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Fr anzi ska U n z n e r urbanism p o rt f o l i o 1


Franziska Unzner urbanist and landscape architect

As an urbanist with a background in landscape architecture, my aim is to create spaces with a strong identity - for and with the people using them. Combining design, planning and research skills, I am particularly interested in the interrelation between strategic planning and its implementation on the human scale.

2 Urbanism portfolio franziska unzner


f un z n e r @ g m ail. c o m +49 152 5496 4266 in L i nke d in f r an z is k au n zn e r

e d u c ati o n MSc Architecture and the Built environment, track Urbanism TU Delft I Netherlands 2015 - 2017

Exchange year Landscape Architecture Université de Montréal I Canada 2012 - 2013

BSc Landscape Arch. & Planning TU München I Germany 2010 - 2014

e xp e r i ence Intern Gustafson Porter + Bowman I London, UK March 2015 - July 2015

Student trainee I Assistant Landscape Architect ver.de landschaftsarchitektur I Freising, Germany August 2013 - December 2014

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aCaDeMiC 01

SociaL houSing regeneration learninG lessons for london

02

Y MÁS aLLÁ La inundación addressinG Ur b a n r i s k i n bUenos aires

03

r e S u s i n c from a new land to a new way

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master thesis tU delft i september 2016 - July 2017 i planning research/comparative analysis of london, Vienna and amsterdam

Group studio project tU delft i Quarter 4, 2016 i spatial strategy

Group studio project tU delft i Quarter 3, 2016 i regional planning

04

rotterdaM noord the interplay between priVate, pUblic and collaboratiVe

05

Breaking the MonotonY redeVelopment erdinGer moos

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h a M B u r g a Lt o n a f r a m e w o r k s : n e w district new encoUnters

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S u B M e r g e e M e r g e breathinG life into a shadowy promenade

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individual studio project i Quarter 2, 2015/16 i Urban renewal

bachelor thesis tU munich i summer semester 2014 i regional strategy

Group studio project tU munich i winter semester 2013/14 i masterplan

Group studio project Université de montréal i summer semester 2013 i Urban design

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ProFessionaL & other

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LincoLn Square desiGn of a residenti al sh aded coUrt yard Gustafson porter + bowman i summer 2015 i Urban design

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S i n g a p o r e n at i o n a l o r c h i d G a r d e n redeVelopment

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pa r t i c i pa t o r Y d e S i g n w o r k S h o p a n e w f a c e f o r t h e h e i n i c k e p l at z

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erLangen urBan converSion Gossen Garden district

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urBan and LandScape week 2016 20:61 - dialoGUes for the fUtUre

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Gustafson porter + bowman i summer 2015 i landscape design

ver.de landschaftsarchitektur i autumn 2013 i Urban design, participatory

ver.de landschaftsarchitektur i summer 2013 i Urban design, participatory

polis study association tU delft i october 2016 i interdisciplinary symposium

content

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01 03 06 04 05

07

02

aCaDeMiC

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ProFessionaL p.60 & other p.78 7


01 social housing regeneration learning lessons for london Master Thesis TU Delft I September 2016 - July 2017 Mentors: Prof. Vincent Nadin; Alexander Wandl Planning research/comparative analysis Location: London, Amsterdam, Vienna Post-war council estates in the UK have been object to various regeneration strategies over the past decades. The latest marketled regeneration wave, in which the estates are often densified and developed into ‘mixed communities’, is controversially discussed. The aim of this research is to contribute to the search of methods to achieve more socially balanced regeneration processes – in particular, to explore the role planning and design can play to ensure that the needs of lower income groups are met. A set of recommendations for planning practice is developed based on the analysis of two differing case studies in London (Heygate Estate; Dover Court Estate) and lessons drawn from regeneration approaches in Amsterdam and Vienna. Full report: https://repository.tudelft.nl/islandora/object/uuid%3Aefa5b6bb-7bb2-49e699f5-d4ede0e67d5d?collection=education

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01// academic


1 issUe

1

Gentrification processes in the historically poor inner east

Urban dynamics in london: The divided city

estate regeneration projects 2016

>5/>1/0/<-1/<-5% increase in poverty 2001-2011 most deprived / highest property prices

/

planned

london is facing a housing crisis. massively rising rents and real estate prices lead to an increasing unaffordability of housing in london. particularly as the historically poor areas in the inner east are rediscovered and redeveloped, lower income groups are pushed further to the outskirts, affecting their opportunities and widening the social gap.

PLANNING

EVALUATION

Under development

completed

estate regeneration plays a prominent role in this. post-war council estates had become places of concentrated deprivation over the past decades; they were stigmatised and often badly maintained. current regeneration approaches address spatial issues of modernist designs, but also aim for densification to attenuate the housing crisis and develop mixed communities by introducing market tenure. in this process, the original residents often cannot afford to remain on the estate.

CONTEXT

Problem definition Problem statement

Problem analysis

Problem field

Theoretical framework The purpose of planning

London Analysis The planning system

The housing system

(in relation to Estate Regeneration)

(in relation to Social Housing)

3 Evaluation criteria

- Policies/Laws/Culture

- Legacy

- Provision of affordable Housing

- Actors

- Social Housing sector/ Housing and welfare policies

- Good Design for All - Meaningful resident participation

>Media and literature study >Estate regeneration survey

- Implementation: General planning process/Financing

Case studies Heygate Estate (Southwark) Dover Court Estate (Islington)

Local conditions

Planning process and outcome

- Aims of the local authority

- Estate conditions

>Literature and policy study >Expert interviews >Investigative field work

>Media and process analysis >Expert interviews >Field work - spatial analysis

(in relation to Evaluation criteria)

Evaluation

- Synthesis -

Action Points International lessons Action Point analysis Vienna Amsterdam

The housing system Vienna Amsterdam

Learning lessons

- Legacy

>Media and literature study >Expert interviews >Investigative field work

- Social Housing sector

Transfer Application

Reflection

Recommendations Strategy

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- Synthesis -

2 MethoDoLoGy the aim of this research is to contribute to the search of methods to achieve more socially balanced development within estate regeneration. a set of recommendations for planners and designers is developed based on the analysis of the policy and planning framework in london and lessons drawn from approaches in amsterdam and Vienna. the thesis touches upon the interconnected fields of housing policy, planning culture, citizen engagement and design. the provision of genuinely affordable, decent housing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as prerequisite for equitable urban development - is the overarching theme in this work. regeneration hould give appropriate consideration to the needs of the local communities and prioritise their well-being over market demands. regeneration strategies are hence assessed against the three main criteria of (1) the maintenance/increase of genuinely affordable housing, (2) meaningful resident engagement and (3) design that responds to the various needs within mixed communities. The findings are derived from a combination of literature study, policy analysis and field work (including 15+expert interviews and conversations with residents) in london, amsterdam and Vienna.


