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The Stanley Bard Collection: A Life at The Chelsea may 16, 2017


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3 Joseph P. Day, 1912, Š New York Historical Society


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AuCTION Sale 1572 Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 6pm 1808 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19103

Front cover: Š 2017 Artists rights Society (ArS), New York / SOFAM, Brussels; Fold-over flaps: Photograph by Bob Estremera; Inside front & back covers: Chelsea Hotel by ross Abraham; Frontispiece & Spine: Courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller; Opposite page: Chelsea Hotel on 23rd Street, Manhattan, New York, uSA (photo) / Marc Jackson / Design Pics / Bridgeman Images


6 Photograph by PJ Pocock, courtesy of the Bard Family


the stanley bard collection

THE STANlEY BArD COllECTION: A lIFE AT THE CHElSEA Tuesday, May 16, 2017 at 6pm

FINE ArT DEPArTMENT Alasdair Nichol Vice Chairman anichol@freemansauction.com 267.414.1211

Dunham Townend Head of Department dtownend@freemansauction.com 267.414.1221

Anne Henry Senior Specialist ahenry@freemansauction.com 267.414.1220

Shannon Jeffers Cataloguer sjeffers@freemansauction.com 267.414.1231

ExHIBITIONS New York*

Philadelphia

Rogue Space | Chelsea, 508-526 West 26th Street, New York, NY

Freeman’s | 1808 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA

Tuesday, May 2

12:00pm-4:00pm

Thursday, May 11

10:00am-5:00pm

Wednesday, May 3

10:00am-5:00pm

Friday, May 12

10:00am-5:00pm

Thursday, May 4

10:00am-5:00pm

Saturday, May 13

12:00pm-5:00pm

Friday, May 5

10:00am-3:00pm

Sunday, May 14

12:00pm-5:00pm

Monday, May 15

10:00am-5:00pm

By appointment only on the morning of the sale.

*Select highlights only, please contact department for list of works to be included in this exhibition.

ClIENT SErVICES Mary Maguire Director | Client Services mmaguire@freemansauction.com 267.414.1236

Joslyn Moore Bidding Registration jmoore@freemansauction.com 267.414.1207

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s a child, Stanley Bard felt no love for the Hotel Chelsea. In fact, he was jealous of the building on West 23rd Street that kept his father away from home for such long hours. Granted, there was some pleasure to be had in exploring the Chelsea’s labyrinthian corridors, peering through half-open doorways at elderly gentlemen half-buried beneath towering stacks of newspapers, or gaggles of adults hunched around a coffee table, arguing politics. But it wasn’t until after he returned from college that Stanley looked at the Chelsea not as a rival for his father’s affection but as an entity in its own right—a strangely anthropomorphic being with its own personality and quintessentially New York past. Stanley’s father, David Bard, had bought the genteel if shabby hotel in partnership with a group of fellow Hungarian émigrés in the wake of the Depression. The hotel’s greatest asset, in the purchasers’ eyes, was its central location. They barely noticed the preponderance of artists, actors, and other creative types among its tenants. At least not at first. David Bard’s correspondence, which one can find in the archives of such famous residents as Virgil Thomson and John Sloan, reveals Bard as unfailingly polite, yet equally professional. A writer (Paul Bowles) is advanced cigarette money on credit “with our compliments.” A painter (John Sloan) is removed from the top-floor studio he can no longer afford but offered a cheaper room because “you are one of the Chelsea’s favorite guests.” Bard may not have known whom he was dealing with at first, but he knew how to listen. Over time, the nineteenthcentury putti ringing the ceiling of his ground-floor office darkened beneath layers of cigar smoke as Virgil Thomson, Edgar lee Masters, Arthur Miller and so many others dropped in to inquire about, say, a lack of hot water and remained to talk long into the evening about life, literature, and art. Thomson told him that this hotel had been designed for artists, like no other in New York. Masters regaled him with stories of Isadora Duncan dancing in its apartments and Mark Twain telling tales in its dining room. Miller knew about the playwrights and producers making the deals in its lobby that led to the creation of Broadway. little wonder that young Stanley was jealous. little wonder that the 22-year-old resented his father’s insistence that he ditch his dreams of a white-collar career to apprentice himself at the Chelsea for a salary of sixty dollars a week. Gradually, though, it dawned on Stanley that some of the faces he encountered at the Chelsea belonged to people whose work he’d studied in college. Wasn’t that Edmund Wilson? Brendan Behan? Mary McCarthy? Gore Vidal?

The writers had caught his father’s interest and imagination, but Stanley was drawn more to the visual arts. As luck would have it, in 1964—just as David Bard died and Stanley, only 29, took over—the Chelsea was facing an onslaught of new artists “staggering out of the muck” of ‘50s abstract expressionism and promoting any work that “does something other than sit on its ass in a museum.” Claes and Patty Oldenburg moved in while preparing his “Bedroom Ensemble” for a show at the Sidney Janis Gallery. As exhibitions of nouveau-realiste works began to take hold in New York, they were joined by a phalanx of Europeans including Yves Klein, Martial raysse, Arman, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jean Tinguely, Daniel Spoerri, and Christo and Jeanne-Claude. Stanley Bard kept busy, running what reporters were now calling the “Ellis Island of the avant-garde,” delivering drop cloths to artists, looking after their children, and mediating their disputes. But hard as he worked, he had never been so happy in his life. After all, these guests were his age. They invited him to their parties, he attended their exhibitions. It was a symbiotic relationship in which both parties found satisfaction. When Daniel Spoerri stayed up past two in the morning, nailing his breakfast dishes to a tabletop in pursuit of his art, Stanley commented supportively, “Good luck to him.” When Christo incorporated the doorknob from his Chelsea Hotel bathroom door into a “Store Front” installation for the May 1964 leo Castelli show, Stanley beamed with pride. On the tenth floor, Niki de Saint-Phalle felt free to fill the hall with giant papier-mache figures she called “Nanas.” On the ninth, Arman and Allan Kaprow staged a raucous Happening called “The Artists’ Key Club,” whose subscribers were given 50-50 odds of going home with a work by a name artist but overwhelming odds of having fun. Stanley wasn’t only having fun, though. He was learning about art, and about how artists see the world. He often recalled the day Christo invited him up to his room to behold a woman standing on a pedestal, wrapped in clear plastic. “You look at her, you see a beautiful woman,” Christo said to Stanley in his imperfect English. “But when I wrap something it becomes a work of art.” Art was being stripped to its essence, Stanley’s new friends explained. If John Sloan had proved that art didn’t have to be conventionally beautiful, and Pollock had demonstrated that it needn’t have a pictorial subject, Christo, Warhol, Oldenburg and Arman had reached the logical conclusion that art didn’t have to be anything and, conversely, that anything could be art.

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THIS PICTurE…HAS BEAuTY. I’ll NOT DENY IT; IT MuST BE THAT HuMAN lIFE IS BEAuTIFul. —JOHN SlOAN

9 Image courtesy of the Bard Family


What could prepare you better for the second half of the 1960s than the Chelsea, where William Burroughs and Brion Gysin moved in to work on their psychedelic Dream Machine and where Andy Warhol filmed “Chelsea Girls”? As new artists including Bernard Childs, Sidney Nolan, and Carl-Henning Pedersen joined the never-ending party, Stanley struck a deal with Fillmore East owner Bill Graham to house his rock bands, adding a new type of creative energy to the hotel’s atmosphere. Janis Joplin. Jim Morrison. Patti Smith. The faster the spin, the more transcendent became the shared creative state that William Burroughs had dubbed the “Third Mind.”

Then came the crash. Drugs. Stagflation. Poets died, actors retreated to rehab, the Fillmore East shut down. Yet, if anything, hard times brought many of the Chelsea’s artists even closer to Stanley, who saw only good in the hotel. The Chelsea was “unique in providing all the conditions artists need to do their work,” he told reporters on the telephone. As manager, to help them feel comfortable, he sometimes had to “allow things to go on that you couldn’t do in the Hilton Hotel…the nouveau riche, they would not be happy here.”

10 Image courtesy of the Bard Family


the stanley bard collection

Image courtesy of the Bard Family

His guests’ appreciation for this sympathetic spirit is evidenced by the inscriptions on the backs of so many of the works included here: “For my dear friend Stanley Bard who made my stay at the Chelsea so wonderful,” from Don Olsen. “Avec le meilleurs voeux pour une tres heureuse année” from Théo Tobiasse. “Dedicated to Hotel Chelsea from Chieko Kawasaki.” “For Stanley, cordially, Corneille, NY, 8 Dec. ’80.” “For Stanley with Affection – Tom Wesselmann.”

And, finally, Stanley Bard would die. What remains of this dream? The building itself remains shrouded, in a state of transition, but these works of art testify to a moment in history when a rich mix of inspired New Yorkers were given the opportunity to live a creative life. “What luck for us, and is it not lovely, that we have such friends as artists,” wrote John Sloan’s good friend, the critic Van Wyck Brooks. “The mere thought of it warms all the way through.”

Is this not the definition of a life well-lived? To have made a better life for those one encounters, to have added to the quality of the cultural air we breathe? Bad times would come. Alliances within the hotel’s ownership would fracture, and Stanley would be ousted. The hotel would be sold.

SHErIll TIPPINS Author of Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York’s Extraordinary Chelsea Hotel

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I WANT TO KEEP THE ATMOSPHErE KOOKY BuT NICE, ECCENTrIC BuT BEAuTIFul. —STANlEY BArD

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• Dylan Thomas, the famous Welsh poet, stayed in room #205 just before his death in 1953 at age 39.

• Photographer robert Mapplethorpe shot his first photographs in room #1017, in 1969, borrowing a friend’s camera.

• leonard Cohen wrote “Chelsea Hotel #2” in 1974, which makes reference to a romantic encounter he had with musician Janis Joplin in room #424 years earlier.

BY THE NuMBErS: (IN)FAMOuS rOOMS OF THE CHElSEA HOTEl

Philip Hubert, Corsa Hotel Collection #83112d, © New York Historical Society

• In 1993, contemporary artist Elizabeth Peyton, famous for her portraits of celebrities, held her first major solo exhibition in her suite, room #828.

• Visual artist and filmmaker Harry Smith lived in room #731 from 1968 until 1975. He recorded performances written in tandem with his long-time friend and beat poet Allen Ginsberg. Smith later suffered cardiac arrest in room #328, and died 16 shortly after.

• Photographer Stephen Meisel took photos of ‘Material Girl’ and former Chelsea resident Madonna, for her book “Sex” in room #822.


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THErE’S NOT ANOTHEr BuIlDING IN THE WOrlD THAT CATErS TO THIS MANY CrEATIVE PEOPlE… THErE’S SOME MYSTIQuE WITHIN THESE WAllS THAT HElPS PEOPlE PrODuCE ArT. —STANlEY BArD

18 Photograph by Bob Estremera


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HENrI lE SIDANEr lot 1 While searching for a country home in 1901, Henri le Sidaner consulted with his friend and fellow artist Auguste Delaherche, who suggested the ancient city of Gerberoy in the Picardy region of France as a place to look. In 1904, le Sidaner purchased a home near the 15th century collegial church of Saint-Pierre and later acquired several other plots where he cultivated beautiful gardens. He not only planted gardens at his own home, but also around the town, including on the

ruins of an old castle and fort where le Sidaner constructed a three-leveled structure called the Temple of love, a replica of which can be found at the Palace of Versailles. Thanks to le Sidaner, this medieval town experienced a renaissance and has become a popular tourist attraction for those visiting France. It is now known as “the town of roses,” and its cobblestone streets are still home to le Sidaner’s house and gardens, which can be visited and toured by the public.

