The Collection of Dorrance “Dodo” H. Hamilton

Page 1

T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

1



T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

THE COLLECTION OF

D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N F I N E PA I N T I N G S & D E C O R AT I V E A R T S

AUCTION Sale 1601 Sunday, April 29 at 2:00pm 1808 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19103

3


ŠMarianne Lee Photography

4


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

S P E C I A L I S T D E PA R T M E N T S Alasdair Nichol Chairman | Fine Art anichol@freemansauction.com 267.414.1211

David Weiss Senior Vice President | Fine Art dweiss@freemansauction.com 267.414.1214

Raphaël Chatroux Junior Cataloguer | Fine Art rchatroux@freemansauction.com 267.414.1253

Nicholas B. A. Nicholson Senior Vice President | Furniture & Decorative Arts nnicholson@freemansauction.com 267.414.1212

Tim Andreadis Vice President | Design tandreadis@freemansauction.com 267.414.1215

Lynda Cain Vice President | American Furniture, Folk & Decorative Arts lcain@freemansauction.com 267.414.1237

SELECT PREVIEWS New York City | March 18-21 Carlton Hobbs LLC 60 E. 93rd Street

Philadelphia Main Line | April 3-7 Freeman’s 503 W. Lancaster Avenue

Please contact departments for list of works to be included in these previews.

EXHIBITIONS Saturday, April 21 Sunday, April 22 Monday, April 23 Tuesday, April 24 Wednesday, April 25 Thursday, April 26 Friday, April 27 Saturday, April 28

10:00am - 5:00pm 12:00pm - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm

By appointment only on the morning of the sale.

CLIENT SERVICES Mary Maguire Director | Client Services mmaguire@freemansauction.com 267.414.1236

Joslyn Moore Bidding Registration jmoore@freemansauction.com 267.414.1207

5

Melissa Arundel Post-Sale Administrator marundel@freemansauction.com 267.414.1226


P H I L A D E L P H I A’ S F I N E S T F L O W E R Celebrating the life and legacy of Dorrance “Dodo” H. Hamilton

6


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

T

hose lucky enough to have met Dorrance “Dodo” Hamilton all attest to her brilliance, kindness, and quiet devotion to the people, institutions and organizations that surrounded her. Mrs. Hamilton created a destiny of her own throughout her eighty-eight year life. A patroness whose interests were manifold, she committed herself to philanthropy and charity everywhere she lived, specifically in the Philadelphia area, where her presence still remains as prolific and widespread as the buildings and organizations that bear her name. A fervent horticulturist, Mrs. Hamilton particularly enjoyed participating in high-level floral championships. She won more than two thousand blue ribbons over the thirty years she competed at the world’s oldest and largest indoor flower show. Of all the flowers she collected and looked after, it is probably her orchids—especially her ‘Spread Eagle’ specimen— that remain in the forefront of everyone’s memory. Mrs. Hamilton also played a crucial role in the rehabilitation of the Blue Garden, an iconic landmark of both Newport’s and

America’s cultural history, which she brought back to its original splendor by dint of sheer perseverance and bold conviction. “Dodo,” a nickname chosen by her mother which she embraced throughout her entire life, collected across categories that spoke to her deep and wide-ranging interests, surrounding herself with what she loved without concern for trends. Her collection, comprised of both fine works and whimsical items, served as a visual reminder of her life’s many facets, honoring the things, people, and places she valued most. In each of her residences, specific objects would also remind her of the other places she cherished and called home, blurring any distance created by her physical separation from these locales. Freeman’s is delighted to present the collection of Dorrance “Dodo” Hamilton, which includes paintings and prints from highly regarded European and American artists, as well as a selection of Decorative Arts and Fine Jewelry from renowned designers and makers, all reflective of Mrs. Hamilton’s personal style and remarkable character.

7


8


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

F I N E PA I N T I N G S & P R I N T S LOTS 1 - 4 1

9



E U R O P E A N PA I N T I N G S LOTS 1 - 1 2


EUGÈNE BOUDIN

(French 1824–1898)

B

oudin was born in Honfleur in 1824. The son of a harbor captain, he would accompany his father as a cabin boy on a steamboat ferry that ran between Le Havre and his hometown. That Boudin would go on to capture the majesty of the sea so exquisitely and so extensively would only seem natural. However, he did not begin painting seriously until his early twenties, when the town of Le Havre awarded him with a three year scholarship, which prompted him to move to Paris and study there.

an intoxicating liquor or like the eloquence of opium.” (“Salon de 1859” in Curiosités Esthétiques, 1868, p. 334). The open and luminous quality of Boudin’s works was a particular influence for the young Claude Monet (1840-1926), who met Boudin at age seventeen and worked alongside him. Under Boudin’s tutelage, Monet moved away from caricature art, and began painting landscapes en plein air, learning to appreciate and capture the distinct effects of light that would define his style and later elevate him to prominence.

The Dutch painter Johan Jongkind (1819-1891) first encouraged Boudin to work outdoors, en plein air, a direct departure from the conventional, studio-based mode of the time, and a move that would foreshadow the Impressionist movement. Boudin created sketches, finely detailed pencil drawings, and watercolors at the seaside, and then returned to Paris to complete the full paintings in his studio in the winters. Boudin’s skill at capturing the changing effects of light on the water and the sky are the hallmark of his work. The artist Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (1796-1875) once called him “le roi des ciels” (the king of the skies), and Boudin’s submissions to the 1859 Paris Salon garnered praise from the poet Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), who rhaposodized: “If you have had the leisure to acquaint yourself with these meteorological beauties, you will be able to verify, by memory, the exactness of Monsieur Boudin’s observations (...) all these depths, all these splendours, go to my head like

Boudin completed more than 120 paintings of Berck, the northern French seaside commune nestled between the English Channel and the tip of the river Authie. “La Plage de Berck” here depicts the wide, flat expanse of the beach, sand blending into sky in cool-hued colors. Several Berckois stroll along the beach, one lifts a parasol against the sun. The wide, confident brushstrokes in the screen of clouds are mimicked in the drawn trails in the sand. The scene is edged by buildings and boats, the water of the Channel only visible in the distance, speckled with people closer to the surf. Like most of Boudin’s work, the present piece uses a linear perspective, approaching his subject straight on, perpendicular to the scene. In the mid-1800s, Berck became a destination for those convalescing from tuberculosis, as the sea was believed to have curative powers for the sick. That, coupled with the ease of access with the newly expanded railway system, made Berck a popular enclave along the coast.

1 EUGÈNE BOUDIN (french 1824–1898) “LA PLAGE DE BERCK” Signed, located and dated ‘E. Boudin/Berck/Juin’ bottom left, oil on canvas 14 1/4 x 23 1/8 in. (36.2 x 58.7cm) provenance: Collection of Mr. Jack Dorrance. A gift from the above. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibition: “By The Sea: Paintings by Eugène Boudin & His Fellow Impressionists,” The Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 1-September 1, 1991. literature: Robert Schmit, Catalogue Raisonné de l’Oeuvre Peint d’Eugène Boudin, Galerie Schmit, Paris, 1973, vol. III, no. 2632.

$80,000-120,000

12


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

13


TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

14


In-situ photograph of the painting when it was exhibited at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, in 1991 (photo courtesy Hamilton family).

15


“Portrait de Pierre-Joseph Redouté” by Louis-Léopold Bailly Oil on canvas, c. 1800 (Photo courtesy Palais des Beaux-Arts de Lille, France)

16


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

P I E R R E -J O S E P H R E D O U T É

(French 1759–1840)

C

onsidered the greatest botanical painter of all time, Pierre-Joseph Redouté is certainly the most famous one. He was born in Saint-Hubert, now Belgium, in 1759, at a time when botany underwent a revolution, ultimately making it one of the most promising sciences of the century. Throughout the 18th century, France enriched its floral collection with many new specimens from both the Indies and America thanks to travel and trade. The newly acquired plants had immense diversity and required classification, comparison, dissection, and ultimately formal cataloging through both written and pictorial descriptions. This was necessary for official institutions such as the National Museum of Natural History, but also amongst private collectors. As an artist, Redouté quickly acquired the technical and scientific skills necessary to complete this hybrid type of work - half science, half art. Often referred to as “The Raphael of flowers,” his work demonstrates undertones of the fine flower painting of 18th Century Dutch artist Jan Van Huysum (1682-1749), and of his mentors Charles Louis L’Héritier de Brutelle (1746-1800) and Gerard van Spaendonck (1746-1882). Redouté’s talent was quickly recognized, working for both Queen Marie Antoinette (1755-1793) before the Revolution, and JeanJacques Rousseau (1712-1778), just after, for whom, he illustrated “La Botanique” in 1805. The present lot, as well as the following three lots, come from Pierre-Joseph Redouté’s most celebrated work, “Les Liliacées” (The Lilies). It is the artist’s largest single production, and, in many ways, it represents the apogee of his art. The book lists many specimens of the lily family. It includes both familiar flowers, such as the tulip or the amaryllis, as well as recently discovered plants, such as the pineapple or the yucca. Despite the title, the volumes also include plants from other families such as irises, orchids, strelitzias, agaves and heliconias. The complete work included 486 plates of different plants, published in eight separate volumes between 1802 and 1816. While his predecessors created ornate compositions of exotic flowers, Redouté here narrows his view, and depicts single flowers and buds in very simple botanical arrangements. In each plate, the flowers are captured in the style of a standard portrait, without any background or setting. The purity of the composition ultimately allows the viewer to focus on the beauty and delicate complexity of the plant itself, without any distraction. The rendering is all the more striking, as Redouté was required to study each plant in real life; lilies for example, could not be included in collections of dried specimens due to their extreme delicacy. Jules Janin (1804-1874), a journalist and a friend of Redouté, praised the greatness of the flower artist when he wrote after Redouté’s death: “This sparkling and elegant family of 17

Liliaceae (…) it was necessary to be a man of genius to be able to describe them.” (Charles Léger, Redouté et son Temps, 1945, p. 111). Although Redouté published “Les Liliaceés” under his own name, he depended on the patronage of Napoleon’s first wife, Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais (1763-1814). Redouté did not draw flowers from his imagination. Rather, he copied most of them after Joséphine’s own flowers in her private gardens at Malmaison, which she acquired in 1798 with the intention of filling them with the rarest plants in the world. Joséphine spent vast sums of money to maintain the beautiful gardens. She surrounded herself with a staff of botanists, including Aimé Bonpland (1773-1858) and Étienne Pierre Ventenat (1757-1808), to help her collect and keep a record of the flowering species. It was in this capacity that Redouté was employed as well, producing illustrations to accompany the scientific descriptions. In order to thank Empress Joséphine for her support, Redouté presented her with all of his original drawings in the form of a bound volume. While later engravings would have sufficed for any common collector or scientist, the Empress required the original working copy. With this book, Redouté transforms the image of the lily, transporting the flower away from its association with old mysticism and the Bourbon monarchy. Instead, he depicts the lily as an organic being, capturing its raw, unimagined beauty. Redouté’s new, scientific approach to art mimicked the overall transformation of French society at that time; namely, the transition from the old French Monarchy to Enlightened Empire.

“Madame Bonaparte dans son Salon de Malmaison” by François Gérard Oil on canvas, 1801 (“The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg” and copyright notice “Photograph © The State Hermitage Museum /photo by Leonard Kheifets” )


18


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

2 PIERRE-JOSEPH REDOUTÉ (french 1759–1840) “IRIS GERMANICA” FROM LES LILIACÉES Pencil signed ‘P.J. Redouté’ bottom left, watercolor on vellum affixed to board Sheet size: 18 15/16 x 13 5/8 in. (48.1 x 34.6cm) provenance: The Artist. Acquired directly from the above. Collection of Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais. By descent to Prince Eugène de Beauharnais, Duke of Leuchtenberg, Bavaria. By descent in the family. Braus-Riggenbach and Ulrico Hoepli, Zurich, Switzerland, “Sale of the Library of Eugène de Beauharnais,” May 23, 1935, lot 82. Weyhe Gallery, New York, New York. Private Trust. Sotheby’s, New York, sale of November 20, 1985, no. 309. Acquired directly from the above sale (in syndication). Arader Galleries, New York, New York. The Syndication in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$50,000-80,000

19


3 PIERRE-JOSEPH REDOUTÉ (french 1759–1840) “LEUCOJUM AESTIVUM” FROM LES LILIACÉES Pencil signed ‘P.J. Redouté’ bottom left, watercolor on vellum affixed to board Sheet size: 18 1/4 x 13 1/8 in. (46.4 x 33.3cm) provenance: The Artist. Acquired directly from the above. Collection of Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais. By descent to Prince Eugène de Beauharnais, Duke of Leuchtenberg, Bavaria. By descent in the family. Braus-Riggenbach and Ulrico Hoepli, Zurich, Switzerland, “Sale of the Library of Eugène de Beauharnais,” May 23, 1935, lot 82. Weyhe Gallery, New York, New York. Private Trust. Sotheby’s, New York, sale of November 20, 1985, no. 135. Acquired directly from the above sale (in syndication). Arader Galleries, New York, New York. The Syndication in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$15,000-25,000

20


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

21


22


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

4 PIERRE-JOSEPH REDOUTÉ (french 1759–1840) “YUCCA GLORIOSA” FROM LES LILIACÉES Pencil signed ‘P.J. Redouté’ bottom left, watercolor on vellum affixed to board Sheet size: 18 7/8 x 13 9/16 in. (47.9 x 34.4cm) provenance: The Artist. Acquired directly from the above. Collection of Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais. By descent to Prince Eugène de Beauharnais, Duke of Leuchtenberg, Bavaria. By descent in the family. Braus-Riggenbach and Ulrico Hoepli, Zurich, Switzerland, “Sale of the Library of Eugène de Beauharnais,” May 23, 1935, lot 82. Weyhe Gallery, New York, New York. Private Trust. Sotheby’s, New York, sale of November 20, 1985, no. 326. Acquired directly from the above sale (in syndication). Arader Galleries, New York, New York. The Syndication in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$12,000-18,000

23


5 PIERRE-JOSEPH REDOUTÉ (french 1759–1840) “MAIANTHEMUM” FROM LES LILIACÉES Pencil signed ‘P.J. Redouté’ bottom left, watercolor on vellum affixed to board Sheet size: 18 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. (47 x 34.3cm) provenance: The Artist. Acquired directly from the above. Collection of Empress Joséphine de Beauharnais. By descent to Prince Eugène de Beauharnais, Duke of Leuchtenberg, Bavaria. By descent in the family. Braus-Riggenbach and Ulrico Hoepli, Zurich, Switzerland, “Sale of the Library of Eugène de Beauharnais,” May 23, 1935, lot 82. Weyhe Gallery, New York, New York. Private Trust. Sotheby’s, New York, sale of November 20, 1985, no. 216. Acquired directly from the above sale. Arader Galleries, New York, New York. The Syndication in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$6,000-10,000

24 24


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

25


(detail)

“Hommage A Delacroix” by Henri Fantin-Latour (detail) Oil on canvas, 1864 (Musée d’Orsay, France) © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY

26

Pictured here, left to right: Alphonse Legros (1837-1911), Henri Fantin-Latour (1836-1904), James Whistler (1834-1903)


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

H E N R I FA N T I N - L AT O U R

(French 1836–1904)

A

lthough Henri Fantin-Latour initially sought academic fame through portraiture, it was actually his still lifes that made him truly renowned during his painting career, as they demonstrated his remarkable capacity to bring life and harmony to simple everyday objects like flowers. Fantin-Latour rapidly realized there was a greater interest for his flower paintings in Great Britain than in France. He first travelled to London in 1859 at the suggestion of fellow artist James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), whom he met while copying Old Masters at the Louvre the year before, and who purchased several of his early still lifes. Fantin returned to London many times after, enjoying a market that proved extremely lucrative and provided him with a reliable income. While on his second trip to London in 1862, Fantin was introduced to Edwin Edwards, an important lawyer and a keen collector who subsequently became his dear friend and agent. Under his patronage, timid-natured Fantin was free to paint as he wished, surrounded with silent flowers, in lieu of a noisy Parisian crowd, which he avoided his entire life. “I am able to live quietly... doing what I please, thanks to Edwards,” he wrote to his friend Otto Scholderer in 1871, the same year the present work, “Narcisses Simples et Doubles dans un Verre Long,” was completed. Art history has not always been completely fair towards Fantin-Latour’s flower paintings. Still lifes were not considered the spearhead of the Avant-Garde movement when FantinLatour started to dabble in the genre. Even when he tried to promote his still lifes in France, he faced severe criticism by the French Académie and Salon officials on still life painting, which they ranked at the bottom of the hierarchy of artist’s subjects. To contemporary critics, Fantin’s paintings were too repetitive and lacked originality. They were simply a response to the market’s high demand and had more in common with the works

27 27

of everyday artists Alexandre Desgoffe (1805-1882) or Philippe Rousseau (1816-1887), than those of future celebrities such as Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) or Paul Sérusier (1864-1927). “The problem with [Fantin-Latour’s] still life paintings isn’t that we don’t care for them,” Laurent Salomé explains, “we simply do not really know what to say about them.” He continues: “We are in the presence of an immense and enigmatic work, as mute as the flowers the artist produces, which, like them, seems to conceal some important secrets about existence” (Fantin-Latour: A Fleur de Peau, exhibition catalogue, 2016, p. 41). This statement applies particularly well to the present work. “Narcisses Simples et Doubles dans un Verre Long” was painted at a point during Fantin-Latour’s career when he struggled to make each work fresh and new, having painted still lifes for over ten years. His biggest fear, voiced to both Edwards and his wife in numerous letters, was that he would ultimately become a “fabricator” of still lifes, and “because of this fear [he] promised [himself] to always paint them with painstaking care” (letter to Edwin Edwards, dated March 2, 1865). Most likely created in England, the present work shows the extent to which Fantin’s still lifes embrace a pure aesthetic, prepared with subtle color contrasts, namely creamy whites and dark blacks. The flowers, carefully arranged in a simple yet elegant vase, are set against a characteristically muted background, which has been rapidly painted, so as to not “distract the attention to be paid to the flowers” (Fantin himself, quoted in Fantin-Latour, exhibition catalogue, 1983, p. 266). Still and calm, Fantin-Latour’s Narcisses seem isolated from the world. They have an emotional quality, which Jacques-Émile Blanche (1861-1942) elucidated best when he said: “Fantin studied each flower, each petal, its grain, its tissue, as if it were a human face” (quoted in Edward Lucie-Smith, Henri Fantin-Latour, 1977, p. 22).


