traveling so much with longboards, what have you learned about it? Is there an art to it? I’ve learned to just go with it. Yeah, your boards might get a few dings, and yeah they may not make the flight but it is what it is. It's really all part of the journey!

Any other quick tips? This is very important: baggage handlers hate heavy board bags, so here’s a huge tip: do not stuff your board bags with a bunch of extra junk. If you throw in wetsuits, wet towels, clothes or any unnecessary things, it only makes it a higher risk for your boards to ding. Yes its their job, but if they're already lifting your 30 kilo board bag, they aren't gonna treat it very nicely if there's added items in there that make it heavier.


WAHINE

Instagram Influencers How much time do you spend on a specific Instagram profile? Maybe 10, 20 seconds, enough to see the first row or two of photos and then on the next one? Every so often there’s a gem of a profile that pulls you like a rip current. For us, that’s the profiles of Sierra Leback, Maine Kinimaka, Monyca Eleogram and Malia Murphy and combined, the four have over 320,000 followers. Scroll through their Instagram feeds and you’ll find incredible mountain and sea scenics from Kauai, vintage longboard photos with Diamond Head watching from its eternal perch, peeling waves in some unnamed tropical locale, beautiful modeling photos, inspiring and inimitable style and fashion and more. Each of their pictures say over 1000 words, and without further ado, here are our wahine influencers.

sierralerback

527

posts

24.1k

followers

Follow

Life in paradise

monycaeleogram

784

following

1,458 posts

129k

followers

783

following

Follow So in love with this Life and the wonderful people in it. Roxy Surfer/ Farmer, married to my best friend @olaeleogram


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maliamurphy

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from Hawaii maliamurphey.com

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Follow ÂŤ m a i n e i a l o h a Âť Native Hawaiian surfer from the island of Kaua'i - roxy girl - world wanderer - aquaholic beneaththesurface.blog


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4 JUNIOR WAHINE ASCENDING SURFING’S COMPETITIVE RANKS By Chris Latronic

The upcoming Hawaii girls are always huge prospects starting from their young keiki days with already big sponsorships and dreams of future professional Tour success. From Megan Abubo to Carissa Moore and Tatiana Weston Webb, Hawaii has proven time and again that our talent bed is top notch and destined for big results. These are four of the young girls of the past who we see as young ladies today and will likely be the women professional surfers of the Tour tomorrow.

Mahina Maeda Mahina Maeda is now an esteemed veteran of the junior ranks and well on her way battling through the Qualifying Series. With a 3rd place finish at the Wahine Pipe Pro and a multitude of close results, Mahina is on the cusp of breaking through to something big. It’s been a little while since those ISA World Championship victories, and I definitely believe she’s due for an equivalent result very soon.

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Kristy Taylor

Summer Macedo

Summer Macedo is the firecracker from the Valley Isle that has a stylish natural footed attack that is unbearably attractive to judging panels. Get her in an open righthander and you'll witness those front side hacks that give her sweet results. After a 5th place finish at Papara this year, she’s now ranked in the top 50 women in the World and 5th among Hawaii’s Regional QS, all while just getting her driver's license.


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Zoe McDougall Zoe McDougall is a quiet and humble little North Shore girl with a big knack for surfing. Always right there when it came to making finals and winning contests, Zoe never backed down and only became stronger. Coming up just short of the Grand Final at the ISA Worlds in Portugal, Zoe looked on a mission going into 2017, winning the Sunset Pro Junior in January, and the Corona Durban Surf Pro in April. With family support and renewed sponsorship, Zoe is blasting through the pack at the junior and professional level.


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Joli

Brisa Hennessy Brisa Hennessy is a spark of exuberance. She’s the current ISA under-18 Girls champion, on her way to defend that title later this year in Japan. With an amazing ability to adapt to conditions and a tenacious attack going both backside or frontside, Brisa is dangerous in all situations. Her boards are always dialed in, and you’ll never see anything but sheer focus from her before a heat, right up until she smiles and hugs you after you’ve been beaten.


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BET HANY HAMILTO N By Cash Lambert

Mother, wife, movie star, activist and a pro surfer who has the talent to enter a WSL Championship Tour contest as a wildcard and finish 3rd overall - as she did at the Fiji Pro in 2016 - along with charging waves of consequence at Jaws: Bethany Hamilton is unstoppable. At 27-years-old, Bethany has accomplished so much in and out of the water, all the while seeking to inspire others along the way. And when asked about her future, it seems she’s only going to put the pedal to the floor. We chatted with the Kauai native to hear her thoughts on being the wildcard entry for the Outerknown Fiji Pro, how she deals with her stardom and what we can expect from her aptly named film Unstoppable when it drops next year.