Self Portrait, 1896 (b/w photo), le Sidaner, Henri Eugene Augustin (1862-1939) / Private Collection / The Stapleton Collection / Bridgeman Images

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1 HENRI LE SIDANER (french, 1862-1939) “LE QUATORZE JUILLET, GERBEROY” Signed bottom left, oil on canvas. Executed in 1901. 23 1/2 x 32 in. (59.7 x 81.3cm) provenance: M. Hamburger, Paris, France. Private Collection. Stanley Bard. literature: Yann Farinaux-Le Sidaner, Le Sidaner: l’oeuvre peint et gravé, Monoco: A. Sauret, circa 1989, no. 111 (illustrated). $30,000-50,000

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2 HENRI MATISSE (french, 1869-1954) “TÊTE DE JEUNE FILLE AUX SOURCILS RECTANGULAIRES” 1930, pencil signed and numbered 12/25 (there were no artist’s proofs), with wide margins. Etching on Chine appliqué to Arches. image: 4 7/8 x 3 3/4 in. (12.4 x 8.3cm) sheet: 14 1/4 x 11 13/16 in. (36.2 x 30cm) [Duthuit, 222] provenance: Stanley Bard. $4,000-6,000

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3 RENÉ MAGRITTE (belgian, 1898-1967) UNTITLED Signed and dated 1959 in ink bottom right, pencil on wove paper laid down to paper board. sheet: 10 3/4 x 7 in. (27.4 x 17.8cm) support: 11 5/16 x 7 7/16 in. (28.7 x 18.9cm) provenance: Leo Castelli Gallery, New York, New York. Stanley Bard. $10,000-15,000

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JOHN FrENCH SlOAN lots 4-9

Pennsylvania-born artist John French Sloan was well-educated and introduced to American art from an early age. During the early 1890s, Sloan began taking drawing classes and was hired as a newspaper artist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, also studying at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts under Thomas Anshutz. Soon thereafter, he met artist robert Henri, who encouraged Sloan to move from drawing towards painting. He then became acquainted with fellow artists Everett Shinn, George luks, and William Glackens, who would go on to refer to themselves as “The Eight” (with other members including Maurice Prendergast and Arthur B. Davies) and who would later become known as the first generation of the Ashcan School. At the very beginning of the 20th century, Sloan’s reputation as an accomplished illustrator was developing. He moved from Philadelphia to New York and, along with other members of The Eight, concretized the group’s preferred style of Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

painting, distinguishing themselves as an avant-garde force railing against the American Impressionists National Academy of Design, as well as the abstracted and modernist aesthetic of Gallery 291 and Alfred Steiglitz’s circle. Instead, The Eight sought to realistically represent authentic scenes of urban daily life in America. While the members of the group varied in their unique styles and techniques, they gravitated towards a darker color palette and gestural brushstrokes. The group exhibited together throughout the early 1900s, and Sloan himself had solo shows as well. like Henri, Sloan tended towards depictions of workingclass members of society that lived around him, while trying to keep any specific political agenda out of his work. Sloan’s urban scenes, for which he is best known, remain as important documentation of American art and its history. Sloan taught at the Art Students league in New York and even acted as president of the league in 1931, but resigned in 1932. However, in 1935 be began to teach there again for several years. During that time, he was a well-respected instructor, teaching artists that would later become world-renowned including reginald Marsh, David Smith, Alexander Calder and Barnett Newman. Sloan and his wife Dolly moved into the Chelsea Hotel on October 8, 1935, after they were evicted from their New York university apartment near Washington Square Park. The couple moved into a top-floor duplex apartmentstudio that had, in a twist of fate, been home to artist Arthur B. Davies in the 1920s. It was during his tenure at the hotel that, in 1939, Sloan wrote “Gist of Art,” the treatise that outlined the impetuses and ideologies behind his art. 24


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4 JOHN FRENCH SLOAN (american, 1871-1951) “MY TWO FRIENDS, ROBERT HENRI AND JOHN BUTLER YEATS” Signed bottom right, inscribed verso ‘My two Friends / Left Robert Henri & Right John Butler Yeats / Left handed, Right handed. John Sloan / 165 West 23rd St. / New York, 1909 / JS#1058,’ oil on linen laid to board. Executed in 1910. 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (21.6 x 26.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. exhibited: “Paintings by Modern American Artists,” Touchstone House, New York, New York, May - September, 1917. “John Sloan 1871 - 1951,” traveling exhibition: Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York, January 10 - March 2, 1952; Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C., March 15 - April 20, 1952; Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio, May 4 - June 8, 1952.

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literature: Rowland Elzea, John Sloan’s Oil Paintings: A Catalogue Raisonné part one, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1991, no. 164 (illustrated). note: John Sloan first moved into the Chelsea Hotel in 1935. The present lot, therefore, was painted before he moved into the Chelsea, but while he was living quite nearby. Sloan met Yeats in 1910, and had known Henri through school for some time. In his January 18th, 1910 diary entry, Sloan wrote of the evening he painted his two friends, Henri and Yeats, “Laubs, Henris, Mr. Yeats, and Nellie (Mrs. Laub’s sister) at dinner and after dinner fortune telling by cards, Mrs. L., and drawing by Yeats, Henri...[while] I painted a small sketch of Henri and Yeats.” It was Sloan’s experience with these two men, as well as with other members of their social circle whom they called the “Petitpas Group,” that Sloan’s taste for living and socializing with artists and other creative people was cultivated and nurtured during the last decades of his life. $8,000-12,000


5 JOHN FRENCH SLOAN (american, 1871-1951) “PROSPECTOR IN APACHE CANYON” Signed, titled, dated 1947-8 and inscribed ‘JS#1108’ verso, casein tempera with oil-varnish glaze on board. 20 x 24 in. (50.8 x 60.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. exhibited: “John Sloan,” Kraushaar Galleries, New York, New York, February 4 - 23, 1952. literature: Rowland Elzea, John Sloan’s Oil Paintings: A Catalogue Raisonné part two, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1991, no. 1215 (illustrated).

note: Sloan’s diary describes the sketching trip that was the origin of this painting: “we left in our car with J[oe] Bakos driving at about 9:30 AM and after a short stop in town went by the main highway south and east to Canyoncito and into Joe’s Apache canyon. It is very beautiful and has great possibilities as beneath the canyon is plenty of water. Joe and I walked about a mile northerly, leaving the car... Joe and I started painting... beautiful dark scrub oak grottos.” (September 21, 1948). $12,000-18,000

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6 JOHN FRENCH SLOAN (american, 1871-1951) UNTITLED (TWO GIRLS) Signed bottom center left, oil on canvas. 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $8,000-12,000

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7 JOHN FRENCH SLOAN (american, 1871-1951) NUDE RECLINING Signed bottom right, crayon on tracing paper. 9 3/8 x 13 13/16 in. (23.8 x 35.1cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: John Sloan worked on nudes towards the end of his career, from approximately 1935 to 1941, the first 6 years he was living at the Chelsea. In an interview with Joseph Abbot for WNYC on April 5, 1936, Sloan said, “Recently, I have devoted most of my work to the painting of the human figure which will require a full lifetime to reach mastery in it.” Although Sloan’s nudes never became his most popular subject, or that for which he is best known, they did occupy much of his work in his later years. On January 17, 1941, W. G. Constable, Curator of Paintings at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (who had purchased Sloan’s painting “Pigeons on a Roof” in 1935), wrote to Walter Pach in New York, saying “I do not want to lose the chance of a good nude [by John Sloan], especially as it seems to me that he has attained at this moment a remarkable mastery over what he wants to do.” The present lot represents an exemplary nude of this time period. $1,000-1,500

8 JOHN FRENCH SLOAN (american, 1871-1951) THREE NUDES Pencil signed and inscribed ‘JS #608’ in red pencil bottom right, conté crayon on paper. 15 1/4 x 10 1/8 in. (38.7 x 25.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,500-2,500

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9 JOHN FRENCH SLOAN (american, 1871-1951) “ALEJANDRA” Signed bottom left, titled, dated and inscribed ‘JS#645’ verso, tempera and oil-varnish glaze on masonite. 22 x 18 in. (55.9 x 45.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard.

exhibited: “John Sloan,” Montross Gallery, New York, New York, January 2 - 13, 1934. literature: Rowland Elzea, John Sloan’s Oil Paintings: A Catalogue Raisonné part two, Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1991, no. 868 (illustrated). $3,000-5,000

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10 MOSES SOYER (american, 1899-1974) UNTITLED (WOMAN IN A RED DRESS) Signed upper right, oil on canvas. 30 x 24 in. (76.2 x 61cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,200-1,800

11 MOSES SOYER (american, 1899-1974) UNTITLED (FEMALE NUDE WITH BLUE STOCKINGS) Signed upper right, oil on canvas. 30 x 25 in. (76.2 x 63.5cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,500-4,000

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12 MOSES SOYER (american, 1899-1974) AFTERNOON LIGHT Signed bottom right, oil on canvas. 30 x 26 in. (76.2 x 66cm) provenance: ACA Galleries, New York, New York. Stanley Bard. exhibited: “A Selection of Painting,” Albrecht Gallery, St. Joseph, Missouri, February - March, 1971. $2,000-3,000

13 MOSES SOYER (american, 1899-1974) “D-DAY 1944” Signed bottom right, signed again, titled and inscribed ‘Collection of Stanley Bard’ on stretcher verso, oil on canvas. 24 x 26 in. (61 x 66cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,000-3,000

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C O B r A ArTISTS lots 14-24 The artistic group known as CoBrA was founded in 1948 in Paris while its first members were sitting in a café during a major international conference. Their name is an acronym that refers to the cities Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam, and their symbol fittingly became that of a curled snake, or cobra. The founding members who drew up and signed their manifesto included Asger Jorn, Joseph Noiret, Christian Dotrement, Constant, Corneille, and Karel Appel. These artists, approximately 30 of them, wanted it known within the greater artistic and sociopolitical community that they were not in agreement with other Western artists working at the time, and they outlined these ideas in their statement entitled “la Cause est Entendu” (The Case is Settled). CoBrA artists sought to move towards more spontaneity of technique and more fantastic subject matter, merging figuration and abstraction, with an aim to rejuvenate Dutch modern art. They were deeply impacted by the ravages of World War II, and they looked towards blunter styles of modernism with anticipations of a Marxist future. They favored improvisation and collaborative efforts over the traditional authorship and individualism associated with their contemporaries. Stylistically, their work was, in many ways, the European counterpart to the American gesturalism or “action painting” associated with Abstract Expressionism.