3 Case stUDies

shared ownership market sale

public space sports community space/dysfunctional

commercial/traffic/ residential street

after

before

council rent affordable rent

heygate estate// affordable housing

heygate estate// public realm

Dover Court// affordable housing

Dover Court// public realm

the dover court estate regeneration is one of islington’s ‘Infill’ schemes, part of the program to build additional homes on land owned by the council. the comparatively benign scheme delivers public realm improvements to the entire estate, additional social housing units as well as market homes.

the heygate estate was demolished and reconstructed as part of the large scale ‘elephant and castle’ opportunity area development, creating a new centrality for housing, leisure and business. heavily protested, t is one of the most prominent and controversial schemes in london.

4 CoNCLUsioNs PLaNNiNG systeM

+ /

project process

/ /

negotiation

PLANNING PE R M ISSI ON

+

RING NITO O E/M NC

planning framework

+

IGN ELABORATION DES

START

DECISION MA KIN G

IVES ECT J B FO

DEFI NIT ION

AUSTERITY, ASSET MANAGEMENT DENSIFICATION

O

plans and policies

LACK OF LA COMPETENCE & CAPACITY DEPENDENCE ON PRIVATE DEVELOPERS

interference

EFFECTIVENESS DEPENDS ON LA NEGOTIATION CAPACITY plans and policies

M A INT EN A

IVERY DEL

POLITICALLY HEATED CLIMATE grants and regulations + refurbishment/infill + LA self-development VS. + demolition/reconstruction+ PPP

£

LACK OF GOVERNMENT FUNDING + LIMITED LA SELFDEVELOPMENT CAPACITIES

the most pressing issue is the lack of public financial resources – eg. local authority budgets in general as well as a lack of funding for estate regeneration itself. this necessitates market-led regeneration often in collaboration with large multi-national developers. in a planning system that is based on negotiation, local authorities often do not possess the capacity to effectively impose their conditions. 01// academic 11


LONDON

VIENNA LONDON

AMSTERDAM VIENNA

5 iNterNatioNaL CoMParisoN

social hoUsinG sector

bUildinG stock condition

LONDON

scale of reGeneration LONDON initiatiVes

VIENNA

LONDON

VIENNA

AMSTERDAM

preferred reGeneration VIENNA option

land politics

AMSTERDAM VIENNA

LONDON

AMSTERDAM

LonDon

public sector/ mixed bad

good

bad

good

bad

good

negotiation

comparably small; LONDON often bad condition, affordability issues in maintenance issues the priate sector VIENNA AMSTERDAM

VIENNA

one VIENNA or several estates, size varies

demolition + reconstruction/ asset management; often AMSTERDAM refurbishment land sales to developers; value capture issues

LONDON

AMSTERDAM bad

good

bad

good

bad

VIENNA

good

Vienna

affordability loan conditions

bad

public sector housing association

good

bad

good

£

bad

VIENNA

large, broad

crosssubsidy

AMSTERDAM £

£

social housing stock rel. AMSTERDAM building/(block) renewal well built and maintained;subsidy issues in the private sector

bad

good

bad

fixed price

cross-subsidy soft urban refurbishment: before 2015 renewal

public land allocation via developer competition

good

bad

aMsterDaM

loan

good

£

bad

protest

£

support

cross-subsidy before 2015

support

mediation

€ bad

mediation demolition + reconstruction/

urbanrefurbishment contract 70% vote

consultation

d

support

district/neighbourhood

varies consultation support

support

good

loan

London

sidy

cross-subsidy before 2015

subsidy protest groups

consultation

vienna

€ loan

cross-subsidy before 2015

support €

support

support

mediation urban contract

support

mediation

70% vote support

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urban

€€

loan

groups large, broad; subsidy decreasing

crosssubsidy

good protest groups

€ cross-subsidy before 2015

subsidy

crosssubsidyhousing association £

£

cross-subsid before 2015

good

€ loan

ON

!!

subsidy

crosssubsidy

urban contract 70% vote support

urban contract

public land ownership + 70% voterent for land rent; lower affordable h. providers

