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and self-consciously met, she glanced at her wristwatch. But she was five minutes late in taking action, since she had become quite preoccupied with checking some of the bodies and angular faces of the security guards, photographers, executives, and fashion scouts as well as the auditioning models. Still, she pressed the keyboard commands that sent the signal and burst of electromagnetic and radio wave interference that should cause the chief’s pacemaker, if it was in range, to send signals that would dramatically and drastically speed up the human heart to which it was attached. These signals would cause the pacemaker to accelerate her heart, the beating and rhythm of which would become increasingly chaotic. The shock caused by the signals should eventually cause her heart to defibrillate and for her to go into cardiac arrest, if she hadn’t already lost consciousness and her cardiovascular system hadn’t already collapsed. From the waiting area of the ornate corporate offices, Melissa couldn’t help but think she had heard a literal thump in the nearby executive suite. Assuming she must be imagining things, though, she dismissed the notion. She did not imagine that what would occur next would be that the offices would be completely caught in confusion and chaos, as the area was mobbed by security guards and emergency personnel, paramedics, nurses, even a doctor, a few firefighters and police officers. A few beefy security guards overflowed into the waiting area of the offices. Melissa glanced about curiously, as might any onlooker caught in the midst of an unexpected minor catastrophe. Mall management personnel and executives roamed and milled about and ran like chickens with their heads cut off, attempting to have their monarch and matriarch revived and resuscitated. Melissa couldn’t help but scoff. These people were so excited, so agitated. She had wistfully assumed they would have been celebrating. Perhaps the celebration and partying would come later. They certainly didn’t know seem to know that the secret to successfully handling an emergency in part was to stay calm. Stay calm, please stay calm, she wanted to explain to everybody. In a few minutes, the corpse of the caustic heir, covered with an official looking orange blanket, was taken in a shiny gurney through some obscure back exit. Melissa couldn’t resist a self-satisfied smirk as she followed the proceedings by scrutinizing the image cast by the mirror the surface of his laptop monitor created. She gingerly put the laptop computer and attached peripherals away in its carrying case. Then she was tentatively approached by a public relations intern who kept consulting her clipboard, clenched like a security blanket. “Is your name Melissa?” she asked abruptly, curtly. “Yes, indeed, it is.” The intern pursed her lips. “I’m sorry to have to inform you, but due to unforeseen, unexpected, and mitigating circumstances your job interview—“ “Yes, that is the reason I’m here.” “Of course. Well, your job interview has been postponed. We’ll, ah, reschedule it as soon as we’ve sorted out a few matters.” “That’s unfortunate. I’m sorry about that.” The intern gazed at her peculiarly. “About what?” Melissa realized she might have aroused the women’s suspicions, but she did not want to come off as too disappointed; she wanted to strike the right note of sympathy and soberness. “It looks as if somebody got pretty sick pretty quickly.” “Yes. They certainly did.” “I wouldn’t wish that upon anybody. Once I suffered mononucleosis—“ “We’ll be sure to give you a call soon to let her know when your interview is rescheduled.” 30 FREE LIT MAGAZINE

Profile for Free Lit Magazine

Volume 5 Issue 1 - The Technology Issue  

Volume 5 Issue 1 - The Technology Issue  

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