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TV DRAMA PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA

3. TV drama

Starting with the police series of the 1960s, local drama has been well received by Australian audiences. Today, Australian telemovies are very popular, often rating more than top movies; for example, Da Kath & Kim Code made it into the top 20 programs in 2005.

LOVE MY WAY Above: Brendan Cowell as Tom and Claudia Karvan as Frankie. Photographer: Jimmy Pozarik. Courtesy: Southern Star Entertainment.

FOR THE LATEST DATA SEE GTP ONLINE – WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP

Australian TV drama has a long history of government support, from the Australian TV content quotas for commercial free-to-air television to funding of public broadcasters the ABC and SBS. Additional financial support has been provided by the 10BA tax incentives, particularly in the 1980s,with the FFC the main government funding source since the 1990s.

43


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TV drama production activity HOURS PRODUCED AND PRODUCTION SPENDING IN AUSTRALIA During the 1990s, 504 TV drama programs (Australian, co-production and foreign mini-series, series and telemovies) with total production budgets of $2.7 billion were shot in Australia – an average of 50 programs with total budgets of $273 million each year. Most of these programs were Australian, with an average of 41 programs per year and total budgets of $180 million. In the seven years since 2000/01, the full TV drama slate has averaged 48 titles and total budgets of $322 million per year, including an average of 37 Australian programs with total budgets of $215 million. Since the mid-1990s, local productions have generally accounted for more than 60 per cent of TV drama spending in Australia.

HOURS PRODUCED

Australian TV drama Co-productions Foreign TV drama

200 150

Australian TV drama Co-productions Foreign TV drama

100 50

Source: Australian Film Commission.

Photography: Dennis Wisken. Courtesy: Crawford Productions.

TV DRAMA: STATE SHARE AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION 2007

ACTIVITY BY STATE Since 1997, NSW has accounted for 44 per cent of the TV drama production slate (as measured by expenditure in Australia), followed by Victoria (34 per cent) and Queensland (16 per cent). SHARE OF EXPENDITURE IN AUSTRALIA ON TV DRAMA PRODUCTION BY STATE, FOR PROGRAMS SHOT 1997/98–2006/07 Victoria 34%

NSW 44%

Queensland 16% Other 3% Source: Australian Film Commission.

South Australia 3%

2006/07

2005/06

2003/04

2004/05

2002/03

2001/02

1999/00

2000/01

1997/98

2006/07

2005/06

2003/04

2004/05

2002/03

2001/02

1999/00

0 2000/01

Below: Tamara Hope as Guinevere

250

1998/99

GUINEVERE JONES (2002)

300

1997/98

Hours

44

SPEND IN AUSTRALIA

900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

1998/99

Since the mid-1990s, local productions have generally accounted for more than 60 per cent of TV drama spending in Australia.

$ million

3. TV DRAMA

TV DRAMA PRODUCTION ACTIVITY


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3. TV DRAMA

TV DRAMA PRODUCTION ACTIVITY

AUSTRALIAN* TV DRAMA VALUE BY FORMAT In terms of production value, adult series tend to account for the majority of Australian TV drama activity each year, followed by children’s programs. TOTAL PRODUCTION BUDGETS FOR AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA BY FORMAT Series/serials Mini-series Telemovies Children’s TV drama

1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/021 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06

45

2006/07 0

50

100

150

200

250

Total budgets ($ million) Source: Australian Film Commission. Note: Australian productions only (excluding co-productions). 1. There were no mini-series produced in 2001/02. * Australian TV drama includes productions under Australian creative control.

PIZZA

Courtesy: SBS Television. Photographer: Matthew Degiorgio.

FOR THE LATEST DATA SEE GTP ONLINE – WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP

Left: Paul Fenech as Pauly Falzoni with Sharona.


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An average of 95 hours of Australian children’s TV drama is produced each year. Cost per hour for children’s TV drama has averaged $750,000.