support


LONDON LONDON

VIENNA VIENNA

VIENNA

AMSTERDAM

VIENNA

AMSTERDAM

AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM

loan bad

good

bad

bad

crosssubsidy

good

£

good

bad

LONDONfinancinG

good

£

resident VIENNA

bad

good

bad

good

General desiGn attitUde

loan

£

good

£

cross-subsidy before 2015 loan

subsidy

crosssubsidy £

desiGn focUs AMSTERDAM

enGaGement

AMSTERDAM

bad

cross-subs before 20

good subsidy

bad

bad

crosssubsidy

good

protest groups

bad

subsidy good

£

cross-subsidy before 2015

consultation

€ mediation

support spatial integration, diversification

urban contract

support

70% vote nostalgia? market driven

support

loan loan cross-subsidy before 2015 cross-subsidy before 2015

subsidy

protest groups subsidy € bad

protest groups

good

consultation

€ support

mediation € support

mediation

consultation

support

urban contract 70% vote support support

community space

urban contract

70% vote

evolution

support

loan cross-subsidy before 2015 support support

€ mediation mediation

support support

urban contract urban contract 70% vote support 70% vote

public space, tenure diversification social integration

vision; experiment

support

aMSterdaM support

urban contract 70% vote support

13


HOUSING POLICY AND FINANCING

2

Regeneration task force

OBJECTIVES

gy ate

IVES ECT J B FO

RING NITO O E/M NC

APPROPRIATION

MA I N TEN A

IVERY DEL

7

4

INFLUENCE

ING PERMISSION (N PLANN E G O TIAT ION (

OPTIONS

PARTICIPATION

Area based offices

Mediation body

3

5

6

OB ION CT JE

n n a

DECISION MA KIN G

IGN ELABORATION DES

Na tio na Me lS tro tr po lita Lo NB cal P HD la DEFI NIT Pl ION O

gy ate r t nS

EVIDENCE

1

COMPETENCE

6 ProCess reCoMMeNDatioNs Preface: Housing policy and financing I National government revise housing policy that impacts the maintenance and future regeneration of council estates. support actors with a long time interest with grants or loans.

1

2

3 4

Competence i National government, GLA support planning capacity of local authorities by setting up institutional support structures – regeneration task force, urban renewal offices and conciliation body.

to retain a large degree of influence over the outcomes throughout the process. at the same time, collaborate with actors with a long-term interest and give space to community-led and co-housing initiatives.

5

objectives i National government, GLA support local authorities in their decision-making by reevaluating the objectives for estate regeneration in national and metropolitan strategies. options i Local authorities, Designers + Regeneration Task Force adopt a thorough and open-ended option appraisal process including an impact assessment on residents as mandatory step. Influence I Local authorities + Regeneration Task Force Give preference to delivery options that allow the local authority

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Participation i Local authorities + Mediation body & area based offices allow residents to influence key decisions – make use of the neighbourhood planning process to define regeneration objectives and give them the possibility to formally object to the conciliation body

6

appropriation i Local authorities, Designers take inspiration from amsterdam and Vienna - adopt a forward oriented attitude and design to facilitate not restrict appropriation

7

evidence i (National government), GLA, Local authorities, Designers + Regeneration Task Force & area based offices set up adequate structures to monitor and evaluate social impacts of estate regeneration.


Every estate is different and requires tailor-made regeneration approaches, but a set of general design recommendations is summarised in the diagram.

mixed and flexible typology in the new build; framed internal courtyards offer high-quality community spaces

explore integration of communityled initiatives and co-housing due to their positive impact on the entire neighbourhood

Variability explore possibilities for mixed schemes and multiple delivery routes; collaborating with not only one large developer

addition of community facilities

addition of private gardens for ground floor apartments

transformation of groundfloor into shops

small interactive elements

New

bui

lt vi

sion

Ref u in larger schemes, include public facilities in strategic locations; multi-program these spaces if possible (schools acting as cultural centre in the evenings,...) and put focus on the surrounding public space

rbis

hm

ent

re-framing Public space as backbone Using intergrative public space as backbone for development; allowing for diverse use: seating, sports, etc.

addition of cornershops

7 DesiGN reCoMMeNDatioNs basic coUncil estate typoloGies:

towers in the landscape

half open courtyards

rigid linearity

recommended leVel of social miX

pepper-potted

within staircase

within building

within block

within street/nbhd

refurbishment is an option that is currently desired by many communities. if funding is available, the modernist layout offers many possibilities for transformation. in all three cities, innovative approaches are taken that include public realm improvements via infill, ground floor conversations as well as reconfiguration of ownership and movement patterns. whether refurbishment or new-build, spaces should offer niches for different user groups and allow, not restrict appropriation by local communities. inspiration can be taken from Viennaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community spaces and amsterdamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus on public space as setting for social integration.

refUrbishment measUres & commUnity spaces within the bUildinG

Reconfiguration of space

Infill

building improvements

addition of elevator

community rooms

addition of storey

reuse of ground floor

light staircase

01// academic 15


8 DetaiLeD reCoMMeNDatioNs: ProCess

1 OBJECTIVES

National Government >Shift from output to outcome related targets in national policy and revaluation of asset management objectives >avoid identifying densification as goal for estate regeneration

Primary Legislation (Planning Act) National Planning Policy Framework National Estate Regeneration Strategy

GLA

2 COMPETENCE

>Shift from output to outcome related targets in the London Plan

London Plan

>avoid referring to densification as goal for estate regeneration

Good Practice Guide to Estate Regeneration

Estate Regeneration Task Force

>Shift from output to outcome related targets in the Local Plan

Local Plan

> Create spatial visions for the area

Neighbourhood Plan

ASSEMBLE SOLID KNOWLEDGE BASE ON ESTATE REGENERATION

Mediation Body

3 EVIDENCE

Local Authority

STREAMLINE AND SUPPORT ANALYSIS + MONITORING

National Government/GLA > Set up database on estate regeneration including statistical data

GLA > Publish monitoring and analysis guidance

> Set up collection of best practice Object

PLANNING PERMISSION Negotiation EVALUATION

DEFINITION OF OBJECTIVES

DECISION MAKING

ELABORATION ELABORATION

PLANNING PERMISSION Negotiation

DELIVERY

MAINTENANCE

DEF. OF OBJECTIVES

EVALUATION

DECISION MAKING

ELABORATION

DELIVERY

MAINTENANCE

Documentation throughout the process Local Authority > Early and transparent definition of objectives for the particular estate in collaboration with residents > Putting them on record in Resident‘s Charter

Initial analysis

Detailed analysis on relevant aspects

Outcome analysis > Follow-up on whereabouts of displaced residents

> Comprehensive anaylsis of social and spatial conditions on the estate in addition to building survey Area based offices

> Long-term studies on residents‘ well-being in selected cased > Analysis of outcomes and entering into database

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6

PARTICIPATION

Local authority > Using neighbourhood planning as engagement tool in regeneration areas

FINANCING + HOUSING POLICY

> Stronger integration of neighbourhood planning in the development of the local plan National Government/GLA Object

