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LIVE PROUD MAGAZINE AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

T H E DES I G N I SSU E From ultra-chic interiors to carefully crafted communities and sustainable retail spaces, explore the way design is shaping this new decade.


Up front CONTENTS

Autumn/Winter

2020

Up front

3  The design of things to come Property 4 – 7  Calm after the storm 8 – 11 The 5-minute community 12 – 15 Property people talk property 16 – 19  Steeped in history: spotlight on Yungaba House

Health & wellbeing

20 – 23  A black and white solution to rising temperatures

4–7 Visions for the new decade

24 – 29  The new frontier of sustainable retail 8 – 11 The 5-minute community

30 – 32  Stronger together 33 – 35

Open up to more

Community 36 – 39

Proud homes

40 – 43  The art of discovery Lifestyle

16 – 19 Steeped in history

44– 45  Home office 101 46 – 49

Inspired outdoors

50 – 51

Perth: go west

24 – 29 The new frontier of sustainable retail

News 52 – 53  Community events 54 – 55

Get to know Frasers Property 36 – 39 Proud homes

52 – 53 Community events

Cover image Ruksanah & friends, Ed.Square, NSW

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Autumn/Winter 2020 | Live proud

46 – 49 Inspired outdoors

Please note that while reasonable care is taken to ensure the contents of this magazine are correct, all information is to be used as a guide only. Images are conceptual only. Purchasers must rely on their own enquiries and the contract for sale.


Up front MARKET INSIGHT

Artist’s impression

The Waterfront, Shell Cove, NSW

The design of things to come As we were getting this special Design Edition of the Live Proud magazine ready for print, a wave of measures to protect people from the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus were in full force across Australia. They’ve meant spending much more time in our homes and neighbourhoods, putting some social distance between ourselves and the crowds we usually move in. Despite these challenges, it’s been inspiring to observe all the ways people have maintained social connection even as they practice physical distancing. Neighbours shopping for neighbours, TV watch parties hosted on social media, and the sprouting of grassroots community movements like Viral Kindness and Light up the Dawn, have shown us at our best and most caring. In times as uncertain as these, it’s reassuring to be able to draw upon the long history and deep expertise of people like Frasers Property Australia CEO Rod Fehring to help us understand what will be different—and what will remain comfortingly familiar—in the post-pandemic property market. His article Calm after the storm is a must-read for anyone thinking about buying, selling, or investing right now. As I mentioned earlier, this edition of the Live Proud magazine is all about the topic of design in property. Everything from designing for heritage locations, urban art installations, and environmental sustainability through to what’s new in interior styling and lifestyle creation.

But perhaps the most important aspect of place design—never more critical than right now—is the creation of strong social bonds and community resilience that help people stay grounded in times of upheaval. This approach has always been at the forefront of the Frasers Property philosophy. As a globally-diversified development business— with deep expertise in residential, retail, and commercial development—we’re able to design our communities not just as places to live, but places to work, shop, learn and thrive too.

“These tumultuous times will pass, but the powerful allure of home will never fade.” Before I sign off, I’d like to leave you with a personal observation. I’ve been working in this industry for a couple of decades, and at this moment more than any other I can recall, the security of home and community has never been greater. These tumultuous times will pass, but the powerful allure of home will never fade. Stay well out there.

Cameron Leggatt

Executive General Manager, Residential Frasers Property Australia Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY CALM AFTER THE STORM

Calm after the storm words by Rod Fehring, CEO, Frasers Property Australia

In what felt like the blink of an eye, COVID-19 changed everything. Social distancing restrictions and work from home requirements forced us all into rapid adaptation—some of which has been painful and difficult. The sanctuary of home has never been more important, yet for many people their property dreams are on hold as they wait to see how recovery takes shape. Frasers Property Australia CEO Rod Fehring has some thoughts on what’s going to be different and what will remain comfortingly familiar when we get to the other side.

Rod Fehring, CEO Frasers Property Australia

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PROPERTY CALM AFTER THE STORM

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY CALM AFTER THE STORM Leah, Nesmi & Mary, Berwick Waters, VIC

They say that after a break, a bone heals stronger than before. I’m no doctor, but I find the metaphor helpful when I think about what recovery might look like as we navigate the path to a post-pandemic world. There’s no question that the injury COVID-19 has done to our collective sense of normality has been severe. Freedoms we’ve long taken for granted and the incidental richness of life that comes from contact with friends and workmates and strangers has been ripped away, leaving many people anxious and overwhelmed. All exacerbated by simply not knowing when things will get better. Of course, we know it will get better. As labs around the world race to create a vaccine, we inch closer to a world in which a return to ‘normal life’ will be within reach. In the meantime, there’s much we can learn from this moment to ensure that we are stronger, more adaptable, and more resilient than we were before.

River Homes, Hamilton Reach, QLD

The uncommon rise of common interest A phenomenon that’s been striking to me—and inarguably for the better— has been the rise and embrace of the ‘common interest’. A core thesis of the ancient Greek philosophers, the common interest—or common good— is an idea that’s somewhat fallen out of favour in our modern times. The speed with which we coalesced around the social obligation of caring for each other’s health and safety during this pandemic, however, is perhaps a sign that it’s always been there, lying dormant just below the surface.

Reactivated as it is now, we’ve seen that the power of common cause is (in the absence of a vaccine) the most potent tool in our arsenal. The social compact of physical distancing has dramatically squashed the curve in Australia and saved countless lives, while at the political level it has reminded governments that their purpose and obligation is to the common interest rather than to parochial self-interest. The motivating factor of urgency has also opened up real and meaningful dialogue between industry and social institutions toward solving problems quickly and collaboratively. The hospitality industry’s role homing the homeless and the property industry’s ability to bring on stock for social housing are just two examples of this new, more productive accord. The question is, will this sense of obligation to something larger than ourselves be a lasting good to come from this crisis? I hope so. I suspect that it’s among younger generations, especially those that have never experienced an economic shock like this, where the impacts will be the most long-lasting. When you come of age in a time where the myth of unlimited growth is shattered, your health cannot be taken for granted, and social freedom is taken from you, those are life lessons not easily forgotten.

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PROPERTY CALM AFTER THE STORM

Redefining the value of ‘place’ A level down from the broader societal impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are signs of evolution in our homes and neighbourhoods as well. As a consequence of spending a good deal of time ‘sheltering-in-place’, we’re more conscious than ever of what place really means to us. Can we get to a local supermarket or pharmacy easily? Will an urban hike around the neighbourhood lead to those small moments of social acknowledgement, like a smile or a wave, that can brighten an otherwise dark day? Is it a safe place to ride your bike or go for a run? These elements have always been important in urban design, but the degree to which it’s done well and cohesively will be under the spotlight more than ever in a post-pandemic world. For a company like Frasers—with deep expertise in residential, retail, and commercial development—we have the ability to affect outcomes across the board. We’ve already begun to design our shopping centres to adapt to online shopping, restaurant deliveries, and after-hours activations or pop-up stores that add some theatre to the retail experience. And anticipating a world in which work-from-home (WFH) will play a larger role, our commercial developments will likely evolve to be less about office space and more about creative collaboration and social connection.

