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Metropolitan Insights 2011 Metropolitan Area Planning Council Calendar and Annual Report


The MAPC Region and its Subregions

North Shore Task Force (NSTF)

Minuteman Advisory Group on Interlocal Coordination (MAGIC)

Wenham Manchester

Danvers

Beverly

Hudson

Nahant Revere

Belmont Somerville Watertown

Wayland

Swampscott

Malden

Medford

Sudbury

Marlborough

Saugus

Arlington Waltham

Lynn

Melrose

Winchester

Lincoln

Salem Marblehead

Stoneham

Woburn

Lexington

Peabody

Wakefield

Burlington

Acton

Maynard

Lynnfield

Reading

Carlisle

Concord

Everett Chelsea

Inner Core Committee (ICC)

Winthrop

Cambridge

Weston Newton

Framingham

Brookline

Wellesley

Southborough

Boston

Natick

Hull

Needham

Ashland

Dedham Sherborn

Quincy

Milton*

Dover*

Hopkinton

SouthWest Advisory Planning Committee (SWAP)

Essex

Gloucester

Wilmington

Boxborough

Metrowest Regional Collaborative (MWRC)

Hamilton

North Reading

Bedford

Stow

Rockport Topsfield

Middleton

Littleton

Bolton

Ipswich

North Suburban Planning Council (NSPC)

Cohasset

Westwood Holliston

Braintree

Medfield

Norwood

Millis Medway

Milford

Weymouth

Hingham

Randolph

Canton

Norwell Holbrook

Walpole

Rockland Stoughton

Norfolk

Scituate

Hanover

Marshfield

Sharon

Franklin Foxborough

Bellingham Wrentham

Three Rivers Interlocal Council (TRIC)

* Municipalities in more than one subregion: Dover is in TRIC and SWAP; Milton is in the Inner Core and TRIC

About MAPC The Metropolitan Area Planning Council is a regional planning agency serving the people who live and work in the 101 cities and towns of Metropolitan Boston. Our mission is to promote smart growth and regional collaboration. We work toward sound municipal management, sustainable land use, protection of natural resources, efficient and affordable transportation, a diverse housing stock, public safety, economic development, an informed public, and equity and opportunity among people of all backgrounds. Our regional plan, “MetroFuture,” guides our work and engages the public in responsible stewardship of the region’s future. MAPC is governed by representatives from each city and town in our region, as well as gubernatorial appointees and designees of major public agencies. Each municipality in our region belongs to one of eight MAPC “Subregions,” each staffed by a coordinator from MAPC (see map above). The MetroWest subregion is led by an independent board and director. Each Subregional Council includes municipal officials, alongside regional and community stakeholders, all of whom work together to develop an annual work plan and priorities. 60 Temple Place • Boston Massachusetts 02111 • (617) 451-2770 • www.mapc.org

Pembroke Duxbury

South Shore Coalition (SSC)

Credits The following MAPC staff helped produce Metropolitan Insights 2011: Amanda Linehan, Timothy Reardon and Holly St. Clair for project coordination and editing; Mariana Arcaya, Chris Brown, Susan Brunton, Alison Felix, Barry Fradkin, David Loutzenheiser, Jennifer Raitt, and Christian Spanring for mapping and writing; Joel Barrera, Amy Cotter, Steve Daly, Rebecca Davis, Joseph Domelowicz, Marc Draisen, James Freas, Jessie Grogan, Mark Racicot, Amy Reilly, Martin Pillsbury, Harry Taylor, Cynthia Wall, and Steve Winter for additional input and editing. Jason Fairchild of The Truesdale Group provided graphic design services. Front Cover: Employees and commuting distances by zip code for selected employers in the 128 Central Corridor. For more information, see the November map.


Highlights of Our Work

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) is a regional planning agency serving the people who live and work in the 101 cities and towns of Greater Boston. With a mission to promote smart growth and regional collaboration, MAPC’s work is guided by our regional plan, “MetroFuture: Making a Greater Boston Region.”

This year, we have increasingly focused our work on helping municipalities to collaborate across city and town borders, to achieve savings through new efficiencies, to capitalize on the existing and multifaceted resources of Greater Boston, and to explore innovation in unexpected ways. As fiscal challenges have intensified at the local level, MAPC has amplified its commitment to partnering with cities and towns in offering progressive solutions. We’re expanding our reach into new areas – from the federal policy arena, to green energy development, and interactive gaming as a tool for community engagement – while keeping an eye toward preservation, sustainability, and responsible stewardship of our shared resources. In every effort we undertake, MAPC works toward a more

Part digital game, part virtual environment, the Participatory Chinatown Project is a case study in immersive planning. The game seeks to engage all ages in community planning, through the use of avatars, 3D virtual neighborhoods, and collaborative problem-solving. The project, created by MAPC, the Asian Community Development Corporation and the Engagement Game Lab at Emerson College, will be featured at the 2011 American Planning Association National Conference in Boston, where participants can explore this digital tool alongside a walking tour of the neighborhood it encompasses.

equitable, livable Greater Boston region.

www.mapc.org

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In October 2010, MAPC was awarded a $4 million Sustainable Communities Grant from the Sustainable Communities Partnership, a new federal collaboration among HUD, the EPA, and the Department of Transportation. At left, Newton Mayor Setti Warren speaks at the award announcement in Boston. Below, left to right: James Hunt, City of Boston; Somerville Mayor Joseph Curtatone; MAPC Executive Director Marc Draisen; HUD Regional Administrator Richard Walega; Federal Transit Administration Regional Administrator Mary Beth Mello; Setti Warren; and EPA Regional Counsel Carl Dierker.

This year, we are heartened to have the Obama Administration’s support for the smart growth ideals put forth in our regional plan, MetroFuture. We are honored to be among a select group of grant recipients from the Sustainable Communities Partnership, a new federal collaboration among HUD, the EPA, and the U.S. Department of Transportation. With this grant, MAPC can go further in promoting sustainable development in Greater Boston.

Identifying priority preservation and development areas along the Route 495/MetroWest corridor; and

The coming year will bring the first activities under the grant, which could total more than $4.5 million over three years when matching commitments from regional foundations are included. The Metro Boston Sustainable Communities Consortium – which includes municipalities, non-profits, and institutional allies – will oversee our work under the grant. The heart of the work plan features several illustrative projects poised to benefit from Sustainable Communities funding. They include: Enhancing the Fairmount transit corridor through Dorchester, Mattapan and Hyde Park in Boston; Engaging the Asian communities in Chinatown, Quincy, and Malden in planning efforts; Creating an anti-displacement strategy for residential areas along the planned Green Line extension in Somerville;

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Studying office park retrofit potential for the Framingham Tech Park, and exploring opportunities for linkage to the downtown commuter rail station. All of these initiatives – and others that will be added as the program develops – will help the region to plan and grow responsibly, with a focus on future stewardship of our shared resources. In addition to this local work, MAPC will develop tools and models, build skills and capacity throughout the region, design and advocate for smart growth policies in state and local government, and track the region’s progress through a Regional Indicators Program. At the core of our mission is serving as a resource to our member municipalities. One of the most important ways MAPC serves cities and towns is to foster forward-thinking economic development opportunities. In 2011, we are focusing much of our economic development work in clean energy and local business development.

www.mapc.org


MetroFuture in Action MAPC and member communities across the region are collaborating on more than 150 planning projects. This map depicts a selection of our efforts to make a better, more vibrant Boston region.