HOURS PRODUCED AND COST PER HOUR BY FORMAT HOURS PRODUCED BY FORMAT 900 Children’s TV drama Telemovies Mini-series Series/serials

800 700

Hours produced

3. TV DRAMA

TV DRAMA PRODUCTION ACTIVITY

600 500 400 300 200 100

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2.08 1.50

1.91

1.70

1.91

2.24

1.80

1.70 1998/99

1.0 0.5

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

0.59

0.66

0.73

0.73

2005/06

2006/07

2002/03

0.86 2002/03

2003/04

2001/02

0.84 2001/02

2004/05

2000/01

0.81 2000/01

1999/00

0.92

0.5

2.5 1.5 1.0

0.57

2.0

0.81

0.78

0.89

1.0

Cost per hour ($m)

3.0

2.40

2.04

1.77

2.28

3.17

3.5

2.50 1.46

2.5

0.5

1998/99

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2002/03

2003/04

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1997/98

1997/98

0

0

1998/99

AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION 2007

3.0

1999/00

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2002/03

2003/04

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1997/98

1998/99

CHILDREN’S TV DRAMA

3.5

1.5

1.5

0

MINI-SERIES

2.0

2.0

1.58

0.30

0.23

0.26

0.27

0.27

0.25

0.30

0.5

0.21

1.0

0.27

1.5

2.5

1997/98

2.0

2.10

3.0

2.5

Cost per hour ($m)

3.5

3.0

0

Cost per hour ($m)

2002/03

2001/021

TELEMOVIES

3.5

0.29

Cost per hour ($m)

AVERAGE ANNUAL COST PER HOUR2 (2007$) BY FORMAT SERIES AND SERIALS

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

0

46

Source: Australian Film Commission. Notes: Australian productions only (excluding co-productions). 1. There were no mini-series produced in 2001/02. 2. In 2007 dollars, adjusted using the ‘non-farm GDP-implicit price deflator’; base year 2006/07.

SERIES AND SERIALS: Australian series and serials production has averaged 515 hours per year in the 10 years since 1997/98; however, the average over the past five years has been lower at 462 hours per year. Cost per hour for Australian series has averaged $260,000 since 1997/98. TELEMOVIES: Telemovie production has ranged from a high of 23 hours in 1999/00 to just six hours in 2002/03. Cost per hour for Australian telemovies has averaged $1.85 million over the 10-year period 1997/98–2006/07. MINI-SERIES: Mini-series production has averaged 21 hours in the last five years after a high of 64 hours in 2006/07; no adult mini-series were produced in 2001/02. Average cost per hour for Australian mini-series has ranged from $0.8 million in 2006/07 to $3.2 million in 1999/00. CHILDREN’S TV DRAMA: An average of 95 hours of Australian children’s TV drama has been produced each year in the 10 years since 1997/98. Cost per hour for children’s TV drama has averaged $750,000.


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CO-PRODUCED TV DRAMA1

3. TV DRAMA

TV DRAMA PRODUCTION ACTIVITY

Co-produced TV drama production spending in Australia has been tracked since 1994/95. During the 13 years since then, co-productions have spent 68 per cent of their total budgets in Australia. Since 1990, Australia’s main TV drama co-production partners have been Canada (22 titles), the UK (19 titles) and the US (8 titles). NO. PRODUCTIONS BY PARTNER COUNTRY, 1990/91–2006/07

PRODUCTION SPENDING

New Zealand 6% Germany 4% Ireland 3%

Spend ($m)

France 10%

Canada 32%

Other 7%

Total budgets Spend in Australia

1994/95 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07

UK 27%

160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

US 11%

Source: Australian Film Commission. Notes: 1. ‘Co-productions’ are defined as projects where control is shared between Australian and foreign partners and there is a mix of Australian and foreign elements in the key creative positions. This includes projects made under the official co-production program. The figures presented here include both official and unofficial co-productions.

Co-produced TV drama had a record year in 1998/99, with seven titles spending $103 million in Australia, and in the following year (1999/00), six co-produced titles spent $106 million. Several high-budget titles went into production in those two years, including two series each of the official co-productions Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Lost World and Beastmaster (both Australia/Canada), and two series of the unofficial co-production Farscape (Australia/US). Since 2000/01, co-produced TV dramas have spent $233 million in Australia, an average of 68 per cent of their budgets.