“ I H AV E M A N Y T H I N G S T O T E L L Y O U S T I L L , B U T I T I S G E T T I N G L AT E A N D O N E N E E D S T O G E T U P E A R LY T O M O R R O W T O F I N I S H A B O U Q U E T T H AT H A S A L R E A D Y W I T H E R E D . M Y L I F E I S A M O N G F L O W E R S .” — H E N R I FA N T I N - L AT O U R

Fantin developed an extraordinary eye for detail as a portraitist, which he uses here to depict each flower with remarkable singularity, treating each as an independent sitter. He provides this bouquet of flowers with the dignity, mystery, and even sensuality of a portrait. One can compare the branches of the narcisses to rebellious sprigs of hair. The vase is the equivalent of a dress; rigid, sophisticated and yet transparent, revealing the elegant stems of the flower. By depicting narcissus, Fantin also plays with the myth associated with the flower itself. Historically speaking, the flower owes its name to the young hunter Narcissus, who tragically drowned in the pool where he contemplated his own reflection. Traditionally associated with narcissism and conceit, here the flowers appear free from this negative symbolism. Instead, Fantin arranges them as a modest bouquet, enriching them with a personal touch that is reminiscent of his delicate, yet powerful, personality. Just like the odorant narcissus, which only grows in wooded and shady areas, the artist shyly reveals a part of himself before withdrawing into the shadows, leaving us with a painting where raw passion lies on the surface. This painting exemplifies a whole new philosophy, a certain lifestyle and, to some extent, a social model the artist sets for himself and his generation. Fantin was the incarnation of

28

the “New Artist” who only considered his work in the face of history. To that extent, the painting proves to reference the art of the past more intensely than the radical concepts put forth by artists of his generation. Here, Fantin clearly looks to the work of 18th Century French still life Master Jean-BaptisteSiméon Chardin (1699-1779) to bring to canvas the vision of peaceful, bourgeois simplicity. The vase is refined without being too precious. The bouquet itself is bright but not too complex. By keeping his composition simple, Fantin ultimately abandons the traditional decorative rhetoric that would complicate his work. Although his works appear beautifully simple, Fantin devoted copious amounts of time determining the best composition for each one. Despite his close friendship with many Impressionists, the artist did not adopt their method of plein air painting. Rather than painting his floral pictures outside surrounded by nature, Fantin-Latour cut his flowers from the garden and went inside to arrange and paint them. There, he could methodically control the light and the atmosphere of his paintings. Like he said to his friend Otto Scholderer in 1872: “I have many things to tell you still, but it is getting late and one needs to get up early tomorrow to finish a bouquet that has already withered. My life is among flowers.”

28


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

29



T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

6 HENRI FANTIN-LATOUR (french 1836-1904) “NARCISSES SIMPLES ET DOUBLES DANS UN VERRE LONG” Signed and dated ‘Fantin 71’ bottom left, oil on canvas 16 3/8 x 8 in. (41.6 x 20.3cm) provenance: E.J. Van Wisselingh & Co., Amsterdam, Netherlands. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. François L. Schwarz. Christie’s, New York, sale of November 7, 2001, lot 106 (sold as “Fleurs”). Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. literature: Madame Fantin-Latour, Catalogue de l’Oeuvre Complet de Fantin-Latour, Henri Floury Publisher, Paris, 1911, no. 529. F. Daulte and J. Focarino, Privately Owned Paintings and Drawings from the Collection of François L. Schwarz, New York, 1974, p. 30 (illustrated p. 31 as “Narcissi in a Tall Glass”).

$100,000-150,000

31


“Autoportrait” by Paul Cézanne Oil on canvas, 1875 (Musée d’Orsay, France) © RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY

32


TH TH E EC O CO L LLELC ET C ITOI O N NO O F FD D OO RRA RN AN CE C E“ D“ D OO DD OO ” ”H H . H . H AM AM I LT I LT OO NN

PA U L C É Z A N N E

(French 1839–1906)

R

eflecting on Paul Cézanne’s career, Pablo Picasso realized that few artists had a greater impact on the art of the 20th century, acknowledging “He was like the father of us all.” In many respects, Cézanne was the first artist to explore abstraction in Western painting and in doing so, he paved the way for a new representation of perspective and space, free from any rule or hierarchy. Treating each aspect of his compositions with the same thoroughness, Cézanne left behind an important, yet complicated legacy: “the most difficult works of art [to access] and yet the most powerful [ones],” according to Philip Conisbee (“L’Atelier des Lauves,” Cézanne en Provence, exhibition catalogue, 2006, p. 257). Still, the artist remained misunderstood and criticized for a significant part of his life. It was not until 1895, when art dealer and gallery owner Ambroise Vollard gave him his first solo exhibition, that he was able to redefine and demonstrate his true achievements. This was a major turning point for Cézanne’s career and ultimately allowed him to secure a legacy as a modern master. Paul Cézanne was born in Aix-en-Provence in 1839. The eldest of three children, he grew up in a very well-to-do family, and largely lived up to his father’s great expectations. In high school, he met Baptistin Baille (1841-1918) and Émile Zola (1840-1902), with whom he formed the Inséparables school group and created life-long friendships. Upon his father’s request, Cézanne studied literature and law. However, he soon abandoned his legal career

33 33

to study painting instead. Like Zola he ended up in Paris, the aspiration of most ambitious provincials. There, he lived comfortably thanks to the monthly allowance his father granted him. Rejected from the École des Beaux-Arts, he attended the Académie Suisse in 1862, where he studied and copied with great interest the works of contempories such as Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) and Gustave Courbet (1819-1877), and the Old Masters like Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) and Diego Velásquez (1599-1660). Cézanne’s first oils are marked by a romantic touch and reveal a certain appeal for allegories. Inspired by his friend Camille Pissarro (1830-1903), he later developed an Impressionist technique, attempting to capture the ever-changing beauty of light through small dashes of color while working en plein air. As a result, he participated in the first Impressionist exhibition, organized by Nadar (1820-1910) in 1874. There, he displayed three paintings which proved radically shocking due to their style and subject. He ultimately decided not to exhibit alongside his fellow Impressionists again until 1877, the year “La Vie des Champs” was executed. Saddened by the lackluster interest in his works that year, Cézanne chose to break ties with the Parisian Impressionistic scene and returned to his native Provence for a while. He left his wife Hortense and his son Paul behind, and resumed life at ‘Jas de Bouffan,’ his parents’ estate near Aix-enProvence. The works produced in the South during this period are very diverse and quite difficult to date. Yet they share the same attention to light and to colorful brushwork for which Cézanne was known.


7 PAUL CÉZANNE (french 1839-1906) “LA VIE DES CHAMPS” Oil on canvas 10 7/8 x 13 7/8 in. (27.6 x 35.2cm) Executed in 1876-1877.

literature: Ambroise Vollard, A Stockbook, no. 3314. Walter Sickert, “French Art of the Nineteenth Century,” The Burlington Magazine for Connoisseurs, vol. 40, no. 231, p. 260-258, plate III, C. Lionello Venturi, Cézanne: Son Art, Son Oeuvre, Pierre Rosenberg, Paris, 1936, vol. 2, no. 251 (illustrated). Françoise Cachin, Isabelle Cahn and Walter Feilchenfeldt, Cézanne, an Exhibition Catalogue, Harry N. Abrams, New York, 1996, no. 43, p. 162-164 (illustrated). John Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: A Catalogue Raisonné, Thames & Hudson, London, 1997, vol. 2, no. 282 (illustrated). Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, Cézanne and Provence, The Painter in His Culture, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 2003, p. 204, fig. 5.18 (illustrated). Denis Coutagne, “The Jas de Bouffan Landscapes,” Jas de Bouffan: Cézanne, Société Paul Cézanne, Hexagone, Aix-en-Provence, 2004, p. 98-139, fig. 86 (illustrated). Pavel Machotka, Cézanne: La Sensation à l’Oeuvre, The Eye and the Mind, Crès Editions, Marseille, 2008, vol. 1, fig. 78 and vol. 2, p. 73. Jean Colrat, Cézanne: Joindre les Mains Errantes de la Nature, Ph.D. Dissertation, Université d’Aix-Marseille, Presses de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, Paris, 2013, p. 232, plate 110 (illustrated). W. Feilchenfeldt, J. Warman & D. Nash, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne, an online Catalogue Raisonné, no. 641 (illustrated).

provenance: Collection of Ambroise Vollard, Paris, France. Collection of Prince Antoine Bibesco, Paris, France. Hôtel Drouot, Paris, sale of June 27, 1931, lot 75. Pierre Matisse Gallery, New York, New York. Parke-Bernet, New York, sale of January 6, 1949, lot 48. Galerie de l’Élysée, with Alex Maguy, Paris, France. Acquavella Galleries, New York, New York. Collection of Mrs. Elinor Dorrance Ingersoll. By descent in the family. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: “Pictures, Drawings, and Sculptures of the French School of the Last 100 Years,” Burlington Fine Arts Club, London, United Kingdom, 1922, no. 17 (exhibited as “Landscape”). “Paintings and Drawings by Paul Cézanne 1839-1906,” Leicester Galleries, London, United Kingdom, June-July 1925, no. 18 (exhibited as “Paysage”). “Cézanne,” Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 3-December 10, 1934, no. 7 (dated circa 1880). “Cézanne,” Galeries Nationales du Grand Palais, Paris, France; Tate Gallery, London, United Kingdom and Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 30-September 1, 1996 (travelling exhibition, only exhibited in Philadelphia).

$1,200,000-1,800,000

34


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

35


TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

36


“CÉZANNE (…) SHOWS A LIKING IN HIS FORMS FOR THE MYSTERY AND DEEP CALM OF A MAN W H O H A S L A I N D OW N TO D R E A M ; H I S CO LO R IS SOLEMN LIKE THE CHARACTER OF THE O R I E N TA L S ; A S M A N O F T H E M I D I H E S P E N D S E N T I R E D AY S AT T H E T O P O F T H E M O U N TA I N S R E A D I N G V I R G I L A N D L O O K I N G AT T H E S K Y (…) HIS HORIZONS ARE HIGH, HIS BLUES VERY INTENSE AND THE RED IN HIS WORK HAS AN A S T O U N D I N G V I B R A N C Y.”

PA U L G A U G U I N (LETTER TO ÉMILE SCHUFFENECKER, 1884, QUOTED IN GAUGUIN A N D I M P R E S S I O N I S M , E X H I B I T I O N C ATA L O G U E , 2 0 0 7 , P. 2 0 - 2 3 ) .

37


(detail)

38


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

“L

a Vie des Champs” was produced during a period when Cézanne still embraced the influence of the Impressionist movement, along with a number of his fellow artists, including his great mentor Camille Pissarro. However, in this particular work, Cézanne departs from the typical dark, more “couillard” (bulky) style of his earlier paintings, which often portrayed violent narratives (see “The Murder,” painted in 1875 and now at the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool, United Kingdom). Instead, “La Vie des Champs” depicts a peaceful gathering of farmhands at rest in a lush field, with a stream and verdant hill in the background. The composition seems to have been carefully planned. It is anchored by the “statuesque” silhouette of the water bearing woman in the middle; she is truly the focus of the painting. Magnified by the jug on her head, she ultimately stretches up the entire painting toward the roof in the background. The present work improves on the watercolor sketch on which it is based (and which still remains in private hands). By extending the canvas - the watercolor lacks the second tree on the right - and by depicting the landscape in greater detail, Cézanne is able to accentuate the overall symmetry of the scene. For Cézanne, “the chief thing is the picture as a whole, the coherence of the composition” Danish art critic Merete Bodelsen (1907-1986) observed (quoted in John Rewald, The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1997, no. 301). The great trees spreading their branches in the foreground, the small human figures below them, the long sweep of the field stretching deep into the picture and counterbalanced by the steep mountain in the background, enable the viewer to immediately embrace the painting in its entirety. The expressive brushwork also participates in the sentiment of deep harmony. They appear somewhat random, yet vivid and compact at the same time. Directionally, the touches are very distinct: horizontal in the foreground, vertical in the background as the hill fills up the entire surface of the painting. Despite its typical Impressionist style, “La Vie des Champs” does not seem to have been directly painted sur le motif, i.e. outside. It is rather a carefully planned composition which Cézanne executed in the studio. “La Vie des Champs” actually belongs to a unique group of paintings dated to the mid-

1870s. All manifest a different approach to anecdotal painting. According to Joseph J. Rishel, former curator of European Paintings and Sculptures at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, “modest in scale; they are perhaps best described as rural genre images. They have the timeless quality of visual fables.” (Cézanne, exhibition catalogue, 1996, p. 162). Indeed, the different figures look like actors about to perform “in a rustic operetta” (Ibid). The entire composition itself is reminiscent of a stage set: the two trees frame the picture on both sides, as two curtains would frame a stage set. The boat, the villa and the wooded hill all appear like theater props. These elements provide a whimsical quality to the scene. Similarly to “La Moisson,” executed around the same time, and which can be analyzed as our work’s compositional and stylistic twin, the landscape, specifically the house (“mas”) on the top of the hill, links this setting to Provence. The farm workers are reminiscent of Camille Pissarro’s, and the hilltop house in the background is typical of the South. Yet the scene is not specifically associated with any of the small villages around Aix-en-Provence. Cézanne intended the painting to be an imaginary scene, not a landscape study. As Vincent Van Gogh (1853-1890) immediately understood while looking at “La Moisson,” “La Vie des Champs” is a vision of Provence; it suggests all its characteristic aspects on the canvas without referring to a specific place.

“La Moisson” by Paul Cézanne Oil on canvas, c. 1877 (Private Collection, Japan) This painting once belonged to Paul Gauguin, who owned an extensive group of Cézanne’s works. Gauguin copied the motif of this painting onto a study for a fan (executed before 1884) and etched it on a ceramic vase (done in the winter of 18861887). Gauguin probably left this painting with the dealer Alphone Portier when he sailed for Martinique in the spring of 1887. According to Danish art critic Merete Bodelsen, the work is directly inspired by Nicolas Poussin’s “L’Été” (now in the Louvre).

39


An admirer of Latin poetry since his youth, Cézanne conceived his native Provence to be a replica of Virgil’s dreamy Arcadia, the fairytale-like country that he described in his poem “Eclogues.” Much like Arcadia, Provence appeared to Cézanne as a luxuriant land with bountiful groves and meadows, alluring blue skies and a perennial summer. “La Vie des Champs” portrays this idea of a luscious and generous South. With its dazzling style and bright colors, the painting stands out as a composite of pastoral theme, bucolic landscape and realistic image of honest workers, all depicted engaged in their seasonal labor in the fields. It differs immensely from more contemporary compositions such as Van Gogh’s harvest scenes in the Arles region, which incorporate factories and trains in the background. Instead, the present work is inspired from the art of the past. While many have analyzed the red dress of “La Vie des Champs’” water bearer as an homage to Camille Corot’s or Eugène Delacroix’s bold style, Cézanne in fact derived the motif from Nicolas Poussin’s (1594-1665) masterpiece of “Eliézer et Rebecca”, which shows two women with clay jugs on their heads. Both captured in an antique style, they offer a glimpse into Cézanne’s true inspiration. This reference to Nicolas Poussin is not the least surprising since Cézanne always revered the Old Master, confessing he wished to “do Poussin again after nature” (quoted in John Canaday, Mainstreams of Modern Art, 1959, p. 340).

subject very clearly, and then If I express myself with distinction and power, there’s my Poussin, there’s my classicism” (quoted in Joachim Gasquet, Cézanne: A Memoir with Conversation, 1991, p. 211). “La Vie des Champs” has a long and distinguished provenance. First owned by the legendary art dealer, Ambroise Vollard, it was sold to the wealthy Romanian aristocrat, Antoine Bibesco - one of the first critics to expose the British public to works of Henri Matisse (1869-1954) and Cézanne. Following its sale at Drouot in 1931, “La Vie des Champs” departed for the United States, only to return to France once. It passed through the hands of many of the greatest galleries of the past century including the Pierre Matisse Gallery and the Galerie de l’Élysée. Dorrance H. Hamilton inherited the painting from her mother, Elinor Dorrance Ingersoll, who acquired it from Acquavella Galleries, a gallery recognized as the doorstep for important Impressionist canvases arriving in the United States. The painting was exhibited twice at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, once in 1934 and later, in 1996, on the occassion of the centenary of the artist’s first solo exhibition in Paris.