ROCKPORT

Rockport Downtown Master Planning Preparing new zoning to implement Rockport’s downtown vision. MetroFuture Goal # 4

LYNN

Clean Technology Business Development

In suburban municipalities, most new growth will occur near town and village centers.

Helping the Cleantech InnoVenture Center to solve energy challenges and promote the success of small clean technology companies. MetroFuture Goal # 35

Small business owners and entrepreneurs will play a major role in the region’s economy and innovation.

C HE L S E A, RE VE RE, W IN THRO P

B E D FO RD, CO N CO R D, LE X I N GTON, L I N CO L N, S U D B U RY, & WE S TON

Shared Services

Studying ways to improve services and reduce costs by regionalizing inspectional services, planning, Management Information Systems and more.

Shared Regional Housing Services

Preparing an Inter-Municipal Agreement for participating towns to contract with Sudbury for on-demand services for management of municipal affordable housing programs.

MetroFuture Goal # 12

Communities will work together to plan for growth and share resources.

MetroFuture Goal #16

Low-income households will be able to find affordable, adequate, conveniently located housing, in suburbs as well as cities, and they will be able to avoid displacement.

B E L L I N G H AM, F R ANK LIN, M I L F O R D

Helping three communities in the Upper Charles Watershed to satisfy new EPA pilot stormwater regulations, possibly through a multimunicipal stormwater utility. MetroFuture Goal # 62

The region’s waterways will have sufficient clean water to support native fish populations and recreational uses.

photo: wallyg-flickr.com

Stormwater Management

F R AM I N G H AM & H A N O V E R

Fire Chiefs Association of Massachusetts Conducting costeffective collective procurement for fire trucks.

MetroFuture Goal # 30

Municipalities will operate efficiently and will have adequate funding.

Number of MAPC Projects 1-4 5-8 9 or more Selected MetroFuture Projects www.mapc.org

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MAPC links federal resources to emerging green technology start-ups like the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems. Fraunhofer is a non-profit applied research and development laboratory located in the heart of Boston’s Innovation District on the South Boston waterfront, dedicated to the commercialization of clean energy technologies. We also provide support and advocacy for emerging business incubators such as the Cleantech InnoVenture Center in Lynn. This business incubator is designed to reduce the startup expenses of small clean technology companies, while accelerating the time it takes to transform a research idea into a marketable product. In Gloucester, MAPC is helping to build a cluster of marine research institutes on and around the harbor – adding strength to a historic fishing-based economy. We are also working with the Dorchester Bay Economic Development Corporation to place job training facilities within walking distance of neighborhoods in need, and to provide skill-based training in partnership with larger businesses that are seeking trained employees.   MAPC also plans to unveil a web-based business development tool that will allow cities in Greater Boston’s urban core to market hard-to-sell commercial and industrial real estate to appropriate buyers. The website, Choose Metro Boston, can be found at http://choosemetroboston.zoomprospector.com. Our energy planning will continue to grow as we start developing energy strategies for Chelsea and Revere, and as we explore similar opportunities across the region. All our green energy work is guided by our Green Energy Campaign, which is an effort to achieve the energy goals of MetroFuture by building local capacity, increasing energy efficiency, and developing alternate energy resources. In the coming year, proposed energy-related projects include

developing a regional ESCO, or Energy Services Company, which would provide comprehensive energy efficiency services for multiple municipalities and school districts; developing a site suitability assessment for wind or solar energy on closed landfill and brownfield sites; and creating a regional energy manager service, which would provide MAPC staff support for a wide range of local energy work. In many municipalities, MAPC can best help to achieve smart growth goals through targeted zoning bylaw work. This year, MAPC worked with the town of Littleton Planning Board, Board of Selectmen and a faithful cadre of concerned citizens over several months to draft, review and finalize two zoning bylaws: a new Village Common zone, and an Overlay zone. The Village Common zone created a new business district along Routes 119 and 110, where mixed use development will be allowed so long as new design guidelines are met. In the Overlay zone, created along Route 119, a vacant 90-acre site once owned by Cisco Systems may now be more easily redeveloped. MAPC presented the zoning changes at Town Meeting, helping to usher the bylaws toward adoption. Both zoning changes will help the town control and attract development consistent with both MetroFuture and the community’s vision. The District Local Technical Assistance (DLTA) program is another essential vehicle for helping communities to achieve such goals. DLTA is a state funding program that helps cities and towns to collaborate regionally on housing, economic development, and environmental protection projects. The funding can also be used to help municipalities to coordinate and more efficiently deliver local services. 2010 was by any measure a prolific year for DLTA-funded projects in municipalities throughout the region. There were a total of 19 projects approved for funding this year – 10 in land use planning, and nine in municipal services. More than two dozen communities received help from MAPC on land use planning projects thanks to DLTA funding, the majority involving research or drafting local zoning bylaws.  There are 39 cities and towns currently participating in municipal services projects, such as examining how to save funds or provide expanded services by sharing engineering staff, public health offices, and even ambulances. Since many of these projects affect multiple municipalities, the total number of cities and towns served is 57 - a record high for the program.

A January 2010 Open House attracted more than 200 visitors to MAPC’s downtown Boston offices. At left, GIS Analyst Chris Brown demonstrates 3-D modeling to MIT fellow Clement Hountondji of Niger. This year’s Open House will be held on January 25, 2011. Photo by Marilyn Humphries.

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www.mapc.org


Valerie Malta Photography

With DLTA funding, MAPC and the MetroWest Regional Collaborative are conducting a MetroWest Regional Open Space Connectivity study. This study will coordinate all the individual open space plans among MetroWest cities and towns, allowing open spaces to become linked into an interconnected network that will cross municipal boundaries and serve a variety of regional needs. The study will also identify and prioritize lands that are ripe for protection or acquisition for open space.

MAPC and the Minute Man National Historical Park are working to preserve and promote the historic Battle Road Scenic Byway, left, which runs through Arlington, Lexington, Lincoln and Concord. Planners from around the country will take a mobile workshop tour of the corridor at April’s American Planning Association National Conference in Boston. At top, MAPC and the MWRA helped secure an easement for public access to the Cochituate Aqueduct, allowing a connected trail network to be developed there from Newton to Framingham.

Transportation planning is central to all facets of MAPC’s work. The economic vitality of the region is dependent on a strong transportation network, and continued investment in all modes of transportation – roads, bridges, sidewalks, bicycle infrastructure, and public transit – is crucial to Greater Boston’s ongoing competitiveness.