As for the home, there’s no question that we’ll see change here. With the sudden—and for many, unwanted— transition to WFH, the value of a room in the house that you can retreat to for study or work in relative privacy has skyrocketed. The question for designers is how to balance that with the desire for ‘flow’ that’s so popular in open design footprints. I think the answer will lie in adaptable spaces that can easily be opened up or closed as the need for privacy waxes and wanes. We’re doing some interesting work in this space, analysing how the apartments and homes of the future will be more flexible, without needing to be bigger or more expensive to run.

Bringing it home With so much change in such a short amount of time, it’s natural to wonder if anything will ever be the same again. As someone who’s been in the property game for as long as I have—four decades and counting—what I can say is that there is one thing that’s unlikely to ever change; and that’s that the value and meaning of home is so much more than the physical asset you buy. It’s a place of sanctuary. A source of pride. A means of connection with the place around you, and a foundation for communion with those you love. Whether you’re watching the market now with a view to buying soon or

planning to jump back in as life returns to normal, the best advice I can give you is to think about property as the sum of many parts. The home or apartment is a key element, that’s for certain; but it’s also much more than that. Is it in a community you feel you can belong—where friendships will be made, and all life’s meaningful social connections are supported? Does the neighbourhood offer more than just houses to live, but places to shop, work, learn and play as well? Can you leave the car at home and walk to do whatever you need to do? Or catch the train or bus to work? Is it a place with a distinct character and strong bonds of inclusion? The secret to making a decision you’ll feel proud of long after the keys are dropped into your hand, is to add the value of all these elements together, not trade them off against one another. Ultimately, the choice you make isn’t just about the price of the home, but the value of connection that comes from the amenity around you, and the full life it helps you live.

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY THE 5-MINUTE COMMUNITY

Artist’s impression

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PROPERTY THE 5-MINUTE COMMUNITY

Residents will be able to pick up essentials from the Town Centre

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or much of the 21st century, the convenience of living just moments from public transport, schools, shops, entertainment, parks and work has been a luxury reserved for those who can afford a home in the inner suburbs of a major capital city.

But with rapid population growth comes increasing urban congestion, pushing buyers to look to suburbs on the city fringes for the space and affordability they desire. And as buyers flock to outer suburban areas, developers are tasked with the challenge of building communities that offer more than just land lots for sale. Mambourin is a new kind of community in Melbourne’s fast-growing western corridor, offering buyers easy access to essential amenities on their doorstep, 38km from the CBD. Residents’ leisure centre, Mambourin, VIC

Once complete, Mambourin will feature a full range of amenity: a future Town Centre with retail, entertainment, dining and childcare; a local business district that will offer employment opportunities, civic buildings, including a library, performing arts centre and maternal and child health facilities; private school prep-12 offering; parks and wetlands; and a residents’ leisure centre with gym facilities, swimming pool, function space, multi-sports court and café.

It’s a level of amenity that’s almost unprecedented in Australia’s outersuburban areas, but one that is becoming a necessity as population and housing prices continue to climb. For Development Director, Penny Dabner and the rest of the team behind Mambourin, the ten year design and build will be an important learning curve for future developments. “For a project of this scale and ambition, with significant infrastructure works, there’s a lot of work with state and local government to bring services on as early and as easily as we can,” explains Penny. “It’s always a balancing act as you grow a community, but I think among the great things we’ve been able to achieve so far is the fast-track on the wetlands, district park and the residents’ club. It means that as the first residents move in, they’ll have places to meet, play and relax without having to leave their neighbourhood.” Along with hard infrastructure, there’s also the task of creating the soft infrastructure that is required to build a thriving community.

Artist’s impression

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY THE 5-MINUTE COMMUNITY

Mambourin's masterplan prioritises functional green spaces

“With new developments like this one, by nature everyone is a stranger to this place and to one another,” says Penny. “Creating strong connections, identifying community leaders, and fostering community groups have such a big impact on the quality of life for our residents.” Mambourin is one of five communities engaged in a pilot study with the City of Melbourne’s Resilient Melbourne Project, which—among other things— aims to test that involving residents in shaping their neighbourhoods can lead to stronger levels of community cohesion and resilience. “I’ve been in the industry for 15 years now and creating a sense of belonging for customers has always been a focus, but it’s always been difficult to deliver because it’s less tangible than roads and services,” says Penny. “I think the big difference now is the focus and attention that it’s getting from the industry in a broader sense. Government and statutory authorities in particular are more cognisant.”

“Creating strong connections, identifying community leaders, and fostering community groups have such a big impact on the quality of life for our residents.”

This change in industry has been driven largely by a new breed of customer that is highly educated and has expectations to match. Artist’s impression

“We recognise that customers are quite mature in their demands for development, and we encourage people to think about affordability from a living perspective, not just from a housing cost perspective,” says Penny. “Communities where you can walk to and utilise a lot of free amenities are going to offer a more affordable lifestyle for families when compared with a community that might offer a lower price point for land but nothing more.”

Residents' only gym facilities, Mambourin, VIC

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PROPERTY THE 5-MINUTE COMMUNITY

Nagella family, Mambourin, VIC

“The community at Mambourin has Lalitha and Suman purchased a lot schools coming in, a railway station, at Mambourin in early 2019 and say swimming pools, a town centre—it has that for them, the lifestyle on offer at everything in a walkable distance which Mambourin reminded them of the way is really important for us.” they grew up. “Moving to Mambourin was actually a collective decision with Lalitha and Suman are among a few of our friends. The intention is hundreds of families eagerly awaiting really to create a community for our the completion of their homes. families and our kids,” explains Suman. “I remember when I was growing up, I was always playing outside with friends. We want our kids to be outside and active, not glued to their gadgets as soon as they get home.”

With the first residents expected to move in in early 2021, all eyes are on this ambitious mini-Melbourne. Discover a new kind of community Visit Mambourin.com.au

With two growing children and the increasingly busy lifestyle that goes with that, the close proximity of amenities was also a key drawcard for the young parents. “The home we’re currently in is fine, it’s good enough. But with the kids growing up we want more,” says Suman.

Wetlands, Mambourin, VIC

Artist’s impression

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY PROPERTY PEOPLE TALK PROPERTY Artist’s impression

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PROPERTY PROPERTY PEOPLE TALK PROPERTY The Waterfront, Shell Cove, NSW

Property people talk property Simone Dyer sits at the helm of one of the largest (and longest) joint development projects between local government and a property developer in Australia; The Waterfront, Shell Cove. Simone stepped into the role of Development Director in 2019, but her history with the 50-year project started back in 2012 when she was working as the project’s Design Director.