Joli

10 QUESTIONS WITH


I got the wildcard for Fiji. Fiji is just the dream wave to compete at, so I’m really excited to compete there again. Especially after last year - finishing 3rd - it just felt really amazing. I’m just trying to mentally cheer myself on from here until the event and just think about surfing well, competing smart and enjoying my time down there. Of course I have dreams to win it, but I’ll take it one heat at a time. Is there one girl on the Women’s World Tour who you like to watch the most? I loved watching Tyler (Wright) win her World Title and I love her as a human. She is so unique and incredibly talented and I love the power and the rawwr she puts into her surfing, it’s just so fun to watch. But of course I love Steph and Carissa, too. What’s been your favorite part of motherhood? Oh my gosh, becoming a mom has been probably the highlight of my life and especially to share that with my husband, who is so amazing too. I already have baby fever. I want to have another one! Yeah, I’ve got some plans, but being a mom is for sure one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever experienced in life and nothing can compare. How do you deal with your stardom? Definitely being famous was probably harder than losing my arm and being able to cope with that. I don’t thrive on attention necessarily, and it gets pretty tiring sometimes. Sometimes when you’re just trying to buy an apple at the grocery store or eating dinner with your friends, people are always coming up. But at the same time, I really cherish the opportunity to show young girls that there’s ways to choose a wonderful way to live your life and be respectful of yourself and others and just overcome the hardest challenges that may come your way. So I try to find the balance. I hide out sometimes and other times I say hi. What’s the funniest thing you’ve experienced interacting with a fan? I always just crack up around Halloween, seeing little girls dressed up as me and their little brother

Aaron Lieber

Can we expect to see you in a jersey this year at any World Tour stops?


Aaron Lieber


will be a shark or something like that, it’s pretty hilarious. So I always get giggles during Halloween time. I’m a Halloween character, it’s so weird. What we can expect from your forthcoming movie Unstoppable? It’s been a crazy project working on it. It started off as making a short edit of high-performance surfing and then with all the time and effort, we realized that my story hadn’t been told in so many different ways and a lot of people just recognize me as the shark attack victim and a soul surfer girl. I’m looking forward to sharing my story in depth along with the hard work I’ve put into my surfing career, and just my life journey as a mom and wife and surfer and all the good that God has done in my life. Hopefully it will encourage all the younger generations of girls to pursue their dreams no matter what comes their way. What’s your favorite wave to surf? I’d say that my favorite waves are probably a toss up between Teahupo’o and Macaronis. Teahupo’o is just the best barrel you can imagine and Macaronis is just incredibly rippable. Your thoughts on the generation of women leading surfing today? I think it’s been so amazing to be a part of this generation of female surfers pushing it and especially on Tour right now. Every heat is a really challenging heat and everyone’s surfing really hard and pushing each other. It’s really cool to see and be a part of. What have you been riding this year? Any different boards? I’m riding a Rook 15 from Channel Islands, that’s my favorite board right now. I guess just depending on the conditions I have different boards, but it’s a 6’0, 2 1/4” and some width. I have a handle; it’s just for duck diving and I use it probably like 50 percent of the time. My Dad makes it. What are your big plans for this summer? I have a few surf trips, so I’m going to be going to every dream destination you can think of in the next four months. I’m super excited to be surfing, and my husband is an amazing supporter and we get to travel together as a family, so it’s pretty unique and cool. We’re finishing up my film Unstoppable, which is going to be coming out in the next year and that’s been a really fun project and challenge to work towards. I’m going to continue to work on my surfing and push myself.


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Previous spread: Carissa Moore photo: Pete Frieden This page: Top: Ha’a Keaulana photo: Lopaka Bottom(L): photo: Dane Grady (R): Ha’a Keaulana photo: Lopaka Opposite page: Rosie Jaffurs photos: Keoki Next Spread: (L): Brisa Hennessy photo: Pete Frieden (R) Coco Ho photo: Tony Heff


Opposite page: Kiana Fores photo: Bryce Johnson Brooklyn Dombroski photo: Lancifer This page: Stephanie Gilmore photo: Matt Paul


A LOOK AT THE EVOLVING STATE OF WOMEN’S SURFING By Tiffany Foyle

The loud thuds and pap-pap-paps of some dude thai boxing in my carport are waking me up just as early as the roosters that I regularly shoot with a high-powered pellet gun. They might as well be hitting the wall next to my face. It’s that loud. So, annoyed and awake, I shuffle to see who is hitting mitts with my husband (who tends to train surfers visiting the North Shore during the winter). I see a gluteus that looks vaguely familiar, attached to some very slender legs. The pounding thud of what sounded like 200 lbs of testosterone is coming from a female. And not just any female. It’s Alana Blanchard.