Local Plan

>Requirement of Impact Assessment on residents (in national Planning Act or policy in the London Plan)

Neighbourhood Plan

PLANNING PERMISSION

PLANNING PERMISSION

Negotiation

Negotiation EVALUATION

DEF. OF OBJECTIVES

DECISION MAKING

4 OPTIONS

ELABORATION ELABORATION

MAINTENANCE

DELIVERY

5

DECISION MAKING

ELABORATION

DELIVERY

MAINTENANCE

Design as engagement tool Initial analysis + consultation

Local authority

> Allocation of appropriate resources and time to thorough appraisal of all options

> Self-development where possible

> Appraisal according to financial and non-financial criteria (assessment of each optionâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s viability, potential to contribute to strategic objectives and impact on different stakeholder groups)

DEFINITION OF OBJECTIVES

INFLUENCE

Local authority + designers + residents

> Spatial exploration of all possible options and consultation with residents

EVALUATION

> Setting up of local authority housing companies

Exploration of options

Adaptation

Detailed Design

public space as backbone and facilitator of integration

community areas as lived space Local authority + developers

ÂŁ

Local authority + Designers + Residents

Local authority + designers + residents

> Solid contractual base for partnership agreement

> Using design as engagement and conflict management tool

ALternative:

> Retain land ownership in the process; explore options for land lease system

> Designing spaces that facilitate and not restrict use

> Exploration of a developer competition system to stimulate innovation and collaboration

> Allowing for unconvential solutions

> Explore collaboration with multiple delivery partners

7 APPROPRIATION

partnership with developer

selfrefurbishment

co-housing

01// academic 17


02 Y m Á s a llá l a i n u n d a c i ó n s pat i a l s t r at e g y a d d r e s s i n g u r b a n r i s k i n Bu e n o s A i r e s Group studio project TU Delft I Team of 6 (in collaboration with Universidad de Buenos Aires & Universität Stuttgart) Quarter 4, 2016 I Spatial Strategy Location: Comuna 8, Buenos Aires, Argentina

The site is located within the poor South of the city of Buenos Aires, along the Matanza-Riachuelo River that separates the city from its metropolitan region and is among the most contaminated waters on earth. Comuna 8 is an area under high urban risk – prone to flooding, vulnerable due to high concentrations of poverty – but also with high potential due to large open spaces on site that are currently neglected but earmarked for development for the 2018 Youth Olympics. The strategic framework explores the potential of open, public space to address urban risk while functioning as well as social justice and integration.

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02// academic 19


1 Analysis

Urbanisation in flood-prone areas and subsequent alterations of the natural water system affect its original dynamics.

High levels of ground sealing and inadequate canalisation regularly cause floodings during heavy rainfalls.

Flood risk Pollution Gated communities

Flood risk Dikes Bottleneck

Villas (slums)

Risk // Metropolitan Area Increase of unregulated/uncoordinated urban development: Villas (slums) often lie in the most hazardous areas, but at the same time luxurious gated communities increasingly encroach the fragile Tigre Delta in the North.

Infrastructure/ Premium infrastr. Consolidated Areas Peripheral vulnerability Flood risk

Social Vulnerability // Metropolitan Area The city historically grew along railway lines, forming new sub-centralities around the stations. Recently, growth has shifted towards isolated communities along premium paid highways. The areas inbetween are occupied by the poor communities that, especially towards the fringes, lack the most basic amenities.

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Risk // CABA The Matanza-Riachuelo River forms the Southern boder between the CABA (city of Buenos Aires) and its metropolitan region. It is among the 10 most polluted rivers on earth, caused by open dumpites, industrial polluters and communities without sanitation facilities along its banks. North - South - Divide Consolidated Areas Deprived areas Flood risk

Social Vulnerability // CABA Within the city of Buenos Aires, there is a sharp divide between the affluent North and the deprived and neglected South. This shows in gradient in median income and employment, but also access to education, employment, health care, public transport and high qualiyt open space.


caba north

caba south

amba

2 CoNCePt this project explores the potential of public space to address both environmental and social issues. the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s flood management and water storage potentials can be increased, adding function, value and meaning. as public space, it can serve as city-wide attractor and integrative space between the different population groups, but only if the needs of local communities are not neglected.

Public spaces Parks sports Nature/greenland Graveyard education industry

open space // caba Open space in the North is consolidated, open and maintained. Towards the South, and particularly outside of the CABA, open space is often neglected. The project site in the South represents the largest continous open space in the city, but most of it is not publically accessible - it contains of a golf course, a race track and a pay-to-enter park as well as wasteland, fenced off due to the housing pressure of the surrounding slum communities to inhabit it. At the same time, its vasteness represents a big asset as large inďŹ ltration space that lacks elsewhere in the otherwise highly sealed city.

02// academic 21


Bus terminus

reurbanisation Park

Logistics centre Park highway bridge

olympic village / social housing

acumar - river cleaning project

slum social housing industry typ. Ba Grid socio-economic structure // site Almost on all sides, the site borders problematic structures including slums, social housing and industrial sites.

2020

2018

2016

socio-economic structure // site Parts of the site are developed for the 2018 Youth Olympic Games. In the NorthEast, a new logistics centre is planned.

2040

2030 Goal: No contact recreation

CLEANING THE RIVER

Wetlands

Prevention of further pollution Cleaning of the water

World Bank National and Provincial Government Acumar

Meander; Flood space

Rainwater Retention Pathway

OLYMPIC GAMES

Provincial Government Olympic Committee Private Investors

Space for flooding

Retention system

Rainwater Canal

FLOOD PROTECTION Bridge

Sports Facilities G A Metropolitan Accessibility M E Olympic village S Water Recreation Entrance Gates

Social and other Facilities

METROPOLITAN PARK Provincial Government Social/Cultural Institutions Private Investors

Internal Structure

Villa

LOCAL INTEGRATION

Building projects

Information of the residents Give them possiblity to experience the event

The Pond project Internal Access

Social Housing

Provincial Government Social/Cultural Institutions Sechi Local Residents

The Islands project The Farming project

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Grid


area of influence

rainwater storage

M S

spine area of control XL

L

M

area of effect

housing

Pedestrian bridge

3 VisioN & strateGy connecting to existing initiatives of the world bank, sechi and the plans for the 2018 youth olympic Games, the proposal contains a long-term phased development of floodwater management, a public park and housing. In the first phase, small scale rainwater storage and urban acupuncture projects improve the immediate living conditions of the neighbouring slum and social housing communities. connecting up to a new flood-canal as to-be â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;spineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of the future park, they ensure the integration of local communities into future developments.