The group emphasized working without predetermined plans, and railed against academic modes of developing and creating works of art. They used bright, bold colors and experimented with a wide array of new materials. Inspired by the child-like quality of Paul Klee’s and Joan Miro’s work, the group embraced creativity and freedom of expression. They also looked to primitive art and folk art for its simplified lines and shapes. They demanded an ‘art of immediacy’, accessing the subconscious to promote and encourage free expression. This notion was somewhat influenced by the ‘automatism’ of Surrealism, which required the creator to allow their subconscious or unconscious mind control the works they made. In 1949, the group changed its name from CoBrA to Internationale des Artistes Expérimentaux, hoping to branch out from their ties to a specific location and increase membership from artists worldwide. Although several artists from other countries did join into the movement’s style, the group eventually disbanded in 1951. Nevertheless, the movement and its contributions to the realm of modern art are still felt and admired within the art historical canon. 14 KARL APPEL (dutch, 1921-2006) “PERSONNAGE” Signed bottom left, signed again, titled, dated 1969 and located ‘New York’ verso, oil on canvas. 38 1/2 x 27 1/2 in. (97.8 x 69.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: This lot will be accompanied by a certificate of authenticity issued by the Karel Appel Foundation. $40,000-60,000 Illustrated opposite page

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15 CORNEILLE (dutch, 1922-2010) “IRENA” Signed and dated 71 bottom left, signed again, titled and located ‘Hotel Chelsea Room 511 New York’ verso, oil on canvas. 21 3/4 x 24 in. (55.2 x 61cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $10,000-15,000

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16 CORNEILLE (dutch, 1922-2010) “FLOWERING GIRL” Signed and dated 75 upper right, signed again, titled and dated verso, oil on canvas. 28 3/4 x 23 3/4 in. (73 x 60.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $10,000-15,000

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17 CARL-HENNING PEDERSEN (danish, 1913-2007) “THE TREE OF LIFE” Signed with initials, titled and dated 1988 bottom right and located ‘Zermatt’ bottom left, gouache on thin laid paper. 20 1/16 x 13 1/2 in. (50.9 x 34.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,000-2,000

18 CARL-HENNING PEDERSEN (danish, 1913-2007) UNTITLED Signed with artist’s initials and dated 1983 bottom right, signed again, dated and located ‘Molesmes’ verso, watercolor on wove paper. 20 3/16 x 25 7/8 in. (51.3 x 65.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,000-2,000

19 CARL-HENNING PEDERSEN (danish, 1913-2007) “THE TRIUMPHANT” Signed, titled, dated 1978-79 and located ‘New York’ verso, oil on canvas. 32 x 24 in. (81.3 x 60.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $15,000-20,000 Illustrated opposite page

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20 COBRA SCHOOL (continental, 20th century) UNTITLED Signed indistinctly and dated 1966 bottom right, oil on paper. 22 1/2 x 33 in. (57.2 x 83.8cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $800-1,200

21 CARL-HENNING PEDERSEN (danish, 1913-2007) UNTITLED (ABSTRACT FACE) Signed with initials, dated 1983 and located ‘Zermatt’ bottom left, ink and wash on thin laid paper. 14 1/8 x 8 1/2 in. (35.8 x 21.6cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $800-1,200

22 PIERRE ALECHINSKY (belgian, b. 1927) UNTITLED Ink signed and dated 1968 bottom left, pencil signed again, dated and dedicated ‘pour Stanley Bard avec amitié. N.Y. 9 x 68’ bottom right, India ink over facsimile of 18th century manuscript laid down to paper board. 12 3/8 x 8 3/8 in. (31.4 x 21.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: The present work bears resemblance to images featured in the exhibition catalogue for “Pierre Alechinsky,” Lefevre Gallery, New York, New York, Nov. 5 - Nov. 30, 1968 [see Rivière, Les estampes de 1946 à 1972, no. 352-357]. $2,500-4,000

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Illustrated opposite page


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23 CORNEILLE (dutch, 1922-2010) THE GREEN SOFA Circa 1979, pencil signed, dated 8 Dec. ‘80, located ‘New York’ and dedicated, ‘For Stanley / cordially Corneille’ upper left, from the edition of unknown size, the full sheet. Color lithograph on heavy wove paper. sheet: 25 7/8 x 19 3/4 in. (65.7 x 50.2cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $800-1,200

24 CORNEILLE (dutch, 1922-2010) LES AMIES Circa 1981, pencil signed, dated and dedicated ‘For Stanley With All My Sympathy,’ presumably an unnumbered proof aside from the regular edition of 200, the full sheet. Color lithograph on wove paper. 25 7/16 x 19 3/4 in. (64.6 x 50.2cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $800-1,200

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25 THÉO TOBIASSE (french, 1927-2012) “LE FRUITS DE CHELSEA” Signed bottom left, dated 84/V upper left and titled upper right, mixed media and collage on two joined canvases (framed together). diptych: 39 1/2 x 59 1/2 in. (100.3 x 151.1cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: We are grateful to Catherine Faust-Tobiasse for confirming the authenticity of this work. A certificate may be purchased directly from Ms. Faust-Tobiasse by the successful bidder. The artist was a resident at the Chelsea Hotel for a four month period in 1980 while he was looking for a permanent loft studio space in Manhattan. $12,000-18,000

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26 THÉO TOBIASSE (french, 1927-2012) “MA BIEN-AIMIÉE EST UN BOUQUET DE MYRTHE” Signed upper right and titled upper left, oil on canvas. 21 1/4 x 25 1/2 in. (53.9 x 64.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: We are grateful to Catherine Faust-Tobiasse for confirming the authenticity of this work. A certificate may be purchased directly from Ms. Faust-Tobiasse by the successful bidder. $4,000-6,000

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the stanley bard collection 27 THÉO TOBIASSE (french, 1927-2012) “LE RENDEZ-VOUS” Pencil signed, titled and numbered 52/99, signed again, dated ‘31. XII. 88’ and dedicated ‘avec le meilleurs voeux pour une très heureuse année’ on the reverse of the folded sheet. Woodcut on folded wove paper. image: 10 x 8 in. (25.4 x 20.3cm) sheet (folded): 12 13/16 x 9 13/16 in. (32.5 x 24.9cm) sheet (unfolded): 12 13/16 x 19 11/16 in. (32.5 x 50cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $200-300

28 THÉO TOBIASSE (french, 1927-2012) “Il N’Y A PLUS J’ETINCELLES SOUS LES SABOTS DES CHEVAUSE” 1982, pencil signed twice and numbered III/XXV, with wide margins. Color etching, aquatint and carborundum on heavy wove paper with added crayon, graphite and collage elements in the right margin. image: 20 3/16 x 27 1/4 in. (51.3 x 69.2cm) sheet approx.: 29 3/16 x 36 5/8 in. (74.1 x 93cm) (uneven) provenance: Stanley Bard. $400-600

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ArMAN, CHrISTO AND MArTIAl rAYSSE lots 29, 30 & 32 “These three artists (along with Yves Klein, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jean Tinguely, and Daniel Spoerri) were part of the European influx of Nouveau Réaliste artists who created a real flowering, a golden age, in the artistic life at the Chelsea in the early- to mid-1960s. Initially, they gravitated toward the Chelsea on the recommendation of larry rivers, who had befriended many of them in Paris. As their work appeared at shows in New York, the Chelsea was where they naturally stayed.

This period coincided with Stanley Bard’s own awakening as an appreciator of art. He enjoyed getting to know these artists, and learning about and discussing their work with them. As a consequence, he cultivated real and lasting friendships with many of them. Arman’s Palette Knives in Lucite (lot 29), Christo’s The Mastaba of Abu Dhabi (lot 30), and Martial raysse’s collage with the inscription, “To Stanley Bard, Avec l’amitie de Martial raysse” (lot 32) bring this great moment in art history vividly to mind. These works truly comprise the heart of this collection. The spirit of joyful experimentation that they express powered the Chelsea, through Stanley, for decades to come.”

SHErIll TIPPINS Author of Inside the Dream Palace: The Life and Times of New York’s Extraordinary Chelsea Hotel

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29 ARMAN (american/french, 1928-2005) UNTITLED Signed, dated 71 and inscribed ‘DL,’ unique accumulation of palette knives in polyester resin. height: 19 3/4 in. (50.2cm) width: 14 in. (35.6cm) depth: 1 1/4 in. (3.2cm)

provenance: Stanley Bard. note: This work is recorded in the Arman Studio Archives New York under number: APA# 8003.71.209. $6,000-10,000

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IN 1964 A PArIS GAllErIST TOlD uS THAT WHEN WE WErE GOING TO GO T O NYC SHE SAID ArTISTS AlWAY S STAY AT TH E CH El SEA H OTEl . W E C A ME FOr AN ExHIBITION AT lEO CASTEllI GAllErY AND NEEDED TO CONSTruCT THE STOrE FrONT PIECE FOr THE SHOW IN Our rOOM, AS WE HAD NO MONEY TO rENT A STuDIO. SINCE WE WErE FrOM FrANCE, WE WErEN’T SurE IF THIS WAS AllOWED SO CHrISTO WOulD uSE HIS HAND SAW lATE AT NIGHT. ONE OF THE STOrE FrONTS NEEDED A DOOrKNOB AND WE lOVED THE ONE ON Our BATHrOOM DOOr, SO WE ExCHANGED THAT ONE FOr ONE FrOM THE lOCAl HArDWArE STOrE. THE PIECE IS NOW IN THE COllECTION OF THE HIrSHHOrN MuSEuM IN DC. —CHrISTO AND JEANNE-ClAuDE

Christo & Jeanne-Claude with Stanley Bard Image courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller

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30 CHRISTO (bulgarian, b. 1935) “THE MASTABA OF ABU DHABI; (PROJECT FOR UAE)� Signed, titled and dated 1981 bottom left, pencil, wax crayon, pastel and charcoal on paper laid down to two pieces of board. 14 1/2 x 11 1/4 in. (36.8 x 28.6cm) provenance: Stanley Bard.

note: The Mastaba was a project conceived in 1977 for Abu Dhabi and intended to be the largest sculpture in the world, with a height of 492 feet, a depth of 738 feet and a width of 984 feet. It is still a work in progress. The sculpture will consist of 410,000 multicolored barrels that together will create a sparkling and colorful effect, an homage to the ancient mosaic tradition in Islamic architecture. A mastaba is a type of Egyptian tomb that pre-dates the iconic shape of the pyramid. To the inhabitants of the region, it is a familiar feature, inherent to their native landscape. $12,000-18,000

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31 SOSHANA AFROYIM (austrian, 1927-2015) “SEA-WEEDS V” Signed bottom left, titled and located ‘Paris’ on stretcher verso, oil on canvas. 45 1/2 x 31 1/2 in. (114.3 x 80cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,500-4,000

32 MARTIAL RAYSSE (french, b. 1936) UNTITLED (EYES) Signed, dated 1963 and dedicated ‘To Stanley Bard Avec l’amitié de Martial Raysse’ verso, mixed media cut-out collage on two sheets of overlapping paper. 24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: Martial Raysse was one of the original members of the 1960s Nouveau Réalisme movement, along with Yves Klein, Raymond Hains and Arman, who were dissatisfied with the dominant trend of abstraction. Instead, they desired to create art that more accurately captured modern life and criticized the post war culture of consumption. The group emphasized the use of ready-made consumer objects in their art, and therefore expelled Raysse from the group when he took up painting on canvas in 1961. Raysse’s new approach, which he called the “hygiene of vision,” still incorporated real-life objects, as well as photo-silkscreens and bright neon-colored paint. He also employed images of fashion models taken from ads and magazines, making archetypal goddesses of the commercial realm the focus of his art. Yet his work from this period can be characterized by its darker tone- his subjects portrayed as wartime refugees, victims of the age of materialism, contrary to the concurrent Pop movement which alternatively celebrated this culture. $5,000-8,000 Illustrated opposite page

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MANY OF MY BEST SuBJECTS HAVE rESulTED FrOM lOOKING BACK ON PAST JOurNEYS. —SIr SIDNEY NOlAN

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SIr SIDNEY NOlAN lots 33-44 An important and influential Australian modernist artist, Sir Sidney Nolan is best-known for his richly colored paintings of the mythology and history of Australian bush life and folklore. Although he studied at the National Gallery of Victoria’s School of Art in the mid-1930s, he was also self-taught, pouring over books about modern European artists such as Paul Cézanne, Paul Klee, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and the Surrealists. He became affiliated with a group of artists known as the Angry Penguins, including Arthur Boyd, Albert Tucker and Joy Hester, who sought to modernize Australian literature, poetry and art through processes and ideas used by the European Surrealists. He was also heavily impacted by the poetry of rimbaud and rilke, and his affinity for literature is evident in his paintings. Nolan’s first solo show occurred in Melbourne in 1940. During that time, he also designed costumes and sets for the Ballets russes, and became a founding member of the Contemporary Art Society. It was also in the 1940s that Nolan painted his famous series inspired by the life of Australian outlaw and bushranger Ned Kelly and the Kelly Gang. Nolan chose to depict Kelly’s armor, and helmet in particular, in a dark square form, which has become an iconic symbol within his oeuvre. Sidney Nolan 1964 by Axel Poignant (1906-1986), gelatin silver photograph, Collection: National Portrait Gallery, Canberra, Purchased 2003

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In 1942 he was drafted to the army, and began working on a series of paintings of the landscape. He later deserted the military in 1944, and continued travelling around north western Victoria and other territories painting the country’s interior. During the early to mid-1950s, Nolan moved to England and traveled throughout Europe. In 1958 he relocated to the united States, where he met American poet robert lowell, for whom he illustrated a number of books. While his wanderlust was strong and kept him traveling to different continents including Africa and Asia, his Australian roots called to him often, and he continued to return to his native country each year. Nolan’s painting style had many influences and inspirations, and often blurred lines between expressionism, representation and abstraction, and the real and surreal. His work has been exhibited in Australia, including retrospectives in 1967, 1987, and 1992, as well as in london in 1957 and Dublin in 1973. In 1974 Nolan donated 24 of his works to the Australian public, held as the Nolan Gallery’s Foundation Collection at the Canberra Museum and Gallery. Major exhibitions for his works have been held in Europe and the united States. He was knighted in 1981 and awarded the Order of Merit in 1983, amongst other accolades. Along with fellow Australian artist Brett Whitely, Nolan frequented the Chelsea Hotel.