Through the prism of Poussin’s paintings, Cézanne credited Provence with a noble and immortal quality, making it the premise behind a new classicism based on nature. In doing so, he imitated an old rhetorical trope of Provençale literary culture, which was revived by contemporary southern writers who embraced the emerging ideas of regionalism. In a letter to his parents dated 1874, which he probably wrote from Paris, Cézanne indicated how important his native region was to him: “It would make me extremely happy to work in the Midi, where the scenery offers so many opportunities for my painting” (quoted in Nina Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, Cézanne and Provence: The Painter in His Culture, 2003, p. 8). In the present work, Cézanne demonstrates his love for his homeland. A testimony to the artist’s origins, it summarizes all of Provence’s ethereal beauty and melancholy on one canvas. Provence is represented as the dreamlike land of a golden age come true in the modern age. With the present work, Cézanne made his prophecy come true: “I’d like to combine melancholy and sunshine... There’s a sadness in Provence which no one has expressed (…) You really need to see and feel your 40


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

41


8 ARMAND GUILLAUMIN (french 1841-1927) “PAYSAGE” Signed ‘Guillaumin’ bottom right, oil on canvas 25 7/8 x 32 in. (65.7 x 81.3cm) provenance: Acquavella Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 1964. Collection of Jack Dorrance and Charlotte Wright. By descent in the family. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: French Impressionist Armand Guillaumin was born in Paris in 1841, and spent much of his childhood in Moulins, a commune along the Allier River. At age fifteen, he began his artistic career taking drawing lessons in the evenings before enrolling at the Académie Suisse at age twenty. It was there that Guillaumin met Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) and Camille Pissarro (1830-1903), with whom he would maintain both a lifelong friendship and artistic relationship. In the early 1870s, Guillaumin traveled with Pissarro to Pontoise, a village in the northwestern suburbs of Paris. The two men worked en plein air, capturing the ever-changing beauty of the landscape. Guillaumin paid close attention to Pissarro’s style and technique, and it was during this time that his own style of landscape painting took shape. “Paysage” is a classic representation of Guillaumin’s body of landscape paintings. The scene depicts a verdant creek bank, the sky beyond obscured by the wide spread of branches from the trees that dominate the foreground. The shaded rural landscape employs lush greens throughout - from the dark, leafy overgrowth of the trees to the pale, almost yellow grass along the subtle rise and fall of the forest floor- sliced through with Guillaumin’s signature winding pathway. Guillaumin’s deep appreciation for the natural world shines through in the present piece, despite the absence of any wide expanse of sky or direct source of sunlight.

$20,000-30,000

42


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

9 HENRI JEAN GUILLAUME MARTIN (french 1860-1943) “PAYSAGE” Signed ‘Henri Martin’ bottom left, oil on canvas 18 1/8 x 25 5/8 in. (46 x 65.1cm) provenance: Niveau Gallery, New York, New York. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Henri Jean Guillaume Martin is best known as a prominent member of the NeoImpressionist movement, and was a popular and successful artist during his lifetime. Born in Toulouse, he studied in Paris and exhibited many of his works in the French capital’s salons and galleries. Inspired by one of the founders of Neo-Impressionism, Albert Dubois-Pillet (1846-1890), the artist employed a pointillist-like technique, with numerous dots and short lines of color closely positioned in thick impasto. Preferring the country to the city, Martin purchased a stone manor home called ‘Marquayrol,’ in the South of France near Cahors, where he would spend much of his time each year painting the house and the surrounding area. He often used a bright palette of warm and cool colors, harmonizing them with his variable, fragmented brushstrokes to create landscapes akin to those painted by Georges Seurat (1859-1891). The present lot is typical of the lovely landscapes Martin executed while in the countryside. The colors of the meadow, trees, and sky alternate between warm and cool to produce a dappled effect of light across the canvas.

$20,000-30,000

43


10 ALBERT LEBOURG (french 1849–1928) “PAYSAGE RIVIÈRE” Signed ‘A. Lebourg’ bottom left, oil on canvas 15 x 21 1/2 in. (38.1 x 54.6cm) provenance: Acquavella Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 1968. Collection of Charlotte Wright. By descent in the family. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: French artist Albert Lebourg (né Albert-Marie Lebourg) was educated at the École des Beaux Arts and the Académie de Peinture et de Dessin in Rouen, and later became a student at the studio of Jean-Paul Laurens (1838-1921) in Paris. Lebourg lived and worked for several years in Algeria, where he became a professor of art, and during which time his style became progressively more impressionistic. It was in Algiers that he refined his palette, honed his skills, and developed his signature style of harmonious colors displayed in the beautiful landscapes for which he is best known. He would paint many scenes in Algiers, as well as numerous French cities in Normandy and Auvergne. In the 1880s, Lebourg exhibited at various exhibitions and salons alongside other famous artists including Claude Monet (1840-1926), Camille Pissarro (1830-1903), Edgar Degas (1834-1917), Georges Seurat (1859-1891), and Berthe Morisot (1841-1895). Throughout his career and posthumously, his work has been shown at institutions including the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Rouen, the Musée d’Orsay and the Petit-Palais in Paris. The present lot’s autumnal shades and soft, broad brushwork perfectly exemplify Lebourg’s Impressionist roots mixed with his adept ability to deftly compose the scene with a balance of light, shadow and color.

$5,000-8,000

44


11 T H E DYF C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N MARCEL (french 1899–1985) “PORTRAIT OF MRS. CHARLOTTE DORRANCE WRIGHT” Signed ‘Dyf’ center right, oil on canvas 36 x 29 in. (91.4 x 73.7cm)

(detail)

provenance: The Artist. Acquired directly from the above. The sitter. By descent in the family. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Marcel Dyf (né Marcel Dreyfus) was born in Paris in 1899. Although he studied engineering, he showed a talent for painting and rapidly embraced an artistic career at the age of twenty-three. A self-taught artist, Dyf spent much of his time in Paris and Normandy, observing the paintings of fellow Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, who proved to be a strong influence throughout his entire career. Dyf bought a studio in Arles in 1922 and began his career as a landscape artist there, painting views of the surrounding countryside and occasionally exhibiting at the Salon des Artistes Français, Salon d’Automne and Salon des Tuileries. The present piece is a portrait of Mrs. Charlotte Wright, Dorrance H. Hamilton’s aunt.

$2,000-3,000

45


Artist photographed at ‘Castle House’ while painting the present work (Photo courtesy Munnings Art Museum)

SIR ALFRED MUNNINGS

(British 1878–1959)

T

he son of a mill worker, Sir Alfred Munnings was born in 1878 in Mendham, Suffolk, in England. At the age of fourteen, he became the apprentice of a printer in nearby Norwich and began to produce graphic work and posters; the sureness of line demanded by the process of lithography proving a constant underpinning of technique throughout his artistic career. His skills as a fine artist were further honed while attending The Norwich School of Art in his spare time. A figurative painter who outwardly rejected Modernism, Munnings’ style and brushstrokes were influenced by Impressionism, and he used naturalistic colors to depict the English countryside and purlieus. Munnings once asked “What are pictures for? To fill a man’s soul with admiration and sheer joy, not to bewilder and daze him.” Despite the fact that he lost sight in his right eye due to an accident, Munnings’ formidable talent soon became apparent, and from 1899 onwards he would exhibit at the Royal Academy.

partial blindness. However, he did serve as War Artist for the Canadian Cavalry Brigade and provided an invaluable historic record of the wartime years.

Favoring rural scenes and representations of gypsy life early in his career, the First World War greatly influenced his preferred subject matter. Although Munnings sought to serve as a soldier during the Great War, he was deemed unfit to fight due to his

We wish to thank Ms. Jenny Hand at the Munnings Art Museum, Dedham, United Kingdom, for her kind assistance in cataloguing this lot.

While Munnings has become acclaimed for his equestrian subjects, landscape painting was one of his first loves, and over the course of his career he repeatedly returned to the subject of natural settings. The bright energy of the present lot is palpable; Munnings uses a rich impasto and warm palette to illustrate chestnut trees bursting with life. The painting was most likely executed in the 1920s, and depicts a view of the lawn and paddocks at ‘Castle House’ in Dedham, which was once Munnings’ home of forty years and is now the location of the Munnings Art Museum. The latter has within their collection a study of the same view, entitled “View at Castle House.” The vast green meadow dominates the foreground and gives the feeling of fresh air and an invitation into the verdant composition.

46


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

12 SIR ALFRED MUNNINGS (british 1878–1959) “CHESTNUTS IN BLOOM” Signed ‘A.J. Munnings’ bottom right, oil on canvas 25 1/8 x 30 1/4 in. (63.8 x 76.8cm) Executed circa 1920. provenance: Collection of Sir Harold Gillies, C.B.F., United Kingdom (per label verso). Christie’s, London, sale of March 15, 1985, lot 248. Frost & Reed Ltd., London, United Kingdom. Acquired directly from the above at the Radnor Hunt Club Exhibition in October 1985. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: British Council Exhibition, Hartford House, England, United Kingdom, 1940.

$40,000-60,000

4747


(Lot 14 detail)

48


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

A M E R I C A N PA I N T I N G S LOTS 1 3 - 2 9

49


“William Trost Richards” by unkown photographer From ‘Cartes de Visite’ Portraits of Nineteenth Century Artists, 1856-1880 (Photo courtesy Smithsonian Libraries, Washington D.C.)

50


TH TH E EC O CO L LLELC ET C ITOI O N NO O F FD D OO RRA RN AN CE C E“ D“ D OO DD OO ” ”H H . H . H AM AM I LT I LT OO NN

WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS

(American 1833–1905)

W

illiam Trost Richards was born in 1833 in Philadelphia, though it is Jamestown, Rhode Island, where the artist felt truly at home. While he received little in the way of a formal education - he left school at thirteen to work as a commercial draftsman in order to support his family - he later studied privately with German-born artist Paul Weber (18231916) for five years when Richards was seventeen. His natural ability flourished under Weber’s tutelage, and by 1852, Richards exhibited for the first time at the prestigious Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. After an obligatory year in Europe, where he traveled to Paris and Italy before spending several months in Düsseldorf, Germany, Richards returned to the east coast. He eventually settled in Rhode Island, where he built a house in 1881. He would spend the remainder of his life between the coastal New England towns of Jamestown and Newport, drawing inspiration from the scenic vistas and ocean bluffs of the surrounding, ever-present sea. Richards, who preferred realism over romanticism, was adept at capturing the golden light emanating from the clouds and reflecting upon the choppy surface of the water and lighthouses

51 51

along the Rhode Island coast at sunset. Fascinated by the effects of the changing light and the constantly swirling water, Newport and its environs provided Richards with an endless palette of marine landscapes, countless interpretations of which he laid down to canvas. The first of the following four lots, “Harbor Entrance On Bull Point, Conanicut Island, Rhode Island” is a magnificent example of Richards’ skillful hand. Isaac Hallowell Clothier (1837-1921), founder of the Northeastern department store Strawbridge & Clothier, commissioned the painting from Richards to hang in his South Philadelphia home. The residence depicted in the finished painting is Clothier’s summer cottage, which he named ‘Harbor Entrance.’ The suns sets behind the turreted mansion at the rocky tip of the island. A sharp, golden light crests along the wrinkled surface of the water, and is caught by the gathering clouds, creating a radiant halo. Thin slits of sails denote two small boats, while a lone seagull glides above the surface. The lowered perspective engulfs the viewer, who is transported to the shoreline, staring into the sunset.


13 WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS (american 1833-1905) “HARBOR ENTRANCE ON BULL POINT, CONANICUT ISLAND, RHODE ISLAND” Signed and dated ‘Wm. T. Richards. 98.’ bottom left, oil on canvas 32 x 56 in. (81.3 x 142.2cm) provenance: Commissioned from the Artist by Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Clothier, Jamestown, Rhode Island, 1898. By descent in the family. Christie’s, New York, sale of November 29, 2001, lot 22. Private Collection, Virginia. William Vareika Fine Arts Ltd., Newport, Rhode Island. Acquired directly from the above in 2012. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$150,000-250,000

52


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

53


TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

54


“ I C A R E N O T T O B E A PA I N T E R O F T R E E S A N D WAT E R A N D H O U S E S ( . . . ) N O T O N LY S H A L L I E N D E AV O R T O D O E V E N T H E COMMONEST INCIDENT IN ART WELL AND U N E X C E P T I O N A L LY B U T I S H A L L S E E K A L S O T O B E – A P O E T.”

( L E T T E R T O J A M E S M I T C H E L L D AT E D A P R I L 2 7 , 1 8 5 4 , Q U O T E D I N L I N D A S . F E R B E R , PA S T O R A L I N T E R L U D E : W I L L I A M T R O S T R I C H A R D S I N C H E S T E R C O U N T Y , E X H I B I T I O N C ATA L O G U E , 2 0 0 1 , P. 2 1 ) .

55


14 WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS (american 1833–1905) “RHODE ISLAND SEASCAPE” Signed ‘Wm. T Richards’ bottom left, oil on canvas 16 x 28 in. (40.6 x 71.1cm) Executed circa 1895. provenance: Private Collection, California. Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 1992. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$20,000-30,000

56


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

15 WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS (american 1833–1905) “SAILING IN PRICE’S COVE ON THE SOUTH SHORE OF NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND” Signed and dated ‘Wm T. Richards 1881’ bottom left; also inscribed with location verso, watercolor and gouache on paper on board 23 x 36 7/8 in. (58.4 x 93.7cm) provenance: William Vareika Fine Arts Ltd., Newport, Rhode Island. Acquired directly from the above in 2002. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$40,000-60,000

57 57


16 WILLIAM TROST RICHARDS (american 1833–1905) “THE SURF NEAR BEAVERTAIL LIGHTHOUSE” Signed ‘W T. Richards’ bottom left, oil on board 8 1/2 x 15 7/8 in. (21.6 x 40.3cm) provenance: William Vareika Fine Arts Ltd., Newport, Rhode Island. Acquired directly from the above in 1991. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$12,000-18,000

58


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

17 EDMUND DARCH LEWIS (american 1835–1910) “WAVES OFF A ROCKY COAST” Signed and dated ‘Edmund D. Lewis 1876’ bottom left, oil on canvas 11 7/8 x 22 1/8 in. (30.2 x 56.2cm) provenance: Christie’s, New York, sale of January 13, 2015, lot 122. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Edmund Darch Lewis was born in Philadelphia in 1835. A student of German-born artist Paul Weber (1823-1916), Lewis rapidly became a prolific artist who made a speciality of his landscape and marine oils. In 1854, he was able to exhibit two of his paintings at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where he was elected an associate five years later and a full academician in 1862. While his oeuvre made him one of the most financially successful artists of the 19th century, Lewis was also well known for his large collection of furniture and China, which he displayed in his sumptuously furnished townhouse on 526 South 22nd Street. This detailed romantic landscape reflects the influence of famous contemporaries Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900) and Albert Bierstadt (1830-1902). Underneath a pink sky, an imposing rock emerges from the sea. Wet by the surrounding waves, it adds to the dramatic tension of the scene. In the distance, sailboats are calmly following each other. They sail peacefully on the shimmering sea, as careless as the summer day the artist here captures.

$2,000-3,000

59


18 ANTONIO JACOBSEN (american/danish 1850–1921) “CLARA DAVIS” Signed and dated ‘Antonio Jacobsen/1908’ bottom right, oil on board 14 x 22 in. (35.6 x 55.9cm) provenance: Port’ N Starboard Gallery, Falmouth, Maine. Acquired directly from the above in 1998. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Antonio Jacobsen was born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1850. Because his father was a violin maker, he was trained as a musician, but he soon transitioned to painting instead, enrolling at the Royal Academy of Design in Copenhagen at an early age. When the Franco-Prussian War made it compulsory for him to join the military forces, Jacobsen decided to set sail for America. With his sketching ability he quickly peaked the interest of an executive of the Old Dominion Steamship Company, who was so impressed with his work that he asked him to paint pictures of some of the company’s ships. Jacobsen is said to have painted around six thousand paintings throughout his career, almost exclusively portraits of ships. Nearly every ship that sailed in and out of New York Harbor between 1873 and 1919 was chronicled by Jacobsen. He often painted several versions of the same ship at the request of its various officers and owners. While many of these extraordinary paintings have been combined in a special Checklist published by the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, Virginia, others still continue to come to light, even today. Such is the case of the present work. To this day, only a sketch of the vessel was known (Harold S. Sniffen, Antonio Jacobsen - The Checklist, S.P. Smith Galleries in association with the Mariners’ Museum, New York, 1984, no. 30, p. 75). The “Clara Davis” was a four-masted schooner built at Mystic, Connecticut in 1905 by William J. Baker. The boat was sold to France in 1918 and renamed ”Martha” shortly after. It was eventually broken up in Sweden in 1938.

$5,000-8,000

60


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

19 PERCY A. SANBORN (american 1849–1929) “SHIP GREAT REPUBLIC” Signed ‘Percy Sanborn’ bottom right, also inscribed with title and ‘Joseph Limeburner, Master. Built by Donald Mc. Key, So. Boston, 1853. As rebuilt after fire of Dec. 26, 1853.’ bottom center, oil on canvas 28 1/8 x 46 1/8 in. (53.7 x 117.2cm) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Percy Sanborn worked with several different media besides oil on canvas, including theater sets, pottery, murals, as well as newspaper and advertising illustrations. A native of Maine, where he spent most of his life, he is best known for his paintings of ships, such as the present lot. Launched on October 4, 1853, “Great Republic” is noteworthy as the largest wooden clipper ship ever constructed. As per the inscription, the ship was damaged in a fire in 1853. It was quickly rebuilt to sail again on February 24, 1855.

$3,000-5,000

61


A L B E R T B I E R S TA D T

(American 1830–1902)

B

orn in Solingen, Germany in 1830, Albert Bierstadt moved to the United States with his family at a young age, settling in Massachusetts. He returned to his homeland in 1853 and studied in Düsseldorf, learning to paint the Alpine mountains and landscape. Upon his return to the United States he traveled to the West, photographing and sketching the mountains and rock formations, making countless studies for the massive paintings he would create later in his New York studio. Bierstadt had a longstanding affinity for mountains, which were a favored subject of his works. The artist’s romanticized and rugged landscapes of the West, carefully painted in large scale with painstaking detail and spectacular lighting, were very popular amongst

collectors, and his paintings garnered record prices, allowing Bierstadt to enjoy marvelous success and respect in his lifetime. A prolific artist, he completed over five hundred paintings thoughout his career. The present work is a striking jewel of a study, set in the woods in a little clearing surrounded by evergreens. The work gives an impression of a cozy enclave, the warm tones of the grass, rocks and moss dappled by dusky light and shadow. While he is best known for his grand works, this painting has all the details and quintessential characteristics of Bierstadt’s style, on a smaller scale.