Water purification

Vision 20150 // site Flood management as spine through the park, integrating the different uses and functions

4 iNterVeNtioNs

Villas// Due to the high housing pressure, open space is scarce in villas; due to the lacking infrastructure, rainwater often causes local inundations. Hence, rainwater storage spaces connected up to the main spine of the drainage canal - are proposed that can be used for sports and meetings in dry times. Due to their double function, they have a lower risk to become encroached.

social housing// Social housing offers necessary amenities, but lacks quality of stay, openness and safety. This is re-inforces by the insular building structure and dark alleyways within these developments. In this context, a set of activities s proposed to attract many different users in a safe, animated pathway between the district and the park.

02// academic 23


03 Re S u s I n c from a new land to a new way Group studio project TU Delft I group of 4 Quarter 4, 2016 I Regional planning Location: Flevoland, Netherlands

Flevoland is the Netherland’s newest province, drained from the Ijsselmeer in the 1980s and destined to provide space for agriculture and housing for the growing ‘Randstad’ with modernist functionality. However, economically, it is one of the weakest regions with high unemployment rates, high levels of commuting, locally over-ageing and shrinking populations and a negative image as ‘suburban’, ‘monotonous’ and ‘boring’. The regional vision builds on local potentials for renewable energy production. An energy transition strategy is proposed, developing a new narrative as sustainable model region.

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03// academic 25


1 BaCKGroUND 50

25

E Gr U ee c Fr e an Cz Ge ce ec rm h a Re ny pu bl Po ic la Hu nd ng a Sl r y ov ak i Cy a p Be rus lg iu m Ire la nd Ne th UK er la nd s Lu M ze alt m a bo ur g

Ita ly Sp ai n

Sw ed en La tv Fin ia la n Au d s De tria nm Po ark rtu g Es al to Ro nia m a Lit nia hu an Sl ia ov en Bu ia lg ar Cr ia oa tia

0

the vision of ressusinc (resilient, sustainable, inclusive) derives from the eU 2050 renewable energy goals. it foresees an 80 % reduction of co2 emissions by 2050, compared to the levels of 1990. the netherlands are currently far behind in the energy transition, suggesting that it will not reach the said objectives in time.

eU 2020 target vs. 2013 share of renewable energies in the eU member states

Share of energy from renewable sources in the EU Member States, 2013 (in % of gross final energy consumption) 2013

EU 2020 target 10

most sustainable!

8

6

4

2

sustainability index nl

t

rg

an

bu

ab

Lim

-Br ord No

nd

nd ela Ze

d Zu

id-

Ho

lla

an

ht

oll -H No

ord

nd

ec Utr

rla Ge

lde

l

d

sse

lan vo Fle

erij

Dr

Ov

nd

the en

sla

ing

Frie

on Gr

Ne

the

rla

nd

s

en

0

employment rates per region

already strongly investing in wind energy, flevoland should lead the nl in the energy transition and act as a showcase for a resilient, sustainable and inclusive energy transition while supporting other regions with its energy surplus. in doing so, flevoland could generate an economic upswing for its region and position itself as centre of energy related innovation and research.

% Labor force (15-74) Source: CBS 2014

lack of industries and employment; high rates of commuting to amsterdam; new airport development

modernist separation of functions; suburban (dark pink) and high end suburban lifestyles (purple), no typical city centres (pink)

most surface occupied by intensive agriculture, threatened by soil depletion (pink) and declining soil fertility

3. Possible far-futures

2 MethoDoLoGy

Scenarios

Abstraction

Energy transition

2. Near-future

4. Integrated visions

Trends Policies Projects

Possible scenarios into desirable scenarios

1. Present Conditions

5. Strategic actions

Actors/Stakeholders Landscape Ecology Sustainable Potential

Decisions Impacts Robustness

Present

Introduction 26 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner PROCESS FRAMEWORK

Near-future

Far-future (Stremke et al, 2012)

the methodology is derived from the conceptual framework of stemke et al. (2012), outlining the steps to strategy development for regions regarding the transition to renewable energies. it includes the use of landscape analysis, stakeholder analysis, near-future trend analysis and farfuture scenarios to develop integrated visions and determine strategic actions to achieve these.


3 PreseNt CoNDitioNs, risKs aND PoteNtiaLs

currently, the energy system in flevoland is dominated by large natural gas plants, but also increasingly investing in wind energy (flevoland currently already produces more wind energy than it consumes). a resilient reneable energy system, however, can not solely rely on wind energy, but needs a mix of energy sources to balance fluctuations. current energy system: two large natural gas plants and well established wind system due for renewal

landscape qualities: sea views from the dike (blue), wide open geometric landscape (dotted), attractive Veluwemeer the south Global markettoscenario

4 VisioN

Unused energy potentials: wind, particularly offshore (purple); geothermal energy and residual heat (orange) and solar roofs (pink), biomass

north-south gradient of wet to forest habitats; nature conservation areas (striped)

a transition in land use needs to be sensitive to - and ideally improve - existing land use structures, ecology and landscape image. the landscape offers wide, grand views, but is criticised to be monotonous and unlegible. the biggest risk in the region is soil depletion and over-use of the soil that will put an end to its useability for intensive agriculture within the next 50 years. the ecologically valuable areas lie towards the south and north of the polder, but could be expanded when the land use is changed.