© Sidney Nolan Trust

33 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) NEW GUINEA MAN Signed with initial bottom right, signed, inscribed “NG’ and dated ‘12-Dec-1965’ verso, oil on canvas. 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $25,000-40,000

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

34 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) INLAND TOWN, CENTRAL AUSTRALIA Oil on canvas. 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $25,000-40,000

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

35 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) CENTRAL AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPE WITH TREES Signed bottom right, inscribed with artist’s name and dated 1969 verso, textile dyes and inks on card. 20 7/16 x 29 15/16 in. (51.9 x 76cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $3,000-5,000

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

36 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) CENTRAL AUSTRALIAN LANDSCAPE Signed bottom right, inscribed with artist’s name and dated 1969 verso, textile dyes and inks on card. 29 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (75.9 x 52.1cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $3,000-5,000

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

37 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) LANDSCAPE (ANTARCTICA) Signed bottom right, textile dyes and inks on card. Executed in 1964. 20 9/16 x 25 in. (52.1 x 63.4cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,500-4,000

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

38 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) “LANDSCAPE” (ANTARCTICA STUDY) Titled verso, textiles dyes and inks on card. Executed in 1964. 20 9/16 x 24 15/16 in. (52.1 x 63.3cm) provenance: Marlborough-Gerson Gallery Inc., New York, New York. Stanley Bard. $2,500-4,000

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39 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) LANDSCAPE WITH FLOWERS Textile dyes and inks on card. 25 x 20 9/16 in. (63.5 x 52.2cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,500-4,000

58 © Sidney Nolan Trust


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40 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) “LEDA” Signed bottom left, signed again, dated twice ‘Dec 2, 1961’ and titled verso, textile dyes and inks on card. 25 x 20 9/16 in. (63.4 x 52.1cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,000-3,000

© Sidney Nolan Trust

41 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) “LANDSCAPE” (ANTARCTICA LANDSCAPE WITH RAIN) Signed bottom right and inscribed ‘landscape’ verso, textile dyes and inks on card. Executed in 1964. 25 1/16 x 20 1/2 in. (63.7 x 52.1cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,500-4,000

© Sidney Nolan Trust

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

42 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) UNTITLED (RIVERBEND) Signed with initial and dated 1966 bottom right, oil on canvas. 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $30,000-50,000

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

43 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) UNTITLED (RIVERBEND) Signed indistinctly and dated 1966 bottom right, oil on canvas. 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $25,000-40,000

note: The two present lots are very closely related to Nolan’s important series of paintings Riverbend I and II. They are more specifically aligned with the second of the two series, which he painted in 1965-66 and which is comprised of nine paintings. When arranged sequentially, these nine individual works of art measure 11 meters in length. This expansive series features the lush and majestic river landscape of the Goulburn Valley, inspired by Nolan’s memories of the terrain where he spent a portion of his early childhood. Interspersed amongst the crowded trees and wild bush of the Riverbend II paintings are the figures of legendary bushranger Ned Kelly, and the police who are pursuing him. This is one of Nolan’s most iconic themes, which dominated his imagination throughout the course of his career.

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© Sidney Nolan Trust

44 SIR SIDNEY NOLAN (australian, 1917-1992) UNTITLED (GALLIPOLI) Signed with an initial bottom left, signed and dated ‘29 Dec 58’ verso, polyvinyl acetate and mixed media on canvas. 48 x 60 in. (121.9 x 152.4cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $20,000-30,000

note: On April 25, 1915, thousands of soldiers stormed the shores of the Gallipoli Peninsula as part of a campaign by the Allied Forces to capture the Turkish city of Constantinople (now Istanbul), the capital of the Ottoman Empire. For eight long and difficult months, Allied troops from Britain, France, Australia and New Zealand fought and died as part of the Gallipoli Campaign. Out of this crucible was forged a new sense of Australian national identity. To this day, April 25 is observed as a day of remembrance known as ANZAC (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) Day, in which Australians honor their countrymen and women who fought on behalf of their nation and specifically those whose lives were lost at Gallipoli. It is little wonder that Sidney Nolan was drawn to Gallipoli as subject. In many ways, Nolan was a myth maker, favoring stories of national resonance. He first began his exploration of Gallipoli in the 1950s, while spending several months on the Greek island of Hydra with Australian authors George Johnston and Charmian Clift. While there, the artist became immersed in classical studies and, at Johnston’s urging, met Alan Morehead, a journalist who had written on the similarities between the battle for ancient Troy and the conflicts at Gallipoli. Nolan, who was studying Homer’s The Iliad at the time, was particularly struck by the comparison. He embarked upon a body of work that explored the connections between the legendary ancient war and the painfully real fight of the recent past. The resulting Gallipoli paintings, like the present example, are profound examples of the artist’s unique ability to convey specific historic events in a timeless visual language. As Johnston recalled, “in images separated by the width of the world and 3000 years of time, [Nolan] sensed a parallel, indeed a mutual poetry concerned with human struggle.”

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BArrY FlANAGAN lots 45 & 46 Welsh sculptor Barry Flanagan created revolutionary and avant-garde works, while most often using the traditional medium of bronze. Best known for his sculptures of hares, he stated in 2006 to the director of london’s Serpentine Gallery, “I enjoy the third dimension and appreciate material in time and space. I find it exciting to the eyes.” His oeuvre is certainly exciting to behold. From the experimental and precocious soft sculptures of his early career in the mid-1960s, to his vibrant and frequently massive sculptures of hares and other animals, which he began executing in the 1980s, Flanagan imbues the quotidian with the whimsical and the fantastic. The subject of the hare allowed the artist not only to capitalize on its anatomical structure—both flexible and elongated—but also on the personified characteristics of the animal from folklore and stories. His fond memory of watching a hare running and leaping on Sussex Downs was his first inspiration to use the creature as a repeated motif. However, there is deeper meaning behind it, as many cultures see the hare as a symbol of life, immortality, and a representation of human existence and our relationship to the animal kingdom. Many times his bronze hares, and other animals such as horses, achieve the appearance of an abstract, fluid line, hovering between abstraction and figuration. He was greatly influenced by the 1979 exhibition “The Horses of San Marco” at the royal Academy of Arts in london, where the ancient horses on display impacted his approach to sculpture and helped shape his interest in the methods of representing the animal and exploring man’s particular affinity and connection with it. Born in 1941 in North Wales, Flanagan studied sculpture and architecture at Birmingham College in the late 1950s, subsequently attending St. Martin’s School of Art in london from 1964 to 1966. His first solo show was held in london at the rowan Gallery in 1966, and he continued thereafter to exhibit in both group and solo exhibitions in Britain and abroad. He was chosen to represent Britain in the 1982 Venice Biennale, and a major retrospective of his works was held in Madrid, Spain, which also toured to Nantes, France in 1993-1994. Subsequent major exhibitions have been held in Germany and France in 2002, and Dublin, Ireland in 2006. The artist simultaneously maintained several apartments and studios around the world in cities such as Paris, london, Amsterdam, and New York, at the Chelsea Hotel.

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45 BARRY FLANAGAN (welsh, 1941-2009) “SMALL HORSE” With the Tallix Foundry, New York mark and incised ‘333663’ twice on the underside. Conceived in 1986. Bronze with brown patina. The present work is one of five unnumbered artist’s casts. The regular edition was 9. height: 14 in. (35.6cm) width: 17 1/2 in. (44.5cm) depth: 4 1/2 in. (11.4cm) provenance: Stanley Bard.

exhibited: “Barry Flanagan: Plastik und Zeichnung Sculpture and Drawing,” traveling exhibition: Kunsthalle Recklinghausen, Germany, May 5 - July 14, 2002; Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice, France, December 6, 2002 - May 25, 2003, catalogue no. 15 (another cast exhibited). note: We are grateful to the Estate of Barry Flanagan and to Waddington Custot for their assistance in researching this work. $20,000-30,000

ONE MErElY CAuSES THINGS TO rEVEAl THEMSElVES TO THE SCulPTurAl AWArENESS. IT IS THE AWArENESS THAT DEVElOPS, NOT THE AGENTS OF THE SCulPTurAl PHENOMENA. —BArrY FlANAGAN 46 BARRY FLANAGAN (welsh, 1941-2009) “JACKASS AND ELEPHANT” Inscribed with the artist’s initial ‘f’ and with the Pietrasanta Fine Arts, New York Foundry mark. Bronze with black patina. Conceived in 1995. The present example is one of two unnumbered artist’s casts. The regular edition was 8. height: 80 in. (203.2cm) width: 44 in. (111.8cm) depth: 23 1/2 in. (59.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard.

exhibited: “Barry Flanagan,” Grant Park, Chicago, Illinois, May 3 - September 30, 1996 (another cast exhibited). ”Barry Flanagan: Sculpture,” Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago, Illinois, April 17 - May 30, 1998 (another cast exhibited). “Barry Flanagan: Sculptures and Ceramics,” Galerie von Bartha, Basel, Switzerland, May 28 - June 26, 1998 (another cast exhibited). “Barry Flanagan,” traveling exhibition: Waddington Galleries, London, U.K., September 16 - October 10, 1998; The Economist Plaza, London, U.K., September 7 - October 17, 1998, catalogue no. 25 (another cast exhibited). “Barry Flanagan: Plastik und Zeichnung - Sculpture and Drawing,” traveling exhibition: Kunsthalle Recklinghausen, Germany, May 5 - July 14, 2002; Musée d’Art Moderne et d’Art Contemporain, Nice, France, December 6, 2002 - May 25, 2003, catalogue no. 15 (another cast exhibited). “Noah’s Ark,” National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, Canada, June 12 - October 3, 2004 (another cast exhibited). note: We are grateful to the Estate of Barry Flanagan and to Waddington Custot for their assistance in researching this work. $150,000-250,000 Illustrated opposite page