(detail)

62


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

20 ALBERT BIERSTADT (american 1830–1902) “ROCK AND FOREST STUDY” Signed ‘Albert Bierstadt’ bottom right, oil on paper laid down to canvas 13 x 19 in. (33 x 48.3cm) provenance: Spanierman Gallery LLC., New York, New York. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$30,000-50,000

63


(detail)

64


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

65


TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

66


MARTIN JOHNSON HEADE

(American 1819-1904)

A

lthough he has sometimes been associated with the Hudson River School of painters, possibly due in part to his close friendship with famed artist Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900), Martin Johnson Heade’s oeuvre is composed not only of landscape paintings, but also still lifes, portraits, and paintings of birds and tropical flora. Heade’s style concentrated more so on the effects of light and the mood created by luminosity, rather than the topographically accurate views of Hudson River painters. In contrast to the Hudson River School’s grandiose depictions of waterfalls, mountains, and valleys, Heade’s typical landscapes display horizontal expanses of quiet scenery, avoiding vast splendor and instead showing petite haystacks and sometimes figures. He is most renowned for his coastal salt marsh landscapes, mainly painted in New England. His affinity for seascapes and marshes resulted in many of his best works, praised for their adroit representation of atmospheric light and meteorological conditions.

Born in Lumberville in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, he exhibited his very first works at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and traveled several times to and from Europe in the late 1840s. In the late 1850s his interest in landscape painting was piqued due in part to his acquaintance with artists John Frederick Kensett (1816-1872) and Benjamin Champney (18171907). He would later move into a New York City apartment building where some of the Hudson River School painters resided, including Church. Heade traveled widely, spending a fair amount of time in Brazil, where he studied and painted hummingbirds, orchids and tropical landscapes. He would eventually settle in Saint Augustine, Florida, where he would live and work until his death. This painting is an absolutely quintessential Heade, awash with the warm light of the setting sun and featuring his signature haystacks in a wide, horizontal marshland. The softness of this scene’s palette and the reflection of the haystack in the water are excellent examples of the artist’s ability to create an aura of tranquility and simplicity.

21 MARTIN JOHNSON HEADE (american 1819–1904) “SUNSET - A SKETCH” Signed with artist’s initials and dated ‘M.J.H. ‘95’ bottom right, oil on board 6 x 12 in. (15.2 x 30.5cm) provenance: Frederick Mont and Victor Spark, New York, New York. Ernest Rosenfeled, New York, New York. Parke-Bernet, New York, sale of November 18, 1965, lot 57. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Edward E. White, New York. By descent in the family. Sotheby’s, New York, sale of May 24, 2006, lot 1. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: Butler Museum of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio, 1958-1965 (on loan). literature: Theodore E. Stebbins, Jr., The Life and Work of Martin Johnson Heade: A Critical Analysis and Catalogue Raisonné, New Haven, Connecticut, 2000,p. 277, no. 303 (illustrated).

$100,000-150,000

67


“American Painter Childe Hassam,” by unknown photographer Everett Collection Inc / Alamy Stock Photo

68


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

CHILDE HASSAM

(American 1859–1935)

F

rederick Childe Hassam was born in Boston in 1859. As a child, he attended the oldest public elementary school in the country, where his inherent artistic talent first appeared. He worked as an engraver and as a draftsman during the late 1870s after leaving high school. In the early 1880s, Hassam worked as a freelance illustrator, and his work appeared in multiple publications, including Harper’s Weekly. He took drawing and painting classes, though by then his preference for watercolor had overtaken other media. It was through his studies at the Boston Art Club that Hassam went to Europe; first for two months in the summer of 1883, to travel the continent, study, and produce art. The artist returned again just three years later, settling in Paris in an apartment in the ninth arrondissement; he would eventually occupy the former studio of Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), though the two never met. Hassam enrolled in formal drawing classes at the Académie Julian, studying briefly under Jules Joseph Lefebvre (1836-1911) and Gustave Boulanger (1824-1888), before withdrawing from the school to pursue his own path of self-guided study.

69

In 1900, after traveling to Italy, Hassam visited Provincetown for the first time. At that time, Provincetown had become something of an artistic enclave in its own right, with artists and writers flocking to the seaside town at the tip of Cape Cod, which had once been rooted in fishing and maritime industries. Executed in the same year as his first trip, the following lot depicts a narrow strip of dappled water along a small patch of sand, with a screen of houses standing at the end of the beach. Similarly to “The Walk Around the Island” (Lot 23), “White Church, Provincetown” is a reverse seascape, planting the viewer unmoored at sea, the perspective flipped towards land. The white spire of the Universalist Meeting House rises into the pale summer sky. Now the First Universalist Church of Provincetown, the building was erected in 1847, close to the Town Hall. In the 1850s, the elegant Christopher Wren steeple was added and provided a visual landmark. Hassam produced about a dozen canvases during his 1900 trip to Provincetown, nearly half of which feature some view or glimpse of this classic New England architecture.


(detail)

70


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

22 CHILDE HASSAM (american 1859-1935) “WHITE CHURCH, PROVINCETOWN” Signed and dated ‘Childe Hassam/1900’ bottom right; also inscribed with title on upper stretcher verso, oil on canvas 20 1/4 x 14 1/4 in. (51.4 x 36.2cm)

exhibited: (Possibly) “Exhibition of Paintings by Childe Hassam,” Saint Botolph Club, Boston, Massachusetts, October 29-November 17, 1900 (exhibited as “The White Church,” no. 38 in the exhibtion catalogue). (Possibly) Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1908, no. 379 (exhibited as “The Church at Provincetown.”) note: The painting will be included in Stuart P. Feld’s and Kathleen M. Burnside’s forthcoming Catalogue Raisonné of the artist’s work. We wish to thank Ms. Kathleen M. Burnside for her kind assistance in cataloguing this lot.

provenance: The Milch Galleries, New York, New York. Hersey Eggington, New York. Russell Brown, New York. Parke-Bernet, New York, sale of January 6, 1954, lot 41. The Milch Galleries, New York, New York. Graham Galleries, New York, New York. The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York. Christie’s, New York, sale of March 15, 1985, lot 212. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

$250,000-400,000

71


23 171359/273 CHILDE HASSAM (american 1859-1935) “THE WALK AROUND THE ISLAND” Signed and dated’Childe Hassam 1890’ bottom left, oil on canvas 10 7/8 x 14 in. (27.6 x 35.6cm) provenance: The American Academy of Arts & Letters, New York, New York, 1935 (by bequest of the artist). The Milch Galleries, New York, New York, 1950. Collection of Mr and Mrs. Meyer Potamkin, 1952. Sotheby’s New York, “American Paintings, Drawings & Sculpture from the Collection of Meyer and Vivian Potamkin,” sale of May 21, 2003, lot 56. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: “‘1892’ Sixtieth Anniversary Exhibition,” Macbeth Galleries, New York, New York, April 1952, no. 20. “Twentieth Century American Painting and Sculpture from Philadelphia Private Collections,” Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October-November 1958, no. 9. “The M.P. Potamkin Collection,” The Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, Texas, January-March 1970, no. 30. “An Alumnus Salutes Dickinson College 200th Anniversary” (From the Collection of Meyer and Vivian Potamkin), William Penn Memorial Museum, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, November 1972-January 1973, no. 65, p. 52. “American Art From the Collection of Vivian and Meyer P. Potamkin,” Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June-October 1989, p. 10. literature: Richard J. Boyle, American Impressionism, Boston, Massachusetts, 1974, p. 187 (illustrated). Warren Adelson, Jay E. Cantor and William H. Gerdts, Childe Hassam: Impressionist, New York, 1999, p. 80, pl. 87 (illustrated). John Coffrey, Austen Barron Bailly, Kathleen M. Burnside, Hal Weeks and Alexandra de Steiguer, American Impressionist Childe Hassam and the Isles of Shoals, Yale University Press, New Haven and London, 2016, p. 42-43, fig. 4 (illustrated). $200,000-300,000

72


the stanley bard collection

T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

73


on

TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

(detail)

74


“I SPENT SOME OF MY PLEASANTEST S U M M E R S AT T H E I S L E S O F S H O A L S A N D I N [C E L I A T H A X T E R ’ S] SA LO N ( . . . ) W H E R E I M E T T H E B E S T P E O P L E I N T H E C O U N T R Y.”

( C H I L D E H A S S A M T O A L B E R T G A L L AT I N , A P R I L 5 , 1 9 2 2 , Q U O T E D I N U L R I C H W. H I E S I N G E R , C H I L D E H A S S A M A M E R I C A N I M P R E S S I O N I S T , 1 9 9 4 , P. 7 8 ) .

W

ell known for his street scenes depicting everyday life in cities like Boston, Paris, and New York, Hassam left the urban behind and spent his summers in the idyllic retreat of Appledore Island, in the Isle of Shoals, off the coast between Maine and New Hampshire. Hassam first visited the island in 1890, and would return regularly until 1916. The location was a haven for an informal colony of artists, writers, and musicians, lead by poetess Celia Thaxter (1835-1894), who held a standing salon in her home there. A joyful mood seems to have always pervaded this private assembly. A female guest who spent the summer of 1893 in Hassam’s company referred to the group as a “jolly, refined, interesting and artistic set of people...like one large family.” (quoted in Ulrich W. Hiesinger, Childe Hassam American Impressionist, 1994, p. 78). While Hassam’s New England roots are evident in the body of work he produced over the course of his life, they are never more apparent than in the paintings and watercolors he produced during his trips to Appledore and, later to the coastal towns of Gloucester, Old Lyme, and Provincetown. According to David Park Curry, “Appledore was a place where the imagination could florish.” (Childe Hassam, An Island Garden Revisited, 1990, p. 13). Hassam chose to paint late into the summer season,

as the island emptied of tourists, preferring the authentic quietude of the Shoals to the bustling high-season crowds; many of his works from Appledore are unpopulated. ”The Walk Around the Island,” executed in 1890, depicts the steep, rocky coast of his island refuge. With a loose, free brush, Hassam here enlivens the inhospitable rock through bright strokes of color. Three small figures ascend the dilapidated, bleached wood walkway, a parasol raised to the bright summer light. Many tourists would explore the secret coves of the island through the “two-mile-gravel-and-plank road that ringed the shore” (John Coffey, American Childe Hassam and the Isles of Shoals, p. 43), which is depicted here. Some of Celia Thaxter’s guests had the habit of taking a walk on it every afternoon after lunch. This painting will be included in Stuart P. Feld’s and Kathleen M. Burnside’s forthcoming Catalogue Raisonné of the artist’s work. We wish to thank Ms. Kathleen M. Burnisde for her kind assistance in cataloguing this lot. According to Ms. Burnside, the brushwork of the present lot is unusually impressionistic for this period of Hassam’s career. It is more characteristic of his later works around 1899. It is therefore possible that the date of ‘1890’ has been enhanced or perhaps added by the artist at a slightly later date.

75


J O H N H E N R Y T WA C H T M A N

(American 1853–1902)

A

merican Impressionist John Henry Twachtman was born in 1853 in Cincinnati. He trained under portraitist Frank Duveneck (1848-1919) before moving to Europe in 1875 to continue his studies at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich. He returned to Europe again in 1883, this time to study at the Académie Julian in Paris. It was during this trip that his artistic style matured; his paintings shifted from the loose brushstrokes of his German education towards a softer, tonalist style, with an emphasis on more muted grays and greens. Upon his return from Europe, Twachtman established himself in Greenwich, Connecticut, joining the art colony at Cos Cob. He expanded his use of media, creating many etchings and pastels in addition to his traditional oil paintings. He made several trips to Gloucester, Massachusetts, the Cape Ann fishing town, and Newport, Rhode Island, the seaside summer resort famed for its opulent summer “cottages” built for pioneering American businessmen. Twachtman became a professor at the Art Students League in 1889, and taught there until his death in 1902. His paintings of Greenwich, as well as Gloucester and Newport, display a deep appreciation for the quietude of

New England life. Executed circa 1889, when Twacthman visited Newport to give art lessons to a woman who ran a school there, “The Landing, Newport” employs the artist’s preferred palette of muted earth tones to depict a pier along the waterfront. The rough approximations of the wooden pillars supporting the structure, their reflections rippling along the water in tight curves, dominate the scene. The rooftops in the background, awash in shades of brown and terracotta tan - the lone exception being a conspicuous pale periwinkle blue swath - stagger into the distance. A small group of figures stands on the pier, forming a distinct and yet featureless shape leaning over the rail towards the water. In an etching Twachtman produced after the painting, the scene is reversed, and the artist has removed the cluster of figures. The etching was described as “a sketch of part of the Long Wharf from the harbor.” This painting will be included in the forthcoming Catalogue Raisonné of the artist’s work by Lisa N. Peters, Ph.D. We wish to thank Dr. Peters for her kind assistance in cataloguing this lot.

76


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

24 JOHN HENRY TWACHTMAN (american 1853–1902) “THE LANDING, NEWPORT” Signed ‘J.H. Twachtman’ bottom left, oil on cradled panel 7 5/8 x 12 in. (19.4 x 30.5cm) Executed circa 1889. provenance: The Artist. The Estate of the Artist. Acquired directly from the above. Collection of Albert Milch, New York, New York, 1928. The Milch Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 1953. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Potamkin. Sotheby’s New York, “American Paintings, Drawings & Sculpture from the Collection of Meyer and Vivian Potamkin,” sale of May 21, 2003, lot 52. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: The Milch Galleries, New York, New York, February 1928. “The M.P. Potamkin Collection,” The Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, Texas, January-March 1970, no. 70 (exhibited as “Gloucester Pier”). “An Alumnus Salutes Dickinson College 200th Anniversary” (From the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Potamkin), William Penn Memorial Museum, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, November 1972-January 1973, no. 150, p. 55 (exhibited as “Gloucester Pier”). literature: Lisa N. Peters, John Twachtman (1853-1902) and the American Scene in the Late Nineteenth Century: The Frontier within the Terrain of the Familiar, Ph.D. Dissertation, City University of New York, New York, 1995, p. 260, pp. XXVIII and XXIX, 260, 798 (illustrated). Mary Welsh Baskett, John Henry Twachtman: American Impressionist Painter as Printmaker: A Catalogue Raisonné of His Prints, M. Hausberg, Bronxville, New York, 1999, p. 118.

$50,000-80,000

77


“Charles Prendergast in studio� C. 1919 (Photo courtesy Williams College Museum of Art, Prendergast Archive and Study Center, Williamstown, MA: Gift of Mrs. Charles Prendergast (A.1.89)

78 78


TTH HEE C CO OLLLLEEC CTTIIO ON N O OFF D DO OR RR RA AN NC CEE ““D DO OD DO O”” H H.. H HA AM MIILT LTO ON N

MAURICE BRAZIL PRENDERGAST

(American 1858–1924)

M

aurice Brazil Prendergast is best known for his colorful depictions of the middle class. Born in Saint John’s, Newfoundland in 1859, he spent his childhood and young adulthood in Boston, where he quickly became captivated with the rugged landscapes of the New England seashore. From 1891 to 1894, Prendergast studied in Paris at the Académie Colarossi and at the Académie Julian where he was introduced to Avant-Garde and Post-Impressionist painters such as Édouard Vuillard (18681940) and Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947). However, it was the works of Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) that impacted him most significantly. In his works, Prendergast mimicked Cézanne’s expressive use of form and adopted his love for color variations, admitting himself: “Cézanne gets the most wonderful color, a dusty kind of grey” (quoted in Nancy Mowll Matthews, Maurice Prendergast, 1990, p. 25). Upon his return to the United States, Prendergast settled in Winchester, Massachusetts, where he started to observe and eventually depict the popular leisure activities of the region. From then on, and throughout his career, Prendergast depicted a vibrant world of crowds enjoying themselves in parks, at the seashore, and in cities. While these scenes are pleasant and seemingly simple, Prendergast in fact paid great attention to his style. In each of his works, he painstakingly reconciles different color harmonies, joining them together in a complex patchwork of free brushstrokes, vivid dots and patches of bold tonalities. In an essay that appeared in The Arts in March 1924, a month after the artist’s death, collector Duncan Phillips wrote that Prendergast was “a purist in regard to the (…) synthesis of the decorative and representative functions of his art (…) he persisted in reducing his observations of the visible world and his joyous emotions in the presence of nature to a simple but beautifully organized pictorial pattern.” Prendergast was interested in

79

capturing spontaneous moments in nature that would produce a visual experience for the viewer. Through color, which he loosely applied to suggest movement and texture, the artist created an emotional scene that ravished the spectator; an innocent, yet bold spectacle for the eyes. Dated 1907-1910, “The Point Gloucester” (Lot 25) is a fine example of Prendergast’s oeuvre. It poignantly illustrates his (then) new approach to composition, color and brushwork, which he had just learned in Paris. Like French artists Henri-Edmond Cross (18561910) and Paul Signac (1863-1935), Prendergast here accentuates the flatness of the painting, which he divides into three different horizontal stripes of different colors and tones, creating a mosaiclike masterpiece. He applies each color in small dots of paint, allowing the lighter colors to stand out underneath the bolder ones, and to shine through for a luminous and marvelous effect. Although Prendergast further develops his relationship with color through this oil, the subject of the painting largely remains the same as those he explored earlier in his career. Once again the viewer is confronted with fashionable members of the leisure class who are enjoying themselves in an idyllic landscape by the seashore near the Massachusetts fishing town of Gloucester. Unlike many who frequented the New England countryside to escape the city and contemplate nature, Prendergast was fascinated with crowds. He was drawn to social spaces, which he celebrated for their modernity and inclusiveness. Leisure and people was the greatest theme of Prendergast’s art. Attitudes and values would change over the years, but the artist “never lost his reverence for a subject that he felt made people more civilized and more human. Nor did he forget that art itself was a leisure-time spectacle.” (Nancy Mowll Matthews, The Art of Leisure: Maurice Prendergast in the Williams College Museum of Art, 1999, p. 15-16).


