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How does BioTrackTHC’s seed-to-sale tracking work? We have two seed-to-sale tracking systems: One is for businesses and the other is for governments to use. Every seed, clone and plant is issued and assigned a unique identifier. That identifier, the associated inventory record, carries information, such as the licensee that has custody of the plant, the plant/strain name, the date it was planted, its growth stage, which employee has interacted with it and so on. Once a plant is harvested, each category of plant material [flower, stems] is assigned its own unique identifier that’s a “child” of the preceding “parent” identifier. The assigning of unique identifiers and connecting new “child” inventory with its “parent” inventory creates a lineage chain from plant to plant material to consumable products. The system can tell any unique identifier’s characteristics and quantity, trace it all the way back to the plant from which it came and follow it to where it and any of its derivative products end up, whether it’s still in inventory, destroyed or sold. The government version captures all inventory activity throughout an entire state. Not only do the government regulators have visibility over what an individual business reports, they can see 44 FREEDOM LEAF

SPRING 2018

products move from one licensee to another, lab-test results and [have] controls in place to prevent malicious and unintentional breaking of the law. What are the advantages and disadvantages of using RFID chips? In industries where products move through an assembly line and conveyor belts, RFID [Radio Frequency Identification] chips provide an advantage over barcodes by reading through certain lightweight materials and boxes. The theory in our industry is that an RFID reader should be able to scan a tag or a group of tags from a farther distance than reading the tag number with your eyes or using a traditional barcode scanner, thereby decreasing the time it takes to undergo an auditor inspection. However, the RFID was not designed for that application. RFID waves can’t pass through items with high water content. Indoor lights and metal can cause interference with signal reading. Densely lining up tags together may cause “shadowing” where the first tag prevents the tags behind it from being readable. An indoor room with waterfilled plants that are densely arranged and surrounded by lights and metal is pretty much the worst environment for this technology.

Issue 32 - Spring 2018  

Living in Baja, Mota History, Terps Guide, Mass Goes Legal

Issue 32 - Spring 2018  

Living in Baja, Mota History, Terps Guide, Mass Goes Legal

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