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47 FRANCESCO CLEMENTE (italian, b. 1952) UNTITLED THE COMPLETE SET OF 5 ETCHINGS 1987, each pencil signed and numbered 48/50 (there were also 10 artist’s proofs), with full margins, Raymond Foye Editions, the Chelsea Hotel, New York, publisher. The complete set of 5 etchings on hand-made paper. images: 15 1/2 x 15 1/2 in. (39.4 x 39.4cm) sheets: 25 x 20 in. (63.5 x 50.8cm) (5) provenance: Stanley Bard. $4,000-6,000

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48 FRANCESCO CLEMENTE (italian, b. 1952) GEOGRAPHY THE COMPLETE SET OF 4 ETCHINGS 1992, each pencil signed and annotated ‘AP X/XV’ (artist’s proofs, aside from the regular edition of 60), with full margins, Lococo Fine Arts, St. Louis, Missouri, publisher. The complete set of four color etchings on wove paper.

images: 19 x 17 3/4 in. (48.3 x 45.1cm) sheets: 28 1/8 x 24 11/16 in. (71.4 x 62.7cm) (4) including: “NORTH,” “SOUTH,” “EAST,” and “WEST.” provenance: Stanley Bard. $3,000-5,000

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49 DAVID HOCKNEY (british, b. 1937) “POOL MADE WITH PAPER AND BLUE INK FOR BOOK” 1980, pencil signed and dated, inscribed ‘special proof for Raymond with love xx’ (an unnumbered proof aside from the edition of 1000, there were also 100 artist’s proofs), the full sheet, Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Mount Kisco, New York, publisher and with their blindstamp. Color lithograph on wove paper. sheet: 10 7/16 x 8 15/16 in. (26.5 x 22.7cm) [M.C.A. Tokyo, 234; Tyler Museum of Contemporary Art, 269] provenance: Stanley Bard. $8,000-12,000

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50 DAVID HOCKNEY (british, b. 1937) “GREEN BORA BORA” 1979, pencil signed and dated, numbered 26/50 (there were also 14 artist’s proofs), the full sheet, Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Mount Kisco, New York, publisher and with their blindstamp. Color lithograph on wove paper. sheet: 35 x 41 3/4 in. (88.8 x 106cm) [M.C.A. Tokyo, 214; Tyler Museum of Contemporary Art, 257] provenance: Stanley Bard. $5,000-8,000

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51 SANDRO CHIA (italian, b. 1946) MALE NUDES Signed and dated 85 bottom right, colored pencil and watercolor on paper. 13 9/16 x 9 9/16 in. (34.5 x 24.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,500-2,500

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52 SANDRO CHIA (italian, b. 1946) FATHER AND SON 1980, pencil signed and dated, annotated ‘C.T.P.’ (a color trial proof, aside from the edition of unknown size), the full sheet. Color etching and aquatint on heavy wove paper. sheet: 19 1/4 x 16 3/8 in. (48.9 x 41.6cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $300-500

53 SANDRO CHIA (italian, b. 1946) UNTITLED (TWO FIGURES WITH DOG) 1984, pencil signed and dated, numbered 11/15, the full sheet and with the artist’s blindstamp. Etching and aquatint on Fabriano. image: 19 3/4 x 17 9/16 in. (50.2 x 44.6cm) sheet: 39 x 27 1/2 in. (99.1 x 69.8cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $200-300

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DAVID rEMFrY lots 54-57 WHEN I ArrIVED AT THE HOTEl WITH MY PArTNEr CArOlINE IN 1995 WE MET WITH STANlEY WHO INTErVIEWED uS AND ASKED ABOuT MY WOrK — HOW MuCH MY PAINTINGS SOlD FOr AND HOW MANY I PAINTED IN A YEAr. HE THEN ANNOuNCED THAT HE HAD JuST THE rOOM FOr uS AND TOOK uS TO 1015, WHICH HAD JuST BEEN rENOVATED AND WHErE JOSE WAS STAPlING THE CurTAINS TO THE WINDOW FrAMES. AlTHOuGH WE lIVED IN 1015 TO STArT WITH, IT lATEr BECAME MY STuDIO AND WE MOVED TO AN APArTMENT ACrOSS THE COrrIDOr. STANlEY AllOWED uS TO FlOurISH IN NEW YOrK. WE HAD THE BEST OF TIMES THErE. FOr ABOuT A YEAr STANlEY AND PHYllIS WOulD COME TO MY STuDIO, 1015 AT THE HOTEl CHElSEA ON FrIDAY MOrNINGS. THEY lIKED lATIN AMErICAN MuSIC AND FrANK SINATrA AND WOulD DANCE TOGETHEr WHIlST I DrEW THEM. I WANTED TO CAPTurE THE CONNECTION THEY HAD AS THEY lOST THEMSElVES IN THE MuSIC — THEY WErE AlMOST OBlIVIOuS OF ME. STANlEY WAS SIMPlY A WONDErFul MAN AND IS DEArlY MISSED. —DAVID rEMFrY

Image courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller

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54 DAVID REMFRY (british, b. 1942) DANCERS (MR. AND MRS. STANLEY BARD) Signed, dated 2000 bottom right and inscribed ‘H8’ bottom left, watercolor and graphite on paper. 26 x 20 in. (66 x 50.8cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. literature: E. Lucie-Smith, et al., David Remfry: Dancers, Boca Raton Museum of Art, 2006, exhibition catalogue no. 51. $1,000-2,000

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55 DAVID REMFRY (british, b. 1942) DANCERS (MR. AND MRS. STANLEY BARD) Signed, dated 2001, located ‘NY’ and indistinctly numbered top left, watercolor and pencil on paper. 60 x 26 1/2 in. (152.4 x 67.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,000-2,000

56 DAVID REMFRY (british, b. 1942) DANCERS (MR. AND MRS. STANLEY BARD) Signed and dated 2000 bottom right, dated again and inscribed ‘#28’ top left, watercolor and pencil on paper. 59 1/2 x 20 in. (151.1 x 50.8cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,000-2,000

57 DAVID REMFRY (british, b. 1942) DANCERS (MR. AND MRS. STANLEY BARD) Signed and dated 2001-2 and located ‘NY’ bottom right, inscribed ‘#44’ top left, watercolor and pencil on paper. 60 x 26 1/2 in. (151.1 x 67.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $1,000-2,000

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PHIlIP TAAFFE lot 58 Born in New Jersey in 1955, Philip Taaffe received his Bachelor of Fine Art from the Cooper union in New York in 1977 and had his first solo exhibition in New York City in 1982. Taaffe’s work is characterized by elements of Op Art and collage, with inspiration drawn from artists such as Bridget riley. He has traveled extensively throughout his career to the Middle East, India, and South America. He also lived and worked in Naples, Italy during the late 1980s and into the early 1990s. The experiences of his travels, including cultural, social and artistic encounters, have deeply impacted the style and content of his oeuvre. In a 2009 interview with fellow artist and friend Diego Cortez, Taaffe mentioned some of the considerations and concerns present within his paintings, including but not limited to, “the history of the decorative, patterns of cultural migration, Islamic art and design, Byzantine architecture, the annals of natural history, as well as contemporary painting.” The combination of these elements and influences create a unique and arresting body of work.

Taaffe’s artwork has been featured in many national and international exhibitions at venues such as the Carnegie International, two Sydney Biennials and three Whitney Biennials. It is also part of several public and museum collections, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the reina Sofia in Madrid, Spain. The IVAM Museum in Valencia exhibited a retrospective of Taaffe’s work in 2000, and another retrospective for the artist was held in 2008 at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg. Taaffe has lived in the Chelsea Hotel since 1991, and is a continuous resident there.

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58 PHILIP TAAFFE (american, b. 1955) UNTITLED Signed and dated 1991-2000 verso, mixed media on canvas. 78 3/8 x 39 3/8 in. (199 x 100cm) Unframed provenance: Stanley Bard. note: We are grateful to the studio of Philip Taaffe for its assistance in researching this work. $20,000-30,000

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I BElIEVE THAT ANY ArT COMMuNICATES WHAT YOu’rE IN THE MOOD TO rECEIVE —lArrY rIVErS

lArrY rIVErS lots 59 & 60 Born in New York in 1923 and originally named Yitzroch loiza Grossberg, larry rivers started out as a jazz saxophonist in the 1940s. During this time he changed his name while playing in clubs and bars as “larry rivers and the Mudcats.” After enlisting in the military and being honorably discharged for medical reasons in 1942, he went on to study at Juilliard School of Music, meeting and befriending fellow musicians Charlie Parker and Miles Davis in 1944. Influenced and inspired by Cubism, and in particular a work by Georges Braque, rivers began to paint in the late 1940s. He enrolled and studied in Hans Hoffmann’s School of Fine Arts, had his first solo show in 1949 at The Jane Street Gallery in New York, and subsequently garnered his Bachelors of Arts from New York university in 1951. While it may be difficult to categorize rivers and his works under one genre, he is best known as an important American painter and Pop artist, in addition to being a sculptor, poet, Jazz musician, filmmaker, set designer, and teacher. His work is distinct and unique, with a strong

focus on himself as subject and object, and displays a stylistic connection between both Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art, while not completely embodying one or the other. In 1953 he completed his seminal work Washington Crossing the Delaware, (now owned by The Museum of Modern Art, New York) which he later described as a key factor in the creation and progression of his professional and artistic persona. rivers was a frequent presence at the Chelsea Hotel. A major figure in the creative and cultural community of New York City, rivers had many close friends at the hotel and collaborated on his autobiography with longtime Chelsea resident Arnold Weinstein. Indeed, his connection to the hotel was a family affair, as his son was a resident there for a time. rivers enjoyed the spirit and energy of the Chelsea, which was embodied by its many residents, both permanent and transient. Of course, no one personified the soul of the hotel more than Stanley Bard, whom rivers counted as a close friend, stopping into the Chelsea nearly every day to visit with its maestro.

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79 Susan Wood/Getty Images


59 LARRY RIVERS (american, 1923-2002) “ART AND THE ARTIST: PORTRAIT AND PAINTING OF ARSHILE GORKY” Signed and dated 91 bottom right, oil on canvas mounted to shaped and sculpted foam board collaged to canvas mounted to panel. 57 1/4 x 70 3/4 x 3 1/2 in. (145.4 x 179.7 x 8.9cm) Unframed provenance: Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York. Stanley Bard. exhibited: “Larry Rivers: Art and the Artist,” Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., May 18- July 22, 2002, checklist no. 64. note: This work is registered with the Larry Rivers Foundation under reference number 3559. $20,000-30,000

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60 LARRY RIVERS (american, 1923-2002) “MAXINE” Signed and dated ‘59 top center right, titled bottom right, pencil and crayon on paper. 14 x 16 9/16 in. (35.5 x 42cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. note: Maxine Groffsky, an editor of “Paris Review,” was the artist’s girlfriend at the time this drawing was made. $1,500-2,500

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61 ROY CARRUTHERS (south african, 1938-2013) UNTITLED (FIVE FIGURES AT A DESK) Pencil signed and annotated ‘A.P.’ (an artist’s proof aside from the regular edition of unknown size), the full sheet, Editions Press, San Francisco, publisher and with their blindstamp. Color lithograph on BFK Rives. sheet: 42 1/2 x 29 in. (108 x 73.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $300-500

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62 ROY CARRUTHERS (south african, 1938-2013) UNTITLED (#127) Signed and dated 1983-86 verso, oil on canvas. 78 3/4 x 66 1/4 in. (200 x 168.3cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $6,000-10,000