25 MAURICE BRAZIL PRENDERGAST (american 1858–1924) “THE POINT, GLOUCESTER” Signed ‘Prendergast’ bottom right, oil on canvas 17 5/8 x 21 3/8 in. (44.8 x 54.3cm) Executed in 1907-1910. provenance: The Artist. The Artist’s brother, Mr. Charles Prendergast, 1924. Mrs. Charles Prendergast, Westport, Connecticut, 1948. Collection of Mr. Robert Carlen, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 1965. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Potamkin. Sotheby’s New York, “American Paintings, Drawings & Sculpture from the Collection of Meyer and Vivian Potamkin,” sale of May 21, 2003, lot 57. Acquired directly from the above sale. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton.

exhibited: “The M.P. Potamkin Collection,” The Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, Texas, January-March 1970, no. 56. “An Alumnus Salutes Dickinson College 200th Anniversary” (From the Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Meyer Potamkin), William Penn Memorial Museum, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, November 1972-January 1973, no. 125. “American Art From the Collection of Vivian and Meyer P. Potamkin,” Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, JuneOctober 1989, p. 13. literature: Carol Clark, Nancy Mowll Mathews and Gwendoly Owens, Maurice Brazil Prendergast, Charles Prendergast: A Catalogue Raisonné, Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts; Prestel, Munich, 1990, no. 211, p. 254 (illustrated).

$100,000-150,000

80


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

81


TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

(detail)

82


(detail)

83


26 ROBERT HENRI (american 1865–1929) “BRIDGE GRAY EFFECT” (SEINE, PARIS) Inscribed with title verso, oil on panel 6 5/8 x 9 in. (16.8 x 22.9cm) Executed in 1899. provenance: Hirschl & Adler Galleries, New York, New York. Christie’s, New York, sale of December 5, 1986, lot 192. Richardson-Clarke Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts. Acquired directly from the above in 2002. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: “American Artists in France: Works From Paris and the French Countryside,” Richardson-Clarke Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts, March 29, 2002 (illustrated on the cover of the brochure). note: Robert Henri is best known as a prominent and celebrated representative of the Ashcan School, whose members differentiated themselves from the American Impressionists by focusing on urban realism. Rather than depicting idyllic landscapes in bright colors, Henri and other Ashcan artists such as John French Sloan (1871-1951), Everett Shinn (1876-1953), William Glackens (1870-1938) and George Luks (1867-1933) espoused the notion of creating “art for life’s sake” instead of “art for art’s sake.” This meant portraying urban people and settings, particularly New York’s streets, restaurants, theatres, and lower class neighborhoods, often using gestural brushstrokes in a predominately dark color palette. Henri trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins (1844-1916) and Thomas Anshutz (1851-1912), as well as at the Académie Julian in Paris under William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825-1905). Henri split his time mainly between Paris, Philadelphia, and New York. As he spent much of his working life in Paris, many of his works depict its environs. In the present lot, the iconic river Seine is shown, with billowing clouds in darkened blue sky. As the title suggests, the palette is replete with various hues of grays, shading the riverbank as well as the river itself.

$6,000-10,000

84


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

27 WALTER KING STONE (american 1875-1949) “EXPANSIVE VALLEY WITH WINDING RIVER” Signed ‘Walter/King/Stone’ bottom left, oil on Masonite 30 x 47 7/8 in. (76.2 x 121.6cm) provenance: Bailey Antiques, North Carolina. Freeman’s, Philadelphia, sale of June 25, 2004, lot 222. Acquired directly from the above sale. Dixon-Hall Fine Art, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 2004. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Walter King Stone was an illustrator, painter and writer and served as a professor of Fine Arts at Cornell University for twenty-three years. His work was featured in such publications as Scribner’s Magazine, Colliers, and Country Gentleman, amongst several others. His interest in wildlife and nature is evident in his oeuvre, as seen here in this vast spring landscape.

$1,500-2,500

85


28 EDGAR HEWITT NYE (american 1879–1943) “CORN SHOCKS IN A LANDSCAPE” Signed and dated illegibly ‘E. Nye **’ bottom right, oil on canvas laid down to board 24 x 28 in. (61 x 71.1cm) In a Laughlin frame. provenance: Alderfer Auction, Hatfield, Pennsylvania, sale of December 7, 2005, lot 886. Dixon-Hall Fine Art, Malvern, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 2006. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Born in Richmond, Virginia, Nye was a painter and teacher who worked mostly in Washington D.C. He studied at the Corcoran School and was a member of the Society of Washington Artists, The Washington Watercolor Club, and the Washington Landscape Club. Although he first succumbed to the Cubist influence of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), Nye adopted a more impressionistic style in the 1920s. The present work is characteristic of this artistic shift. Nye applied thick dabs of colorful paint in order to suggest the vibrant beauty of the landscape. The color and climate both suggest a quiet summer scene. Similarly to other works by the artist, the present corn field is completely desolated. Rather than depicting anonymous figures at work, Nye instead makes the colorful singularity of the field his sole focus.

$3,000-5,000

86


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

29 CARL JOHAN DAVID NORDELL (american 1885-1957) “SOLEMNITY” Signed ‘Carl J. Nordell’ bottom center left, oil on canvas 44 1/4 x 50 1/8 in. (112.4 x 127.3cm) provenance: Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 1992. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Originally from Denmark, Nordell immigrated to the United States at a young age. He studied at the Rhode Island School of Design, the School of Painting of the Museum of Fine Arts under Edmund C. Tarbell (1862-1938) in Boston, as well as at the Académie Julian in Paris. Nordell exhibited widely throughout America in New York, Boston, and on the West Coast. Influenced by the popularity of Impressionism in America, as well as his travels throughout Europe while studying in Paris, he returned to Boston having developed his mature style. The present lot showcases his Impressionist roots as well as his own unique flair.

$4,000-6,000

87


88

(Lot 32 detail)


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

P E N N S Y LVA N I A A R T LOTS 3 0 - 3 7

89


30 HORACE CARPENTER (american 1857-1947) “MUNICIPAL PIER” Signed and dated ‘Horace T. Carpenter/1926’ bottom right, oil on canvasboard 15 3/4 x 20 in. (40 x 50.8cm) provenance: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above. Knoke Galleries, Atlanta, Georgia. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Horace Carpenter was born in Michigan but spent most of his life in Pennsylvania, studying at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Eakins (18441916), the Philadelphia School of Industrial Art, as well as the New York Students League. His early career was focused on engineering, illustration, and writing. He is most well known for his illustrations, which were included in several noteworthy books in the late 19th and early 20th century. In the present painting, a pier is depicted in stunning shades of reds and blues, deftly painted from an interesting aerial angle to show the bustling commercial industry of shipping, imports, and exports in the city.

$3,000-5,000

90


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

31 ADOLPHE BORIE (american 1877-1934) “FLOWERS IN AN URN” Signed ‘Adolphe Borie’ bottom left; also with certification stamp verso, oil on canvas 22 x 18 in. (55.9 x 45.7cm) provenance: The Artist. The Estate of the Artist. Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 2014. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. literature: George Biddle, Adolphe Borie, The American Federation of Arts, Washington D.C., 1937, p. 65 (illustrated). Philadelphia Collection XLVI, Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 1991, plate 28 (illustrated). note: A Philadelphia native and a student of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Royal Academy of Munich, Adolphe Borie was influenced by French Impressionism and Parisian Modernism. Unlike Thomas Eakins (1844-1916) and the Academy, Borie’s style was more modern, and he was most well known for his awarded portraiture. Nevertheless, his still lifes are also quite important to his oeuvre and became particularly notable after the 1935 memorial exhibition of his work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. This lot represents an excellent example of one of his still lifes. The color palette is warm and inviting, and it exhibits his characteristic thick and visible brushstrokes.

91

$2,000-3,000


“Photograph of Daniel Garber” (right profile view) by Conrad Haeseler. Daniel Garber papers (MS.023). Photo courtesy Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Dorothy & Kenneth Woodcock Archives.

92


TTH HEE CCO OLLLLEECCTTIIO ON NO OFF D DO ORRRRAAN NCCEE ““D DO OD DO O”” H H.. H HAAM MIILT LTO ON N

DANIEL GARBER

(American 1880–1958)

W

idely considered one of the most influential of the Pennsylvania Impressionists, Daniel Garber was born in Indiana and studied at the Art Academy of Cincinnati before enrolling at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia in 1899. He married fellow PAFA student Mary Franklin and, after Garber was awarded the prestigious Cresson Scholarship, the two were able to travel to Europe after leaving the school in 1905 to complete their art education. Upon their return in 1907, Garber settled in Cuttalossa, a hamlet on the Delaware River an hour north of Philadelphia. It was this verdant and varied landscape that would remain his inspiration and subject matter for the rest of his career. He used a broad spectrum of color for his landscapes and quiet interiors, and the appealing depictions of Bucks County earned him national attention, a teaching position at PAFA, and a seat at the head of New Hope’s colony of Pennsylvania Impressionists. He painted en plein air, a naturalist, approach already championed by French landscape painters Eugène Boudin (1824-1898) and Claude Monet (1840-1926). Garber’s paintings are lush and light-suffused, with dense greenery and an obvious appreciation for his adopted home. The first of the following two lots, “The Morning Train,” was executed in 1924. It is one of the many views Garber painted of the curving sweep of the Delaware River from the hill at Point

93 93

Pleasant, Pennsylvania. Perched above the scene, the artist has captured two distinct worlds, cleaved by an icy river. In the foreground, the hillside is dotted with small homes with pitched roofs, a woman tending to chickens, sheep grazing. The titular train is implied by a tall plume of smoke rising in the distance against a dark mountain. The anachronism of industry cutting through the pastoral landscape - replete with farm workers and livestock - provides at once a contrast of subjects and a commentary on the changing era in which Garber worked, modernity ever at odds with nature. “Water Birch - Springtime” (Lot 33), depicts the small town of Lumberville, north of New Hope along the Delaware River. Garber began painting it in 1918, and completed it the following year. Characteristic of Garber’s style, the painting uses a lone, denuded tree to divide the canvas visually down the middle, lending an imposing power to the knotty branches. The perspective of the glistening pool of water, as viewed from the bottom of Fleecydale Road, feels both expansive and intimate, with Garber’s subtle touches of gold, green, and purple: a direct contrast to the icy surface of the lake. Garber returned to this vista several times, painting the scene in different seasons to capture the effect of the changing light, as fascinated and inspired by the water birch tree as Monet was with the poplars at Giverny.


(detail)

94


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

32 DANIEL GARBER (american 1880-1958) “THE MORNING TRAIN” Signed ‘Daniel Garber’ bottom left; also signed and titled on label verso, and inscribed with title and artist on stretcher verso, oil on canvas 30 1/4 x 30 1/8 in. (76.8 x 76.5cm) Executed in 1924. provenance: The Artist. The Estate of the Artist, 1958. Collection of the Artist’s granddaughter, July 1964. Richard Stuart Gallery, Pipersville, Pennsylvania, 1984. Collection of Mrs. John Ross, Pennsylvania, September 1984. The Estate of Mrs. John Ross. Private Collection, 1993. Sotheby’s, New York, sale of May 25, 1994, lot 92. Acquired directly from the above sale. Newman & Saunders Galleries, Wayne, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in November 1994. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: “Joint Exhibition of Paintings by Daniel Garber, and Stanley Woodward,” Macbeth Gallery, New York, New York, December 13-31, 1927, no. 7 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue). “Sixteenth Annual Exhibition: Thirty Paintings by Thirty Artists,” Macbeth Gallery, New York, New York, February 28-March 19, 1928, no. 12 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue). “Annual Exhibit of Paintings, Heinz Art Salon, Season 1931: Delaware Valley Landscapes by Daniel Garber, N.A.,” Exhibition organized by the Macbeth Gallery, Heinz Pier Exhibition, Atlantic City, New Jersey, May 1931, no. 23 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue). “Daniel Garber, Retrospective Exhibition: Paintings, Drawings, Etchings,” Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 3-29, 1945, no. 123 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue). literature: The Artist’s Record Book, I, p. 29, lines 13-18. Advertisement for Richard Stuart Gallery, The Magazine Antiques, September 1984, ed. 126, no. 3, p. 453 (illustrated). Lance Humphries, Daniel Garber: Catalogue Raisonné, Volume II, Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, New York, 2006, p. 176, cat. P 480 (illustrated).

$200,000-300,000

95


33 DANIEL GARBER (american 1880-1958) “WATER BIRCH-SPRINGTIME” Signed ‘Daniel Garber’ bottom center; also inscribed with title on upper stretcher verso, oil on canvas 25 1/2 x 30 1/4 in. (64.8 x 76.8cm) Executed in 1919. provenance: The Artist. Collection of the Artis’ts daughter, Tanis Garber Page, 1958. By descent in the family. Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 1983. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. exhibited: “Exhibition of Oil Paintings by Daniel Garber, Robert Henri, Frederick J. Waugh,” November 18-December 10, 1922, no. 44 (illustrated in the exhibition catalogue). (Possibly) “Daniel Garber, Retrospective Exhibition: Paintings, Drawings, Etchings,” Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 3-29, 1945, no. 64. literature: American & European Paintings: Philadelphia Collection XX, Summer, 1983, Frank S. Schwarz & Son, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1983, cat. I (illustrated on the front cover). Lance Humphries, Daniel Garber: Catalogue Raisonné, Volume II, Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, New York, 2006, p. 138, cat. P 386 (illustrated).

$120,000-180,000

96


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

97


34 MARTHA WALTER (american 1875–1976) “CHILDREN IN THE GARDEN” Oil on board 7 3/4 x 10 1/4 in. (19.7 x 26cm) provenance: David David Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 1998. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Impressionist Martha Walter was born in Philadelphia in 1875. She was a student at the University of the Arts, as well as the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, where she studied under William Merritt Chase (1849-1916). While at the Academy, she received the prestigious Cresson Scholarship, which allowed her to travel to Europe to continue her education. She visited Spain, the Netherlands, and Italy, before enrolling at the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in France. Her intimate depictions of women (often mothers) and children earned her great critical acclaim beginning early on in her career, and was a theme which she returned to frequently. “Children in the Garden” presents a common scene from the artist’s oeuvre, two children ambling through a lush and verdant landscape. Each grasps a bouquet of wildflowers, the dappled sunlight landing on their bodies through the canopy of trees. The brushstrokes are quick dabs, leaves blending with sky and the soft flesh of each of the children, who appear almost as nymphs, gamboling in a glen. There is a gentle innocence and prevailing stillness to the scene, despite Walter’s characteristic brisk application of paint to the canvas.

$2,000-3,000

98


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

35 PAULETTE VICTORINE J. VAN ROEKENS (american 1896-1988) “GIRARD TRUST BUILDING: THIRD LIBERTY LOAN, 1918” Signed ‘Paulette Van Roekens’ bottom left, oil on canvas 20 x 25 in. (50.8 x 63.5) provenance: Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 2014. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Born in France, Paulette van Roekens is best known as an important member of the Pennsylvania Impressionists. She attended Moore College of Art and Design (then called Philadelphia School of Design for Women) and later became a professor there for nearly forty years. She also trained at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, as well as the Graphic Sketch Club of Philadelphia where she studied sculpture. She and her husband, Arthur Meltzer (1893-1989), another well known Pennsylvania Impressionist, lived and worked in Philadelphia and its suburbs for most of their lifetime. While her style is highly influenced by Impressionism, she also relied heavily on her academic training, particularly drawing. Van Roekens worked in multiple media, but is best known for her oils and pastels. In her early career, she concentrated on still lifes, but as she developed her style over the years, she turned more toward landscapes. The present lot depicts the Third Liberty Loan parade in 1918 as it passes the corner of South Broad and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. During World War I, the United States borrowed monies from Americans, issuing bonds through the Treasury Department, the collection of which were called “Liberty Loan Campaigns.” The country amassed much of the funding for the war through these campaigns, using the money to supply and distribute troops and equipment. Parades such as these were joyful and celebratory displays well received by Philadelphians. The east side of the Girard Trust Corn Exchange Bank is shown here. Built between 1905 and 1908, it exemplifies the Classical Revival style meant to emulate the architecture of the Pantheon in Rome.

$20,000-30,000

99


36 ALBERT VAN NESSE GREENE (american 1887-1971) “FISHING BOAT ON THE RIVER” Signed ‘AVan Nesse Greene’ bottom right, oil on canvas 24 x 30 in. (61 x 76.2cm) provenance: Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 1992. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. literature: Philadelphia Collection XLVI, Schwarz Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, June 1991, plate 31 (illustrated). note: Albert van Nesse Greene studied under famed Pennsylvania Impressionist Daniel Garber (1880-1958) at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and was trained as a painter, illustrator and etcher. Born in Jamaica, New York, he also studied at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Académie de la Grande Chaumière in Paris. His work was influenced by his teacher, as well as artists such as William Merritt Chase (1849-1916), Fred Wagner (1860-1940), Edgar Degas (1834-1917) and Claude Monet (1840-1926). Greene served in World War I and lived and worked in Virginia following the war. Eventually he settled in Chester Springs, Pennsylvania, and established his studio there. For fifty years thereafter he painted his lush gardens and the Bucks County environs. While most of his paintings were of Pennsylvania, this piece is thought to be a scene of the Potomac River near Washington D.C., as he had ties to the area through his grandfather, a prosperous manufacturer in Falls Church, Virginia. The scene is one of respite, the boat docked safely on shore, tucked between two trees, and the river calm on a sunny day.