Cooperative Scenario

We are here

The vision for the region is defined by the â&#x20AC;&#x161;ideal land useâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC; in respect to its current conditions, projected risks and developments and potentials for renewable energy production. Urban development and energy infrastructure should be bundled along the existing corridors. around almere, the increasingly wet lands can be used for biomass production and innovations in algae technologies. around dronten, the geothermal heat potential can be used for an production shift to greenhouse agriculture. Far Future 2050 EXTREME SCENARIOS

heat grid

solar roof

Protection Corridor solar roof

Wet land use

intense wind

Wind

industry + solar

Geothermal intense agriculture + wind

heat hub

ecology

LEGEND Solar Energy Roof

industry + solar

Biofarming, recreation

Wind intensive

algae research

Wind extensive + Agriculture Geothermal Hub Heat Grid

Ecology + Recreation + Energy Wet land use

ideal land use

intervention areas around corridor Ecology Ecological Corridor

Strategic Vision FLASHBACK: IDEAL LAND USE

0

3

6

12

18

Strategic Actions Kilometers 24 INTERVENTION AREAS

3 academic 6 12 03// 2718

0

Kilome 24


4

2

1 6

2 almere

4

1

< amsterdam

3

28 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner


6

5 1

Dronten Lelystad

5

3

7

3

1

Zeewolde

1

Green living

2

New biomass industries

3

Biofarming

4

CityLaB

5

Greenhouseheat corridor

6

offshore windfarms

7

ecological network

03// academic 29


5 aCtor aNaLysis aND Far FUtUre sCeNarios

National government

in the far future, the composition and scale of the actors involved in flevoland‘s energy transition will largely determine both way of energy production and landscape image. two extreme scenarios for 2050 were explores. in the „global market“ scenario, large scale energy production in centralised and controlled by big corporationsin. with the development of an eU- smart grid to balance fluctuations, the focus will lie on large scale windparks as the most efficient local energy source. in the „collaborative“ scenario, there is a focus on local selfsufficiency, with the energy production being de-centralised and coming from diverse sources.

eU

sDF sUeZ rijkswaterstraat NUoN

Network owners airport Flevoland

power

obalGlobal market scenario market scenario Nature Conservation

Waterboard

housing associations

Wind Unie

Municipalities

Cooperative Scenario Cooperative Scenario

rabobank almere

residents

Bio Farmers

energy Farmers

interest in the enerGy transition

We areWe here are here

s

W

s

efficient through economic incentive

monopoly of utility companies

eU smart grid

disregard to ecology and landscape qualities

o

t

W

inclusiveness in energy transition

Less efficiency

employment

spatial disorder, lower efficiency

o

t

- Globalization and market liberalisation - Strong national government and regional admi- admi- Globalization and market liberalisation - Strong national government and regional - Decisions drivendriven by economical efficiency nistration - Decisions by economical efficiency nistration 6 strateGy global market energy transition - Large- Large scale developments Emphasis on public participation scenarioon public scale developments - Emphasis participation - International EnergyEnergy Grid Grid - Small- Small scale developments - International scale developments - Metropolitain region Local Energy Grid and self-sufficiency - Metropolitain region - Local EnergyVision Gridseek andfor seek for self-sufficiency present awareness (de)regulation integration upscale - Scale- enlargement and further technological Mid scale city network Scale enlargement and further technological - Mid scale city network profit optimization agriculture: Mega-Farms High quality agriculture, organic production optimization agriculture: Mega-Farms - High quality agriculture, organic production

people both scenarios imply potentials and risks.the vision for collaborative scenario resusinc builds on a balance between large scale corporations planet and collaborative action to ensure a sustainable and inclusive, r Future 2050 Far Future 2050 but also efficient energy transition. actions at each DevelopedStrategic from Stremke et al. (2012), Integrated Visions (Part II): Envisioning Sustainable Energy Landscapes XTREME SCENARIOS Developed from Stremke et al. (2012), Integrated Visions (Part II): Envisioning Sustainable Energy Landscapes EXTREME SCENARIOS point need to be defined to re-direct development towards the middle ground. reGUlate de-reGUlate

city edge - connectivity

city edge - suburban experimentation

Retrofitting housing stock

Use of urban green spaces

performative landscape +

biofarming

regulation/deregulation

30 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner

fields

special energy zones

central to this strategy is the concept of (de)regulation of different aspects and areas. to give economic inventives and boost innovation and employment in the knowledge sector, energy deregulation zones are created - and arranged along the principle landscape axis to allow for a coherent and legible landscape image. ecological corridors, on the other hand, eed further regulation and protection.


7 strateGiC iNterVeNtioNs lelystad is chosen as showcase to illustrate the proposed strategic interventions, following a timeline of ‚awareness‘, ‚(de)regulation‘, ‚integration‘ and ‚upscale‘. below, one example, the creation of a tangible energy corridor around the natural gas plant ‚Maxima Centrale‘, are explained in further detail. city edge: green living and biofarming

energy landscape: Visual experience and recreation

suburban retrofitting and revitalisation of centres

MaximaCentrale

Lelystad

step ii (de)regulate: special energy zones and for innovation hubs and test areas

step i increase awareness, and support visual integration & physical connectivity

step iii integrate: establish viewpoints and exposition areas

step iV Upscale: innovation lab and energy showroom along the coast

The ‚Maxima‘ centrale itself, connected to the research campus in the special energy zones, can gradually be upgraded into a exchange platform and storage hub for the offshore wind and algae farms. as a monumental landmark, it is made publically accessible and offers powerful views into the new energy landscape on and off shore.