Simone Dyer

Development Director, Frasers Property Australia

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY PROPERTY PEOPLE TALK PROPERTY The Waterfront, Shell Cove, NSW

“I’ve wanted to be an architect for as long as I can remember,” says Simone. “I’ve been drawing ever since I could hold a pencil and creating things from my imagination is really my true love. I worked in architectural practice for a while but was drawn to development so that I could have a hand in shaping projects commercially as well as in a design sense. When the opportunity at Shell Cove came up, it was really a case of perfect timing.” As an avid boater herself, Simone was particularly drawn to The Waterfront, Shell Cove vision. Once complete, the harbourside Town Centre will offer waterfront retail, dining and entertainment, open space, and pontoon berthing for approximately 270 vessels. “My husband and I are boat people,” Simone explains. “That’s what really drew me to the project seven years ago when the masterplan was going out to tender. Having some grounding and knowledge of what the boating community is looking for has helped to evolve and improve our plans for the marina, I think.”

“A great vision needs to be underpinned by at least one really good idea.”

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Autumn/Winter 2020 | Live proud

Artist’s impression

Now, after so many years working intimately to develop the masterplan, Simone is navigating The Waterfront’s transition from a grand vision to a thriving community and landmark of the New South Wales south coast. “The project was conceived in the late ’70s, so it’s older than I am,” laughs Simone. “And for the last 20 years, the project has largely been a land subdivision project. For many years, coming down the hill you’d see a ‘coming soon’ billboard along the highway. But with the marina, tavern, dining precinct and first stage of apartments all due for completion in the next 12 months or so, the community can finally see everything

coming to life. It’s a really exciting time in the project’s life.” In addition to overseeing the construction programme, Simone plays a vital role connecting with The Waterfront’s engaged and passionate local community. While the feedback she receives is generally positive and encouraging, she’s the first to admit it hasn’t always been plain sailing. “I think with all things that are so visionary and require such a great deal of change, there’s some natural apprehension about what that means for way of life,” says Simone. “But this is something that a lot of people have been waiting a long time for; they’re


PROPERTY PROPERTY PEOPLE TALK PROPERTY

really excited to see it finally coming together. Recently I was having breakfast in Wollongong and somebody recognised the Frasers Property logo on my jacket and came over to say, ‘what you’re doing for the Illawarra region is just incredible.’ That’s always gratifying to hear, it means you’re on the right track.” With the project now in its fifth and final decade of development, the team are firing on all cylinders to deliver the completed marina in mid 2021 and plan to close out the project by 2026. But with more than 30 years already under their belts, how are they keeping the momentum? According to Simone,

everything they do comes back to the very core of why the project exists. “A great vision needs to be underpinned by at least one really good idea. And The Waterfront, Shell Cove is anchored by a really great one,” says Simone. “With anything of this scale you’re going to have to synthesise the needs and influences of the market, government and statutory bodies, as well as the community. Not to mention the sheer mountain of risk and logistics to navigate.

But we always come back to the core idea, the best idea: to create a publicly accessible piece of marine infrastructure that would become a landmark place and employment hub for not only Shell Cove, but for the entire south coast region.” Find your dream home in a thriving coastal community. Visit TheWaterfrontShellCove.com.au

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY STEEPED IN HISTORY Yungaba House, QLD

Steeped in history:

Spotlight on Yungaba House

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PROPERTY STEEPED IN HISTORY

Historic Yungaba House started life as an Immigration Depot, commissioned by the Queensland Government in 1885 and completed two years later. In the 130 years that have since passed, Yungaba House has lived many lives, serving a different purpose for each generation than the one that went before them. Today, the heritage-listed property sits amongst expansive manicured gardens and is home to ten private residences, lovingly restored and renewed by Frasers Property Australia and a team of the nation’s best architectural artisans.

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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PROPERTY STEEPED IN HISTORY

Yungaba House in 1903

A brief history of Yungaba House A place of welcome In 1859, Queensland became a separate colony to New South Wales and began offering assisted passage to British, German and Scandinavian settlers. To cope with the influx of people, in 1885 the Queensland Government commissioned an Immigration Depot which would be completed two years later and christened Yungaba House.

The war years In 1901, Yungaba House was temporarily used as a ‘return house’ for Australian troops returning from combat in South Africa’s Boer War. In the war years of the 1900s, the property was used as a hospital for Australian troops, as well as a dispatch centre for food and clothing and a venue for welcome home ceremonies.

Creating the Story Bridge Yungaba House was used as the project and design office for Brisbane’s Jubilee Bridge, now called the ‘Story Bridge’, which opened in 1932. The women’s ward was converted to the drafting office and modifications were made to provide clear and natural light for drawing.

A place to call home In 2003, Frasers Property (then Australand) purchased the Yungaba House site from the state government and embarked on a decade-long mission to restore and revitalise this iconic piece of Brisbane history.

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PROPERTY STEEPED IN HISTORY  rom top to bottom F 1. Spiral staircase 2. Rear exterior 3. Veranda and garden 4. Private residence

Restoring Yungaba

A place to call home

Transforming the purpose of a building while preserving more than a century of history is no easy feat. For the team behind Yungaba House, the project required the developer, architect, and builder to be united in their approach to heritage design and restoration.

Today, Yungaba House is home to ten families who are adding their own legacies to the building’s rich history. One of them is Kim Hill, a long-time farmer from Gatton who fell in love with the building while walking the streets of Brisbane with her husband, searching for the perfect place to retire.

Experts in their field were sourced for the project including a team of specialist glaziers from Tasmania who were engaged by Hutchinson’s Builders to restore 135 windows to their former glory, replacing 400 pieces of glass in total. Beads and sashes were removed, individually catalogued and labelled. On refitting, each window was balanced and reweighted with extra lead as needed to ensure smooth operation.

“As soon as I saw it, it got in my head,” says Kim. “When we discovered it was actually being restored and converted into residences, it became a bit of an obsession. I couldn’t believe we might be able to live in a place like that.”

The Hills purchased one of the ten residences and moved in shortly after. “Every single time I drive up to that gate, my heart nearly stops,” says Kim. “It’s The building’s proximity to the Story absolutely magical and everything we Bridge also made acoustics a key hoped it would be. The fact that this consideration. All windows were property once welcomed new residents replaced with specialised acoustic glass, to Brisbane…there’s something very together with high-end door seals and special about that.” window seals. Internally, partition walls Cameron Leggatt, Executive General and floors were designed with acoustics Manager, Residential at Frasers well above minimum requirements. Property Australia says that everyone Each of the ten residences has a unique involved is incredibly proud of what identity that draws upon the history of they have created at Yungaba. “Our the property and its rooms in particular. vision for Yungaba House has been For example, The Bradfield Residence clear from the very beginning,” says was once part of the male dormitory Leggatt. “This was an opportunity and was designed to celebrate the sky to restore one of Brisbane’s oldest lights that once filtered into Bradfield’s buildings while preserving its drawing studio. historical integrity.” “It was never about shoehorning ten apartments into a heritage building,” recalls Scott Peabody, Director of Arqus Design. “The way we approached the internal subdivision was to be very mindful of its former uses and to reflect this in the design and how that interfaced with modern living spaces.”