47

FOREIGN TV DRAMA1

PRODUCTION SPENDING IN AUSTRALIA 300 Spend in Australia ($m)

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

250 200 150 100 50

FOREIGN TV DRAMA PRODUCTION AS A PROPORTION OF TOTAL PRODUCTION

Foreign TV drama has generally accounted for less than 20 per cent of all TV drama spending in Australia (11 per cent in 2005/06 and 10 per cent in 2006/07). Source: Australian Film Commission. Notes: 1. A foreign production is a project under foreign creative control, originated and developed by non-Australians. It includes projects with an Australian production company operating in a service capacity. For a foreign project to be included in the AFC's National Survey of Feature Film and TV Drama, a substantial amount must be shot in Australia; foreign productions post-produced only in Australia are not covered.

2006/07

2004/05

2005/06

2002/03

2003/04

2000/01

2001/02

1998/99

1999/00

1996/97

1997/98

1994/95

1995/96

2006/07

2004/05

2005/06

2002/03

2003/04

2000/01

2001/02

1998/99

1999/00

1996/97

1997/98

1994/95

0 1995/96

No. of products

NO. PRODUCTIONS

1994/95 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 0%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

FOR THE LATEST DATA SEE GTP ONLINE – WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP

During the 13 years since 1994/95, foreign programs have spent 66 per cent of their total budgets in Australia. Levels of foreign TV drama production are mainly impacted by fluctuations in the number of telemovies made here. The peak of 16 titles in 2000/01 was the result of 14 foreign telemovies starting production, due in part to the acceleration of production schedules by US companies to avoid strike action in that country. Production of foreign TV drama rose in 2005/06, with three programs for adults spending $26 million of their budgets in Australia. This expenditure is due almost entirely to one high-budget US series – Nightmares and Dreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King. Spending in Australia by the 2006/07 foreign TV drama slate remained relatively steady with five programs spending $29 million.


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Since 1995/96, around half the finance for the combined Australian and co-production TV drama slate has come from the Australian film/TV industry.

Financing Australian TV drama SOURCES OF FINANCE, AUSTRALIAN AND CO-PRODUCTION TV DRAMA Since 1995/96, around half the finance for the combined Australian and co-production TV drama slate has come from the Australian film/TV industry, mainly commercial broadcasters. Foreign investors are also a significant source of finance, with contributions peaking at 49 per cent in 1999/00. A substantial proportion of foreign contributions are for co-productions.

CONTRIBUTIONS OF VARIOUS TYPES OF INVESTOR TO AUSTRALIAN AND CO-PRODUCTION TV DRAMA 300 250

Contribution ($m)

3. TV DRAMA

FINANCING AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA

200 150

Australian government sources provide around 15 per cent of finance for the combined Australian and coproduction TV drama slate. Most of this finance comes from the Film Finance Corporation Australia (FFC), which invests in both Australian and co-production TV dramas.

100 50 0 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 20005/06 2006/07

48

Foreign investors Australian film/TV industry1 Australian private investors2 Australian government sources3 Notes:

Contributions from private sources increased in 2001/ 02 and 2002/03, due principally to the investment of funds raised by the Macquarie Nine Film & TV Funds. Source: Australian Film Commission.

1. Includes Australian-based film and TV production companies, distribution companies, commercial free-to-air broadcasters, the ABC and SBS, and pay TV channels. 2. Includes private non-industry sources such as FLICs, and 10B and 10BA investors. 3. Includes Australian state and federal agencies and funding bodies. Comprises equity investments only – distribution guarantees, loans and underwriting are not included.

BUDGETS FOR TV DRAMA ACCESSING PRIVATE FINANCE THROUGH 10BA When first introduced in June 1981, 10BA allowed investors to claim a 150 per cent tax concession and to pay tax on only half of any income earned from the investment. Government concern about the cost of 10BA over the years meant that concessions were progressively reduced to 100 per cent. Division 10BA was closed to new applicants in July 2007 with the introduction of the new Producer Offset (see page 22). The concessional status for investment in productions holding a valid 10BA certificate will continue to be available until 30 June 2009.

PROPORTION OF TOTAL TV DRAMA BUDGETS RAISED THROUGH 10BA TAX INCENTIVES 40

Estimated production budgets ($m)

10BA

Other funding

35 30 25 20 15 10 5

Source: Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts; Australian Taxation Office.