Reef

BIKINIS, BIG WAVES & BREAKING BARRIERS


She looks better in a bikini than most of us. She is a pro surfer. And she can kick ass. I had no idea someone that petite could pack that much power. That moment was an epiphany: women’s surfing has evolved from Gidget to Carissa Moore; it has expanded from a select few contests to a World Tour; a few bikinis in the lineup to a near 50-50 split; and today there are a wide variety of talented and inspiring females, from freesurfers to World Tour veterans and big wave chargers. Catching Up While the 2002 movie Blue Crush seemingly ushered in a generation of female surfers, the professional side of things was slow to catch up on enthusiasm.

For example, in 2007, on the Men’s Tour, 45 surfers competed in 10 events, with the Quiksilver Pro offering $300,000 in prize money. The Women’s Tour consisted of 17 surfers in eight events. The Roxy Pro, which was won by Chelsea Hedges that year, paid a total of $80,000 in winnings. Now in 2017, in contrast, the total prize money at each of the Men’s Championship Tour stop (11 events) amounts to $579,000, while the total prize money for the Women’s CT Tour (10 events) at each stop is $289,500. It was only a couple years ago that the women’s World Tour was covered in mainstream media, with Fuel TV adding live coverage of the Women’s WSL in 2014. The ASP added more women’s events to the World Tour that year as well.

“I’d say the performance level of all the women is what has changed the most,” says Maui’s Big Wave World Champion Paige Alms. “The technical approach, the speed and control, and the maneuvers. Everything has gotten better. Also, the WSL has done a great job at providing better contest venues and better prize money, which allows the women to showcase our sport in better conditions.” Alana Blanchard agrees: “About five years ago people just really wanted to follow women’s surfing. I think the surfing level really just got so much better and exciting that it was just cool to watch.” Dialing In “I think every year the women continue to step it up in every aspect,” 3-time World Champion Carissa Moore says. “Everyone


is becoming more progressive, more fluid, faster in the water. More competitive, more driven, smarter in competition. Each woman has their team dialed in and their boxes checked when it comes to surfing, diet, and training.”

Selling Bikinis In juxtaposition to the tried and true competition route, for the first time ever in women’s surfing history, certain freesurfers can make a living from modeling the lifestyle, rather than grinding it out in heats.

in-store appearances. I try my best to be a good role model and project happiness and positivity through my social media outlets. I absolutely love what I do. And I feel empowered because I am still a pro surfer, but not obligated to compete. I’m surrounded by confident, talented, inspiring women, and I get to see the world!” While it can be argued that freesurfing for photo shoots that will sell bikinis WSL / Heff

She adds that because the sport is growing, there is positive outside motivation to get better and to want to perform for a growing audience. “We all want to be the best,” she says. “We see

better and hunting those swells, like any big wave surfer.”

each other improving and know that we have to evolve if we want to keep up with the game.” Female big wave surfers don’t have as many opportunities to compete as males, although that sector of women’s surfing is on the rise. “I guess it’s just the will and want, all of the women charging big waves want to get better and improve,” Paige says. “I think that is the number-one driving force. We all want to push ourselves more, ride bigger waves, ride them more technically. It is nice to have opportunities to showcase our sport in empty lineups at contests, but that isn’t the main thing pushing the sport forward. It really is the big wave women just wanting to get 58

Roxy girls like Monyca Eleogram and Kelia Moniz - also a two-time ASP Women’s World Longboard Champion - get to surf, model lifestyle clothing and swimwear, and make a living doing it. Of course they are beautiful and cute, but their grace and style surfing is also what sells the brand. This still makes young girls want to try surfing, and this persuades women to get in the water. “I do photo shoots where I model clothes, accessories and bikinis,” says Monyca, providing an introspective look into her schedule. “I surf, do interviews and e-learning videos. I make myself readily available for events such as contests and fitness gatherings and sometimes

sexualizes women’s surfing, if Alana Blanchard inspires females to put on a bikini and get to the beach, perhaps try surfing or some other outdoor activity, then the sport is only gaining fans. “I loved being on Tour but it was just too much trying to do everything,” Alana explains. “I was doing the Tour and doing shoot after shoot and it really took it out of me. I decided to try to be more of a freesurfer because not too many women surfers get a chance to make a living out of it.” Challenges Moving Forward “The biggest obstacle for big wave women moving forward is the opportunity


to travel,” explains Paige. “Most of the big wave women do not have main sponsors, so being able to travel the world and surf different types of big waves is a challenge.” Alana thinks much of the obstacles women’s surfing faces can be remedied by having more women at the top of the industry. “While I think it’s always getting better, more women in charge in the whole business of surfing like running companies, running contests, leading the marketplace—that will make a huge difference in how we as surfers are portrayed and compensated.” Frieden

It’s those who sit atop the industry that are serving as role models and inspirations, according to Carissa. “I am truly honored to be apart of the evolution and am constantly inspired

by the strong, independent, driven, hard-working, tremendously beautiful women I am surrounded by and compete with everyday,” she says. “The sport wouldn’t grow or evolve without each and everyone one of us, present and past. I’m excited to see what the future holds.” Carissa and company certainly have reason to be excited, with signs pointing to great expectations becoming reality: the Women’s CT is as progressive as ever, there’s discussions and desires among the surf community to grow the women’s Big Wave arena, and female freesurfers are ripping at dreamy locales and sharing the session with the world via photos and videos, creating viral sensations. Most importantly, the women on today’s frontlines of surfing are inspiring new generations of surfers who will one day take the reins and push the sport forever forward.