“The work undertaken from the design right through to the construction has delivered a suite of world-class residences that will keep that history alive for generations to come.” Find out more about the restoration of Yungaba House. Visit Yungaba.com.au

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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HEALTH & WELLBEING A BLACK AND WHITE SOLUTION TO RISING TEMPERATURES

A black & white solution to rising temperatures words by Olivia Leal-Walker, Innovation Manager, Frasers Property Australia

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HEALTH & WELLBEING A BLACK AND WHITE SOLUTION TO RISING TEMPERATURES Fairwater, NSW

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nless you’re building a new home or gazing out of an 11 x 17-inch aeroplane window as you descend into a new city, you’re probably not giving much thought to the colour of roof tiles. And yet, it's something I think about a lot. With extreme heat conditions becoming more and more frequent, the roofs over our head could be the solution to keeping our cities cool. Having grown up in Western Sydney, I’m no stranger to summer days spent baking in temperatures of 40 degrees plus. Uncomfortable as this heat is for most of us, for thousands of vulnerable Australians rising mercury can be fatal. In fact, heatwaves kill more Australians than any other natural disaster, and yet they’re one of the least talked about. When the Black Saturday bushfires swept through Victoria in 2009, the entire nation mourned the 173 lives lost. But what didn’t make it into the media coverage of that week, was that more than 432 people died from the extreme heat associated with those fires. This is hardly an isolated incident. In 2011, a PwC study concluded that there are, on average, approximately 80 excess deaths associated with heat events each year across our major capital cities. Climate change and an increasing risk of extreme weather conditions means that number will continue to rise. The design of our cities also has a lot to answer for. Where trees and grass have been replaced with black tar roads, concrete paths and dark roofed homes, communities become sponges for extreme heat. It’s called the ‘Urban Heat Island Effect’, and it’s one of the biggest challenges facing Australian communities today and as we look towards the future. Put simply, the Urban Heat Island effect is the feeling you get wearing black clothes on a sweltering day, but on a massive scale.

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HEALTH & WELLBEING A BLACK AND WHITE SOLUTION TO RISING TEMPERATURES

Urban heat island profile As I was researching this effect, a potential mitigator presented itself—what if we built new homes with white roofs instead of dark ones? Where you have white roofs, such as our Fairwater community in Blacktown, your home could be up to 4.7 degrees cooler on a hot day; potentially cutting your cooling costs by more than a third. Those kinds of savings are reason enough to rethink roof colour, but there are other reasons too. For the elderly and mobility-impaired people most at risk in extreme heat, that 4.7 degrees might be the difference between life and death; or at the very least wellbeing and profound, life‑limiting discomfort. Considering that such a simple solution could have such huge potential improvements on liveability, it seemed only obvious that we should investigate the possible impacts of wider implementation. And so kicked off the White Roof Revolution Project—a mission to determine whether we could turn every roof in Western Sydney white. Supported by the Urban Development Institute of Australia (UDIA) and project champions within Frasers Property, I’ve been out there conducting desk research and interviews with industry players. The results so far have been interesting to say the least. Perhaps best summed up as a traditional catch-22: most homebuyers don’t choose light-coloured roof materials because that choice is not often available to them, while volume builders don’t offer a wide colour choice in roof materials because consumers generally don’t ask for it. Therefore, inertia is our biggest obstacle to changing this one simple problem.

33.3 32.8 32.2 31.7 31.1 30.6 30.0 29.4

Temp °C Rural

Suburban Commercial Residential

Fairwater, NSW

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HEALTH & WELLBEING A BLACK AND WHITE SOLUTION TO RISING TEMPERATURES

Too hot to handle Heatwaves kill more Australians than any other natural disaster, with an average of approximately 80 excess deaths associated with heat events each year. The elderly and marginalised are most at risk.

Designed for discomfort The Urban Heat Island effect is one of the biggest challenges facing modern communities. Where trees and grass have been replaced with black tar roads, concrete paths and dark roofed homes, communities become sponges for extreme heat.

The white roof revolution

Downtown

Urban Residential

Park

Suburban Residential

Another observation is the major role that ‘fashion’ plays. Because most roofs are black or red, new homebuyers are fearful that if they build with light-coloured materials, their house will stand out in their neighbourhood—and not in a good way. As constraints go, this is not an easy one to overcome. Perhaps the industry needs to invest in educating and reassuring property owners that homes with light roofs sell just as well and are worth just as much as the dark-roofed ones next door. There are signs that this ‘fear-factor’ is changing though. And it’s coming from a surprising source: Instagram influencers! While the attraction might be mainly aesthetic, these social media influencers are helping to challenge perceptions that roofs only come in two colours - black and blacker. So that’s definitely a space I’m watching with interest.

By simply swapping out dark coloured roofs for light ones, your home could be up to 4.7 degrees cooler on a hot day. Not only does this have the potential to cut your cooling costs by more than a third, but those all-important degrees can make a world of difference to your home’s liveability in the warmer months.

To date, we’re about half way through the project. We’ve presented our early findings to UDIA NSW who have generously supported the project through the Roy Sheargold scholarship, and have brought experts from across the country together to come up with solutions that enable us to roll out white roofs. We're about to experiment with the best of these ideas to test their feasibility. Stay tuned for more detail coming soon. Until then, next time you glance out your window take note of the roof colours you see. If we’re successful with our white roof revolution, you might just start seeing more lightcoloured rooftops in your field of vision soon. Find out why more than 500 families have chosen Fairwater to call their home. Visit FairwaterLiving.com.au

Live proud | Autumn/Winter 2020

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HEALTH & WELLBEING THE NEW FRONTIER OF SUSTAINABLE RETAIL

The new frontier of sustainable retail acre farm & eatery, Burwood Brickworks, VIC

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HEALTH & WELLBEING THE NEW FRONTIER OF SUSTAINABLE RETAIL

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ast year we introduced you to Burwood Brickworks, the shopping centre in Melbourne’s east pushing the boundaries of sustainability in retail development and redefining the consumer experience. One year on and the centre—officially opened to the public in December 2019—has quickly become a local hub and destination for visitors across Melbourne. The innovative urban regeneration project is on track to achieve Living Building Challenge® (LBC) Certification, a feat never before achieved by a shopping centre. Only 24 buildings worldwide have successfully met the rigorous criteria of the LBC®, which scrutinises sustainability, useability and beauty in equal measure. For the team tasked with bringing the Burwood Brickworks vision to life, the human experience has always been the guiding principle for the centre’s creation. To be deemed a success, the centre needs to not only deliver a net positive or regenerative ecosystem, but must also foster a sense of unity and collaboration between the team from Frasers Property, the centre’s tenants and its shoppers.

This means creating a more comfortable centre, with access to an abundance of natural light, fresh air and living greenery, while connecting visitors on a sensory level through texture, scent and sound, ultimately providing a platform for retailers to be more productive in an environment that shoppers love to spend time in.