$8,000-12,000

100


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

37 WILLIAM FRANCIS TAYLOR (american/canadian 1883–1970) “THAW” Signed ‘Wm Francis Taylor’ bottom left, oil on canvas 20 1/4 x 24 1/8 in. (51.4 x 61.3cm) provenance: David David Gallery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Acquired directly from the above in 1998. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: A member of the New Hope School of Pennsylvania Impressionists, William Francis Taylor began to visit the Bucks County area and later decided to relocate there from New York in the 1920s. He developed a friendship with fellow artist William Lathrop (1859-1938), and was highly influenced by the earlier Pennsylvania Impressionists, such as Daniel Garber (1880-1958) and Edward Willis Redfield (1869-1965). He was prominent in establishing and purchasing Phillips Mill in New Hope as an exhibition space, where he and other artists showed their works each year, and eventually led to the founding of the James A. Michener Art Museum. The present lot is a wonderful example of Taylor’s oeuvre, as he painted many landscapes of the Bucks County area. Here, a wintry scene of a stream flanked by snow covered banks is shown in classic Pennsylvania Impressionist style, using multiple layers of color to reflect the trees and sky in the flowing water.

$5,000-8,000

101


(Lot 41, part lot, detail)

102


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

PRINTS LOTS 3 8 - 4 1

103


“John James Audubon” by John Syme Oil on canvas, 1826 (Photo courtesy The White House Collection)

104


TTH HEE CCO OLLLLEECCTTIIO ON NO OFF D DO ORRRRAAN NCCEE ““D DO OD DO O”” H H.. H HAAM MIILT LTO ON N

JOHN JAMES AUDUBON

(American 1785–1851)

J

ohn James Audubon is without a doubt the most celebrated American Natural History artist.

Born in Haiti in 1785, he spent his youth in France where he studied for a time under Jacques Louis David (1748-1825). The artist came to America in 1803 and first engaged in a series of unlucky ventures as a farmer, merchant and portrait painter. But none of these occupations engaged Audubon as much as his deep passion: studying and identifying the birds of North America, which he would draw from observation. Audubon eventually conceived a plan to make his passion into a financially rewarding pursuit and went on to publish his studies into a monumental engraved series. During the years 1827-1838, Audubon supervised the production of 435 plates for his masterpiece, which he entitled the “Birds of America.” Audubon was the first to undertake the unprecedented and ambitious task of attempting to document all the bird species of the United States. His tireless efforts and remarkable talent culminated in this unprecedented success. The most distinguished names in Europe and America were on the list of Audubon’s subscribers, including King George IV of England and King Charles X of France. The work ultimately established Audubon as the only American artist who could attract European attention. For many, he personified the New World culture and its emerging independent existence.

105 105

The spectacular Roseate spoonbill (Lot 38) was commonly spotted in the mangrove swamps and marl flats of Texas and Florida in Audubon’s day. Their rosy plumage was so popular for the making of fans that by the end of the Civil War, the bird had completely disappeared from Texas; only two dozen were to be found in Florida. However, the Mexican Reoseate spoonbill population remained untouched and through the valiant efforts of the National Audubon Society, these wonderful birds have been reintroduced to Texas, the Florida Keys and the Everglades National Park. Audubon painted the “Great White Heron” (Lot 39) during the spring of 1832, while on a voyage to the Florida Keys. His image of the heron was the first one ever produced. When it was released, the picture generated much interest in Europe as it offered an astonishing glimpse of the rare bird. Shown in profile, the Heron here is framed by a dramatic sky speckled with dark clouds. Audubon depicts the bird in all its majesty, proving difficult to contain it to the confines of the full-sheet image. Startlingly white, the heron is caught in a moment of action as it holds a fish in its beak. The curve of its graceful body is mirrored by the shape of the base on which it stands, while the island of Key West is visible on the horizon. It is one of Audubon’s few site-specific images and one of his boldest compositions.


(detail)

106


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

38 JOHN JAMES AUDUBON (american 1785–1851) “ROSEATE SPOONBILL” FROM BIRDS OF AMERICA Hand-colored engraving with aquatint and etching. Robert Havell Publisher, London, 1836. Plate CCCXXII, 1827-1838. Sheet size: 24 7/8 x 37 1/2 in. (63.2 x 95.3cm) provenance: Arader Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 2011. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $40,000-60,000

107


39 JOHN JAMES AUDUBON (american 1785–1851) “GREAT WHITE HERON” (KEY WEST) FROM BIRDS OF AMERICA Hand-colored engraving with aquatint and etching. Robert Havell Publisher, London, 1835. Plate CCLXXXI, 1827-1838. Sheet size: 25 1/8 x 37 3/4 in. (63.8 x 95.9cm) provenance: Arader Galleries, New York, New York. Acquired directly from the above in 1996. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $30,000-50,000

108


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

(detail)

109


110


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

40 ALEXANDER POPE JUNIOR (american 1849-1924) “BLACK DUCK” FROM UPLAND GAME BIRDS AND WATERFOWL OF THE UNITED STATES Chromolithograph. Scribner, Armstrong & Co., New York, New York, 1877-1878. Plate VI, 1877. Sheet size: 13 7/8 x 20 in. (35.2 x 50.8cm) together with nineteen companion prints: “THE GREEN-WINGED TEAL” Plate I, 1877. “THE AMERICAN SNIPE” Plate II, 1877. “THE WOODCOCK Plate III, 1877. “THE MALLARD DUCK” Plate IV, 1877. “THE AMERICAN QUAIL” Plate V, 1877. “THE RUFFED GROUSE Plate VII, 1877. “THE BLUE-BILL OR SCAUP DUCK” Plate VIII, 1877. “THE PINNATED GROUSE” Plate IX, 1877. “THE RED-HEAD” Plate X, 1877. “THE CANADA GROUSE” Plate XI, 1877. “THE WOOD DUCK” Plate XII, 1877. “THE VALLEY QUAIL” Plate XIII, 1877. “THE BUFFLE-HEADED DUCK” Plate XIV, 1877. “THE UPLAND PLOVER Plate XV, 1877. “THE GOLDEN-EYE OR WHISTLER” Plate XVI, 1877. “THE MOUNTAIN QUAIL” Plate XVII, 1877. “THE WIDGEON” Plate XVIII, 1877. “CANVAS-BACK DUCK” Plate XIX, 1877. “THE BRANT” Plate XX, 1877. (20) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

111

(Part lot, detail)


112


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

41 MARK CATESBY (british 1679-1749) “THE FLAMINGO” FROM THE NATURAL HISTORY OF CAROLINA, FLORIDA AND THE BAHAMA ISLANDS Hand-colored engraving on laid paper, presumed to be first or second edition plate. London, 1731-1743; 1754. Plate 73. Sheet size: 14 x 10 1/4in. (35.6 x 26cm). together with six companion prints: “THE PURPLE CREEPER (PINE WARBLER)” Plate 61. “THE PINE CREPPER [WITH] THE PURPLE-BERRIED BAY” Plate 62. MOTHS AND BUTTERFLIES: PAWPA Plate 86. MONARCH BUTTERFLY WITH BAHAMA ORCHID AND SHELL ORCHID Plate 88.mm BROWN MOTH WITH MAHO (CORK TREE) Plate 90. POLYPHEMUS MOTH WITH GEIGER TREE AND MORNING GLORY Plate 91. (7) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

113


114


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

F U R N I T U R E & D E C O R AT I V E A R T S LOTS 4 2 - 1 4 0

115


116


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

117


118


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

42 A near pair of polychrome painted rattan lounge chairs and an ottoman american, circa 1900 The ottoman with applied paper label:  “Karpen Furniture.” (3). H: 36 1/2, W: 32 1/2, D: 36 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $300-500

43 A pair of polychrome painted rattan and oak drink stands american, circa 1920 With weighted bases. (2). H: 26 1/2, Dia: 9 1/4 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $100-150

119

44 A polychome painted and upholstered rattan sofa american, circa 1920 H: 35, W: 85, D: 38 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $500-700


45 Two polychrome painted wicker and rattan fabric-lined table lamps american, circa 1900 H: 25, Dia: 16 in. (larger) provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $100-200

46 Two polychrome painted rattan and oak occasional tables american, circa 1910 H: 28, W: 33, D: 21 3/4 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $200-300

47 A polychrome painted rattan chair and side table american, circa 1900 H: 32 1/2, W: 34, D: 26 in. (chair) provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $200-300

48 A polychrome painted rattan and oak library table american, circa 1920 H: 30 1/2, W: 45, D: 21 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton $200-300

120


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

49 Two polychrome painted rattan lounge chairs american, circa 1900 H: 33 1/2, W: 33, D: 34 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

50 Three polychrome painted wicker floor lamps american, circa 1900 H: 75, Dia: 28 in. (largest) provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

51 A large polychrome painted wicker and oak center table american, circa 1900 H: 22, Dia: 48 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

121


52 A large polychrome painted stick and ball rattan mirror with peacocks american, circa 1900 H: 73, W: 62 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

53 A pair of contemporary drum-form painted table lamps with fabric-lined rattan shades modern, the shades american, circa 1900 H: 26, Dia: 24 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $200-300

122

54 A polychrome painted rattan and oak console table american, circa 1900 H: 36, W: 76, D: 25 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

55 A polychrome painted rattan and wicker mirror with peacocks american, circa 1900 H: 74, W: 33 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

123

56 A related pair of polychrome painted rattan “Peacock” chairs american, circa 1910 H: 55 1/2, W: 32, D: 40 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $500-700


57 A rare pair of child’s rattan and stick wicker “Peacock” armchairs american, circa 1910 H: 36 1/2, W: 28, D: 18 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker, 2015 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

58 A child’s polychrome painted wicker rocker american, circa 1900 H: 28, W: 24 1/2, D: 28 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $100-200

59 A seven-piece child’s polychrome painted rattan and wicker parlor suite american, circa 1910 Including settee, rocker, lounge chair, coffee table, pair of demilune side tables and sofa table. (7). H: 29, W: 39, D: 20 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

6 of 7 shown

124


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

60 A pair of polychrome painted, carved wood and fabric-lined tables lamps with owls american, circa 1900 H: 26, W: 12 1/2, D: 9 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

61 A polychrome painted rattan and oak console table and wastepaper basket american, circa 1910 H: 35 1/2, W: 48, D: 16 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

62 Three polychrome painted rattan and wood side tables american, circa 1910 H: 21 1/2, W: 25 3/4, D: 12 in. (largest) provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

125


63 A large polychrome painted rattan and cane mirror with swans american, circa 1900 H: 56, W: 41 1/2 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

64 A pair of polychrome painted wicker and fabric-lined table lamps american, circa 1900 H: 17 1/2, W: 9 in. sq. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $100-200

65 A polychrome painted rattan and oak console table american, circa 1900 H: 30, W: 42, D: 18 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

126


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

66 A polychrome painted wicker floor lamp, demilune side table and smoker’s stand american, circa 1900 H: 72, Dia: 26 in. (lamp) provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $500-700

67 Two polychrome painted wicker floor lamps american, circa 1910 With fabric-lined shades and fringe. (2). H: 70 1/2, Dia: 23 in. (larger) provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

68 A polychrome painted wicker and rattan rocker and demilune side table american, circa 1900 H: 36, W: 31 1/2, D: 28 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $200-300

127


70 A pair of tall polychrome painted rattan plant stands american, circa 1920 H: 62, Dia: 15 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

69 A pair of tall polychrome painted rattan plant stands american, circa 1920 H: 61 1/2, Dia: 15 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

71 A pair of tall polychrome painted rattan plant stands american, circa 1920 H: 62, Dia: 15 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

72 A polychrome painted rattan and upholstered chaise longue american, circa 1900 H: 39, W: 37, L: 64 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker, 2009 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

128


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

73 A set of six upholstered rattan horseshoe back armchairs american, circa 1920 H: 30, W: 22, D: 24 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker, 2009 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800

74 A polychrome painted rattan and oak center table american, circa 1900 H: 29 1/2, Dia: 44 1/2 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $200-300

Lots 74-78

129

75 Weller Pottery, etc. group of three matte green vessels, circa 1900 Including two Weller vases and low bowl attributed to Wheatley Weller vases signed with impressed mark: “WELLER” Low bowl with incised, overglazed marks: “W 189” H: 11, Dia: 3 3/4 in. (tallest vase), H: 2 1/2, Dia: 8 3/4 in. (low bowl) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500


76 Teco buttressed vase, terra cotta, illinois, circa 1910 Signed twice with impressed mark: “TECO” H: 10, Dia: 4 1/4 in. provenance: Sotheby’s New York, Important 20th Century Design, 17 June 2004, Lot 5 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

77 Hampshire pottery collection of six matte green vases, keene, nh, early 1900s All marked “Hampshire” or “Hampshire Pottery.” (6). H: 10 7/8 in. (tallest) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800

78 Wilhelmina Post for Grueby squat, bulbous matte green vase with leaves, boston, massachusetts, circa 1905 Impressed circular mark: “Grueby Pottery Boston USA” and “155” Incised artist’s cypher: “W.P” H: 5 3/4, Dia: 6 3/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

79 Gustav Stickley oak plant stand no. 48, east aurora, new york, circa 1901 Signed with applied red compass decal. H: 26, W: 13 in. sq. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-2,000

130


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

80 Gustav Stickley oak plant stand no. 48 with grueby tile insert, east aurora, new york, circa 1901 Signed with applied red compass decal. H: 26, W: 13 in. sq. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,500-3,500

81 Gustav Stickley three billiard chairs, model 312 1/2-B, east aurora, new york, circa 1905 Oak, leather, patinated brass tacks. H: 41, W: 31, D: 27 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $3,000-5,000

131


82 A pair of Arts & Crafts willow and leather armchairs american, circa 1905-1910 H: 41, W: 21, D: 27 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker, 2009 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

132


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

Mrs. L.A. Robinson House: interior view of fireplace, Charles Sumner Green Collection, Environmental Design Archives, University of California, Berkeley.

133


TON

THE COLLECTION OF DORRANCE “DODO” H. HAMI

“ D R A M AT I C C H A N G E S I N T H E G R E E N E S ’ P H I L O S O P H Y, E X P R E S S I O N , A N D C R A F T CAN BE TRACED THROUGHOUT THE DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND FURNISHINGS O F T H I S H O U S E .” – RANDELL L. MAKINSON ON THE HENRY M. ROBINSON HOUSE, PA S A D E N A , C A L I F O R N I A , 1 9 0 5

134


83 Charles Sumner Greene (1868-1957) and Henry Mather Greene (1870-1954) pair of andirons for the mrs. l.a. robinson House, pasadena, california, 1905 Bronze, wrought iron . H: 11, W: 12 1/4, D: 8 in. (overall) provenance: The Mrs. L.A. Robinson House, Pasadena, California, 1905 David Rago Auctions, Lambertville, New Jersey, 26 September 1999, Lot 644 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $20,000-30,000

135


84 Archibald Knox for Liberty & Co. assembled set of four pewter “tudric” candlesticks, england, circa 1905 Two signed with impressed marks: “9 ENGLISH PEWTER 0223 MADE IN ENGLAND” One signed with impressed marks: “J MADE IN ENGLAND TUDRIC 0223 4” One signed with impressed marks: “8 TUDRIC 0223” H: 9, Dia: 5 7/8 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800

85 Oliver Baker for Liberty & Co. footed jardiniere, england, circa 1905 Pewter set with stone cabochons. Signed with impressed marks: “English Pewter Made by Liberty & Co. 01130” H: 6 1/4, Dia: 9 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

86 Two large glazed ceramic floor vases possibly by galloway, circa 1920s H: 34 1/2, Dia: 21 in. (larger) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

136


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

NEWCOMB COLLEGE POTTERY LOTS 8 7 - 9 6

137


87 Anna Frances Simpson for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1916 Decorated with pine trees and full moon. Impressed marks: “NC IJ 37 238” Incised marks: “AFS 367” H: 4, Dia: 2 3/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

88 Sadie Irvine for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1917 Decorated with pine trees. Impressed marks: “IP 23 JM NC 237” Incised artist’s cypher: “SI” H: 5 1/2, Dia: 3 1/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

138


89 Anna Frances Simpson for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1930 Decorated with live oaks, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed marks: “NC SK 26 500 H” Incised artist’s cypher: “AFS” H: 6, Dia: 6 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,500-3,500

90 Henrietta Bailey for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1916 Decorated with pine trees and full moon. Impressed marks: “NC 150 JM HZ26” Incised artist’s cypher: “HB” H: 8 3/4, Dia: 3 3/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $3,000-5,000

139


91 Sadie Irvine for Newcomb College Pottery trivet, new orleans, louisiana, circa 1920 Decorated with live oak trees, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed mark “NC” Incised marks: “KS SI” Dia: 5 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

92 Anna Frances Simpson for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1926 Decorated with live oaks, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed marks: “PX28 NC 79 AFS” H: 7 1/4, Dia: 4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

93 Sadie Irvine for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1928 Decorated with live oaks, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed marks: “RA 89 35 NC JM” Incised artist’s cypher: “SI” H: 5, Dia: 3 7/8 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

140


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

94 Anna Frances Simpson for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, 1928 Decorated with live oak trees, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed marks: “NC 35 AFS RB75” H: 4 7/8, Dia: 3 3/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