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By Cash Lambert

Can you feel this energy? This is the start of something great We might be a little late...hey But at least we’re on our way

“I’d like to advance into more and more rounds and just improve everyday,” she says, speaking on her outlook for the rest of the year. Something tell us that Keala’s impressive run is just as her favorite song voices: this is the start of something great.

These lyrics flow in Keala Tomodo-Bannert’s ears, turning the Ala Moana Bowls lineup into a silent, watery dance as the Kauai native battles at the HSA State Championship.

What’s your earliest surfing memory, Keala?

“It’s weird, because before heats, most people would rather listen to, you know, rock out type music, but that makes me fall asleep,” the 16-year-old says with a smile. “So I actually listen to slow music before a heat, that’s what gets me pumped up.” The “slow music” she’s been listening to lately is the rhythmic beats of Khalid’s Let’s Go. This song of choice seemed to work well, because Keala went on to win the 14-15 year old division at States, adding further momentum to her year, already coming off a semifinal finish at the Wahine Pipe Pro.

My mom pushed me on a really big board, something like a 6’9”, at Pinetrees. I remember standing and riding all the way to the beach. After that, I started surfing everyday. I loved the feel of it. How did your surfing evolve from one ride to wanting to compete? I started competing in the Irons Brothers contest. At my first one, I made it to the Final and got 2nd. I love competing, and recently I’ve been doing HSAs and now I’m trying to do Pro Junior events.

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SHE RIPS / KEALA TOMODO-BANNERT Did you feel pressure when you first came to Oahu, with so many cameras and the crowded lineups?

It’s a fun day where everyone can surf together, and the community comes together and it brings joy to the island. Plus, when you lose, you still get prizes!

It’s from Bethany. She said that everytime you go into the water, it doesn’t have to be a competition. You don’t always have to be aggressive in the water; it’s about having fun.

And you made it to the semis at the Wahine Pipe Pro in March. What was the biggest takeaway from the event?

Very few people have the opportunity to grow up in an area as beautiful as Kauai. What’s that like?

Committing to the waves. Thinking about Pipeline is scary, but once you’re out there, it’s not bad. I gained so much confidence from that contest, and I learned that you just have to commit to the waves and you won’t get hurt.

Not many people have the chance to live in paradise, so I’m very blessed. It’s so quiet and nice. I started out surfing small waves at Pinetrees, and once I started to progress, it’s hard to find waves because there’s not a ton of spots on the island. But I was able to surf with Bethany, Alana and Tati. Every day consists of waking up early and surfing, maybe a hike with friends or something adventurous, and then surfing again and watching the sunset.

Everyone is progressing more and more. I think that girls that come out of Hawaii definitely look stronger and more powerful. Tati is my favorite backside on tour, and I love Carissa Moore’s frontside. Her carves are so powerful.

And there’s hardly ever coverage of swells from the Garden Isle, compared to Oahu.

What can we expect from you in the future?

Overall, what are your surfing goals? I’d love to win a pro junior, that’s one of my top goals. I’d like to advance into more and more rounds and just improve everyday. Who are some of your surfing influences? Who inspires you? I’m inspired by Tatiana Weston-Webb right now. She’s showed me that even though I come from a small island, I can achieve my dreams. She’s very committed to what she does in her surfing. I’m also inspired by Bethany Hamilton.

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What’s the best piece of advice you ever received?

Yeah, you feel more of a freesurfing vibe on Kauai. You can do whatever you want, because you’re trying to progress to get better, not to get the clip or the photo. It’s a passion to freesurf and you don’t feel like you have to perfect because there’s not a lot of people watching.

I wasn’t used to that many people in the water or on the beach. It put pressure on me, and it made me fall on a bunch of waves. I’m used to it now since I’ve come here so often. Your thoughts on the Women’s tour? Anyone’s surfing that you really like?

What does it mean to be a wahine? It’s about being generous, kind, and remembering Hawaiian traditions, culture and style.

Practicing, progressing and traveling more to different places!

Dane Grady

What is that like to have the Irons Brothers contest in your backyard every year?