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HEALTH & WELLBEING THE NEW FRONTIER OF SUSTAINABLE RETAIL acre farm & eatery

Form follows function Upon entering the centre, the eye is immediately drawn up to the striking sawtooth roof that is as beautiful as it is functional. Operable windows set into the sawtooth design allow the building to be naturally ventilated, and are adorned with a striking permanent art installation by multi-disciplinary Wurundjeri artist Mandy Nicholson in collaboration with indigenous art consultancy Balarinji.

Ceiling mural by Mandy Nicholson

A truly living building Burwood Brickwork’s crowning glory is the 2,000m2 farm that occupies the building’s rooftop. Visitors are invited to meander through rustic planter boxes of fruits and vegetables, take a peek in the hydroponic greenhouse, and say hello to the resident quails. The farm is operated by acre farm & eatery which also supplies the adjoining farm-to-table restaurant and café with fresh produce.

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HEALTH & WELLBEING THE NEW FRONTIER OF SUSTAINABLE RETAIL

Keeping it cool The northern side of the building is covered by three rows of young citrus plants, which upon maturity will help to protect the building from the harsh sun and lessen the requirement for artificial cooling within the building. The trees will also provide fruits to the food retailers and enhance the building’s visual appeal to residents and passers‑by. Citrus trees on northern exterior

No space too small

Powered for good

Perhaps surprisingly, one of the most striking parts of the building is the travelator void that carries visitors from the basement carpark into the ground floor atrium. The eye-catching display was created using salvaged timber from the centre’s own construction site. Once used to form up the concrete slabs in the early phase of construction, the timber was then recovered, recut, and crafted into a permanent piece of art.

The LBC® mandates that certified buildings must be net positive, ultimately giving back more energy to the grid than they consume. Forty per cent of the building’s energy requirements will be satisfied by 3,300 rooftop solar panels, with surplus energy needs procured from off-site solar and wind farms to generate 105% of the building’s energy needs.

Reclaimed timber installation

Homes and apartments now selling at Burwood Brickworks. Visit BurwoodBrickworks.com.au

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HEALTH & WELLBEING THE NEW FRONTIER OF SUSTAINABLE RETAIL

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HEALTH & WELLBEING THE NEW FRONTIER OF SUSTAINABLE RETAIL

All images provided by Smiling Mind

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HEALTH & WELLBEING STRONGER TOGETHER

Stronger together How you can stay connected to your community while maintaining social distance.

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HEALTH & WELLBEING STRONGER TOGETHER

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n the space of a few short weeks, the normal rhythm and pace of life for millions of Australians changed. A suite of measures recommended by health experts and government authorities to protect people from the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus suddenly means we’re all spending more time in our homes, and a lot less time out socialising. Terms like ‘selfisolation’ and ‘social distancing’ have entered our everyday lexicon, and a lot of people are understandably feeling anxious. But social distancing doesn’t have to equal social isolation. There are many small steps you can take that can have a cumulatively large impact on your own wellbeing, and those of the community around you.

Be a helper While all of us are feeling the impact of COVID-19 on our daily lives, it’s important to remember that some are more severely affected than others. The elderly, disabled, and those with pre-existing medical conditions are at higher risk and are often less mobile, making it even harder for them to get access to everyday essentials and often leaving them cut off from social interactions.

There are also a large number of parents who are heavily impacted by the closure of childcare providers or the self-isolation of grandparents who would normally help to care for their children while they go to work. For parents working in healthcare and essential services, the situation is especially difficult. If you are currently well and able to assist with simple tasks like shopping, posting mail, or even just a friendly phone call of support, reach out to your neighbours who might be in need. Call, text, or leave a note in the mailbox to let them know that you’re here to help with anything they may need. At some Frasers communities, residents have been making use of a 'viral kindness' postcard to reach out to their neighbours and offer help. You can find the template online by

searching #ViralKindness or heading to viralkindness.org.au. We encourage you to do the same if you are in a position to assist in any way.

Share the love There’s no doubt that we’re facing one of the most challenging times in recent history, yet there are still plenty of incredible things happening around the world. From small acts of kindness between neighbours, to countless small businesses digging into their own pockets to offer essentials to the vulnerable; there is so much joy to be found outside of the mainstream news cycle.

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HEALTH & WELLBEING STRONGER TOGETHER

This is the perfect time to switch up your habits and your social feeds to bring a little more good news into your life, and to pass on this positivity to your community. If your neighbourhood has an existing Facebook group for residents, use it. And if one doesn’t already exist, start one yourself and invite your neighbours to join. These groups can become a place for community members to ask for and offer support, share good news stories and acts of kindness from around the world, sharing resources that they’ve found helpful during these challenging times. Some of our favourite online sources for good news are Tank’s Good News, Good News Movement, Upworthy and Soul Pancake.

Get creative The situation we find ourselves in poses a number of unique challenges as we attempt to shift our normal lifestyles to confined spaces. If a fitness instructor in Spain can teach a class from the roof of his apartment building to surrounding residents on their balconies, what other creative ideas are out there for us to think up?

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Facebook friends. If you’re a chef or terrific homecook, share your best recipes using non-perishable and easily available ingredients. All of us have unique knowledge and skills to bring to the table, so don’t be afraid to get out there and share your talents with those around you.

We’re in this together

In the wake of the cancellation of public ANZAC Day gatherings, residents at our Brookhaven community in QLD joined together to organise a moment of silence shared from the end of their respective driveways. And at our Fairwater community in Blacktown, one resident has established a free street library where residents who are social distancing can come to pick up some reading material. Normal transmission might be interrupted for a little while, but that doesn’t mean we can’t find innovative ways to maintain our routines in the meantime! If you have experience working with children, share some kid-friendly art and craft projects that can be done easily at home using household items. If you’re a yoga instructor, upload a video or livestream a virtual class for your

The important thing to remember is that you’re not alone. Fostering social connection and community resilience has always been at the forefront of the Frasers Property approach. Our Community Development managers are skilled at bringing people together, even if it’s on- rather than offline. If you’re living in a Frasers community, you can reach out to them through our social pages any time. For everyone else, kindness is key. Ask for help if you need it or offer it if you have capacity. We don’t know when this crisis will pass, but we know that it will. Until then, we’re all in this together. And together we stand stronger and more resilient than if we stand alone.


HEALTH & WELLBEING OPEN UP TO MORE

Open up to

more

How community designers are approaching the increased need for density by offering buyers more, not less. Meadowlands Picnic Ground, Carina, QLD

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HEALTH & WELLBEING OPEN UP TO MORE Pool and pavilion, Minnippi Quarter, QLD

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t’s no secret that our capital cities are growing fast. Between 2017 and 2018, capital city growth accounted for 79% of Australia’s total population growth*. That’s 119,400 new Melbournians, 93,400 Sydneysiders and 50,000 Brisbanites. And while increasing urban density puts issues like housing affordability, traffic congestion and ever-shrinking home sizes at the top of everyone’s agenda, there’s one thing that’s often overlooked: green space. More than ever, Australians are opting for high and medium density homes that allow them to stay closer to employment and transport hubs, while some developers sacrifice parks in the name of profit. But the World Health Organisation has identified green spaces as a fundamental component of a healthy urban ecosystem. Not only do they facilitate physical activity and relaxation, but trees also produce oxygen and help to filter out harmful air pollution from our increasingly congested environments. Creating an affordable metropolitan community that provides connection to ample green space is harder than ever, but the team behind Minnippi Quarter, an upcoming Frasers Property community in the East Brisbane neighbourhood of Carina, is proving that it’s not impossible. Set just 8km from Brisbane’s CBD, Minnippi Quarter has been designed to redefine the borders of the home, seamlessly blending private retreat with communal connectivity to create a place where home stretches far beyond the front door. It’s medium-density terrace home living, but not as we know it.