95 Sadie Irvine for Newcomb College Pottery trivet, new orleans, louisiana, 1932 Decorated with live oaks, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed marks: “UA2 NC” Incised marks: “SI KS” Dia: 5 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

96 Aurelia Arbo for Newcomb College Pottery scenic landscape vase, new orleans, louisiana, circa 1935 Decorated with live oak trees, spanish moss and full moon. Impressed marks: “W1 NC F AA” H: 4 1/8, Dia: 5 1/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

141


97 A set of four Arts & Crafts style ebonized ‘Thebes’ armchairs 20th century After the model by William Morris (English, 1834-1896). (4). H: 36, W: 24, D: 19 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

98 A contemporary games table and library steps modern The table with removable top. H: 30, W: 33 in. sq. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

142

99 A Victorian Aesthetic Movement bamboo writing desk and chair circa 1890 H: 30 1/4, W: 37, D: 23 1/4 in. (desk) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

100 A large collection of seated Staffordshire dog figures 19th/20th centuries Of graduating height, in singles and in pairs, sold together with a figure of a girl in a yellow dress seated upon a dog, a dog with a girl in a floral dress, and a small figure of a girl with a dog. (approx. 48). H: 12 in. (tallest) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $5,000-7,000

101 A monumental pair of Staffordshire style seated spaniels 20th century H: 23 1/2, W: 19, D: 11 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

143

102 A polychrome painted rattan and oak étagère american, circa 1900 H: 77, W: 61, D: 20 1/2 in. provenance: Antique American Wicker Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800


103 An Edwardian country house call board 20th century with later customizations With reverse-painted glass panel indicating eight locations: Front Door, Back Door, Wicker Room, Library, Office, Bedroom, Bathroom, and Dressing Room; accompanied by modern bell. H: 9 3/4, L: 14 1/2, D: 2 3/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800

104 A pair of Victorian stoneware stump-form planters circa 1880 H: 37, Dia: 23 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

144


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

105 Two Victorian style tôle peinte trays on japanned chinoiserie stands contemporary The trays signed and dated: “Luke Randall 2013.” (2). H: 21, W: 29 1/4, D: 23 1/4 in. (larger) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

106 A full-bodied zinc weathervane of a pigeon late 19th/early 20th century The figure perched on a sphere and tapering shaft, mounted on a modern base. H: 19 1/2 in. (pigeon); H: 26 1/2 in. (incl. base) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

145


107 An unusual sailor’s valentine barbados, 19th century A variety of shells arranged in a architectural design centering an urn with flowers, in a rectangular frame. H: 13 1/4, W: 11 1/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

108 A double sailor’s valentine barbados, second half 19th century Various shells arranged in a star pattern enclosing an anchor on one side, and elaborate vase with flowers on the other side, hinged octagonal case. H: 10, W: 10 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,500

109 A large single sailor’s valentine barbados, second half 19th century A compass star enclosed by a swag border worked with various shells within an octagonal frame. H: 14, W: 14 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

146


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

110 A group of five ships in bottles 19th and 20th century Variously painted and rigged ships, some with inscribed pennants, the largest with elaborate cradle. (5). L: 7 in. to 11 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-1,500

111 A single small sailor’s valentine barbados, second half 19th century Variety of shells worked a floral arrangement within an octagonal frame. H: 9 1/2, W: 9 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

112 A pair of Chippendale walnut hall chairs massachusetts or rhode island, late 18th century With lift seats, each bearing paper label with hand-written inscriptions, one label reads, “...they came from Hannah Burrill of Newport, mother of Lydia Wharton (Earl A.) Pearce, W.E. Lincoln’s grandmother. Hannah Burrill married Wm Wharton who was born in 1750 & died in 1800 & the chairs are said to be his wedding gift from her mother. These came from Mrs. Abby W. ... Chace, there was 1 more in the Moore & I in the Lincoln family... “ (2). H: 39, W: 20 3/4, D: 21 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-2,000

147


113 An Italian giltwood chinoiserie mirror 20th century H: 53, W: 39 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

114 A Régence style gilt-bronze mounted Chinese celadon-glazed porcelain bowl 19th century The celadon bowl with two handles in the Régence taste in the manner of Berain, on gadrooned and molded ormolu foot. L: 15 in. provenance: Elinor Gordon, Villanova, Pennsylvania Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

115 A semiprecious hardstone group of roosters apparently unmarked, 20th century L: 8 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $800-1,200

148


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

116 An associated pair of Asian carved coral figures of meiren, now mounted as lamps in the manner of E. I. Farmer late 19th/early 20th century, the lamps circa 1920 One figure depicting a meiren with dish of peaches, with Japanese carved ivory okimono figural finial; the other carved as a meiren with boy and bird, a cat at their feet, with carved coral male figural finial; both on flared carved giltwood bases. (2). H: 8 in. (figures, approx.) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

117 A pair of Chinese export rose mandarin armorial shrimp dishes 18th century Bearing the arms of Seton of Tough (Scotland) with the motto “Forward ours.” (2). L: 9 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

118 A Japanese carved red coral figure of an Immortal with basket of flowers and a boy on Ho-o bird Of a rich color with scattered white inclusions, finely carved, stained carved wood base. H: 8 3/4 in. (coral) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $4,000-6,000

149 Susan Wood/Getty Images


119 A pair of rare Chinese export orange and green ‘Fitzhugh’ pattern dishes 19th century Of typical form, the borders with green decoration, the cavetto with orange. (2). Dia: 9 3/4 in. provenance: Elinor Gordon, Villanova, Pennsylvania Sold Northeast Auctions, August 18-19, 2012, Lot 978 Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800

120 A Chinese export porcelain bean-form covered bourdaloue 19th century L: 10 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,000

121 An associated pair of Chinese polychromedecorated tree pots 20th century H: 14 1/2, D: 15 3/4 in. (approx.) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

150


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

122 A Chinese export porcelain rose medallion punch bowl circa 1800 H: 4 3/4, Dia: 11 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,200-1,800

123 Two Samson Chinese export style porcelain covered pitchers late 19th century Of the same size and form, and with ribboned floral decoration; one in famille rose palette, the other in giltenriched cobalt palette. (2). H: 10 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,000-2,000

124 A Chinese export porcelain blue and white ‘Canton’ two-handled covered tureen circa 1800 H: 10 in. provenance: Elinor Gordon, Villanova, Pennsylvania Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $200-300

151


125 A Derby parcel-gilt yellow ground heraldic porcelain part luncheon service circa 1800-1815 Comprising fourteen luncheon plates, three quatrefoil shaped serving dishes, three lobed and scalloped shallow serving bowls, two covered sauce tureens with stands, two leaf-form dishes, one lobed lozenge-form dish, and one large footed compote. (28). H: 8 in. (tallest) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

152


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

153


154


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

126 A pair of Meissen porcelain animal figural groups 1815-1860 After the 1739/40 model ‘Jays and Squirrel’ by Johann Joachim Kändler (German, 1706-1775), each depicting a jaybird atop a leafing stump, one with a leaping squirrel in descent; with underglaze blue crossed sword marks. (2). H: 15 3/4 in. (approx.) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. note: Johann Joachim Kändler, one of the most famous modellers of the Meissen factory, created the first of this model for the Japanese Palais of Augustus the Strong in October 1735. After 1739-1740, Kändler furthered the model, adding a squirrel and a buckhorn beetle to some models. $2,000-3,000

127 An Italian Maiolica gourd-form box 20th century L: 8 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

128 A Meissen porcelain rooster-form box late 20th century H: 10 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,000


129 A large collection of Staffordshire architectural-form pastille burners england, 19th century Various architectural forms including cottages, castles and whimsical pavillions, together with five Staffordshire flat-back architectural mantel ornaments. (approx. 33). H: 3 5/8 in. to 8 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $500-800

130 A pair of Dorothy Doughty Royal Worcester porcelain figures dated 1964 Inscribed on back “Wren Troglodytes Parvulus and Burnet Rose” and mounted on wood bases; with “W” mark, and signed “D. Doughty.” (2). H: 6 in. (taller) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $200-300

156


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

131 A small Paris porcelain sauce tureen and stand likely early 20th century H: 6 3/4, L: 7 in. (incl. stand) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $200-300

132 An Edwardian painted ladies’ writing desk circa 1900 H: 29 3/4, W: 51 1/2, D: 23 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

157


133 An assembled silver four-piece dressing set various makers, 20th century Comprising a sterling silver mirror, William Devenport, Birmingham, England, 1911; an unmarked sterling silver comb, stamped 925; and two continental silver brushes stamped, “VCh 830S.” (4). L: 10 3/4 in. (mirror) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

134 A Georgian style silver-plated copper presentation tankard 20th century Without lid, engraved to underside: “H*H/Feb 25, 1950.” H: 6 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $100-200

135 A cased Victorian sterling silver and mother-of-pearl fruit service for twelve harrison brothers & howson, sheffield, england, 1900 Comprising twelve each fruit forks and fruit knives, sold together with original fitted oak case (25). L: 8 in. (knives); W: 12 1/2, D: 10 1/4 in. (case) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

158


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

136 Four American sterling silver weighted candlesticks kirk & sons, baltimore, maryland, 20th century H: 12 in. (weighted) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

137 Four American sterling silver candlesticks in the form of Doric columns international silver co., meriden, connecticut, 20th century H: 7 in. Weighable silver: 45.1 oz. t. (approx.) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600-800

138 Three American sterling silver chased and engraved trumpet vases various makers, 20th century Two weighted and one engraved to foot, “D/18951920” and to underside, “From/Margarent William.” (3). H: 12 in. (largest); Weighable silver: 10.8 oz. t. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $400-600

139 An American sterling silver Art Nouveau three-handled presentation cup reed & barton, taunton, massachusetts, circa 1900 H: 16 in. Weighable silver: 82.8 oz. t. (approx.) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $1,500-2,000

159


160


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

140 A Goyard fitted wardrobe trunk in black ‘Goyardine’ printed canvas first quarter 20th century The sides mounted with original Malles Goyard metal labels, the interior fitted with orange leather lining and tabac baize compartments with movable spacers likely for shoes, above a removable webbed boot compartment, together with four custom dividers possibly later ordered from or rewebbed by Louis Vuitton; the exterior painted with red and white stripe and “E.D. Hill, Newport, R.I.”, and affixed with labels for the Swedish American Line, the whole with original hardware, the locks stamped “Goyard Aine,” the handles stamped with the Goyard cypher. H: 32 1/2, W: 23, D: 19 1/2 in. provenance: Elinor (Winifred) Dorrance Hill, thence by descent Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $6,000-10,000

161


162


the stanley bard collection

T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

FINE JEWELRY LOTS 1 0 0 0 - 1 0 1 6

163


164


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

FINE JEWELRY F E AT U R I N G

THE COLLECTION OF

D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N AUCTION Sale 1603 Wednesday, May 9 at 12:00pm 1808 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19103

165


166


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

F I N E J E W E L R Y D E PA R T M E N T Virginia Salem, GIA GG Head of Department vsalem@freemansauction.com 267.414.1233

Michael Larsen, GIA GG Senior Specialist, Director Beverly Hills mlarsen@freemansauction.com 818.205.3608

Kate Della Monica Department Administrator kdellamonica@freemansauction.com 267.414.1259

Beverly Hills | April 17 & 18 By appointment only

New York City | April 24 & 25 By appointment only

EXHIBITIONS Main Line | April 3-7, 10 & 11 10:00am-4:00pm

Philadelphia Saturday, April 21 Sunday, April 22 Monday, April 23 Thursday, April 26 Friday, April 27 Saturday, April 28

10:00am - 5:00pm 12:00pm - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm

Friday, May 4 Saturday, May 5 Sunday, May 6 Monday, May 7 Tuesday, May 8

10:00am - 5:00pm 12:00pm - 5:00pm 12:00pm - 5:00pm 10:00am - 5:00pm 10:00am - 4:00pm

By appointment only on the morning of the sale.

CLIENT SERVICES Mary Maguire Director | Client Services mmaguire@freemansauction.com 267.414.1236

Joslyn Moore Bidding Registration jmoore@freemansauction.com 267.414.1207

167

Melissa Arundel Post-Sale Administrator marundel@freemansauction.com 267.414.1226


1000 171362/103 A gold and silver threaded emerald beaded bag Set with cabochon emeralds within a silver and gold brocade ground. Length: 8 in.; Height: 5 in.; Depth: 1 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $500-700

1001 171362/104 A beaded evening bag france The yellow and white kite-shaped pattern with a gold tone frame. Length: 8 1/2 in.; Height: 6 1/4 in.; Strap: 15 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $50-100

168


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

1002 171362/50 A ladies eighteen karat gold strap watch, Tiffany & Co. atlas Quartz movement, case no. L3630 23-116, with Tiffany & Co. strap and gold filled buckle. Length: 8 1/2 in.: Width: 24.5mm. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $500-700

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue

1003 171362/51 A ladies eighteen karat gold and diamond strap watch, Maurice Lacroix Quartz movement, diamond-set bezel with a textured mother-of-pearl dial and single-cut diamond indicies. Length: 8 3/4 provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $500-700

169


1004 171362/54 A cultured baroque pearl multi-strand necklace Composed of five strands of cultured baroque pearls, measuring approximately 8.30-9.50mm, completed by a circular green quartz clasp set in silver. Length: 23 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $300-500

170


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

1005 171362/49 An eighteen karat gold and cultured pearl bangle and earrings craig drake Designed as a semi-flexible cuff bangle set with five rows of cultured pearls ranging in size from 6.50mm to 7.50mm alternating with gold studs, together with a pair of 3.50mm button pearl earrings with gold studs. Circumference: 6 1/4 in.; Diameter (earrings): 7/8 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue

1006 171362/48 A baroque South Sea cultured pearl and diamond ring Set with an approximate 17.2mm baroque South Sea pearl within a channel-set tapering baguette diamond surround; estimated total diamond weight: 3.77 carats, mounted in platinum. Ring size: 6 1/4 (sizing band) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,500-3,000

171


1007 171362/56 An eighteen karat gold and diamond dome ring Surmounted by a small marquise diamond within a circular-cut diamond dome; estimated total diamond weight: 1.00 carats. Ring size: 7 (sizing beads) provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $700-900

1008 171362/55 A carved rock crystal and diamond suite Bombé design set with a pavé-set circular-cut diamond center flanked by a row of channel-set baguette diamonds, together with matching earrings; estimated total diamond weight: 8.00 carats, set in eighteen karat white gold. Ring size: 8 1/4; 1 3/8 in. x 1 in. for ring and earrings provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $2,000-3,000

172


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

1009 1 A pair of diamond earrings Designed as a flower set with pavé-set diamonds; estimated total diamond weight: 2.50 carats, set in 14 karat white gold. Length: 1 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $4,000-6,000

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue

173


1010 171362/47 A kunzite and diamond cocktail ring diesinger and dolan Set with a large kunzite measuring approximately 33.3mm x 25.0mm x 18.3mm, flanked by two rows of full-cut diamonds; estimated total diamond weight: .75 carats; mounted in 14 karat yellow gold. Ring size: 8 3/4 provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $7,000-9,000

174


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

1011 An eighteen karat yellow gold and diamond necklace tiffany & co. ‘X motif’ alternating with pavé-set, full-cut diamond sections; estimated total diamond weight: 11.20 carats, with additonal link. Length: 18 in, additional link: 2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $8,000-12,000

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue

175


1012 An eighteen karat white gold and diamond necklace Set with pavé-set, round brilliant-cut diamond links alternating with straight baguette-cut diamonds; estimated total diamond weight: 45.00 carats. 111.4 dwt.; Length: 15 1/2 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $25,000-35,000

1013 An eighteen karat white gold and diamond bracelet The flexible bracelet set with channel-set straight baguette and circular-cut diamonds; estimated total diamond weight: 10.90 carats. Length: 7 3/4 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $5,000-7,000

176


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

1014 171362/53 An Art Deco diamond covered bracelet-watch cartier, france Set with baguette and circular-cut diamonds mounted in platinum, with a diamond-set cover; estimated total diamond weight: 17.00 carats, dial signed Cartier, France, bracelet signed Cartier London, Number 17400, watch signed Cartier France, Number 19314, 28429, 2980. Length: 7 in. provenance: Formerly from the collection of Alice Tully, Christies, New York, October 1994. Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $30,000-50,000

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue

177


1015 171362/42 An Art Deco diamond and rock crystal choker/bracelet Designed as a wide openwork strap set with round and circularcut diamonds; estimated total diamond weight: 35.00 carats, accented by a central rock crystal and cylindrical link, together with additional diamond link. 50.8 dwt.; Length: 7 1/4 in.; Width 1 in. provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $30,000-50,000

178


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue


180


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O � H . H A M I LT O N

1016 171362/41 An impressive diamond solitaire ring Centering an emerald-cut diamond weighing 16.56 carats, flanked by tapering baguette-cut diamonds, mounted in platinum. Accompanied by a GIA report number 8489184 dated January 11, 2018 stating one 16.56 carat emerald-cut diamond, F color, VS2 clarity. Size 8 1/2 provenance: Collection of Dorrance H. Hamilton. $600,000-800,000

Please see May 9 Fine Jewelry catalogue

181


Index FINE ART AUDUBON, J. J.

38, 39

HENRI, R.

26

TWACHTMAN, J. H.

24

BIERSTADT, A.

20

JACOBSEN, A.

18

VAN ROEKENS, P. V. J.

35

BOUDIN, E.

1

LEBOURG, A.

10

WALTER, M.

34

CARPENTER, H.

30

MARTIN, H. J. G.

9

CATESBY, M.

41

MUNNINGS, A.