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REPORTING LIVE WITH SHANNON MARIE QUIRK By Cash Lambert

It’s one of the biggest nights in surf: the World Surf League Big Wave awards, with the industry’s best looking spectacular and strolling the red carpet as a soft California summer breeze fills the air. Standing on the red carpet, alongside the likes of Keala Kennelly, Paige Alms and Billy Kemper is the dazzling Shannon Marie Quirk - otherwise known as Shannon Reporting - with a microphone in hand. “I have to interview the athletes, and their friends and family, along with work on the stage for live production,” she says, describing her duties at the gala that took place on the eve of the much anticipated 2017/2018 WSL Big Wave season. The red carpet is certainly one of the safer on camera jobs Shannon has executed throughout her impressive career. The 29-year-old has reported live from the channel at Mavericks as the world’s best cartwheeled down waves the size of 3-5 story buildings, live streamed from the back of a ski at Nazare, with 60-70 foot sets detonating into mountains of whitewash nearby and so much more. With dedication, hard work, and a bit of luck, Shannon has cashed in on her action sports passion and is present during the headlining days around the world - serving as the WSL Big Wave Event Coordinator - scoring incredible surf along the way and calling Sunset Beach her hanai home. Shannon’s roots begin in the cold waters of Northern California, where she learned to surf in uncomfortable fashion. “My Dad 66

would get me out in the water with no hood, no booties and I thought it was a really uncomfortable sport,” she says with a laugh, revealing a snow-white smile. “I remember it being so cold...Ocean Beach, it’s a marathon of swimming and it takes so long to get to the lineup. I loved the first ride but I would always get one wave and come in because I couldn’t feel my hands.” An action sports fan from then on, Shannon attended UCLA, and was injected into the epicenter of the industry. “Transworld Snowboarding was my first job, and I thought it was awesome that the editor was paying for helicopter flights to Alaska and doing amazing trips like that, getting paid and raising a family. I was inspired, knowing that I could do that myself.” After completing her undergraduate, she packed bare essentials and moved to Brazil, working on websites and as a surf photographer. There, she not only conquered learning new languages (Spanish and Portuguese); she also paddled out at unfamiliar breaks and reached the summit of windy mountain ranges. Opportunity soon came knocking at her door. “I got a call from the company that was wanting to start the Surf Channel,” Shannon says, her blue eyes glowing. “There I was, living in tropical paradise. And I was happy there, but the opportunity seemed right up my alley, so I decided it was time to move back to the mainland. I became the Editor in Chief of the Surf Channel, where we created so much content. I helped to really found the business. I was at the point in my life where I wanted


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to hustle; I was game to meet as many people as possible and be busy all the time.” It was during this time that she saw Mark Healey’s famed wipeout live - free falling down a monster Mavericks wave - from the channel. “It was the first time I was in the channel, and there I was, reporting live on television,” she says. “Those environments make me thrive, and I do my best work live because I know I can’t screw it up. Being in that environment, that is what I wanted and still want to do with my career...Tell those kinds of stories.” For 3 years, she hustled, she shook hands, she was present at every industry gathering and she surfed during her days off. Then came another offer she couldn’t refuse: “When the WSL bought the Big Wave Tour, they had locked in production team,” she says. “They offered me a job as Event Coordinator, which entails planning, permits, travel, accommodation, things like that.” This is how she describes her job: “Once we have an orange light, I start booking reservations at hotel, making sure the event manager on sight is ready to go. Once we have a green light, all athletes have my number, because if they need a new flight or their boards don’t make it...basically, it’s days without sleep. It’s fun and exciting but a lot can always go wrong...there’s always such mayhem surrounding these massive storms, so we prepare for the worst.” Within that role sits another: pushing for a Women’s Big Wave Tour, along with vocalizing support for female Big Wave surfers.

“Even though women have been surfing big waves for so long, the format for putting a women’s event together is only a couple years old,” she says. “I was on the broadcast team for the Big Wave event in Oregon, and it was a men’s event but they ran a women’s heat. I mentioned on the live feed how there is no prize money for the girls, and a local brew company came down and presented $5,000 for the girls. I think it’s about voicing that reality. Maybe people don’t know how truly unsponsored these big wave girls are, how expensive their gear and last minute flights are.” She continued: “Most of the Big Wave women have jobs; they can’t freesurf all day, because surfing isn’t their main source of income, or their income at all. I also think it’s only fair for women to get paid the same as the men. Since we’re at the beginning of the sport, we have the ability to set the tune up now and make changes.” One of those changes is to “accept differences and be ok that maybe we’re going to run a Big Wave event for the girls a different day, maybe even have a different format. If any of the girls get hurt, be excited that they’re out there trying. They’re the the ones who decided to be out there. I see the future as a way for women to not only empower themselves but inspire others, make money and potentially a career.” When Shannon isn’t focusing on a Big Wave agenda or spending time in lineups around the world, she’s wielding her entrepreneurial spirit, pitching and working on production and social media jobs, continuing to turn her passion into a profit. “Have coffee with someone you’re inspired by or want to learn from,” she says when asked about advice to she’d give to those aspiring to be on surfing’s frontlines. “Mentorship is really important; it’s important to reach out and to learn from whoever it is that you’re looking up to.”