“The vision behind Minnippi Quarter was really to embrace what we have as a natural context,” explains Development Manager, Steve Booth. “It’s about more than just creating a box for someone to live in. It’s about creating somewhere where people come home and enjoy not just that private space, but also getting out and enjoying the amenity around them and the environment it’s immersed in.” * Australian Bureau of Statistics (2019) Growth in Australia’s Capital Cities Remains Steady.

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Artist’s impression

The masterplan draws much of its inspiration from Minnippi Parklands, the stunning 90-hectare network of public parks and gardens bordering the development. Once complete the community will include 6000m2 of retained and regenerated green space, three additional landscaped pocket parks, residents’ recreation centre, and shared barbeque and leisure facilities. “We wanted to come up with a masterplan that gave people the opportunity to socialise with their neighbours and to just be outside in nature,” says Steve. “Ultimately that openness helps to build community resilience. People are out of the home more, so they get to know their neighbours, which makes them feel safer because they have friends nearby that they can call on if they ever need it.” While townhome and terrace-style living haven’t historically been the norm in Brisbane, things are rapidly changing as the market responds to affordability pressures and changing family dynamics. “I think there’s a natural evolution that comes from people wanting more flexibility in the way they live, and terrace style living really answers that,” says Steve. “Some people travel a lot for business and want a lower maintenance place to come home to; some are coming to Australia from other countries where apartment living is the norm; and more people than ever work flexibly from home. What’s becoming more desirable is a home that acts as a solid foundation from which we can explore a multitude of lifestyle opportunities outside the home.”


HEALTH & WELLBEING OPEN UP TO MORE

Terrace home, Minnippi Quarter, QLD

Artist’s impression

Outdoor living, Minnippi Quarter, QLD

Artist’s impression

Whatever the motivation, Steve sees the key to Minnippi Quarter’s success is the embrace of the great outdoors. “This is all about the lifestyle,” he says. “The homes are designed to seamlessly flow from inside to outside, while expanding out to these really high quality communal open spaces and recreation areas, as well as the expansive meadowlands of Minnippi Parklands further afield. The wellbeing and lifestyle benefits are tremendous and I’m really excited that we’re in a position to facilitate that.” Terrace homes and freehold land lots coming soon. Visit MQuarter.com.au to register your interest. Artist’s impression Pool and pavilion, Minnippi Quarter, QLD

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COMMUNITY PROUD HOMES McCulloch family, Brookhaven, QLD Image courtesy of Coral Homes

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COMMUNITY PROUD HOMES

Proud homes The rise of Instagram, Pinterest, and home makeover shows like The Block have awoken the interior designer in millions of Aussie homeowners. In preparation for this special design issue of the Live proud magazine, we took to social media to find the most stylish residents from Frasers Property communities around the country. These are the spaces they’re most proud of.

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COMMUNITY PROUD HOMES

Torie and Kevin Brookhaven, QLD

We really enjoyed the process of designing our home. I put together a bit of a lookbook and a mood board for the spaces, which was really fun, and our builder Coral Homes was super accommodating with all of our requests to customise the layout. This is our oldest daughter, Aria’s bedroom. We chose the hydrangea wall decals to tie in with the Hamptons theme we have running through the whole house. She’s quite a girly girl so we went for pink and purple accents throughout. She actually wanted the same Hamptons-style bed as we had, so we basically got her a miniature version! For the shelves we chose to display some of the toys that she really loves but doesn’t play with so much anymore.  op Aria's bedroom, Brookhaven, QLD T Middle Dennis’ living room, Fairwater, NSW

Dennis Alejo Fairwater, NSW

Having a two-bedroom apartment might seem like a decorating challenge. However, I love that my unit at Fairwater has an open plan layout. It makes the apartment so much more inviting even though it’s a compact space. I added multi-functional pieces of furniture such as bar-height dining table that doubles as an additional kitchen working space, and a buffet cabinet that is also used as an entertainment centre. That way, I was able to fulfill all of my needs without sacrificing on space or design.

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COMMUNITY PROUD HOMES

Ima Miranda-Brown Port Coogee, WA

This is my gorgeous butler’s pantry. It came completely bare and then my husband built it using some wood and a hack saw. I was really inspired by classic American kitchens where all of the cans and products were on display. In our old pantry everything was on top of or behind something else and I was constantly having to search for things. I wanted a pantry where I could walk in and just see everything straight away.

Bek Demicoli The Grove, VIC

My friend Belinda pushed me into trying for my first home. I never thought I could do it, but one day we were display home shopping and all of a sudden it became possible. Belinda’s always been into interior design so she offered to help me out and it became a project we worked on together. I always wanted that black industrial kitchen and to feature the timbers with the soft blushes and whites coming out through the furnishings. I wanted the kitchen to speak for itself, and because it’s a smaller plan we decided to keep white wherever we could just to keep it fresh and open. I was always inspired by Scandinavian style homes, so we tried to keep everything really slimline and simple, letting small features have their moments.

Left Ima’s pantry, Port Coogee, WA  Right Bek’s kitchen and dining, The Grove, VIC Image courtesy of Homebuyers Centre

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COMMUNITY THE ART OF DISCOVERY

The art of discovery 40

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COMMUNITY THE ART OF DISCOVERY

Burwood Brickworks, VIC

F

rom the kaleidoscopic street art that covers Melbourne’s iconic laneways, to the mesmerising light show that draws hundreds of thousands of visitors to Sydney’s CBD every winter, public art is a vital part of the cultural landscape of our cities and communities. For almost as long as humans have existed, we’ve turned to art as inspiration for new ways of thinking, stimulus for conversation, and a means of capturing the zeitgeist. Public art in particular occupies a unique position within the art world. It doesn’t sit behind glass cases in ticketed galleries. It requires no formal attire, or companion with whom to hold a conversation. Public art—often stumbled upon and accidentally discovered—is free to access, providing inspiration for people from all walks of life and helping to create a sense of place through cultural vibrancy.

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COMMUNITY THE ART OF DISCOVERY Central Park Public Art Collection, Central Park, NSW

Central Park Public Art Collection Central Park, NSW Public art projects are an important part of a number of Frasers Property communities around Australia. Sydney’s iconic Central Park provides a backdrop for some of Sydney’s most exciting public artworks. The project’s $8 million public art collection welcomes locals and visitors to an area of Sydney that was closed to the public for more than 100 years, and draws intricate links between the city’s past, present and future. The most recognisable piece in the permanent collection is Halo, a golden ring that balances delicately on a 13-metre tilted mast. Halo interacts passively with nature, rotating slowly or spinning rapidly with the changing winds. The piece was inspired by the site’s long history as a brewery, the circular form inspired by the brewing vats.