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TOM WESSElMANN lots 63 & 64 Tom Wesselmann’s visual lexicon is one of the most iconic and instantly recognizable of any artist working in the twentieth century. A leading figure in the American Pop Art movement, he rose to prominence in the 1960s, working in a style that uniquely blended contemporary images and pop culture with classical representation. The artist explored iconic subjects like the female nude, the landscape and the still life in new and innovative ways. The resulting paintings were boldly-colored, often erotically-charged, and always assertive. Perhaps the best known of these are his paintings from the Great American Nude series of the early 1960s, in which the female nude is portrayed in intense, bright (often patriotic) colors and exaggerated flattened forms. The images created in these, and other similar works, have come to be synonymous with Wesselmann’s name and style. Face #1 is an impressively sized oil on shaped canvas, executed in 1966, a rich and seminal period of the artist’s career. During this time, the artist focused his interest on the nude even more specifically, moving away from a complete representation of the figure and concentrating on specific, highly sexualized elements of the female form, such as the mouth and breast. Wesselmann’s decision to use shaped canvases to portray these forms gave these paintings a sculptural quality, which — in turn — imbued them with a particularly active energy that served to heighten their bold sensuality. Face #1 is an excellent example of the artist’s work of this period. The woman’s face is only partially shown, the artist choosing to emphasize her mouth, with her bright red lips erotically parted and painted with fetishistic focus against a highly sexualized cut-out relief. The painting calls to mind

leonard Cohen’s famous 1974 song, “Chelsea Hotel No. 2”, in which Cohen reminisces about a sexual encounter he shared with Janis Joplin at the hotel years earlier. In October 2016, the Almine rech Gallery held an important exhibition of Wesselman’s work, inspired by the artist’s seminal show at the Sidney Janis Gallery in 1970. The 2016 exhibition debuted the restaging of Wesselmann’s key performance piece Bedroom Tit Box in Paris for the first time, and included many works from the same series as Face #1. like so many artists of the time, Wesselmann was drawn to the creative haven of the Chelsea Hotel, and found friendship with Stanley Bard. His fondness for Stanley is clear from the dedication on Face #1, which is inscribed on the stretcher bar verso, “For Stanley with affection — Tom Wesselmann.” 63 TOM WESSELMANN (american, 1931-2004) “FACE #1” Signed and dated 66 on the bottom exterior edge of the canvas, signed again, titled, dated, dedicated ‘For Stanley with Affection - Tom Wesselmann,’ and inscribed ‘Collection Stanley Bard’ on stretcher bar verso, oil on shaped canvas. 72 1/4 x 66 in. (183.5 x 167.6cm) Unframed provenance: The Artist, New York, New York. Stanley Bard. (Longtime tenant and art dealer Richard Librizzi facilitated the sale of this work to Stanley Bard from Tom Wesselmann). And with a Sidney Janis Gallery New York label verso. note: We are grateful to the Estate of Tom Wesselmann for its assistance in cataloguing this work. $600,000-800,000 Illustrated opposite page

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I rEMEMBEr YOu WEll IN THE CHElSEA HOTEl... —lEONArD COHEN

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THE CHAllENGE FOr AN ArTIST IS AlWAYS TO FIND YOur OWN WAY OF DOING SOMETHING. —TOM WESSElMANN

Image courtesy of HW Gallery

64 TOM WESSELMANN (american, 1931-2004) “STUDY FOR BLUE NUDE #14” Signed and dated 00, inscribed with the artist’s name, title and date on the canvas overhang verso, oil on canvas. Executed in 2000. 18 1/4 x 15 in. (46.4 x 38.1cm) provenance: The Estate of Tom Wesselmann, New York, New York. Connaught Brown Gallery, London, United Kingdom (acquired directly from the above). Stanley Bard.

note: We are grateful to the Estate of Tom Wesselmann for its assistance in cataloguing this work. $50,000-80,000 Illustrated opposite page

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THE MOST BElOVED—AND ENIGMATIC— CHArA C T E r E V Er TO G rACE THE H A l l S OF THE CHElSEA IS, OF COurSE, Our IlluSTrIOuS PrOPrIETOr, STANlEY BArD. —ED HAMIlTON 91 Image courtesy of the Bard Family


65 ROY LICHTENSTEIN (american, 1923-1997) “RED AND YELLOW APPLE” from “seven apple woodcuts series” 1983, pencil signed and dated, numbered ‘color trial proof 3/4’ (aside from the regular edition of 60, there were also 14 artist’s proofs), with full margins, Petersburg Press, Inc., London and New York, publisher. Color woodcut on handmade Iwano Kizuki Hosho paper. image: 22 3/4 x 30 1/2 in. (57.8 x 77.5cm) sheet (irregular): 29 1/4 x 37 1/2 in. (74.3 x 95.3cm) [Corlett, 195] provenance: Stanley Bard. note: The regular edition of 60 included grey-brown and a darker blue. $6,000-10,000

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66 ROBERT MOTHERWELL (american, 1915-1991) “THE PERSIAN II” 1985, pencil signed and dedicated ‘for Arnold Weinstein in friendship,’ annotated ‘unique working proof’ (one of four trial proofs aside from the regular edition of 70 plus 10 artist’s proofs in Roman numerals), with wide margins, the artist and Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Bedford Village, New York, publishers. Etching and aquatint on wove paper (E&B call for Whatman). image: 19 3/4 x 15 3/4 in. (50.1 x 40cm) sheet: 29 15/16 x 20 in. (76.1 x 50.8cm) [Engberg & Banach, 353; Belknap, 323]

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provenance: Stanley Bard. note: Arnold Weinstein was a poet and playwright who lived at the Chelsea Hotel for thirty years. In the 1950s and 60s, he kept company with the thriving creative community of downtown Manhattan. One of Weinstein’s most wellknown operas, written as a collaboration with composer William Bolcom, was A View from the Bridge, which was based on the play by fellow Chelsea resident Arthur Miller. Additionally, along with Larry Rivers, Weinstein co-wrote What Did I Do: The Unauthorized Autobiography of the artist. $2,000-3,000


67 DON OLSEN (american, 1910-1985) UNTITLED (COLLAGE) Signed bottom left, signed again and dedicated ‘For my dear friend Stanley Bard who made my stay at the Chelsea so wonderful’ verso, mixed media collage on paper. 17 15/16 x 23 1/2 in. (45.6 x 59.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $300-500

68 CESARE PEVERELLI (italian, 1922-2000) UNTITLED Signed and dated 66 bottom right, oil on canvas. 28 x 24 in. (71 x 61cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $400-600

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69 DIEGO RIVERA (mexican, 1886-1957) “SELF PORTRAIT” 1930, pencil signed and indistinctly inscribed (a proof aside from the numbered edition of 100), with wide margins, Weyhe Gallery, New York, publisher. Lithograph on wove paper. image: 15 13/16 x 10 15/16 in. (40.2 x 27.9cm) sheet: 18 3/8 x 13 3/4 in. (46.7 x 34.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,000-3,000

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70 CHIEKO KAWASAKI (b. 1942) “PLAYING CHILDREN” Pencil signed, titled and numbered 3/5, inscribed on support verso ‘Dedicated to Hotel Chelsea from Chieko Kawasaki.’ Etching and aquatint on BFK Rives. image: 9 11/16 x 6 7/8 in. (24.6 x 17.4cm) sheet: 14 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. (37.5 x 23.5cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $200-300

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71 ERNEST CRICHLOW (american, 1914-2005) UNTITLED Signed and dated 67 bottom right, oil on canvas. 24 x 50 in. (60.8 x 126.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $2,000-3,000

72 RENÉ (BRO) BRAULT (french, 1930-1987) “DERNIER PAYSAGE PEINT À HOUSTON” Signed center right, signed again, titled, inscribed ‘No 58’ and located and dated ‘Houston, Texas, Janvier 1972’ verso, oil on canvas. 24 x 28 3/4 in. (61 x 73cm) Unframed provenance: Stanley Bard. $600-1,000

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73 JOHN HULTBERG (american, 1922-2005) “GREEN NIGHT DESTRUCTION” Signed and dated 1963 (in another hand has been added -7, implying a total working date of 1963-1967), also inscribed with the title verso, oil on canvas. 40 x 59 in. (101.6 x 149.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $600-1,000

74 JOHN HULTBERG (american, 1922-2005) UNTITLED Signed and dated 1961 verso, oil on canvas. 39 x 50 in. (99.1 x 127cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $400-600

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75 GASTON ORELLANA (20th century) “EL MEDICO MODERNO” Signed and dated 78 upper left, dated again and titled on the stretcher verso, oil on canvas. 50 x 38 in. (127 x 96.5cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $600-1,000

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76 20TH CENTURY SCHOOL UNTITLED four paintings Each indistinctly signed and dated 1967 bottom center or bottom right, each indistinctly signed and dated verso, oil on canvas. three: 20 x 18 in. (50.7 x 45.7cm); one: 19 x 18 in. (48.3 x 45.7cm) (4) provenance: Stanley Bard. $800-1,200 Illustrated opposite page

77 AIKO MIYAWAKI (Japanese, 1929-2014) “MIRAGE 3” Signed twice (once in Japanese), titled, dated and located ‘1964 France’ verso, oil, marble dust and mixed media on panel. 21 1/2 x 21 1/2 in. (54.6 x 54.6cm) provenance: Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, New York. Stanley Bard. $600-1,000

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78 TOTO MEYLON (swiss, 1917-1997) UNTITLED (LEGS) Bronze with brown patina. height: 54 in. (1372.cm) width: 7 3/4 in. (19.7cm) depth: 7 1/2 in. (19.1cm) provenance: Galerie Iris Clert, Paris, France. Stanley Bard. $500-800

79 MAX PAPART (french, 1911-1994) UNTITLED (2:R) Pencil signed and numbered 59/60. Etching and aquatint with carborundum on heavy wove paper. sheet: 19 3/4 x 25 3/8 in. (50.2 x 64.5cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $500-700

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80 SIMON AVISSAR (israeli, b. 1938) UNTITLED Signed bottom right, oil on canvas. 28 x 23 in. (71 x 58.4cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $200-300

81 SIMON AVISSAR (israeli, b. 1938) UNTITLED (BIRD WITH PAINTING) Signed upper right, oil on canvas. 21 x 24 3/4 in. (53.3 x 62.8cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $200-300

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82 BERNARD CHILDS (american, 1910-1985) “K’UN - THE RECEPTIVE” from “images from the i ching or book of changes” Engraved and illuminated acrylic sculpture. Executed in 1969. height: 16 1/2 in. (41.9cm) width: 13 in. (33cm) depth: 3 in. (7.6cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. exhibited: “Bernard Childs: Paintings / Prints / Images in Lights,” Storm King Art Center, Moutainville, New York, July 26, - October, 1969. $600-1,000

83 BERNARD CHILDS (american, 1910-1985) “THE FLOOD OF PAOÖ FISH FROM LALO-HONA” from “images from hawaiian legends” 1969, pencil signed, dated and titled, annotated ‘color trial proof’ (aside from the edition of 10), with full margins. Color etching/ collagraph on wove paper. image: 16 1/8 x 13 3/16 in. (41 x 33.5cm) sheet: 26 x 20 1/8 in. (66 x 51.1cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. exhibited: “Bernard Childs: Paintings / Prints / Images in Lights,” Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, New York, July 26 - October 31, 1969. $200-300

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84 BERNARD CHILDS (american, 1910-1985) “E=MC2” Signed and dated 68 bottom right, signed again, titled and dated on the canvas overhang verso and on the stretcher, oil on canvas. 44 3/4 x 57 1/4 in. (113.6 x 145.4cm) provenance: Stanely Bard. exhibited: “Bernard Childs: Paintings / Prints / Images in Lights,” Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, New York, July 26 - October 31, 1969. note: The present lot is one of six paintings commissioned by Robert Benayoun for his 1968 film “Paris n’existe pas.” $600-1,000