Pat Nolan

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LIFE ON CANVAS: JULIE PATACCHIA ADDS COLOR NORTH SHORE HISTORY By Tiffany Foyle Photos Keoki

Julie Patacchia’s paintings chronicle the landmarks, traditions and pastimes of the once sleepy and rural towns of Waialua and Haleiwa and the people who live there. She paints the neighborhoods of old sugar mill homes and dusty streets, the ocean she played in her entire life, the flowers used to express Aloha, and the unique people rich in culture and tradition. While her paintings are her life on canvas, they are so much more: her art is truly a rich and authentic historical portrait of the North Shore. Born in Waialua Hospital before statehood and raised in Waialua Mill Camp House #1, Julie attended Hale‘iwa Elementary and Waialua High School. “Our families worked in the sugar and pineapple plantations and we entertained ourselves at the Haleiwa, Kawailoa, Waialua, and Koga Theatres,” she recalls. “Our many cultures, foods, traditions and languages were intertwined. Together we experienced the tragedies of our native sons going to war and buried our loved ones at Queen Lili‘uokalani Church and The Waialua Graveyard. We fed ourselves with food from the sea, toiled the land, and raised our own livestock.” Plantation Life There wasn’t much to do during the summertime in Waialua besides go to the beach, so Julie’s parents bought her paints and canvas. She went to the Waialua Public Library and borrowed stacks of art books and taught herself to paint at the

age of 15. Her first subjects were ocean-related. Growing up, her family’s beach of choice was Haleiwa Beach and Puaena Point because it provided food. “Every weekend we would drive to Haleiwa Beach and gather different varieties of seaweed, clams, shrimp, opihi, and fish. We only took what we could eat for the week so our food was always fresh and we did not want to over harvest. The water was so clear then.” Julie recalls that one summer, she noticed workers dredging the Hale’iwa Harbor and building barriers. A year later, the ocean turned a murky brown and the wildlife diminished. After that all the families stopped going to Haleiwa Beach. “There were many other beaches to go to for food but Hale’iwa had the best reefs and gave us a variety that we could not get


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sure that they got back safely to their parents. Sometimes there would be ten or more boys from other countries sleeping on my living room floor. When my son traveled to their countries, their families also welcomed him into their homes with open arms.” Their son, Fred Patacchia, Jr. is of course a professional surfer who works for Quiksilver. Their two daughters, Leilani and Lehua, work for Hurley. Because Julie spends the majority of her week babysitting her four grandchildren (ages one, three, four, and five) there is no time to paint during the day. “I try to paint about four times a week and wake up at 4 a.m. and paint until 7 a.m. before the grandchildren arrive,” she says. “Making time to paint is like making time to surf. You love doing it so you do it when you can and enjoy every minute of it.”

anywhere else,” she says. “That’s why I really enjoy putting captions and sharing stories with my paintings to inform everyone young and old about our fragile environment because some of Mother Nature’s gifts are irreversible.” She loves painting the Anahulu Stream Bridge and remembers the days when the water was crystal clear there as well. Julie’s paintings chronicle the growth of the North Shore. Early works had just a few surfers in the lineup, but as time went on, the number of surfers on her waves began to grow. “Surfing has changed due to different equipment but the love of surfing that I see when a surfer rides a wave is always the same,” she says. “The waves are always different depending on the weather conditions, so every wave that I paint is never the same.” Surf Family When she met Fred Patacchia— a surfer from Florida who was fulfilling his dream of moving to Hawaii to surf and marry a local girl— she had a place at Waimea Bay and he lived across the street from Sharks Cove. “We met at the beach, got married two years later, and had our three children,” she laughs. Julie and “Big Fred” owned the “Hawaiian Surf” brand for years. She manufactured the clothing line and he shaped surfboards. They loved being in the surf business because their lives revolved around the sport of surfing. They went to every single surf contest throughout the island, almost every weekend, packed lunches, pitched tents, and sat at the beach with surfers and their families throughout the day. “We became a surf Mom and Dad to all the young surfers in Hawaii, and worldwide,” Julie says. “Our home was always open to my son’s surfing friends and they would sleep over for the weekends, and some would stay for the winter. I would cook for them, wash their clothes, drive them to the contests, and make

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Inspirations & Dreams “The painter that I relate to is Grandma Moses,” Julie says of her artistic inspirations. “She was a self-taught, primitive style painter who came from humble beginnings. Grandma Moses raised her children and grandchildren and painted people living in the ever-changing countryside.” Her biggest art dream is to make people smile when they see her paintings and read the funny (mostly written in pidgin) captions that accompany them, something that happened in April, when her art was on display at Haleiwa Joe's. Julie hopes that the galleries in her neighborhood will take notice and feature her as a local Haleiwa artist. For now, folks can visit her home studio by appointment (email juliepatacchia@ gmail.com) or order prints and originals on her new website: www.juliepatacchia.com