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COMMUNITY THE ART OF DISCOVERY

Foundation Bricks Project, Burwood Brickworks, VIC

The Dragonettes, The Waterfront, Shell Cove, NSW

The Dragonettes by Vera Möller Shell Cove, NSW Just a few hours south of Sydney sits the idyllic coastal community of The Waterfront, Shell Cove. And at the heart of The Waterfront Town Centre lies The Dragonettes, an installation of 35 cast aluminium sculptures by artist and former biologist, Vera Möller. When the project was first commissioned in 2015, Möller knew that she wanted to draw inspiration from the rich natural environment of the NSW south coast. It didn’t take long before she found her inspiration in the rich marine ecology of nearby Bass Point Reserve: the Weedy Seadragon. The spot patterns are drawn from the Seadragon’s skin, while their wavy shape is reminiscent of seagrass beds. Möller is passionate about the impact that artworks like this have on passionate local communities undergoing significant change and development. “I think that public sculpture can fulfil a really important role in reminding us that we are working people that live in a built environment, but we shape these environments and we create our own culture,” says Möller. “In that sense, everybody is contributing.”

Foundation Bricks Project Burwood Brickworks, VIC One of the most recently completed public art pieces in the Frasers Property portfolio greets visitors to the innovative new Burwood Brickworks shopping centre. The Foundation Bricks Project called upon local residents to contribute their thoughts on what makes a great community. The top 100 contributions were then hand painted onto recycled bricks most of which were produced at the original brickworks site on which the retail centre now stands. Illustrator Lachlan Philp worked with the Burwood Brickworks team for 18 months to carry the project from concept to installation. The centre is aiming to achieve Living Building Challenge® certification, a strict set of sustainability criteria that forced Lachlan to rethink his normal process.

“I have a set of materials that I like to use and that I can rely on but those didn’t fit in with what was needed with this project in terms of environmental impact,” Lachlan explains. “So there was some research and collaboration involved in making sure we could tick all of those boxes.” After working off-site for so many months, Lachlan was relieved to finally see the bricks set into their new home. “I’m really happy with how it’s come together,” says Lachlan. “By involving the community, you create a bridge or a link between them and this new construction. It’s more about that narrative and communication between a business and the people living here. Bridging the gap and getting people involved is really important, culturally.”

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LIFESTYLE HOME OFFICE 101

HOME OFFICE 101

T

he practice of flexible and remote working has long been heralded for its various associated benefits, from increased flexibility and improved work-life balance, to lower business overheads and increased productivity. The latest data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics indicates that around one quarter of Australian workers work at least part of their time from home, with this number certain to skyrocket throughout 2020.

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LIFESTYLE HOME OFFICE 101

If you’re currently working from home or set to start working more flexibly in the near future, it’s important to make sure that your workspace is set up for success. Here are our top tips for creating the perfect workspace in your home. 1

Define your space Working from the sofa or kitchen table might be fine for the odd day here and there, but if you’re working from home regularly it’s a good idea to have a clearly defined space that’s for work only. This will help you to stay focussed and avoid distractions, as well as switch off at the end of the day. If your home doesn’t have a separate study available, just make sure you set up your desk in a quiet area of your house or apartment.

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Embrace ergonomics Most traditional office spaces are equipped with furniture designed to support your back and minimise strain on your eyes during long work days. Your home office should be no different. Choose a desk that comes to around elbow height and a chair that is both comfortable and provides ample back support. When seated, your feet should rest comfortably on the floor with your thighs parallel. If working from a laptop, invest in a stand that brings your screen up to eye level.

3

Go green Not only are indoor plants a chic way to style your workspace, but they also contribute to a calmer environment, produce oxygen and help to filter the air in your home, which can help to improve focus and overall wellbeing. If your track history with plants is less than ideal, we recommend going with easy care varieties like pothos, rubber plants and peace lilies.

4

Make it feel like you There’s nothing particularly inspiring about a plain white desk and a chair you borrowed from the dining table. Take some time to add your own personality and make your workspace visually appealing. It should be somewhere you enjoy going to each day, not somewhere that feels stark and lifeless. Hang some artwork above your desk, opt for a colourful chair, or decorate your shelves with personal trinkets. You have the freedom to make your workspace what you want it to be, so don’t be afraid to have some fun!

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LIFESTYLE INSPIRED OUTDOORS

Inspired outdoors

Our top tips for stylish outdoor living in 2020 (and beyond)

T

here’s nothing Australians love more than having a couple of friends around for a few cold drinks and a good yarn. And when the weather is fine, our favourite place to settle in for the afternoon is always the outdoor spaces of the home. Spending time outdoors helps us unwind and reconnect with ourselves and our loved ones, away from the clutter and chaos of our everyday routines. Not to mention the host of health benefits associated with spending time in the fresh air and sunshine. So whether you have a backyard, courtyard or balcony to play with, creating a gorgeous outdoor area is one of the simplest ways to elevate your home, and your lifestyle. Ed.Square, NSW

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LIFESTYLE INSPIRED OUTDOORS

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LIFESTYLE INSPIRED OUTDOORS

1

Don’t be afraid to have fun Your outdoor space is the perfect opportunity to play with patterns and colours that you might shy away from in the rest of your home. Add a pop of colour or print with throw cushions and blankets, plant pots and table settings. These items are inexpensive and available in hundreds of varieties to suit every style and personality, and they can easily be swapped out with changing seasons or tastes!

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Keep it comfy When it comes to choosing your outdoor furniture, it’s important to keep a practical head. Think about how you’re going to be using the space most often and find pieces that will work for you and your lifestyle. If you know you’re always hosting dinners for family and friends, make sure that you choose a table that’s high enough for everyone to sit and eat comfortably. On the flipside, if you favour drinks and board games over sit down meals, a low table and flexible seating might be the way to go. At the end of the day, you want to make sure that your outdoor furniture is actually going to get used, so keep it comfy.

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Welcome to the jungle Indoor plants have become a home design staple over the last few years, but let’s not forget that the outdoors have always been, and will always be, the domain of the green. Depending on your choice of variety, plants are an easy way to set the tone of your outdoor space. Palm varieties can help to establish an Island or coastal theme, while ferns and bamboo create a lush jungle feel. A tall bird of paradise works towards a clean Hamptons style. Climbing varieties and vertical gardens are great options for those working with smaller outdoor courtyards or balconies. By disguising some of the exterior fences or walls of the home with greenery, you create the illusion of a larger and more tranquil space, especially important for those living in inner-city areas.


LIFESTYLE INSPIRED OUTDOORS

5

Throw some shade It’s possible to have too much of a good thing, sun included. To ensure that your outdoor space is usable at every time of day, it’s important to incorporate a shaded area to protect your guests and prevent excessive squinting in group photos.