Using DLTA funds, MAPC assisted Bellingham in writing a Housing Production Plan in 2010, the first of what we hope will be many such plans crafted by MAPC. Housing Production Plans help cities and towns guide local affordable housing developments. Another tool, the Smart Growth Zoning and Housing Act (Chapter 40R), offers financial incentives to encourage cities and towns to zone for compact residential and mixed-use development in smart growth locations. These districts are catching on slowly across Eastern Massachusetts, and MAPC is currently working to prepare a 40R District for Sharon. On the North Shore, MAPC is working with Beverly, Danvers, Hamilton, Ipswich, Salem and Wenham to solicit local input on Priority Development Areas and Priority Preservation Areas, as part of a $68,000 grant from the Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development. We are also exploring which regional transportation improvements may be critical to the municipalities.

MAPC works toward sustainable transportation projects throughout the year, including the regional bike share system that is projected to launch in Boston in spring 2011. MAPC is collaborating with Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, and Brookline to link into Boston’s system once it is established. The program will provide hundreds of stations, outfitted with several thousand bicycles, throughout the participating municipalities. Designed for short trips, the bike share system will provide a sustainable mode of transportation while extending access to public transit locations across the region. MAPC worked with Boston and the MBTA to secure a $3 million Federal Transit Administration grant to implement the program in 2011. In 2010, MAPC unveiled a comprehensive Pedestrian Transportation Plan with action steps that cities and towns can take to make their streets more walkable. Both a resource and a guide, the Pedestrian Transportation Plan identifies actions that local governments, advocacy groups, the private sector and individuals can take to increase pedestrian safety and convenience and to encourage more walking. The plan is available on our website, at www.mapc.org/resources/ped-plan.

www.mapc.org

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Above: MAPC’s Regional Bike Parking Program has funded 5,615 bike spaces across the region to date, with an additional 3,036 in orders waiting to be installed. The program continues throughout 2011 and still has available funding. MAPC accepts orders on a first come, first served basis. To participate, contact David Loutzenheiser at 617-451-2770, ext. 2061. Right: Rain gardens are one tool available for reducing storm water runoff from impervious surfaces such as parking lots and driveways. Reducing rain runoff can curb erosion, pollution, and water shortages.

MAPC is working collaboratively with three towns on the Upper Charles River to help them adapt to a series of new federal storm water regulations. Bellingham, Franklin and Milford were selected this year by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to pilot stricter storm water regulations. These regulations are required to reduce unhealthy rates of pollution in the Charles River. The new regulations will attempt to reduce storm water flow and contaminated runoff into the watershed from private and public properties, which could cost the towns and property owners several million dollars to retrofit existing infrastructure. The regulations may eventually be extended to the rest of the Charles River and other watersheds in the region. To assist with these challenges, MAPC is working with three towns to explore creation of a storm water utility, a public entity that maintains storm water infrastructure and performs needed upgrades and capital improvements. As with water or sewer utilities, costs are covered by user fees, which are assessed on each property owner that contributes storm water runoff. Another area in which MAPC aids cities and towns in planning for the future is public safety. As municipal budgets grow tighter, cities and towns are increasingly seeking ways to maintain public safety services in the 6

www.mapc.org

face of cuts, to build emergency preparedness, and to enhance their expertise by working with neighbors and allies. In keeping with our mission to promote regional collaboration, MAPC has helped to establish three regional emergency equipment cache sites, containing reserves of emergency equipment for large-scale use. The three sites – in Beverly, Framingham, and Lexington – help the region to be prepared for a major incident, by providing resources that municipalities most likely could not afford on their own. The cache sites offer first responders and public safety officials such equipment as shelters-in-a-box, cyanide detectors, cots, illuminated signs, and other tools for disaster preparedness. MAPC works in tandem with NERAC, the Northeast Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council, to offer these vital resources through a federal homeland security grant program. Throughout this year, despite of several budget cuts, the Metro Mayors Community Safety Initiative worked to maintain a strong police presence in troubled areas of the region through the Metro Gang Task Force and through additional patrols funded by the anti-crime Shannon Grant. High-risk and gang-involved youth experience intervention and prevention through Shannon Grant-funded programs, including more than 600 out-of-school activities and employment opportunities.


MAPC also helps municipalities to save money through our collective purchasing efforts, which allow cities and towns to make discounted bulk purchases of supplies, equipment, vehicles and more. Since its inception in 1998, the program has assisted dozens of municipal clients in saving millions of dollars. This year, we announced an exciting new partnership with the Fire Chiefs Association of Massachusetts, allowing MAPC to act as a collective purchasing agent for fire apparatus. This program has lots of potential to help communities save local dollars on major purchases, while improving the caliber of emergency vehicles and response capabilities. Another way MAPC is working with NERAC to support emergency planning is through a new evacuation route planning tool, which kicked off in 2010. The goal of the program is to create an intuitive mapping application that will provide local emergency responders with critical information during emergencies and evacuations. The project will feature online maps and a mapping application that will let users coordinate evacuations by referencing electronic route maps and resources from inside emergency response vehicles or emergency command centers.

MAPC and WalkBoston are also conducting research on which school districts in the MAPC region have the best potential for encouraging more students to walk to school. This “Safe Routes to School” Analysis aims to shift school trips from cars to feet, which can reduce greenhouse gas production, air pollution, and traffic congestion around schools. Several studies estimate that up to 30 percent of morning commuter traffic is actually generated by parents driving children to school. Shifting even a small percentage back to walking could result in measurable reductions in emissions, as well as health benefits for children and community benefits for their neighborhoods. Once the most promising walkable school districts are identified, MAPC and WalkBoston will work with participating municipalities to devise a plan for increasing the number of students who walk to school in those areas.

MAPC staff is also working on a first-in-the-nation dataset analyzing driving patterns, fuel consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions. Working in collaboration with MassGIS and the MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning, we will collect and analyze data on vehicle miles travelled and fuel consumption based on odometer readings from vehicle inspection records. The data will help local, state, and regional entities develop effective strategies to reduce transportationrelated greenhouse gas emissions and their associated climate impacts. The data also answer MetroFuture’s call to focus new development in transportation-efficient locations.

Top right: Since 2004, the Greater Boston Police Council (GBPC) has partnered with MAPC to offer training and collective purchasing services for its members. Right: Governor Deval Patrick speaks to a group of teens and crime prevention partners at a community safety rally in the State House. MAPC’s Metro Mayors Coalition uses Shannon Grant funds to combat youth violence, gangrelated crime and substance abuse.

www.mapc.org

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“It is an honor and a privilege to serve as President of MAPC. Sustainability, economic development, responsible land use, affordable housing and public safety all come together under the MAPC banner, and we have seen dramatic results in many of these issue areas throughout the past year.” —MAPC President Jay Ash, below center. At left, MAPC Executive Director Marc Draisen; at right, Deputy Director Joel Barrera.