OFFSHORE WINDPARK

OFFSHORE BIOMASS PRODUCTION

VIEWPOINT BIOMASS STORAGE

CONVERSION TO STORAGE UNIT (BATTERIES) AND CHP PLANT

VISITOR‘S CENTRE CAFE FREIGHT HARBOR

RESEARCH CLUSTER

NEW HIGHWAY EXIT

TEST SITE BIOFUEL STATION LOGISTICS CLUSTER + INDUSTRIAL ZONE

TEST SITE

03// academic 31


04 R o t t e r d a m N o o r d the i n t e r p l a y b e t w e e n p r i v at e , p u b l i c a n d c o l l a b o r at i v e Individual studio project Quarter 2, 2015/16 I Urban design Location: Rotterdam, Netherlands This project work is set within the ambiguity of the residential sphere and the public urban life of a city. In many housing developments in the second half of the 20th century, the neutral design of the outdoor spaces leads to tensions and confusion between private and public. This results in an unanimated streetscape and deserted areas that were intially planned to be used by the neighbourhood community. The project focusses on the example of the social housing blocks in Rotterdam along the river Rotte between Noordplein and Hofdijk, and proposes a reconfiguration of space characteristics to support both community development and an expansion of the public sphere along the river.

32 Urbanism portfolio franziska unzner


04// academic 33


1 LoCatioN

Urban life

vs. resiential monotony

proJect site neglected stretch along the rotte river

the project focusses on the example of the social housing blocks in rotterdam along the rotte between noordplein and hofdijk. notions of public/ private/collaborative are re-distributed based on four general principles that were developed from local spatial, behavioural and literature analysis: (1) clearly differentiate the design of public and communal spaces (shifts in design language/scale/elevation/materials (2) promote spaces that can be appropriated by individuals, including private garden space (3) promote long term adaptivity and short term multi-useability (4) ensure openness and variability of the facades.

34 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner


2 aNaLysis aND CoNCePt public space/does not feel like it

parking

community space/does not feel like it

private space

Noordplein

rechter rottekade

rottekwartier

spaces - existing

shared 2.2

spaces - proposal

sh 2.1

Gallery

in 2.2

in 1.2

individual 2.1

in 1.1

sh 1.1

sh 1.2

shop entrances - existing

entrances - proposal

04// academic 35


Flexibility zone

Community Gardens

Parking garage

Play asphalt

Community Garden/ Flexibility zone

Modular playstructure with swings, slides, climbing nets etc.

(1) the enclosed coUrtyards

Pavilion

sand

36 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner

Barbecue


3 DesiGN

(1) the enclosed coUrtyards - a set of private rented garden parcels animates the former neglected large courtyards of the rottekwartier, in which investment can become targeted towards specific high quality play and community elements as inviting meeting point for all generations.

(2) the open coUrtyard - the building extensions framing the outer half open courtyards could be removed and replaced by owner occupied townhouses â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in the with the dutch social mixing policy attracting a higher income social group ready to further invest in their surroundings.

(3) the promenade - the re-design of the riverfront walk opens an attractive alternative route to the city centre and hence contributes to the revalorization of the image of the rotte as a whole. making use of the existing level difference, a clear spatial separation to the residential sphere is achieved. the parking (formerly along the river) is relocated into the courtyards, allowing for a larger planted and paved area.

(4) the new commUnity on the opposite side of the rotte, the residents are given a community zone to animate the formerly neglected building block. some groundfloor storage can be converted into workshops, event rooms for rent or community spaces. the green area is visually extended and protected by water plantings that furthermore purify the mostly standing rotte waters.

Wooden promenade, materials in continuity with refurbishment of northern river stretch.

Design varies. example: lawn with spring bulbs

Wooden sitting element, various sizes, overlaying the planting

refurbished Private housing

Linear brick paving Water plantig: several species of Phragmites, Carex and typha

Waterbound surface

Annual wildďŹ&#x201A;ower meadow. (Callirhoe involucrata, Coreopsis tinctoria, Chrysanthemum segetum,...)

(2) the open coUrtyard

(3) the promenade

(4) the new commUnity Community garden

Front yards

rental room elevated beds

Workshop

street

37


38 Urbanism portfolio franziska unzner


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05 breaking the monotony redevelopment erdinger moos Bachelor Thesis TU Munich I Summer Semester 2014 Supervisor: Prof. Sören Schöbel Regional planning Location: Erdinger Moos near Munich, Germany The metropolitan area of Munich is facing a massive population growth. Despite still being poorly served, a fast and faceless suburbanisation - with industrial zones and dull settlement areas - is about to start taking place in the area between the city and its airport. There, in the past century, the marshland of the „Erdinger Moos“ was drained and transformed into an intensive agricultural production area resulting in erosion and a monotonous, unappealing scenery. Still, the Erdinger Moos holds great potential in its rurality, its architectural heritage, the ecological importance of the remaining marshlands, and its many hidden gems like small waterways and lakes. The aim of this thesis is to revalue the Erdinger Moos, recovering the area‘s special identity and purpose and elaborating methods to manage the current developments.

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05// academic 41


1 LaNDsCaPe aNaLysis

niedermoor almoorgleye/alm Gleye und braunerdgleye almrendzina

topoGraphy

wet soils nature conservation area ffh (eU) conservation area landscape conservation area unprotected wet biotope

forest/hedGe strUctUres

natUre conserVation

‚Straßendorf‘ - moor village ‚Haufendorf‘ - agricultural village munich agglomeration industrial area settlement farm

settlement strUctUre

42 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner

waterscape local trains highway/large roads bikepaths

infrastrUctUre hydropower photovoltaik biogas Geothermal water clearance Landfill

airport noise

enerGy and waste treatment


2 treNDs aND risKs

local impacts

popUlation Growth: airport and city as major pull factors expected growth up to 10% until 2030 while oversaturated housing market

lack of bindinG reGional planninG Both ‚Regionalplan 14‘ (grey) and ‚Landschaftliches Vorbehaltsgebiet‘ (green) without legally binding effect; municipalities resposible for urban development within their boundaries

local risks

sUbUrbanisation: expansion of monotonous, uniform, energy un-efficient single family homes

destrUctiVe land Use: expansion of negative land use (airport, land fill, heavy industries) in ecologically relevant area, but without powerful advocates

monotonoUs landscape: continuation/expansion of intense agricultural land use (corn, wheat) that does not match the natural site conditions