85 BERNARD CHILDS (american, 1910-1985) “JACOB” Signed and dated 65 bottom right, signed again, titled and dated on the canvas overhang verso, oil and graphite on linen. 45 3/4 x 35 in. (116.2 x 88.9cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. exhibited: “Bernard Childs: Paintings / Prints / Images in Lights,” Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, New York, July 26 - October 31, 1969. $500-800

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86 IRVING KRAUT MANOIR (american, 1891-1982) UNTITLED (ONE OF EUCLIDS ‘IMPOSSIBLES’: FOR 2500 YEARS NOT BEEN SOLVED UNTIL IRVING MANOIR DID IN 1921) Signed bottom right and dedicated ‘To my friend “Bard” at the “Chelsea,”‘ pastel, crayon and ink on paper. 14 5/8 x 13 1/4 in. (37.1 x 33.7cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $300-500

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87 GRACE PAILTHORPE (british, 1883-1971) UNTITLED (BIRD) Signed bottom left, dated ‘Dec. 4. 1945-6’ twice verso, watercolor on paper. 10 1/8 x 13 3/8 in. (25.7 x 34cm) provenance: Stanley Bard.

note: Grace Palithorpe was a British Surrealist painter who worked alongside fellow artist Reuben Mednikoff, who was — at once — her creative partner, lover and surrogate child figure. Indeed, Mednikoff referred to the dominant Palithorpe as his ‘Mother Flower’ and ultimately took her last name as his own. Together, the two shared a profound interest in psychoanalysis and saw their art as a means of exploring their subconscious, looking to one another’s work as both creative outlet and scientific experiment. So strong was her interest in this element of painting that, in 1939, Palithorpe published an essay on ‘The Scientific Aspects of Surrealism’ in the London Bulletin, the main source for Surrealist ideas in Britain at the time. Though not particularly well-known today, Palithorpe was an important figure in British Surrealism. When she and Mednikoff exhibited their works at the International Surrealist Exhibition in London in 1936, André Breton concluded that theirs were ‘the best and most truly Surrealist of the works’ on view. $500-800

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JOE ANDOE lot 88

Stanley Bard standing in the Chelsea Hotel lobby © Allan Tannenbaum / sohoblues.com

as horses and dogs, and images of alluring young women. His work has been featured in many gallery and museum exhibitions and can be found in numerous collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and the Detroit Institute of the Arts. Andoe wrote and published a memoir of his life and experiences entitled “Jubilee City: A Memoir at Full Speed” in 2008. He lived and worked in the Chelsea Hotel for some time, and a painting similar to lot 88 hung in the hotel’s lobby for several years.

Born in Tusla, Oklahoma, Joe Andoe has lived in New York for over twenty years, but still thinks fondly of his hometown and uses it as inspiration for his paintings. He enjoyed drawing from early childhood, but did not initially study art, nor foresee a career in fine art for himself. rather, Andoe’s adolescence was filled with alcohol, drugs, parties, and reckless activities. After enrolling as an agricultural business major at a community college, he found that an elective course in art history, where he became familiar with works by other male artists such as robert Smithson and Dennis Oppenheim, inspired him to pursue more art classes. He eventually received his Masters of Fine Art from the university of Oklahoma in 1981, and shortly thereafter moved to New York. Andoe’s pieces display a fairly limited color palette, often completed in shades of blacks and grays, and he often works by applying paint and then wiping it away. The effect is hazy, ghostly, and often melancholy, and his subjects recall his youth. Nostalgic and dreamy, his paintings invoke vintage 1960s cars in nocturnal landscapes, animals such

88 JOE ANDOE (american, b. 1955) UNTITLED (MARE AND FOAL) Signed bottom right, oil on linen. Executed in 2001. 46 x 36 in. (116.8 x 91.4cm) provenance: Stanley Bard. $6,000-10,000 Illustrated opposite page

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110 Image courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller


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N THE BASIS OF THE CArEFul CONSIDErATION OF THE HISTOrY, THE ArCHITECTurE AND OTHEr FEATurES OF THIS BuIlDING, THE lANDMArKS PrESErVATION COMMISSION FINDS THAT THE HOTEl CHElSEA HAS A SPECIAl CHArACTEr, SPECIAl HISTOrICAl AND AESTHETIC INTErEST AND VAluE AS PArT OF THE DEVElOPMENT, HErITAGE AND CulTurAl CHArACTErISTICS OF NEW YOrK CITY…THE lANDMArKS PrESErVATION COMMISSION DESIGNATES AS A lANDMArK THE HOTEl CHElSEA, 222 WEST 23rD STrEET, BOrOuGH OF MANHATTAN. —lANDMArKS PrESErVATION COMMISSION, MArCH 15, 1966 111


HE rEASON MANY IMPOrTANT PEOPlE HAVE STAYED IN THE BuIlDING IS THE BuIlDING ITSElF— HIGH CEIlINGS, THICK WAllS, AND GOOD, NOrTHErN lIGHT. A lOT OF GAllErIES, DEAlErS, AND ArTISTS uSE THE rOOMS FOr VIEWING ArT. SOuNDPrOOF WAllS PErMIT WrITErS AND MuSICIANS TO WOrK TOGETHEr. A rTISTS NEED T O F EEl GOOD I N THEIr ENVIrONMENT. I lEArNED THAT FrOM MY FATHEr, WHO GuIDED ME TO PrOVIDE A NurTurING ATMOSPHErE. WITH MY SON AND DAuGHTEr, I WOrKED TO CArrY THIS ON. —STANlEY BArD 112


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113 Image courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller


ArTIST INDEx BY lOT NuMBEr AFrOYIM, S.

31

AlECHINSKY, P.

22

ANDOE, J.

88

APPEl, K.

14

ArMAN

29

AVISSAr, S.

80, 81

BrAulT, r.

72

CArruTHErS, r.

61, 62

CHIA, S.

51-53

CHIlDS, B.

82-85

CHrISTO

30

ClEMENTE, F.

47, 48

COBrA SCHOOl

20

COrNEIllE

15, 16, 23, 24

CrICHlOW, E.

71

FlANAGAN, B.

45, 46

HOCKNEY, D.

49, 50

HulTBErG, J.

73, 74

KAWASAKI, C.

70

lE SIDANEr, H.

1

lICHTENSTEIN, r.

65

MAGrITTE, r.

3

MANOIr, I.K.

86

MATISSE, H.

2

MEYlON, T.

79

MIYAWAKI, A.

77

MOTHErWEll, r.

66

NOlAN, S.

33-44

OlSEN, D.

67

PAIlTHOrPE, G.

87

PAPArT, M.

78

PEDErSEN, C.H.

17-19, 21

PEVErEllI, C.

68

rAYSSE, M.

32

rEMFrY, D.

54-57

rIVErA, D.

69

rIVErS, l.

59, 60

SlOAN, J.

4-9

SOYEr, M.

10-13

TAAFFE, P.

58

TOBIASSE, T.

25-28

uNKNOWN ArTIST

75, 76

WESSElMANN, T.

63, 64

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SPECIAl THANKS & ACKNOWlEDGEMENTS We would like to extend our sincerest thanks and appreciation to the following for their assistance: linda and lothar Troeller, Joe langman, Sherill Tippins, the Tom Wesselmann Estate, Judith Childs, David remfry, Caroline Hansberry, raymond Foye, Philip Taaffe, the larry rivers Foundation, Catherine Faust-Tobiasse, the Estate of Barry Flanagan, Waddington Custot, the Arman Studio, The New York Historical Society, Michele Grabell and David Bard. Pages 12 & 13, 15

PHOTO CAPTIONS & CrEDITS Front cover: © 2017 Artists rights Society (ArS), New York / SOFAM, Brussels Fold-over flaps: Photograph by Bob Estremera Inside front & back covers: Chelsea Hotel by ross Abraham Frontispiece: Courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller Page 3: Joseph P. Day, 1912, © New York Historical Society Page 4: Chelsea Hotel on 23rd Street, Manhattan, New York, uSA (photo) / Marc Jackson / Design Pics / Bridgeman Images Pages 6 & 7: By PJ Pocock, courtesy of the Bard Family Page 9: Courtesy of the Bard Family Page 10: Courtesy of the Bard Family Page 11: Courtesy of the Bard Family Page 16: Philip Hubert, Corsa Hotel Collection #83112d, © New York Historical Society Page 18: Photograph by Bob Estremera Page 20: Self Portrait, 1896 (b/w photo), le Sidaner, Henri Eugene Augustin (1862-1939) / Private Collection / The Stapleton Collection / Bridgeman Images Page 24: Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images Page 46: Courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller Page 51: Sidney Nolan 1964 by Axel Poignant (1906-1986), gelatin silver photograph, Collection: National Portrait Gallery, Canberra, Purchased 2003 Page 72: Courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller Page 79: Susan Wood/Getty Images Page 89: hwgallery.com/index.php/contact Page 91: Courtesy of the Bard Family Page 108: © Allan Tannenbaum / sohoblues.com Page 110 & 111: Courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller Page 113: Courtesy of Photographer and Chelsea resident, linda Troeller Page 114-115: Courtesy of the Bard Family 115 Image courtesy of the Bard Family


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Crozier Fine Arts Catherine Erickson New York, NY 10011 212.741.2024 / Fax: 212.741.5513 shipping@crozierarts.com

‡ Shippers that can fulfill international deliveries

IMPOrTANT INFOrMATION FOr BuYErS Registration All potential buyers must register for the sale prior to placing a bid. Registration information may be submitted in person at our reception desk, by fax or through our website at www.freemansauction.com. We will require proof of identification and residence and may require a credit card and/or a bank reference. By registering for the sale, the buyer acknowledges that he or she has read, understood and accepted Freeman’s Terms and Conditions of Sale. Buyer’s Premium A Buyer’s Premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. The Buyer’s Premium shall be: 25% on the first $200,000 of the hammer price of each lot, 20% on the portion from $200,001 through $3,000,000, and 12% thereafter. Sales Tax All items in the catalogue are subject to the 8% Pennsylvania and Philadelphia sales tax. Dealers purchasing for resale must register their tax numbers on current PA forms. Forms should be submitted to our Client Services office on the second floor. Catalogue Descriptions All item descriptions, dimensions and estimates are provided for guidance only. It is the buyer’s responsibility to inspect all lots prior to bidding to ensure that the condition is to their satisfaction. If potential buyers are unable to inspect lots in person, our specialists will be happy to prepare detailed Condition Reports on individual lots as quickly as possible. These are for guidance only, and all lots will be sold “as is” as per our Terms and Conditions of Sale. Bidding At the sale Registered bidders will be assigned a bidder number and given a paddle for use at the sale. Once the first bid has been placed, the auctioneer asks for higher bids in increments determined by the auctioneer. To place your bid, simply raise your paddle until the auctioneer acknowledges you. The auctioneer will not mistake a random gesture for a bid. By phone A limited number of telephone lines are available for bidding by phone through a Freeman’s representative. Phone lines must be reserved in advance. Requests must be submitted no later than 24 hours prior to the scheduled start of the sale. In writing Bid forms are available in the sale room and at the back of the catalogue. These should be submitted in person, by mail or by fax no later than one hour prior to the scheduled start of the sale. The auctioneer will bid on your behalf up to the limit. On the internet A fully-illustrated catalogue is available on-line at www.freemansauction.com. Registered bidders may leave absentee bids through the website and will receive email confirmation of their bid. Freeman’s is not responsible for errors or failure to execute bids. Payment Payment is due within ten (10) working days of the sale. Lots purchased will not be released until we have received full payment. Payment may be made in cash, by check, money order, or debit card. Payments by check must clear the bank before goods will be released. Removal of Purchases Deliveries will not be made during the time of the sale unless otherwise indicated by the auctioneer. All items must be paid for and removed within ten (10) working days of the sale. Purchases not so removed may be turned over to a licensed warehouse at the expense and risk of the purchaser. Shipping and Packing Responsibility for packing, shipping and insurance shall be exclusively that of the purchaser. Upon request, Freeman’s will provide the purchaser with names of professional packers and shippers known to us. Endangered Species Lots marked * are manufactured in whole or in part of restricted materials that may include tortoiseshell, ivory, mother-of-pearl, coral, rhinoceros horn, whalebone or marine ivory. Such materials may require specific licenses, certificates, or CITES documentation for import, export, moving between states in the U.S., or resale. Obtaining these documents may require scientific, laboratory or other expert analysis, in order to establish which species or genus the material came from. Freeman’s is unable to provide this information, and the obligation is on the purchaser of a lot containing any of these materials to ensure that they are able to obtain all the necessary or required documents should they need to, prior to bidding on the lot. If proper documentation or licenses etc. cannot be obtained for a purchased lot, the purchaser will still be required to make an on time payment for the lot as per our standard terms and conditions. Freeman’s cataloguing of the lots marked with this symbol * represents the best of our opinion, and the absence of this symbol from any lot description does not form a warranty that the lot will be free from any licensing or certification restrictions.