MAPC, an official Census Affiliate, helped promote Census participation throughout 2010, and will continue to monitor the results of the Census as data are released in 2011. As the data come out, MAPC will assist municipalities and nonprofit partners with training and technical assistance. Data release schedules, new data and municipal profiles about your city or town, as well as training opportunities, can be found on the MetroBoston DataCommon, MAPC’s online mapping tool, at www.metrobostondatacommon.org. As we work collaboratively and in innovative new ways throughout the year, we are mindful that all we do is guided by our bold regional plan, “MetroFuture.” The development of the MetroFuture plan involved thousands of “plan builders” around the region, a group MAPC is now working to turn into “plan implementers,” who will work to advance MetroFuture at the local, regional, and state levels. To engage old and new allies alike, MAPC launched the Friends of MetroFuture program with a well-attended open house in January 2010. This program will educate the public about key issues relating to MetroFuture implementation, and will build public energy for the change necessary to achieve MetroFuture’s goals.  In the past year, the program has sponsored a photo contest, eight speakers on a wide range of topics, and three walking tours in the summer months, with similar activities planned for 2011.  Check www.metrofuture.org for the full agenda. As always, building a constituency for change involves many partnerships with other like-minded organizations.  MAPC was a founding member in the Massachusetts Smart Growth

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www.mapc.org

Alliance (MSGA), and remains active in its work. This year, MAPC and the MSGA kicked off the Great Neighborhoods Initiative, a campaign to link smart growth policy with place-based results. Throughout 2011, MAPC and MSGA will work with several local organizations around the region as they make their neighborhoods into smart growth models. Finally, building regional support for smart growth principles requires research, expertise, a demonstrated record of local success, and – importantly – a commitment to legislative advocacy. We are proud to be pointing to a demonstrated track record of success both on Beacon Hill and in Washington. MAPC furthered its agenda of fostering regional collaboration by participating in the legislatively mandated Regionalization Advisory Commission. Chaired by Lieutenant Governor Timothy Murray, the commission studied impediments and benefits of regionalization over a broad spectrum of topics, ranging from public safety to energy and backroom office support. MAPC will use the findings of the commission’s report to file a comprehensive piece of legislation in the 2011-2012 session, which will incentivize and remove barriers to sharing services across municipal boundaries. Additionally, MAPC and the MSGA were successful for the first time in advancing a piece of land use reform legislation favorably out of committee. Passage of comprehensive land use reform will continue to be a major priority for MAPC in the upcoming year. Check www.mapc.org for news and updates about MAPC’s work throughout the year.


Financial Statement STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2009, AUDITED

Sources of Operating Funds (total revenue including pass-through*) FOUNDATIONS

Grants, 2%

OPERATING REVENUES

Grants and Contracts

US Economic Development Administration, 1% US Department of Transportation, 9%

Other, 15%

$

5,971,565

Municipal Assessment

909,585

Charges for Services

88,549

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES

$

6,969,699

INTEREST REVENUE

$

2,999

TOTAL REVENUE

$ 6,972,698

District Local Technical Assistance, 2%

STATE

FEDERAL

Contracts, 4% Assessment, 7%

MUNICIPAL

US Department of Homeland Security, 60%

Sources of Operating Funds (total revenue excluding pass-through*) DIRECT EXPENSES

Salaries

Contracts, 13%

$

Expenses (including project-specific expenses and pass-through*)

District Local Technical Assistance, 8%

1,396,098 3,858,221

Assessment, 26%

STATE

MUNICIPAL

Other, 11% FOUNDATIONS

TOTAL DIRECT EXPENSES

$

5,254,319

INDIRECT EXPENSES

$

1,985,834

TOTAL EXPENSES

$ 7,240,153

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE TRANSFERS AND OTHER INCOME

$

TRANSFERS IN

FEDERAL

Fiduciary Transfers In

$

Operating Transfers Out

(267,455)

283,000 -

TOTAL TRANSFERS IN

$

283,000

NET INCOME (LOSS)

$

15,545

US Department of Homeland Security, 7%

Grants, 3% US Economic Development Administration, 2% US Department of Transportation, 29%

Use of Operating Funds (total expenses excluding pass-through*) Operating Expenses, 8%

Administration, 8% Regional Plan Implementation, 6%

Occupancy, 14%

Legislative and Operations, 10%

Municipal Governance, 10%

Data Services, 13%

Environmental Planning, 6%

FUND BALANCE - JUNE 30, 2008

$

365,577

FUND BALANCE - JUNE 30, 2009

$

381,122

This year’s financial statement shows MAPC data only. Please contact MAPC for the financial statements of affiliated entities for which MAPC serves as a fiscal agent, such as the Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS) and MetroWest Regional Collaborative (MWRC).

Transportation Planning, 10%

Land Use Planning, 16%

* Pass-through funds include municipal grant programs managed by MAPC (such as the Shannon Grant Program) as well as equipment or services purchased by MAPC on behalf of municipalities.

www.mapc.org

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Housing Unit Growth, 2000-2009 Despite the current recession, Greater Boston built new housing at a brisk pace during the past decade. Cities and towns in the MAPC region reported issuing building permits for 71,000 new housing units from 2000 through 2009, increasing the region’s housing unit stock by nearly 6%. The 16 municipalities that each reported issuing permits for more than 1,000 units account for half of all housing production. Not surprisingly, Boston saw the largest growth, issuing permits for more than 10,000 new housing units, with a peak of 2,400 units in 2006. Quincy, Cambridge, Peabody, and Waltham all permitted more than 1,500 units, for a combined total of more than 10,000. Among suburban communities, Hingham led the way with nearly 1,700 units permitted, as a result of a large over-55 community and nearly 500 units in a transit-oriented development at Hingham Shipyard. While total housing production was split almost evenly among the region’s urban and suburban municipalities, the type of housing differed considerably. 80% of permitted units in urban communities were in multifamily buildings, compared to only 40% in suburban communities. Suburban municipalities reported issuing permits for 14,800 units in multifamily buildings, half of which were in just eight communities: Hingham, North Reading, Braintree, Saugus, Burlington, Canton, Danvers, and Franklin. Meanwhile, 50 suburban municipalities permitted fewer than 100 units in multifamily buildings over the past 10 years. These estimates are based on monthly building permit data reported to the U.S. Census by individual municipalities. Many municipalities do not report regularly. At least 10 municipalities in the MAPC region reported less frequently than six of every 12 months during the past decade, which affects not only this map but the annual Census population estimates.

Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau, MAPC analysis

This cartogram shows the size of each municipality in proportion to the number of housing units permitted from 2000 through 2009: ~1,000 Permits ~ 500 Permits ~ 200 Permits Single family homes as a percent of all new units 0 - 25% 25% - 50% 50% - 75% 75% - 100% Infrequent reporters * Municipalities that reported monthly building permit data to the U.S. Census Bureau an average of six or fewer months per year, 2000 - 2009


JANUARY 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

T U E S D AY

W E D N E S D AY

T H U R S D AY

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

1

New Year’s Day

2

Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

3

4

Inner Core Subregion 9:30 a.m.