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11 WAYS TO MAKE YOUR SUMMER TOXIC FREE By Kahi Pacarro

The beach boys are hustling for lessons and maybe a future wife. The sun’s cooking your shoulders as the wax on your overheated longboard barely sticks. Throngs of tourists do their cooked lobster impersonations while sitting on towel-sized oceanfront real estate. They spray sunscreen like it’s deodorant onto their melanin-challenged skin while most of it goes into the air. As you slide into the overly warm Waikiki waters, an oily sheen with the scent of pina coladas and bananas coats your board and body. You don’t even wear sunscreen anymore in Waikiki, because you can get a good coat just paddling out.

Toothbrush You’re fighting the plastic fight yet everyday you start your day with a plastic toothbrush. Get yourself a bamboo toothbrush that biodegrades. Start your day off right: plastic free.

that shave ice falls onto your feet and the sticky syrup turns to glue between your slippers and your toes. Stop preventing your child from this experience. Lead by example and get the paper cup, no straw, the wooden spoon is ok,

Coffee Did you know most coffee shop “to go” cups are lined with plastic? Ditch it altogether and bring in your own mug.

and don’t forget the ice cream at the bottom.

As you paddle out through Baby Queens, you wonder when the sign is going to be installed encouraging beginners to paddle towards Canoes and leave Queens to the experienced. As you stare over your left shoulder at Diamond Head, you also wonder how much longer this postcard lifestyle can sustain itself. Here are a few ways that will make your summer a bit cooler on our environment and a path towards a sustainable paradise. Sunscreen There are two types of sunscreens: Physical and chemical. Use reef friendly physical blockers like zinc, titanium, and fabric. A really good way to look at it is that if you can’t see your sunscreen on your body, you’re killing the reef. The active ingredient in most sunscreens is oxybenzone, and it is a proven reef killer. Chemical sunscreens are effective by absorbing into your skin, but they also absorb into your bloodstream while also killing the reef. Bottled Water Hawaii has some of the cleanest drinking water on the planet coming directly from our taps. When you’re buying bottled water, you’re not actually buying water, you’re buying convenience because you’re lazy. Get a reusable water bottle, fill it up and save your money for a surf trip.

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Shave Ice It’s like every kid gets a trophy and every kid now gets a stupid plastic spill proof cup for their shave ice. You’re not a true local keiki until

Surfing Look at your existing board and start making your next one greener. There are those protruding apparatuses under our board that cuts things, are made of plastic, and get in the way. Go finless or even better, ditch the foam and ride an alai’a.


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Beach Cleanups There’s not a better place to meet like minded individuals in minimal clothing. It’s also a known fact that beach cleaners get more waves. Bonfire If you’re gonna have a bonfire, don’t use pallets. Burnt pallets leave nails in the sand. Shopping Our plastic bag ban is still in limbo. We have retailers handing out thick plastic bags calling them environmentally-friendly and one retailer even has the gall to write “Reusable, Help Protect our Aina”. Don’t buy into this madness. Bring your own bag and if you forgot your bag, carry it out. Stick your stuff in a box like at Costco, put it directly in the cart, turn your shirt into a bag, get creative, but whatever you do, don’t justify taking another single use plastic bag. Concerts There are some good shows coming up and you know you’re going to go to at least one. A few simple things you can do include reusing your cup and ditching the straw. Why are you getting a straw anyways? Surfers don’t drink cosmos. Want to see how a concert should be hosted? Check out the Jack Johnson shows coming up in August. Lunch After a long sesh, nothing really beats a plate lunch. Problem is, they often serve the best food in the least environmentally friendly packaging. Therefore, eat where they use compostable plates. If you must, hit up the spot using polystyrene (styrofoam), bring in your own container and cutlery. Chopsticks are better than the plastic cutlery. Those are just a few way to mellow out your plastic vibe this summer. It’s going to take all of us pushing the needle towards a more sustainable Hawaii. We can’t point fingers at others if we’re not living pono ourselves. Learn more about what you can do to malama aina by following along on our Instagram at @ sustainablecoastlineshawaii and better yet, join as at any of our upcoming beach cleanups across the state. Kahi Pacarro is the Executive Director of Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii.


CUSTOM SURFBOARDS - JERRY GRANTHAM

(808) 968-7149

Central Coast Surfboards 855 Marsh Street San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (805) 541-1129 Ala Moana Surfboards 1124 Kona Street Honolulu, HI 96814 (808) 591-9283

Natalina Dance Company

Dancers for every occasion!