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TErMS & CONDITIONS

All property offered and sold (“property”) through Samuel T. Freeman & Co, (“Freeman’s”) shall be offered and sold on the terms and conditions set forth below which constitutes the complete statement of the terms and conditions on which all property is offered for sale. By bidding at the auction, whether present in person or by agent, by written bid, telephone, internet or other means, the buyer agrees to be bound by these terms and conditions.

1 Unless otherwise indicated, all Property will be offered by Freeman’s as agent for the Consignor. 2 Freeman’s reserves the right to vary the terms of sale and any such variance shall become part of these Conditions of Sale. 3 Buyer acknowledges that it had the right to make a full inspection of all Property prior to sale to determine the condition, size, repair or restoration of any Property. Therefore, all property is sold “ASIS”. Freeman’s is acting solely as an auction broker, and unless otherwise stated, does not own the Property offered for sale and has made no independent investigation of the Property. Freeman’s makes no warranty of title, merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose, or any other warranty or representation regarding the description, genuineness, attribution, provenance or condition to the Property of any kind or nature with respect to the Property. 4 Freeman’s in its sole and exclusive discretion, reserves the right to withdraw any property, at any time, before the fall of the hammer. 5 Unless otherwise announced by the auctioneer at the time of sale, all bids are per lot as numbered in the printed catalogue. Freeman’s reserves the right to determine any and all matters regarding the order, precedence or appropriate increment of bids or the constitution of lots. 6 The highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer shall be the buyer. The auctioneer has the right to reject any bid, to advance the bidding at his absolute discretion and in the event of any dispute between bidders, the auctioneer shall have the sole and final discretion either to determine the successful bidder or to re- offer and resell the article in dispute. If any dispute arises after sale, the Freeman’s sale record shall be conclusive in all respects. 7 If the auctioneer determines that any opening or later bid or any advance bid is not commensurate with the value of the Property offered, he may reject the same and withdraw the Property from sale.

8 Upon the fall of the hammer, title to any offered lot or article will immediately pass to the highest bidder as determined in the exclusive discretion of the auctioneer, subject to compliance by the buyer with these Conditions of Sale. Buyer thereupon assumes full risk and responsibility of the property sold, agrees to sign any requested confirmation of purchase, and agrees to pay the full price, plus Buyer’s Premium, therefore or such part, upon such terms as Freeman’s may require. 9 No lot may be removed from Freeman’s premises until the buyer has paid in full the purchase price therefor including Buyer’s Premium or has satisfied such terms that Freeman’s, in its sole discretion, shall require. Subject to the foregoing, all Property shall be paid for and removed by the buyer at his/her expense within ten (10) days of sale and, if not so removed, may be sold by Freeman’s, or sent by Freeman’s to a public warehouse, at the sole risk and charge of the buyer(s), and Freeman’s may prohibit the buyer from participating, directly or indirectly, as a bidder or buyer in any future sale or sales. In addition to other remedies available to Freeman’s by law, Freeman’s reserves the right to impose a late charge of 1.5% per month of the total purchase price on any balance remaining ten (10) days after the day of sale. If Property is not removed by the buyer within ten (10) days, a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month from the tenth day after the sale until removal by the buyer shall be payable to Freeman’s by the buyer; Freeman’s shall charge 1.5% of the total purchase price per month for any property not so removed within 60 days after the sale. Freeman’s will not be responsible for any loss, damage, theft, or otherwise responsible for any goods left in Freeman’s possession after ten (10) days. If the foregoing conditions or any applicable provisions of law are not complied with, in addition to other remedies available to Freeman’s and the Consignor (including without limitation the right to hold the buyer(s) liable for the bid price) Freeman’s, at its option, may either cancel the sale, retaining as liquidated damages all payments made by the buyer(s), or resell the property. In such event, the buyer(s) shall remain liable for any deficiency

in the original purchase price and will also be responsible for all costs, including warehousing, the expense of the ultimate sale, and Freeman’s commission at its regular rates together with all related and incidental charges, including legal fees. Payment is a precondition to removal. Payment shall be by cash, certified check or similar bank draft, or any other method approved by Freeman’s. Checks will not be deemed to constitute payment until cleared. Any exceptions must be made upon Freeman’s written approval of credit prior to sale. In addition, a defaulting buyer will be deemed to have granted and assigned to Freeman’s, a continuing security interest of first priority in any property or money of, or owing to such buyer in Freeman’s possession, and Freeman’s may retain and apply such property or money as collateral security for the obligations due to Freeman’s. Freeman’s shall have all of the rights accorded a secured party under the Pennsylvania Uniform Commercial Code. 10 Unless the sale is advertised and announced as “without reserve”, each lot is offered subject to a reserve and Freeman’s may implement such reserves by bidding through its representatives on behalf of the Consignors. In certain instances, the Consignor may pay less than the standard commission rate where Freeman’s or its representative is a successful bidder on behalf of the Consignor. Where the Consignor is indebted to Freeman’s, Freeman’s may have an interest in the offered lots and the proceeds therefrom, other than the broker’s Commissions, and all sales are subject to any such interest. 11 No “buy” bids shall be accepted at any time for any purpose. 12 Any pre-sale bids must be submitted in writing to Freeman’s prior to commencement of the offer of the first lot of any sale. Freeman’s copy of any such bid shall conclusively be deemed to be the sole evidence of same, and while Freeman’s accepts these bids for the convenience of bidders not present at the auction, Freeman’s shall not be responsible for the failure to execute, or, to execute properly, any pre-sale bid.

13 A Buyer’s Premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. The Buyer’s Premium shall be: 25% on the first $200,000 of the hammer price of each lot, 20% on the portion from $200,001 through $3,000,000, and 12% thereafter. 14 Unless exempted by law from the payment thereof, the buyer will be required to pay any and all federal excise tax and any state and/or local sales taxes, including where deliveries are to be made outside the state where a sale is conducted, which may be subject to a corresponding or compensating tax in another state. 15 Freeman’s may, as a service to buyer, arrange to have purchased property posted and shipped at the buyer’s expense. Freeman’s is not responsible for any acts or omissions in packing or shipping of purchased lots whether or not such carrier is recommended by Freeman’s. Packing and handling of purchased lots is at the responsibility of the buyer and is at the entire risk of the buyer. 16 In no event shall any liability of Freeman’s to the buyer exceed the purchase price actually paid. 17 No claimed modification or amendment of this Agreement on the part of any party shall be deemed extant, enforceable or provable unless it is in writing that has been signed by the parties to this Agreement. No course of dealing and no delay or omission on the part of Freeman’s in exercising any right under this Agreement shall operate as a waiver of such right or any other right and waiver on any one or more occasions shall not be construed as a bar to or waiver of any right or remedy of Freeman’s on any future occasion. 18 These Conditions of Sale and the buyer’s, the Consignor’s and Freeman’s rights under these Conditions of Sale shall be governed by, construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and Consignor and Buyer agree to the exclusive jurisdiction of the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas and the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

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bidding & registration form sale no

bidder no

name

1808 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia PA 19103 Tel-215.563.9275 Fax-215.599.2240 e-mail: bids@freemansauction.com www.freemansauction.com

client no

business name

address city

state

zip code

e-mail

phone (primary)

phone (secondary)

country

fax

resale / tax identification

state

A Buyer’s Premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price. The Buyer’s Premium shall be: 25% on the first $200,000 of hammer price of each lot, 20% on the hammer from $200,001 through $3,000,000, and 12% thereafter. All lots must be paid for and removed within 10 days.

lot no

description

maximum bid

please adhere to the bidding increments $10 until $200 is reached $25 until $500 is reached $50 until $1,000 is reached $100 until $3,000 is reached $250 until $5,000 is reached $500 until $10,000 is reached $1,000 until $30,000 is reached $2,500 until $50,000 is reached $5,000 until $100,000 is reached over $100,000 auctioneer’s discretion

bank reference bank name

account no

contact name

telephone

I hereby confirm thet I have read and am bound by the “Terms of Sale” presented by the auction house and which govern all auction purchases made by me. Although every attempt is made to execute your bid(s), the auctioneer is not responsible for errors and omissions.

signed

q id confirmed

(signature required to execute your bids)

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DIrECTOrY Officers

Specialist Departments

Representatives

Samuel M. Freeman II Chairman

20th Century Design Tim Andreadis tandreadis@freemansauction.com

New England Kelly Wright kwright@freemansauction.com

Alasdair Nichol Vice Chairman Margaret D. Freeman Director Emeritus Paul S. Roberts President Hanna Dougher Chief Operating Officer

Departments Appraisals Amy Parenti aparenti@freemansauction.com Business Development Thomas B. McCabe IV tmccabe@freemansauction.com Client Services Mary Maguire Carroll mmaguire@freemansauction.com Finance Whitney Long wlong@freemansauction.com Marketing & Communications Micah Dornfeld mdornfeld@freemansauction.com Museum Services Thomas B. McCabe IV tmccabe@freemansauction.com Photography Thomas Clark tclark@freemansauction.com Shipping & Receiving Stephanie Parker sparker@freemansauction.com Trust & Estates Amy Parenti aparenti@freemansauction.com

Mid-Atlantic Matthew Wilcox mwilcox@freemansauction.com

American Art & Pennsylvania Impressionists Alasdair Nichol anichol@freemansauction.com

Southeast Colin Clarke cclarke@freemansauction.com

American Furniture, Folk & Decorative Arts Lynda Cain lcain@freemansauction.com

West Coast Michael Larsen mlarsen@freemansauction.com

Asian Arts Benjamin Farina bfarina@freemansauction.com

Main Line Thomas McCabe tmccabe@freemansauction.com

Books, Maps & Manuscripts Benjamin Truesdale btruesdale@freemansauction.com British & European Furniture & Decorative Arts Nicholas B. A. Nicholson nnicholson@freemansauction.com European Art & Old Masters David M. Weiss dweiss@freemansauction.com Jewelry & Watches Virginia Salem, GIA GG vsalem@freemansauction.com Modern & Contemporary Art Dunham Townend dtownend@freemansauction.com Musical Instruments Frederick Oster foster@freemansauction.com Oriental Rugs & Carpets Andrew Taggart ataggart@freemansauction.com Prints Anne Henry ahenry@freemansauction.com Silver & Objets de Vertu Nicholas B. A. Nicholson nnicholson@freemansauction.com

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