5

MAGIC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

6

7

8

13

14

15

20

21

22

27

28

29

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

9 16

10 Martin Luther King Jr. Day

17

11 TRIC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

18

NSPC Subregion

12

NSTF Subregion

Executive Committee

19

SSC Subregion

8:30 a.m.

11:30 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

23

24

30

31

MAPC Open House

4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

25

26

SWAP Subregion 2:00 p.m.

FEBRUARY 2011

DECEMBER 2010 SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

5

6

7

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10

11

6

7

8

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10

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13

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Sidewalk Snow Clearance Policies Walking can be a convenient and healthy way to get around, except when sidewalks are blocked by snow and ice. Many municipalities are building new sidewalks and crosswalks to create a safer pedestrian network, but more needs to be done to ensure that walking is safe and practical year round. The region receives 42” of snow in an average year. When sidewalks are not shoveled or plowed, pedestrians often walk in the street, where they are at risk of being hit by vehicles driving in narrower lanes and on icy surfaces. Municipal policies that require property owners to clear snow from abutting sidewalks help to ensure that walkways are clear for pedestrians. Of the 68 municipalities that responded to a recent MAPC survey, only a quarter said they require all sidewalks to be cleared of snow. Several municipalities require only commercial property owners to clear sidewalks, while others require it only of residential property owners. Nearly half reported having no policies that require private property owners to shovel snow from sidewalks. In many cities and towns, municipal staff may clear sidewalks near schools and in business districts, but usually after all roadways have been plowed. No municipality reported having the resources to clear all sidewalks, so private property owners have a critical role to play in ensuring that we have a year-round pedestrian network. Even when snow removal policies are in place, enforcing these regulations may be challenging. In February 2010, Governor Deval Patrick signed the “Green Tickets Bill” that expands local authority to collect unpaid fines, including those related to sanitation, housing, and snow and ice removal. Municipalities can now charge penalties for late payments and impose sanctions for failure to pay. Some municipalities such as Cambridge have implemented websites for residents to report uncleared sidewalks. With stronger snow removal policies, effective enforcement, and the participation of private property owners, the region’s sidewalks can be clear and well used throughout the year.

Data Source: MAPC Survey, 2010

Property owners subject to snow removal policies All Property Owners Commercial Property Owners Only Residential Property Owners Only No Sidewalk Snow Removal Regulations No Data Municipal staff clear selected sidewalks abutting private property (e.g., walk-to-school routes, business districts)


FEBRUARY 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

T U E S D AY

W E D N E S D AY

1

Inner Core Subregion 9:30 a.m.

T H U R S D AY

2

Chinese New Year Begins MAGIC Subregion

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

3

4

5

10

11

12

17

18

19

24

25

26

7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

6

Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

13

7 14

8

TRIC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

15

NSPC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

9 16

NSTF Subregion 8:30 a.m.

SSC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

20 27

Presidents Day

21 28

22

23

SWAP Subregion 2:00 p.m.

MARCH 2011

JANUARY 2011 SUN

MON

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Mortgage Denial Rates For High-Income Borrowers Even qualified borrowers may find it difficult to get a mortgage in certain locations. In 2008, the most recent year for which data are available, 39% of all applicants regionwide were denied a conventional loan to purchase a one- to four-family home. Reasons for denial may include high debt-to-income ratio, poor credit, or weak employment history. For mortgage reporting purposes, “highincome” applicants are defined as those earning more than 120% of the HUD Area Median Family Income, equivalent to more than $103,000 in 2008. They generally fared better, with average denial rates of just 11%. However, high-income applicants who intend to buy in a low-income neighborhood are twice as likely to be denied as are applicants in highincome areas. Regionwide, 130 Census tracts have a median household income less than $50,000, defined here as “low-income” tracts. High-income applicants made up 30% of the 4,300 mortgage applicants in these tracts. However, the denial rate for high-income applicants was 21% in low-income tracts, versus 9% in tracts with a median income greater than $100,000. These lending patterns affect many disadvantaged urban neighborhoods already reeling from the foreclosure crisis, such as Dorchester, Mattapan, and Roxbury. Of the 83 low-income tracts in Boston, the denial rate for highincome borrowers was 35%, and was above 50% in nine tracts. Outside of Boston, six low-income tracts in Lynn, Chelsea, Peabody, Gloucester, and Salem saw denial rates of more than 30% for high-income applicants. Denials in low-income neighborhoods may have two significant outcomes: higher-income families might find it harder to move to, or remain in, low-income neighborhoods, perpetuating economic segregation; and if willing buyers cannot access financing, it may impede the recovery of the real estate market and extend the foreclosure crisis. Data Source: The Urban Institute (www.metrotrends.org/natdata/hmda/), MAPC Analysis

High-Income Applicant Denial Rate by Census Tract, 2008 0% - 10% 10% - 20% 20% - 30% 30% - 40% 40% - 100% Fewer Than Five High-Income Applicants Low-Income Census Tracts


MARCH 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

T U E S D AY

W E D N E S D AY

1

Inner Core Subregion 9:30 a.m.

T H U R S D AY

2

MAGIC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

3

4

5

10

11

12

17

18

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24

25

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Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

6

Daylight Saving Time Begins

Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

7

13

14

20

21

27

28

8

TRIC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

15

Ash Wednesday NSPC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

9

NSTF Subregion 8:30 a.m.

16

Evacuation Day

22

23

SWAP Subregion

29

30

Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

SSC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

31

FEBRUARY 2011

APRIL 2011

SUN

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Census 2010 Mail Participation Rates The decennial Census results released in 2011 represent the fruits of the region’s labors to ensure a “complete count” in 2010. A major objective of Census Bureau outreach efforts in 2010 was to increase the percent of households that return their Census forms by mail. Many municipal and non-profit partners joined in this effort, as shown by the red circles on the map. A higher mail participation rate allows the Census Bureau to focus follow up on the hardest-to-count populations. The Massachusetts statewide participation rate of 75% slightly bested the national average of 74%. The highest participation rate in the MAPC region was in Acton, where 91% of households returned their Census forms by mail. The lowest participation rates were in parts of Lynn and Boston, where less than half the population mailed back their forms. Areas of low mail participation often occur among “hard-to-count” populations such as students, new immigrants, and renters. Fortunately, the number of tracts with very low mail participation rates decreased in 2010: only six Census tracts had participation rates lower than 50%, compared with 35 in 2000. The “most-improved” award goes to the households of a Census tract in the Allston neighborhood of Boston. Their participation rate increased from 50% in 2000 to 71% in 2010. The improvement in these hard-to-count areas is due in part to the efforts of 12 foundations that formed the Massachusetts Census Equity Fund (MCEF), which supported numerous outreach campaigns. MAPC was a lead partner in one of these campaigns, focusing on the Greater Boston Asian community. Of the Census tracts targeted by MCEF-funded campaigns, half increased their mail participation rates by 5% over the 2000 Census. As the Census data are released this year, MAPC will continue to assist our municipalities by providing training and technical assistance on the new data. Data release schedules, new data about your city, town, or neighborhood, and training opportunities can be found at www.metrobostondatacommon.org. Data source: U.S. Census Bureau, MAPC Analysis

Census Form Mailback Rate by Census Tract, 2010 Less than 50% 50% - 65% 65% - 85%

Census Outreach Partners in Municipality 100 10 1

More than 85%

Inset: Mail back rate improved to more than 50% since 2000


APRIL 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

MARCH 2011

T U E S D AY

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Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

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21

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6

S AT U R D AY

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MAY 2011

SUN

1

W E D N E S D AY

MAGIC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

10 17

11

Patriots Day

18

12

First Day of Passover TRIC Subregion

NSPC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

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13 20

8:30 A.M.