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/00

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1995/96

1994/95

1993/94

1992/93

1991/92

1990/91

0

1989/90

AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION 2007

TV drama programs allowed under the 10BA tax incentives were mini-series and telemovies. In March 2000, half-hour animated telemovies became eligible for 10BA as well as animated mini-series for adults (30 minutes an episode) and children (15 minutes an episode). Between 1989/90 and 2005/06, an average of four TV dramas a year were made with funds raised under 10BA. The total value of production budgets raised averaged $14 million per year, with an average of $5 million per year raised under 10BA.


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Drama program expenditure

3. TV DRAMA

DRAMA PROGRAM EXPENDITURE

FREE-TO-AIR TV Commercial free-to-air TV services spent $140.6 million on Australian drama programs in 2005/06 – $125.3 million on adult TV drama and $15.3 million on children’s drama. This represented 30 per cent of their total spend on drama of $472.6 million. This is close to the five-year average of 32 per cent. EXPENDITURE ON AUSTRALIAN DRAMA PROGRAMS (INCLUDING BOTH TV DRAMA AND FEATURE FILMS) BY COMMERCIAL FREE-TO-AIR SERVICES IN AUSTRALIA, 1995/96–2005/06 EXPENDITURE ON AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA IN AUSTRALIA ($m) ADULT DRAMA

CHILDREN’S DRAMA

TOTAL

1995/96

77.2

7.0

84.2

1996/97

73.7

7.8

81.5

1997/98

82.1

11.2

93.3

1998/99

117.9

10.0

127.9

1999/00

89.7

8.7

98.4

2000/01

105.0

9.5

114.5

2001/02

114.7

13.5

128.2

2002/03

130.8

15.1

145.9

2003/04

115.4

9.3

124.7

2004/05

113.8

13.4

127.2

2005/06

125.3

15.3

140.6

49

Source: Australian Communications and Media Authority, Broadcasting Financial Results.

PAY TV AUSTRALIAN CONTENT REQUIREMENTS ON PAY TV

In 2005/06, expenditure on new eligible Australian drama programs (including both TV drama and features) by channel providers and pay TV licensees for the 16 pay TV drama channels totalled $18.4 million. This included investment in and payment of licence fees for a range of programs, such as the feature films Romulus, My Father, Hey Hey It’s Esther Blueburger and The Silence and the TV series Love My Way (Series 3), Stupid, Stupid Man, Supernova, Blue Water High and H2O Just add Water. AGGREGATE EXPENDITURE BY PAY TV DRAMA SERVICES ON NEW AUSTRALIAN DRAMA, 1995/96–2005/06 250 Total program expenditure

Spend by drama channels ($m)

$206m 200

150

100

50

Expenditure on new Australian drama $18m

0 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 Source: Australian Communications and Media Authority, Media Release No. 46/2000, 13 July 2000; ABA Update July 2001; Media Release No. 85/2001; Media Release No. 144/2002, 27 November 2002; Media Release No. NR48/2004; Media Release No. NR76/2004, 14 July 2004; Media Release No. NR172/2004; Media Release No. MR9/2006.

FOR THE LATEST DATA SEE GTP ONLINE – WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP

Under the Broadcasting Services Act 1992 (BSA), subscription television licensees that broadcast drama channels, and drama channel package providers, have been required since July 1999 to spend at least 10 per cent of their total program expenditure on new Australian drama and make up any shortfall in subsequent financial years.


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3. TV DRAMA

RELEASE OF AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA

In 2005, free-to-air TV screened 101 hours of first-release Australian children’s TV drama.

Release of Australian TV drama TV DRAMA RELEASED ON FREE-TO-AIR TV ADULT TV DRAMA An average of 31 Australian TV drama programs for adults (including telemovies, mini-series, series and serials) receive first-release screenings on Australian free-to-air television each year. Series/serials make up the majority of these (around 65 per cent). An average of 20 new series/serial titles screened each year between 1996 and 2005, including one-off series such as the ABC’s We Can Be Heroes and long-running serials such as Ten’s Neighbours. First-run screenings of telemovies and mini-series fluctuate annually. Telemovies have averaged seven new titles per year in the last 10 years, and mini-series have averaged four. FIRST-RELEASE AUSTRALIAN AND CO-PRODUCTION ADULT TV DRAMA SCREENED ON FREE-TO-AIR TV, NUMBER OF TITLES SCREENED, 1996–2005