12

CÉZANNE, P.

7

NORDELL, C. J.

29

DARCH LEWIS, E.

17

NYE, E. H.

28

DYF, M.

11

POPE JR., A.

40

FANTIN-LATOUR, H.

6

PRENDERGAST, M. B.

25

GARBER, D.

32, 33

REDOUTÉ, P. J.

2-5

GREENE, A. V. N.

36

SANBORN, P.

19

GUILLAUMIN, A.

8

STONE, W. K.

27

HASSAM, C.

22, 23

TAYLOR, W. F.

37

HEADE, M. J.

21

TROST-RICHARDS, W.

13-16

182

FINE JEWELRY CARTIER

1014

CRAIG DRAKE

1005

DIESIGNER AND DOLAN

1010

MAURICE LACROIX

1003

TIFFANY & CO.

1002, 1011


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

GLOSSARY any statement as to authorship, attribution, origin, date, age, provenance and condition is a state of opinion and is not to be taken as a statement or representation of fact. freeman’s reserves that right, in forming their opinion, to consult and rely upon any expert or authority considered by them to be reliable. names

attributed to

school of

Forename(s) and surname of painter is in our

School accompanied by the name of a place or country

opinion a work by that artist; e.g. Charles Willson

and a date means that we believe the picture was

Peale. When an artist’s forename(s) is not known, a

executed at that time and in that location; e.g. Italian

series of asterisks followed by the surname of the

School, 18th Century. After an artist is in our opinion a

artist, wether preceded by an initial or not, indicates

copy of any date after a work by that artist; e.g. After

that in our opinion the work is by the artist named.

Charles Willson Peale. after an artist

Refers to probably a work by the artist; e.g. Attributed to Charles Willson Peale.

Signed and/or dated and/or inscribed means that we believe the signature and/or date and/or inscription are from the hand of the artist. Bears a signature and/

studio of

circle of

Refers to a work from the studio of the artist which

or a date and/or an inscription means that we believe

may or may not have been executed under his

the artist’s name and/or date and/or inscription have

direction; e.g. Studio of Charles Willson Peale.

been added by another hand.

Circle of..... refers to a work of the period of the

signatures & dates

artist executed under his immediate influence; e.g.

All references to signature, inscriptions and dates refer to the present state of the work.

Circle of Charles Willson Peale. measurements follower of

Follower of..... refers to a work by a painter working in the artist’s style, contemporary or nearly contemporary, but not necessarily his pupil; e.g. Follower of Charles Willson Peale.

manner of

Manner of..... refers to a work in a style related to that of the artist, but of a later date; e.g. Manner of Charles Willson Peale.

183

Dimensions are given height before width.


PURCHASE REMOVAL, SHIPPING AND OFFSITE STORAGE INFORMATION To ensure the safety of your property Freeman’s requests removal within 10 business days of the sale date. Collection hours are Monday–Friday, 9:30am–4:30pm. For larger items, please email Juwan Muse at loadingdock@freemansauction.com to schedule a loading dock appointment. For purchase release to persons not listed on your contract or invoice, 3rd party authorization is required. Please mail or fax, 215.599.2240, a signed letter stating receipt/item(s) or sale/lot(s) and name of third party collecting property. Freeman’s does not handle packing or shipping. The shippers listed have worked with Freeman’s clients in the past and will be happy to provide you with quotes for the packing and shipping of your property. Annie Hauls Michael Topley Doylestown, PA 18901 609.577.5133 annie@anniehauls.com Art In Transit Nick Clarke 314 North 12th Street Philadelphia, PA 19107 540.550.7080 nclarke@artintransit.net Atelier Art Services ‡ Lynn Smith 1330 North 30th Street Philadelphia, PA 19144 215.235.0402 | Fax: 215.235.0421 info@atelierartservices.com

Mr. C’s Charles Cohen 1615 North 10th Street Philadelphia, PA 19122 267.977.9567 mrcees61@gmail.com Malca Amit ‡ Christine Duke 153-66 Rockaway Blvd New York, NY 11434 718.525.6100 | Fax: 718.425.3703 maa.nyc@malca-amit.com The Packaging Store ‡ Alex Long 2333 Welsh Road Lansdale, PA 19446 215.361.6940 | Fax: 215.361.6941 hello@packandshipnow.com

Aiston Fine Art Service ‡ Mark Aiston P.O. Box 3434 Grand Central Station New York, NY 10163 212.715.0629 | Fax: 718.361.8569 info@aistonart.com

U.S. Art ‡ Jessica Pierce 37-11 48th Avenue Long Island City, NY 11101 800.472.5784 | Fax:718.472.5785 jpierce@usart.com

Cadogan Tate Fine Art ‡ Stacey Ferguson Cadogan House 41-20 39th Street Sunnyside, NY 11104 718.706.7999 | Fax: 718.707.2847 s.ferguson@cadogantate.com

FURNITURE & LARGE ITEMS For larger pieces where delivery time is not the primary concern, we suggest getting your items freighted: www.plyconvanlines.com www.freightquote.com

Crozier Fine Arts Catherine Erickson New York, NY 10011 212.741.2024 / Fax: 212.741.5513 shipping@crozierarts.com

‡ Shippers

that can fulfill international deliveries

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR BUYERS Registration All potential buyers must register for the sale prior to placing a bid. Registration information may be submitted in person at our reception desk, by fax or through our website at www.freemansauction.com. We will require proof of identification and residence and may require a credit card and/or a bank reference. By registering for the sale, the buyer acknowledges that he or she has read, understood and accepted Freeman’s Terms and Conditions of Sale. Buyer’s Premium A Buyer’s Premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. The Buyer’s Premium shall be: 25% on the first $200,000 of the hammer price of each lot, 20% on the portion from $200,001 through $3,000,000, and 12% thereafter. Sales Tax All items in the catalogue are subject to the 8% Pennsylvania and Philadelphia sales tax. Dealers purchasing for resale must register their tax numbers on current PA forms. Forms should be submitted to our Client Services office on the second floor. Catalogue Descriptions All item descriptions, dimensions and estimates are provided for guidance only. It is the buyer’s responsibility to inspect all lots prior to bidding to ensure that the condition is to their satisfaction. If potential buyers are unable to inspect lots in person, our specialists will be happy to prepare detailed Condition Reports on individual lots as quickly as possible. These are for guidance only, and all lots will be sold “as is” as per our Terms and Conditions of Sale. Bidding At the sale Registered bidders will be assigned a bidder number and given a paddle for use at the sale. Once the first bid has been placed, the auctioneer asks for higher bids in increments determined by the auctioneer. To place your bid, simply raise your paddle until the auctioneer acknowledges you. The auctioneer will not mistake a random gesture for a bid. By phone A limited number of telephone lines are available for bidding by phone through a Freeman’s representative. Phone lines must be reserved in advance. Requests must be submitted no later than 24 hours prior to the scheduled start of the sale. In writing Bid forms are available in the sale room and at the back of the catalogue. These should be submitted in person, by mail or by fax no later than one hour prior to the scheduled start of the sale. The auctioneer will bid on your behalf up to the limit. On the internet A fully-illustrated catalogue is available on-line at www.freemansauction.com. Registered bidders may leave absentee bids through the website and will receive email confirmation of their bid. Freeman’s is not responsible for errors or failure to execute bids. Payment Payment is due within ten (10) working days of the sale. Lots purchased will not be released until we have received full payment. Payment may be made in cash, by check, money order, or debit card. Payments by check must clear the bank before goods will be released. Removal of Purchases Deliveries will not be made during the time of the sale unless otherwise indicated by the auctioneer. All items must be paid for and removed within ten (10) working days of the sale. Purchases not so removed may be turned over to a licensed warehouse at the expense and risk of the purchaser. Shipping and Packing Responsibility for packing, shipping and insurance shall be exclusively that of the purchaser. Upon request, Freeman’s will provide the purchaser with names of professional packers and shippers known to us. Endangered Species Lots marked * are manufactured in whole or in part of restricted materials that may include tortoiseshell, ivory, mother-of-pearl, coral, rhinoceros horn, whalebone or marine ivory. Such materials may require specific licenses, certificates, or CITES documentation for import, export, moving between states in the U.S., or resale. Obtaining these documents may require scientific, laboratory or other expert analysis, in order to establish which species or genus the material came from. Freeman’s is unable to provide this information, and the obligation is on the purchaser of a lot containing any of these materials to ensure that they are able to obtain all the necessary or required documents should they need to, prior to bidding on the lot. If proper documentation or licenses etc. cannot be obtained for a purchased lot, the purchaser will still be required to make an on time payment for the lot as per our standard terms and conditions. Freeman’s cataloguing of the lots marked with this symbol * represents the best of our opinion, and the absence of this symbol from any lot description does not form a warranty that the lot will be free from any licensing or certification restrictions.

184


T H E C O L L E C T I O N O F D O R R A N C E “ D O D O ” H . H A M I LT O N

TERMS & CONDITIONS All property offered and sold (“property”) through Samuel T. Freeman & Co, (“Freeman’s”) shall be offered and sold on the terms and conditions set forth below which constitutes the complete statement of the terms and conditions on which all property is offered for sale. By bidding at the auction, whether present in person or by agent, by written bid, telephone, internet or other means, the buyer agrees to be bound by these terms and conditions.

1 Unless otherwise indicated, all Property will be offered by Freeman’s as agent for the Consignor. 2 Freeman’s reserves the right to vary the terms of sale and any such variance shall become part of these Conditions of Sale. 3 Buyer acknowledges that it had the right to make a full inspection of all Property prior to sale to determine the condition, size, repair or restoration of any Property. Therefore, all property is sold “ASIS”. Freeman’s is acting solely as an auction broker, and unless otherwise stated, does not own the Property offered for sale and has made no independent investigation of the Property. Freeman’s makes no warranty of title, merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, or any other warranty or representation regarding the description, genuineness, attribution, provenance or condition to the Property of any kind or nature with respect to the Property. 4 Freeman’s in its sole and exclusive discretion, reserves the right to withdraw any property, at any time, before the fall of the hammer. 5 Unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer at the time of sale, all bids are per lot as numbered in the printed catalogue. Freeman’s reserves the right to determine any and all matters regarding the order, precedence or appropriate increment of bids or the constitution of lots. 6 The highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer shall be the buyer. The auctioneer has the right to reject any bid, to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion and in the event of any dispute between bidders, the auctioneer shall have the sole and final discretion either to determine the successful bidder or to re- offer and resell the article in dispute. If any dispute arises after sale, the Freeman’s sale record shall be conclusive in all respects. 7 If the auctioneer determines that any opening or later bid or any advance bid is not commensurate with the value of the Property offered, he may reject the same and withdraw the Property from sale.

8 Upon the fall of the hammer, title to any offered lot or article will immediately pass to the highest bidder as determined in the exclusive discretion of the auctioneer, subject to compliance by the buyer with these Conditions of Sale. Buyer thereupon assumes full risk and responsibility of the property sold, agrees to sign any requested confirmation of purchase, and agrees to pay the full price, plus Buyer’s Premium, therefore or such part, upon such terms as Freeman’s may require. 9 No lot may be removed from Freeman’s premises until the buyer has paid in full the purchase price therefor including Buyer’s Premium or has satisfied such terms that Freeman’s, in its sole discretion, shall require. Subject to the foregoing, all Property shall be paid for and removed by the buyer at his/her expense within ten (10) days of sale and, if not so removed, may be sold by Freeman’s, or sent by Freeman’s to a public warehouse, at the sole risk and charge of the buyer(s), and Freeman’s may prohibit the buyer from participating, directly or indirectly, as a bidder or buyer in any future sale or sales. In addition to other remedies available to Freeman’s by law, Freeman’s reserves the right to impose a late charge of 1.5% per month of the total purchase price on any balance remaining ten (10) days after the day of sale. If Property is not removed by the buyer within ten (10) days, a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month from the tenth day after the sale until removal by the buyer shall be payable to Freeman’s by the buyer; Freeman’s shall charge 1.5% of the total purchase price per month for any property not so removed within 60 days after the sale. Freeman’s will not be responsible for any loss, damage, theft, or otherwise responsible for any goods left in Freeman’s possession after ten (10) days. If the foregoing conditions or any applicable provisions of law are not complied with, in addition to other remedies available to Freeman’s and the Consignor (including without limitation the right to hold the buyer(s) liable for the bid price) Freeman’s, at its option, may either cancel the sale, retaining as liquidated damages all payments made by the buyer(s), or resell the property. In such event, the buyer(s) shall remain liable for any deficiency

in the original purchase price and will also be responsible for all costs, including warehousing, the expense of the ultimate sale, and Freeman’s commission at its regular rates together with all related and incidental charges, including legal fees. Payment is a precondition to removal. Payment shall be by cash, certified check or similar bank draft, or any other method approved by Freeman’s. Checks will not be deemed to constitute payment until cleared. Any exceptions must be made upon Freeman’s written approval of credit prior to sale. In addition, a defaulting buyer will be deemed to have granted and assigned to Freeman’s, a continuing security interest of first priority in any property or money of, or owing to such buyer in Freeman’s possession, and Freeman’s may retain and apply such property or money as collateral security for the obligations due to Freeman’s. Freeman’s shall have all of the rights accorded a secured party under the Pennsylvania Uniform Commercial Code. 10 Unless the sale is advertised and announced as “without reserve”, each lot is offered subject to a reserve and Freeman’s may implement such reserves by bidding through its representatives on behalf of the Consignors. In certain instances, the Consignor may pay less than the standard commission rate where Freeman’s or its representative is a successful bidder on behalf of the Consignor. Where the Consignor is indebted to Freeman’s, Freeman’s may have an interest in the offered lots and the proceeds therefrom, other than the broker’s Commissions, and all sales are subject to any such interest. 11 No “buy” bids shall be accepted at any time for any purpose. 12 Any pre-sale bids must be submitted in writing to Freeman’s prior to commencement of the offer of the first lot of any sale. Freeman’s copy of any such bid shall conclusively be deemed to be the sole evidence of same, and while Freeman’s accepts these bids for the convenience of bidders not present at the auction, Freeman’s shall not be responsible for the failure to execute, or, to execute properly, any pre-sale bid.

13 A Buyer’s Premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. The Buyer’s Premium shall be: 25% on the first $200,000 of the hammer price of each lot, 20% on the portion from $200,001 through $3,000,000, and 12% thereafter. 14 Unless exempted by law from the payment thereof, the buyer will be required to pay any and all federal excise tax and any state and/or local sales taxes, including where deliveries are to be made outside the state where a sale is conducted, which may be subject to a corresponding or compensating tax in another state. 15 Freeman’s may, as a service to buyer, arrange to have purchased property posted and shipped at the buyer’s expense. Freeman’s is not responsible for any acts or omissions in packing or shipping of purchased lots whether or not such carrier is recommended by Freeman’s. Packing and handling of purchased lots is at the responsibility of the buyer and is at the entire risk of the buyer. 16 In no event shall any liability of Freeman’s to the buyer exceed the purchase price actually paid. 17 No claimed modification or amendment of this Agreement on the part of any party shall be deemed extant, enforceable or provable unless it is in writing that has been signed by the parties to this Agreement. No course of dealing and no delay or omission on the part of Freeman’s in exercising any right under this Agreement shall operate as a waiver of such right or any other right and waiver on any one or more occasions shall not be construed as a bar to or waiver of any right or remedy of Freeman’s on any future occasion. 18 These Conditions of Sale and the buyer’s, the Consignor’s and Freeman’s rights under these Conditions of Sale shall be governed by, construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Consignor and Buyer agree to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

185 v2.2016


DIRECTORY Officers

Specialist Departments

Representatives

Alasdair Nichol Chairman

20th Century Design Tim Andreadis tandreadis@freemansauction.com

New England Kelly Wright kwright@freemansauction.com

Margaret D. Freeman Director Emeritus Paul S. Roberts President Hanna Dougher Chief Operating Officer Samuel T. Freeman III Senior Vice President

Departments Appraisals Amy Parenti aparenti@freemansauction.com Business Development Thomas B. McCabe IV tmccabe@freemansauction.com Client Services Mary Maguire Carroll mmaguire@freemansauction.com Finance Whitney Long wlong@freemansauction.com Marketing & Communications Micah Dornfeld mdornfeld@freemansauction.com Museum Services Thomas B. McCabe IV tmccabe@freemansauction.com Photography Thomas Clark tclark@freemansauction.com Shipping & Receiving Stephanie Parker sparker@freemansauction.com Trust & Estates Amy Parenti aparenti@freemansauction.com

American Art & Pennsylvania Impressionists Alasdair Nichol anichol@freemansauction.com American Furniture, Folk & Decorative Arts Lynda Cain lcain@freemansauction.com Asian Arts Benjamin Farina bfarina@freemansauction.com Books, Maps & Manuscripts Benjamin Truesdale btruesdale@freemansauction.com

Mid-Atlantic Matthew Wilcox mwilcox@freemansauction.com Southeast  Colin Clarke cclarke@freemansauction.com West Coast Michael Larsen mlarsen@freemansauction.com Main Line Thomas McCabe tmccabe@freemansauction.com

British & European Furniture & Decorative Arts Nicholas B. A. Nicholson nnicholson@freemansauction.com European Art & Old Masters David M. Weiss dweiss@freemansauction.com Jewelry & Watches Virginia Salem, GIA GG vsalem@freemansauction.com Modern & Contemporary Art Dunham Townend dtownend@freemansauction.com Musical Instruments Frederick Oster foster@freemansauction.com Oriental Rugs & Carpets Andrew Taggart ataggart@freemansauction.com Prints Anne Henry ahenry@freemansauction.com Silver & Objets de Vertu Nicholas B. A. Nicholson nnicholson@freemansauction.com

186 v3.2016