8:30 a.m.

7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee

Good Friday

10:00 a.m.

Easter Orthodox Easter

24

25

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Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

27

SWAP Subregion 2:00 p.m.

28

Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Housing Production Plans Housing Production Plans help municipalities guide affordable housing development. Last November, Chapter 40B, the state’s Comprehensive Permit law, escaped repeal at the polls by a wide margin, 58% to 42%. The law allows developments with at least 25% affordable housing to circumvent restrictive local zoning in municipalities where less than 10% of the housing stock is subsidized. As of Election Day 2010, only 27 MAPC municipalities exceeded the 10% target. Critics of 40B claim it reduces local control over development, but municipalities can retain that control through proactive efforts to create and preserve affordable housing. A Housing Production Plan (HPP) helps a city or town identify housing needs and opportunities, establish production goals and priorities, and specify zoning and regulatory changes to encourage a diversity of housing. As of October 2010, 23 MAPC municipalities had an HPP approved by the Department of Housing and Community Development. State regulations provide special exceptions for municipalities with an approved HPP. Those that increase their subsidized housing inventory by specified “production thresholds” (0.5% in one year or 1% over two years) are “Certified Compliant” with their plan, and are granted authority to deny comprehensive permits - which can curb unwanted developments - for one or two years. In the past two years, 14 MAPC municipalities that had not yet met the 10% target exceeded one of the production thresholds. Six of those now have the authority to deny a comprehensive permit because they are either Certified Compliant or over the 10% target. Eight other municipalities, shown in red on the map, also exceeded the production thresholds but did not have a housing production plan at the time. As a result, they are still subject to comprehensive permits. This demonstrates the usefulness of developing an approved Housing Production Plan and encouraging development consistent with that plan. MAPC is available to help municipalities prepare Housing Production Plans and implement policies that support housing diversity.

Data Source: Massachusetts DHCD, MAPC Analysis

Approved Housing Production Plan Certified Compliant Exceeded Housing Production Thresholds But No Housing Production Plan Subsidized Housing Inventory greater than 10.0%


MAY 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

1

Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

T U E S D AY

2

W E D N E S D AY

3

Inner Core Subregion 9:30 a.m.

T H U R S D AY

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F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

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NSTF Subregion

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MAGIC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

8

9

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TRIC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

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NSPC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

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8:30 a.m.

7:00 p.m.

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

22

23

Annual Council Meeting and MPO Elections

24

25

SWAP Subregion 2:00 p.m.

(tentative)

29

Memorial Day

30

31

APRIL 2011

JUNE 2011

SUN

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Solar Photovoltaic Installations

Solar PV capacity by category in MAPC Region, 2010 3500 KW

Metro Boston is leading the state in development of solar power. The region installed nearly 10 megawatts (MW) of solar photovoltaic production capacity as of April 2010, more than a third of the state’s total existing solar capacity (28 MW as of August 2010). Massachusetts began providing incentives for solar photovoltaic (PV) installations in 2001 using funds generated by a renewable energy charge on all electric utility bills. In 2008, the state established the Commonwealth Solar Program to provide rebates toward solar installation. So far, $160 million of public funding has leveraged $330 million in private investment.

3000 KW 2500 KW 2000 KW 1500 KW 1000 KW 500 KW 0 KW

Commercial

Residential

Municipal (incl. K-12)

Industrial

Agriculture, health and other

College, university or private schools

In the MAPC region, 689 solar installations are registered with the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, which administers Commonwealth Solar. Three quarters of these installations are on residential property, averaging 6 kilowatts (kW) per installation and totaling 29% of the region’s registered production. Commercial installations tend to be larger, averaging 43kW. The largest solar installation in the region is on an office building in Watertown, with a production capacity of 501 kW—5% of the region’s total. There are 21 installations sites with an individual capacity of more than 100kW, including an affordable housing development in Boston (391kW), a municipal facility in Waltham (378kW), and a supermarket in Somerville (198kW.)

Solar PV Installations Less than 100kW Installations over 100kW by Category

Commercial Residential Municipal (including K-12 schools) Industrial College, univ. or private school Production Capacity per Capita [Watts/person]

Less than 2 2 to 5 5 to 10 More than 10 No Installation

Overall, the region has a production capacity of 9,800 kW, equal to 3.1 watts per person. Leading the region in per capita production is the town of Hopkinton, with installations equivalent to 27 watts per person, due in part to 300 kW of capacity installed at public school facilities. However, we have a long way to go. During one hour on a sunny summer day, the region’s solar facilities generate less than 0.04% of each resident’s annual electricity demand.

Source: Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, U.S. Energy Information Administration, U.S. Census Bureau, MAPC Analysis

NOTE: This map only includes solar installations registered with the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center since 2001.


JUNE 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

T U E S D AY

W E D N E S D AY Inner Core Subregion 9:30 a.m.

T H U R S D AY

1

MAGIC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

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Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

5 12

Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

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NSPC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

8 15

NSTF Subregion 8:30 a.m.

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SSC Subregion 7:00 p.m.

Bunker Hill Day

Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

19

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TRIC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

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SWAP Subregion 2:00 p.m.

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MAY 2011 SUN

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Beach Closings Due To Bacteria Levels, 2009 Our region’s coastal beaches are great places to cool off in the summer, but we can only enjoy them when they are clean. Nearly 200 public beaches dot our region’s coastline, providing places to swim, relax, and play. With nearly half of these accessible by bus, subway, or commuter rail, our public beaches are important recreational resources – especially for residents who may not have the transportation or economic resources to travel outside the region for summer fun. Unfortunately, many families may arrive at the shore only to find the beach closed due to high levels of bacteria in the water. Stormwater from paved areas and lawns can carry bacteria from pet waste and other sources into waterways, and some areas still have “combined sewer overflows” (CSOs) that discharge a mixture of stormwater and sewage during large storms. Urban beaches are disproportionately affected by these pollutant sources. In 2009, six beaches in Boston, Quincy, Braintree, Salem, and Lynn were closed 25 times or more. The beaches in those communities account for 60% of beach closure days but just 21% of beach miles in the region. Fortunately, the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and its member municipalities have been making progress solving the problem through a program of sewer separation projects, control facilities that chlorinate combined wastewater before discharge, and other improvements. In 1987, there were 84 CSOs discharging untreated wastewater into Boston Harbor and surrounding rivers. As of September 2010, 27 of these outfalls have been closed. Annual CSO volumes have been reduced by 81% overall, and three quarters of the remaining overflows are now treated prior to discharge. As part of the Sustainable Communities Regional Planning Grant program, MAPC and its partners will create plans for “green infrastructure” in Boston and other urban communities. These studies will identify opportunities to capture stormwater and infiltrate it into the ground before it enters the sewer system, thereby improving the local environment and reducing the amount of runoff and pollution that can foul the region’s beaches.