Samba, African,French Cancan, French Cabaret Plume, Disco, Afro-Caribbean, Charleston, and Dance Hall. www.natalinamonteiro.com natalinamonteiro@hotmail.fr

(347) 636-7247

Orchidland Surfboards 262 Kamehameha Avenue Hilo, Hawaii 96720 (808) 935-1533 World Core Surf 75-5744 Alii Dr #132, Kailua-Kona, HI 96740 Phone: (808) 329-8825


STUFF WE LIKE

REVO SUNGLASSES Living in Hawaii, style is minimal. It’s a perk, yeah? Given our friendly proximity to the Equator, the only items needed are a shirt (aloha prefered), board shorts/swim apparel, slippers, and sunglasses. Let’s talk more about that last one: you have a pair of sunglasses you like? Or do you wear whatever you can find? Because chances are you’re one of two types in the sunglass arena: you either live off cheap pairs, and once you sit on a pair and break/ contort them, you buy another at the gas station or mall, or you go for an ultra stylish, ultra durable pair. Regardless of your current fashion vs. function style, give Revo a look. Founded in 1985, Revo quickly became a global performance eyewear brand, known as the leader in polarized lens technology, which is, you know, that kind of technology that makes the colors of the lush, green mountains and aqua blue water pop when you slip the shades on. Revo sunglasses were first created by utilizing lens technology developed by NASA as solar protection for satellites. The lenses offer not just UV protection, but also a reduction in blue light (creating a greater contrast between colors and a more pronounced brightness of objects) as well as blocking HEV light (which has been implicated as a cause of age-related macular degeneration). Sold already? We thought so. So what kind of style ya dig? Streamlined? Try their Bearing model. Or are you more of a round frame shape kind of person? Check out their Blackwell model. For the ladies spying a cat eye look, try on the Barclay model. Prices range from $189 to $250, and for more information on how to get that summer swag, visit Revo.com!


Your Skin. Our Ocean. One Sunscrn.

ALISON’S ADVENTURES’ #1 CHOICE FOR SUN PROTECTION

Find Raw Elements at qualy shops acro e islands…

WWW.DARKFINGLOVES.COM

SURFING - PADDLING = MORE SURFING

WWW.RAWELEMENTS.COM

PHOTO: SARAH LEE


INDUSTRY NOTES

WaveGarden released it’s newest and greatest technology: the Wave Garden Cove, which is capable of churning out 1000 waves per hour. “It’s a new technology where they can pump out a wave every 8 seconds,” said Kauai’s Sebastian Zietz, after surfing in the pool located in the Basque country. “For the general public, it's a lot more functional for beginners and experienced surfers.” The company has aims to open over a dozen pools in places like New York, Miami, Melbourne, Sydney, and London. Visit WaveGarden.com for more information. Announcing the opening of our new showroom featuring Jud Lau Surfboards and Tai Vandyke Photography. This collaboration between Tai and myself will feature Jud Lau Surfboards, Tai Vandyke Photography, and Tai Vandyke Photography glassed on Jud Lau Surfboards. Tai and I grew up surfing together here on Maui and to be embarking on this business venture together is super exciting! We will be opening on June 1, 2017 at the Pauwela Cannery #28C, 375 W. Kuiaha Rd., Haiku, HI 96708

Coral Isles has removed the common ingredients found to be harmful to coral reefs. Recent studies have determined that these common sunscreen ingredients are harmful to coral:

Zinc Oxide • Titanium Dioxide Oxybenzone • Octinoxate • Butylparaben

“Reef-Friendly Sunscreen” www.coralisles.com FOR DEALER INQUIRIES CALL 888-356-8899

Taylor Steele released his much anticipated film Proximity, “a visceral portrait of modern surfing. The film follows eight of the world's best surfers - Kelly Slater, John John Florence, Albee Layer, Shane Dorian, Stephanie Gilmore, Dave Rastovich, Rob Machado and Craig Anderson - as they search for new waves and deeper understanding in exotic destinations.” The film explores these surfing icons from different generations in unique locations around the world. The film premiered worldwide in May, and stay tuned to Freesurfmagazine.com for updates on how to watch the movie online.


John Choi

Auto Accident Law Center

808.792.8333HIautoAccident.com The People’s Choice Law Firm R Pacific Guardian Center, Makai Tower 733 Bishop Street, Suite 2390 Honolulu, Hawai`i 96813 attorneyjohnchoi@gmail.com

Call for free consultation

Former Deputy Attorney General

LEARN JIU-JITSU! 66-437 Kamehameha Hwy Behind the Haleiwa Post Office

(808) 372-8428 Men Women Kids

@freesurfmag

7 DAYS A WEEK!

#C-32543

94-344 Ukee St #2 Waipahu, HI 96797 Office: (808) 554-2572 Cell: (808) 321-9629 info@directelectrichawaii.com www.directelectrichawaii.com


LAST LOOK Dancing amongst the golden light, Natalia Smith further exemplifies the characteristics of a wahine: beauty, style and grace. Photo: Dane Grady


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