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Natural textures

If your outdoor area isn’t shaded by existing trees or a fixed overhead structure like a pergola, there are loads of great options to choose from. Umbrellas are an easy, portable option to provide shade over your outdoor table or provide pockets of relief from the sun. For a more permanent solution, retractable awnings are a great choice for wide-reaching shade when you need it, but won’t clutter your space when not in use.

Natural materials and textures are a huge trend for 2020. And while a full rattan furniture set might not be your vibe, there are subtle ways you can make this trend work for you. Try swapping a traditional planter for a woven basket or store extra cushions and blankets in a wooden box. Or, opt for canvas cushions and chunky knit throws for those cooler evenings.

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LIFESTYLE PERTH: GO WEST

PERTH go west Considered the most remote major city in the world, Perth is closer to Jakarta than Sydney. But for those in the know, Perth’s remoteness is part of its unique charm. From here you can make a plan to explore the secrets and delights of Western Australia.

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LIFESTYLE PERTH: GO WEST

North Rough and tough

South The green cradle of WA

With its famous pink lake and breath-taking inland gorges, Kalbarri National Park is one of the most stunning stops along Australia’s Coral Coast. Combining gorgeous beaches, colourful coral, and unique sandstone cliffs, Kalbarri is an easy six-hour drive from Perth and worth every minute.

Wine, caves, surfing and whale watching, but mostly wine. Need we say more? Margaret River is one of the most beloved viticulture regions of the country, and spectacularly picturesque to boot. Check out Busselton Jetty, the longest in the world, on your way.

Kalbarri National Park

Margaret River Region

Shark Bay

Valley of the Giants

East The great outback

West Coastal bliss

It’s a big drive from Perth, but if you ever want to really get away from it all, the Gibson Desert is the place to do it. Part of one the largest desert regions in the Southern Hemisphere, it’s teeming with unique Australian wildlife.

This unassuming island off the coast of Fremantle is home to arguably the world’s cutest animal - the quokka. Snap a selfie but please don’t touch, they are listed as a vulnerable species.

Head north past Kalbarri and you’ll hit one of the world’s best aquatic nature reserves. After the Great Barrier Reef, this lesser known bay is Australia’s most beautiful ecological zone. The wildlife is the big drawcard, with sea turtles, dugongs and dolphins calling this world-heritage area home.

Gibson Desert

Jarrahdale

Jarrahdale and its surrounding nature reserve are two mustsee experiences in the west. The township itself is heritageclassified and a delight to stroll around, but it’s the nature reserve that’s the real draw, with its lush forest, low intensity hikes, and railway heritage trail.

Continue south towards Albany and you’ll discover another region known for its wineries and coastline, but this time there’s ancient forests and awe-inspiring treetop walks. Spend the day suspended high above the forest canopy, and among trees that are found nowhere else on earth.

Rottnest Island

Fremantle

The most beautiful port city you’ll find in these parts, Fremantle straddles the mouth of Swan River and has developed into a bustling city in its own right. Not too far from Perth itself, Freo is all about the food, shopping, and heritage tours of its stunning colonial landmarks.

Fraser Suites Perth Discover it all with Fraser Suites Perth as your base. Overlooking the Swan River, these fully-furnished, luxurious serviced apartments put you within cheering distance of the city’s famous cricket ground—the WACA—and on the doorstep of all this glittering western gem has to offer.

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NEWS COMMUNITY EVENTS 7

Recent

Community events NSW

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Vegan market

Shell Cove

February 2020 2

Ed.Fest

Ed.Square

November 2019

VIC

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Bush Bus playgroup

The Grove

February 2020 4

 etail centre R opening

Burwood Brickworks

December 2019 5

Parkrun launch

Berwick Waters

November 2019 6

Trick or treating

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Avondale

October 2019

WA

7 P  layground opening Port Coogee

January 2020 8

Food Festival

East Green

November 2019 9

Jetty to Jetty Swim

Port Coogee

March 2019

QLD

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 esident Christmas R Party

Cova

December 2019 11

‘ Bee series’ workshop

2

Brookhaven

October 2019 12

 hocolate C masterclass

Hamilton Reach

October 2019 13

Oktoberfest

Brookhaven

September 2019

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NEWS COMMUNITY EVENTS 3

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NEWS GET TO KNOW FRASERS PROPERTY

Discover a place you’ll be proud to call home We began developing property in Australia in 1924 and today we’re part of the global Frasers Property Limited. Global in scale but local at heart, we exist for the uncompromising pursuit of customer pride.

Now selling WA

VIC

» Baldivis Grove » Baldivis Parks » Cockburn Living » East Green Coming soon » Frasers Landing » Port Coogee » Queens Riverside

» Berwick Waters » Burwood Brickworks » Encompass Carlton » Found Carlton » The Grove » Life, Point Cook » Mambourin » Parkside, Parkville » Valley Park » Wallara Waters

NSW » Ed.Square » Fairwater » Macquarie Park Coming soon » Shell Cove

QLD » Brookhaven » Minnippi Quarter » Cova » Hamilton Reach

Milestones We’re proud of each and every home and community we’ve created in Australia. We could fill an entire magazine with the milestones we’ve reached in our 96 years, but here are just a few of the moments we’re most proud. 1

It all started with Noosa

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We began developing the Noosa area in 1927 as T.M. Burke’s first major project, creating a new seaside city and one of Australia’s favourite beach destinations. 2

140,000 down, thousands more to go.

In 2017 we launched our very own energy provider, Real Utilities, which now provides cleaner, greener, cheaper energy solutions to thousands of our residents. 5

Since the founding of T.M. Burke in 1924, Frasers Property Australia has developed more than 140,000 homes in Australia. 3

Transforming the NSW South Coast We’re building one of the largest coastal tourist/ residential developments ever initiated by a Local Government Authority in Australia. Shell Cove, a joint venture with Shellharbour City Council, includes over 3,000 residences and a 270‑berth marina.

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Cleaner, greener, cheaper energy

Sydney’s new downtown In 2019, One Central Park was named as one of the 50 most influential tall buildings of the last 50 years by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.

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 e’re aiming to build the world’s most W sustainable shopping centre At our Burwood Brickworks community in VIC, we’ve set ourselves the ambitious goal to do something that’s never been done anywhere before—to design and build a shopping centre that achieves the world’s strictest environmentally-friendly certification: The Living Building Challenge®. The Burwood Brickworks retail precinct opened to the public in December 2019.


NEWS GET TO KNOW FRASERS PROPERTY 1

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Creating places where social connection and community resilience grow naturally has always been at the forefront of the Frasers Property philosophy.

Cameron Leggatt

Executive General Manager, Residential Frasers Property Australia

Find out more Liveproud.com.au Frasers Property Australia


LIVE PROUD MAGAZINE | AUTUMN/WINTER 2020

Profile for Frasers Property Australia

Live Proud Autumn/Winter 2020  

Live Proud Autumn/Winter 2020