Source: National Resources Defense Council, Massachusetts Water Resources Authority, MAPC Analysis

Beach Closing or Advisory Days, 2009 31 - 40 21-30 6 - 20 1-5 Combined Sewer Overflows Boston, Cambridge, Somerville, Arlington, Chelsea, and Quincy only

Active Closed Beach Accessibility Beaches Accessible by Public Transit Beaches Inaccessible by Public Transit Environmental Justice Communities


JULY 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

3

Independence Day

T U E S D AY

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W E D N E S D AY

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T H U R S D AY

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Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

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Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

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TRIC Subregion 8:30 a.m.

12

NSPC Subregion

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8:30 a.m.

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JUNE 2011

AUGUST 2011

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Sudbury River: Fish For Fun, Not for Food There’s something fishy about the fish in the Sudbury River. Mercury released from the defunct Nyanza chemical facility in Ashland, an EPA Superfund site, has contaminated a 26-mile stretch of the Sudbury River through Ashland, Framingham, Wayland, Sudbury, Lincoln, and Concord. The mercury from Nyanza contaminates the river’s fish, posing a health risk to anyone who consumes what they catch in these waters. Some segments of the river have higher mercury levels than others. The health effects of mercury are most severe for children and pregnant women. They include mental retardation, cerebral palsy, deafness and blindness. Even in low doses, mercury may cause learning disabilities. An advisory against eating the fish has been in place since the 1990s, with signs along the river. Although the signs are multi-lingual, there is concern that anglers from various immigrant and ethnic groups are not aware of the health risk, and that some anglers and their families may be consuming fish from the river on a regular basis due to economic or cultural reasons. To address the public health effects of the Sudbury River contamination, the MetroWest Regional Collaborative conducted a public outreach program, with the financial support of the MetroWest Community Health Care Foundation, and the collaboration of MAPA Translations in Framingham. The “Fishing For Health” campaign developed educational materials in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, including a website (www.fishing4health.com), flyers and posters, ads in ethnic newspapers, pre-recorded radio announcements, and a series of four opinion pieces in the MetroWest Daily News. The campaign launched in the summer of 2010, and aims to get out the message to Sudbury River anglers: FISH FOR FUN, NOT FOR FOOD!

Data Source: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Fish Consumption

Fish Consumption HealthRisk Risk Children Health forfor Children Hazard Quotient

Hazard Quotient 0.9 -- 1.0 0.9 1.0 1.1 -- 1.4 1.1 1.4 1.5 -- 1.8 1.5 1.8 1.9 -- 2.1 1.9 2.1

Nyanza Superfund Site

Fishing Locations Locations Fishing Sudbury RiverWatershed Watershed Sudbury River Note: A Hazard Quotient greater than 1.0 indicates a risk of health impacts from consuming fish caught in these areas.


AUGUST 2011 S U N D AY

M O N D AY

T U E S D AY

First Day of Ramadan Officers Meeting 10:00 a.m.

1

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T H U R S D AY

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Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee

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JULY 2011

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Regional emergency Emergency Medical response Response Planning regional help is is on on the the way, way, every every When help minute counts. counts. For Formany manyheart heartattack attack or minute or stroke victims,chances chancesofofsurvival survival decline decline with stroke victims, with minute passes before treatment eacheach minute thatthat passes before treatment by by a paramedic EmergencyMedical MedicalTechnician a paramedic ororEmergency Technician (EMT). four However, four on Shore (EMT). However, towns ontowns the North the North Shore are served by a patchwork are served by a patchwork of of emergencyresponse responseservices services that emergency that provide uneven levels of provide uneven levels of service service and may leave some victims and may leave some victims with waiting too long for an ambulance. a long wait for an ambulance. In In Topsfield, paramedic services are Topsfield, paramedic services are provided by the fire department; provided by the fire department; Ipswich and Rowley contract with a Ipswich and Rowley contract with a private ambulance service. Meanwhile, private ambulance service. Meanwhile, Georgetown is served by Boxford Georgetown is served by Boxford paramedics during the day, but must rely paramedics during the day, but must on mutual aid agreements with nearby rely onatmutual aid on agreements nearby towns night and weekends, with resulting in towns at night and on weekends, resulting in unpredictable and often unacceptably long wait unpredictable and often unacceptably long times. wait times. These four towns are working together to These four towns are working to develop a regional approach to together emergency develop athat regional to emergency response wouldapproach provide more consistent response wouldUnder provide consistent service to that residents. the more District Local service toAssistance residents. (DLTA) Under program, the District Local Technical MAPC staff Technicalthe Assistance (DLTA) program, analyzed contractual, financial, and MAPC level- staff of-service impacts of various regionalization analyzed the contractual, financial, and leveloptions. MAPC then mapped times of-service impacts of variousresponse regionalization from each potential regional dispatch location options. MAPC then mapped response times and these to regional assess the level of location service fromoverlaid each potential dispatch provided by different station configurations. and overlaid these to assess the level of service

provided by different station configurations. This map shows that one potential combination of stations in potential Topsfield, combination Ipswich, This map shows that one and Georgetown would provide response of stations in Topsfield, Ipswich, and Georgetown times 10 minutes nearlythan all 10 wouldshorter providethan response timesfor shorter residents in the four towns. In its report, MAPC minutes for nearly all residents in the four towns. recommended that the towns conduct a joint In its report, MAPC recommended that the towns procurement for emergency medical services conduct a joint procurement for emergency using these three deployment locations and a medical services using these three deployment “zero contract” financing model, which means locations and a “zero contract” financing model, that all services are paid through insurance or which means that all services are paid through Medicaid reimbursements, at no cost to the insurance or Medicaid reimbursements, at no municipalities. cost to the municipalities.

Response Time, Minutes Time, Minutes Response 22 44 66 88 10 10 12 12 15 15 Dispatch Dispatch LocationsLocations Potential

Residential Residential Land LandUse Use(2005) (2005) Data Source: MAPC Analysis and Towns of Georgetown, Ipswitch, Ipswich, Rowley Rowleyand andTopsfield Topsfield


SEPTEMBER 2011 S U N D AY

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10:00 a.m.