50

TELEMOVIES

MINI-SERIES

SERIES/SERIALS

TOTAL

1996

6

7

20

33

1997

11

3

21

35

1998

4

6

20

30

1999

5

4

17

26

2000

7

3

18

28

5-YEAR AVERAGE 1996–2000

7

5

19

30

2001

5

6

23

34

2002

10

1

24

35

2003

4

3

21

28

2004

9

3

20

32

2005

10

1

15

26

5-YEAR AVERAGE 2001–2005

8

3

21

31

10-YEAR AVERAGE 1996–2005

7

4

20

31

AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION 2007

Source: Compiled by the Australian Film Commission. Notes: Includes Australian productions and co-productions with overseas partners. Based on first recorded screenings. Telemovie figures include both one-offs and series or anthologies.

FORMAT DEFINITIONS The following format definitions are applied to data gathered by the Australian Film Commission. Telemovie: Drama made for television. Usually the producer's intention prior to release is the main indicator. Telemovies can be 52 minutes (commercial TV hour) or longer. Mini-series:1 A limited series of drama which is less than 13 hours in total length, and which is either made to be broadcast in several sequential parts featuring a major continuous plot for which there is an expectation of an ending resolving the major plot tensions, or an anthology of drama works for television made to be broadcast under one generic title. Individual episodes must be 60 commercial minutes or longer, unless the program is for children, in which case episodes must be 30 commercial minutes or longer, or, if animated, 15 commercial minutes or longer. Series: Comprises a potentially unlimited number of episodes, each being a self-contained plot which can be screened in any order. Serial: Comprises a potentially unlimited number of episodes and contain a number of interweaving and overlapping plots continuing from one episode to the next. Notes:

1. In categorising titles as either mini-series or series, the AFC follows the definitions used by the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts for Division 10BA of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936. This occasionally means that a mini-series which might be classified as a series according to industry definitions is defined as a miniseries in order to retain parity with data from other government agencies.


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3. TV DRAMA

RELEASE OF AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA

CHILDREN’S TV DRAMA An average of 16 TV drama programs for children receive a first release on Australian free-to-air television each year. This is about half the number of new drama programs for adults released annually. In contrast to TV drama for adults, first-release screenings of children’s TV drama are mostly in the form of mini-series. An average of nine mini-series for children received a first release screening each year between 1996 and 2005, compared to six series/serials. Telemovies for children are less common than for adults, with an average of only one new release per year in the last 10 years. They are often Christmas specials. FIRST-RELEASE AUSTRALIAN AND CO-PRODUCTION CHILDREN’S TV DRAMA SCREENED ON FREE-TO-AIR TV, NUMBER OF TITLES SCREENED, 1996–2005 TELEMOVIES

MINI-SERIES

SERIES/SERIALS

TOTAL

1996

1

10

3

14

1997

0

12

7

19

1998

0

13

10

23

1999

1

10

7

18

2000

2

8

5

15

5-YEAR AVERAGE 1996–2000

1

11

6

18

2001

4

8

4

16

2002

1

5

6

12

2003

1

4

7

12

2004

0

7

9

16

2005

1

9

5

15

5-YEAR AVERAGE 2001–2005

1

7

6

14

10-YEAR AVERAGE 1996–2005

1

9

6

16

51

Source: Compiled by the Australian Film Commission. Notes: Includes Australian productions and co-productions with overseas partners. Based on first recorded screenings. Telemovie figures include both one-offs and series or anthologies.

Left: Keenan MacWilliam as Carole. Photographer: Bill Bachman. Courtesy: Crawford Productions.

FOR THE LATEST DATA SEE GTP ONLINE – WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP

THE SADDLE CLUB


3_TVDrama.fm Page 52 Saturday, December 15, 2007 10:20 AM

Between 1990 and 2006, Australian mini-series, series and serials (including both children’s and adult programs) won an average of 41 Australian and international awards each year.