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Inner Core Committee 9:30 a.m.

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7:00 p.m.

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Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

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2:00 p.m.

Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Prisoner Reentry Supportive services, housing, and access to jobs help returning prisoners to reenter society as productive, contributing members. After serving their sentences, nearly 1,000 prisoners released from Massachusetts correctional facilities in 2009 returned home to our region. Roughly half had been incarcerated for non-violent offenses such as property or drug cimes. Affordable housing, jobs that pay a living wage, substance abuse counseling, and other resources to get people back on their feet are critical to successful reentry, giving former prisoners viable alternatives to criminal activity.

Number of Returning Prisoners by Receiving Zip Code, 2009

This map shows the number reentering prisoners by zip code in 2009, with neighborhoods of Boston, Framingham, Lynn, and Quincy topping the list. These municipalities are also home to most of the region’s residential reentry and treatment facilities, which provide needed support to released prisoners, including programs specializing in substance abuse, HIV, veteran’s needs, family issues, and more.

Less than 5 5 - 10 11 - 20 21 - 40 Greater than 40 No Returns

In August 2010, Governor Deval Patrick signed a bill to reform the Commonwealth’s Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) system.This bill reduces the barriers ex-prisoners face during job searches by making it harder for potential employers to screen out applicants with past convictions during the initial hiring stage. But CORI reform alone will not ensure that returning prisoners find jobs and re-establish themselves. Services such as job training and health care are essential to preparing individuals for independent living. Strategies to create new jobs are also needed. Together, legislative changes, supportive services, and economic development will help to ensure that returning prisoners are assets, not risks, to their receiving communities.

Data source: Massachusetts Department of Correction

Residential Reentry and Treatment Facilities

Note: Releases are reported for offenders released from criminal sentences under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Department of Correction during 2009. Release types include parole, expiration of sentence, or good conduct discharge to street (not to the custody of another agency, a new sentence, or a warrant). The release address zip code is reported by the inmate in close approximation to time of release. For inmates releasing to residential reentry and treatment facilities, the zip code for the facility is reported.


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Boston MPO Transportation Planning and Programming Committee 10:00 a.m.

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Diwali Fall Council Meeting

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Route 128 Central Corridor Commuting Miles The Route 128 Central Corridor draws commuters from far and wide. Five municipalities along a 15-mile stretch of Route 128 through Burlington, Lexington, Lincoln, Waltham, and Weston together house more than 117,000 jobs. Corporate headquarters, information technology firms, medical facilities, universities, and research institutes are well represented in this corridor, and all draw their workforces from a very broad geographical area. As part of a transportation and land use planning effort conducted in 2010, MAPC surveyed 18 major employers and collected the residential zip codes of 8,600 employees from more than 500 zip codes across New England. MAPC measured the distance from home to work zip codes in order to estimate commuting distances. On this map, the color of each zip code indicates the number of workers commuting to the corridor. The height of each zip code represents the total daily round-trip commuting miles associated with those workers. Based on estimated commuting distances and the number of commuters from each zip code, MAPC found that the average worker lives 20 miles from his or her work location, resulting in 349,000 round-trip commuting miles each day, just from the workers in this survey. These results highlight the disproportionate impacts of long commutes on the transportation system and personal finances. One quarter of surveyed workers reside within the corridor or in an adjacent municipality; their commutes, averaging just 6.5 miles, add up to only 8% of total commuting miles. Meanwhile, workers living more than 25 miles from the corridor make up 32% of total commuters, but account for 60% of total mileage. Compared to workers living in or near the corridor, these long-distance commuters must travel an extra 60 miles each day, spending an extra $3,600 per year and untold hours in traffic. This revealing picture of the dispersed commuting patterns common to Massachusetts demonstrates the challenge of coordinating transportation, residential, and economic development planning, so that workers can spend less money on gasoline and more time with their families.

Data Source: MAPC Survey, 2010

Number of Surveyed Commuters to 128 Central Corridor, by Zip Code 151 - 250 101 - 150 76 - 100 51 - 75

The color of each zip code indicates the number of workers commuting to the corridor. The height of each zip code indicates the total daily round-trip commuting miles associated with those workers.

26 - 50 11 - 25 1 – 10 128 Central Corridor Municipalities


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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Diabetes Hospitalization Rates, 2003-2008 Diabetes is a serious and costly chronic disease that affects more than 300,000 Massachusetts residents, and numbers are rising. Active management of diabetes, including physical activity, weight maintenance, and a healthy diet, can help prevent serious complications. Diabetes that is not well managed is more likely to lead to complications requiring hospitalization. Unfortunately, certain communities are disproportionately affected by higher diabetes hospitalization rates. Holbrook, Boston, Chelsea, and Everett suffer the highest rates, while Lincoln, Dover, Boxborough, Carlisle and Wellesley residents had the fewest hospitalizations per 100,000 residents from 2003 to 2008. Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to major health problems such as stroke, blindness, and kidney problems. Diabetes self-management education programs, shown in purple on this map, teach people with diabetes how to control their disease, preventing hospitalizations and other complications. Although most communities with high rates of diabetes hospitalizations are served by diabetes self-management education programs, not all highly impacted areas are adequately covered, and additional services may be needed in some places, particularly on Cape Ann and in communities south of Boston. Municipal governments can help people with diabetes to manage their disease through policies that expand access to healthy foods and provide safe, attractive places to walk and play. Learn more at www.mass.gov/dph/diabetes.

Data Source: Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Diabetes Hospitalization Rate Hospitalizations per 100,000 Residents

20 - 65 66 - 100 101 - 135 136 - 170 171 - 328 Diabetes self-management education programs recognized by the American Diabetes Association


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10:00 a.m.

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Inner Core Subregion 9:30 a.m.

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Executive Committee 11:30 a.m.

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Find this map and learn more at www.MAPC.org


Calendar Maps At-a-Glance January Housing Unit Growth, 2000-2009

M ay Housing Production Plans

September Regional Emergency Medical Response Planning

February Sidewalk Snow Clearance Policies

June Solar Photovoltaic Installations

October Prisoner Reentry

March Mortgage Denial Rates For HighIncome Borrowers

July Beach Closings Due To Bacteria Levels, 2009

November Route 128 Central Corridor Commuting Miles

April Census 2010 Mail Participation Rates

August Sudbury River: Fish For Fun, Not for Food!

December Diabetes Hospitalization Rates, 2003-2008

Production Notes Metropolitan Insights 2011 is printed with 100% wind energy on elemental chlorine-free, Green-e certified and FSCcertified paper using 55% recycled content, 30% of which is post-consumer waste. As a result, the environmental benefits when compared to virgin paper are as follows:

4,576,740 BTUs energy not consumed

19 lbs water-borne waste not created

2,745 gal wastewater flow saved

304 lbs solid waste not generated

598 lbs net greenhouse gases prevented

6 trees preserved for the future R

MAPC Calendar/Annual Report 2011  

MAPC Calendar/Annual Report 2011

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