TV DRAMA RELEASED ON VIDEO In 2006, there were 43 Australian titles in the top 500 adult TV drama titles sold on video (DVD and VHS). These titles accounted for 6.6 per cent ($13.5 million) of sales value and 6.3 per cent of units sold. The highest-selling over the past three years have been McLeod’s Daughters: Season 5 (2006), Da Kath & Kim Code (2005) and Kath & Kim: Series 3 (2004). ABC television series Kath & Kim achieved the highest cumulative sales of the period, followed by McLeod’s Daughters, Farscape and Blue Heelers. AUSTRALIAN SHARE OF TOP 1,000 RETAIL VIDEO SALES 1

12 10 8 6 4 2 0 2004 2

Titles

52

2005 3

Units

TOP AUSTRALIAN ADULT TV DRAMA TITLES ON VIDEO (DVD AND VHS), 2002–20061

(DVD AND VHS) OF TV DRAMA TITLES Share of retail video (%)

3. TV DRAMA

RELEASE OF AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA

YEAR

TITLE

2002

Kath & Kim: Series 1, Episodes 1–8

2003

Kath & Kim: Series 2

2004

Kath & Kim: Series 3

2005

Da Kath & Kim Code

2006

McLeod’s Daughters: Season 5

Source: Australian Film Commission analysis of GfK Marketing data. Notes: 1. Adult TV drama refers to scripted productions excluding children’s programming. It does not include documentary and light entertainment TV shows. 2. Refers to the number of titles sold during each calendar year (first-release titles issued that year and continued sales of previously issued titles). This may include multiple editions of the same content. 3. Although box sets are counted as a single title for ranking purposes, their units and value are proportioned according to the origin of discrete titles included in the collection.

2006

3

Value

RATINGS

AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION 2007

TOP-RATING AUSTRALIAN DRAMA/COMEDY SERIES – FIVE-CITY METRO AVERAGE, 1998–2006

TOP-RATING AUSTRALIAN TELEMOVIE – FIVE-CITY METRO AVERAGE, 2001–2006

YEAR

TITLE

NETWORK

YEAR

TITLE

1998

Blue Heelers

1999

Seachange

2000

Blue Heelers

2001 2002

NETWORK

7

2001

My Husband My Killer

10

ABC

2002

Heroes’ Mountain

10

7

2003

The Postcard Bandit

10

Blue Heelers

7

2004

The Alice

10

All Aussie Adventures

10

2005

Da Kath & Kim Code

ABC

2003

Kath & Kim

ABC

2006

The Society Murders

10

2004

Kath & Kim (Comedy) McLeod’s Daughters (Drama)

ABC 9

2005

All Aussie Adventures (Comedy) McLeod’s Daughters (Drama)

10 9

The Wedge (Comedy) Blue Heelers (Drama)

10 7

2006

Source: Compiled by the Australian Film Commission using OzTAM data. Notes: All people, 1998–2006, program average. Any comparison of data before and after January 2001 should take into account that a different audience measurement system has applied since that date.

Source: Compiled by the Australian Film Commission using OzTAM data.

TOP-RATING AUSTRALIAN MINI-SERIES – FIVE-CITY METRO AVERAGE, 2001–2006 YEAR

TITLE

NETWORK

2001

My Brother Jack

10

2002

The Potato Factory

7

2003

After the Deluge

10

2004

Jessica

10

2005

The Incredible Journey of Mary Bryant

10

2006

Answered by Fire

ABC

Source: Compiled by the Australian Film Commission using OzTAM data.


3_TVDrama.fm Page 53 Saturday, December 15, 2007 10:20 AM

SALES OF TV DRAMA TO OVERSEAS MARKETS

3. TV DRAMA

RELEASE OF AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA

HIGHEST AND LOWEST PRICES PAID FOR FFC-SUPPORTED TELEMOVIES AND MINI-SERIES FOR ADULTS IN SELECTED TERRITORIES, 2003–2004 (RANKED BY HIGHEST PRICE PAID) PRICES PAID (US$) PER HOUR MAIN TERRITORY

HIGHEST

LOWEST

NO. TITLES

LATIN AMERICA

13,900

3,000

3

NEW ZEALAND

12,550

7,100

3

POLAND

8,000

2,650

4

PAN ASIA

7,850

1,150

2

CANADA

7,000

3,850

4

PORTUGAL

3,750

3,350

2

ISRAEL

2,300

800

4

DENMARK

2,150

2,000

2

IRELAND

2,100

2,100

2

MEXICO

2,000

1,500

3

Source: Film Finance Corporation Australia.

53

FOR COMPLETE LIST SEE WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP/MROSSALESADULTMINITELES.HTML HIGHEST AND LOWEST PRICES PAID FOR FFC-SUPPORTED CHILDREN’S MINI-SERIES IN SELECTED TERRITORIES, 2003–2004 (RANKED BY HIGHEST PRICE PAID) PRICES PAID (US$) PER HOUR MAIN TERRITORY

1

FRANCE & FRENCH-SPEAKING EUROPE

HIGHEST

LOWEST

NO. TITLES

36,200

1,350

8

32,100

3,500

4

GERMANY & GERMAN-SPEAKING EUROPE

30,300

3,950

5

ITALY & ITALIAN-SPEAKING EUROPE

13,150

950

5

CANADA

4,100

1,250

10

PORTUGAL

4,000

1,000

4

SWEDEN

3,700

600

5

SPAIN

2,550

1,300

2

BELGIUM

2,500

2,400

3

SOUTH AFRICA

2,500

800

4

Source: Film Finance Corporation Australia. Notes: 1. Includes sales for single country within territory.

FOR COMPLETE LIST SEE WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP/MROSKIDSMINIS.HTML

FOR THE LATEST DATA SEE GTP ONLINE – WWW.AFC.GOV.AU/GTP

UK


3_TVDrama.fm Page 54 Saturday, December 15, 2007 10:20 AM

3. TV DRAMA

RELEASE OF AUSTRALIAN TV DRAMA

AUSTRALIAN AWARDS AUSTRALIAN FILM INSTITUTE (AFI) AWARDS – BEST TELEVISION MINI-SERIES/TELEFEATURE, 1997–2006

LOGIE AWARDS – MOST OUTSTANDING AUSTRALIAN DRAMA, 1997–2007

YEAR

TITLE

YEAR

TITLE

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Good Guys Bad Guys Wildside: Mini-series The Day of the Roses On the Beach My Brother Jack The Road from Coorain After the Deluge Marking Time The Incredible Journey of Mary Bryant Remote Area Nurse: R.A.N.

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Water Rats Frontline Seachange Seachange Seachange The Secret Life of Us The Secret Life of Us The Secret Life of Us Love My Way Love My Way Love My Way

Source: Australian Film Institute.

AUSTRALIAN FILM INSTITUTE (AFI) AWARDS – BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES, 2002–2006

54

YEAR

TITLE

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Kath & Kim MDA Stingers Love My Way Love My Way

Source: Australian Film Institute.

AUSTRALIAN FILM INSTITUTE (AFI) AWARDS – BEST CHILDREN’S TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES, 1997–2006

AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCTION IN AUSTRALIA: AUSTRALIAN FILM COMMISSION 2007

YEAR

TITLE

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

The Wayne Manifesto: Amy Pastrami Day Blabbermouth and Stickybeak See How They Run: Episode 1 Eugenie Sandler P.I: Episode 2 Cybergirl: Episode 1 Short Cuts Out There Wicked Science Holly’s Heroes Mortified

Source:

Australian Film Institute.

LOGIE AWARDS – MOST POPULAR AUSTRALIAN DRAMA, 1997–2007 YEAR

TITLE

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Blue Heelers Blue Heelers Blue Heelers Blue Heelers All Saints All Saints All Saints McLeod’s Daughters McLeod’s Daughters Home and Away Home and Away

Source: TV Week Logie Awards.

Source: TV Week Logie Awards.

LOGIE AWARDS – MOST OUTSTANDING AUSTRALIAN MINI-SERIES/TELEMOVIE, 1997–2007 YEAR

TITLE

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

Not awarded Wildside The Day of Roses Not awarded Halifax FP: A Person of Interest Changi The Road from Coorain After the Deluge Jessica The Incredible Journey of Mary Bryant Not awarded

Source: TV Week Logie Awards.

LOGIE AWARDS – MOST OUTSTANDING AUSTRALIAN COMEDY, 1997–2007 YEAR

TITLE

1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Club Buggery Frontline Not awarded The Micallef Program The Games The Micallef Program Kath & Kim CNNNN; Kath & Kim The Chaser Decides We Can Be Heroes: Finding the Australian of the Year Rove Live

2007

Source: TV Week Logie Awards.

Aus. TV Drama Prod.  

a document from the Australian Government which provides lots of figures on domestic TV productions including volumes and costs

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