Global impacts

climate chanGe: increased flood risk need of co2 retention & renewable energy sources

hoUsinG preferences: desire for both urban and rural lifestyle; increased m2/person

social chanGe : dissolution of traditional family structures; increased mobility

demoGraphic chanGe: ageing; increased immigration rate

05// academic 43


3 LaNDsCaPe ZoNes aND strateGies

the analysis of the natural conditions and present-day use of the currently monotonous, hardly legible landscape reveals three different zones that require different strategies:

Urbanized zone

inner marshland

rUral zone

in the ‘Urbanised zone’ lie the municipalities hallbergmoos and ismaning, where most of the population daily commutes to munich and the housing pressure is the highest. as both municipalities are connected to the munich metro network, housing development should be concentrated here. especially in the sprawling Hallbergmoos, internal densification and the creation of a liveable city centre are the highest priority.

an adjusted land use revives the wet soils in the center area, connects and expands the conservation areas. made accessible by new bike and walking paths, the moos can now serve as appealing alternative local recreation area to munich‘s overcrowded south. three north-south axis - along the renaturalized isar, the revitalized wet landscape and the pond/ isarkanal system - along with numerous crosslinks, let users experience the diversity of the landscape and encourage its positive appropriation.

the ‘rural zone’ consists of small villages that partially already lie in the hilly landscape that marks the eastern border of the marshland. currently sprawling along the country roads, the strategy aims to re-direct their growth towards the nearby water elements such as the isarkanal and other small canals. the currently neglected ignored waters are made accessible and can serve as new meeting points for the villagers - a quality the villages lack in their centre.

4 NeW CoMMUNity hoUsiNG as DeVeLoPMeNt tooL

land attributes landscape

liVinG land use

liVinG

landscape

housing is a key element of the development strategy. new developments should be connected with the land, use local typologies, provide identity and cater for communities beyond traditional family structures. therefore, taking the local conditions like climate, soil, relief and vegetation into consideration is crucial.

44 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner

the typology of the locally traditional ‘three sided farm’ can offer community oriented living/co-housing both in rural and urban settings. refurbished or newly adapted, they provide different dwelling types to suit various life styles, with the central hallway separating different apartments and the traditional ‘stube’ (salon) re-interpreted as community room.

locally sensitive buildings green views; closeness to nature

within the city, a variation in the configuration of the three buildings (courtyard open to the street or closed off) can animate the streetscape similar to the historic core. in the rural area, the new housing structure is designed in a way to enable the inhabitants to live in and with the landscape that is surrounding them, allowing the inhabitants to view and cultivate the land.


urbanized zone

inner marshland

rural zone

05// academic 45


5 strateGiC aCtioNs

rUral zone

pioneer - prestructuring

Infill development

insertion and pre-structuring of the pioneer structure.

46 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner

the new housing structures are implemented on the borders of the villages. they direct the spatial expansion of the villages by marking its ending point and pre-structuring the spaces between them and the current village borders for future development. the aim is to stop the sprawl along the arterial roads and revaluate the quality of the water bodies. Each â&#x20AC;&#x161;farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC; structure consists of appartment buildings, garages and/or single family homes, inspired by ensembles found in the area, that are arranged around a central courtyard. towards the outsides, individual and community gardens are located.

detailed plan of the prioneer structure.


inner marshland

Infill

bypassing

retentionof drainage channels

short rotation croppice Alnus glutinosa biomass prod. 4-10 t tm/ha*a harvest every 5-60 years

palUdi cUltUre i Phragmites australis biomass prod. 3-16 t tm/ha*a

In the ‚Inner marshland‘, the intensive agricultural land is restructured to better suit the capacities of the soils. in the core, drainage canals can be filled in, redirected or retained to ‚re-wet‘ the land. farmers can receive subsidies to change to biomass production (including short rotation croppice, paludi cultures and pasture), and in the long run, land that has been given up can be bought up to extend the natural preservation and recreation areas. bike paths and visitors centres allow visitors to experience landscape.

palUdi cUltUre ii Phalaris arundinacea biomass prod. 3,5-13 t tm/ha*a

eXtensiVe meadow and pastUre

before 1825 future today

CO²-storage

water regulation

biodiversity

R e g u l a t i o n

housing+traffic Consumption

alimentation P r o d u c t i o n

biomass

leisure

identification

S o c i a l

previous, present and expected ecosystem services

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06 hamburg altona frameworks: new district new encounters Group studio project TU Munich I Team of 3 Summer semester 2013 Masterplan/Urban design Location: Hamburg, Germany The former railroad station of Altona is converted into a new urban district. The task of this semester studio was to detail out AndrĂŠ Poitiers Architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s masterplan, design the park, open space and streetscape. The objective was to create a livable and well connected city district for the new residents, while the park must also appeal to the population from the surrounding districts, which lack green spaces. The concept thus focuses on the edges of the park, aiming to design them in a way that both the public and the residents can benefit from.

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water play

water retention

Altona brewery kindergarden

water tower landmark highschool retained platform structure: play, seating

historic freight packing halls - reused for small shops and galleries offices

sports fields

skate park

50 Urbanism portfolio franziska unzner

altona train station


residential district, 20% social housing park residential district; 50% social housing

‘entrance‘

mixed use district

linear gardens index street residential street circular road

sport fields ZONES and DISTRICTS

STREET TYPES northern park edge: water on all levels

‚the balcony‘

commercial public residential - raised residential - at grade BUILDINGS

linear gardens

EDGES

According to the masterplan of André Poitiers architects, the former freight train area will be built-up with 3 districts surrounding a green space. A commercial orientated core area is located around the former warehouse structures in the south-east, whereas the overall use of the district is planned to be 90% residential. It will host about 3.500 dwellings in 4-8 storey houses, of which one third is respectively destined to social housing, self-financed rented apartments and owner-occupied dwellings. Critically questioning and modifying their proposal, this studio project aims to develop a neighbourhood that is liveable for the new residents while the open space must also cater for the population from the surrounding districts that lack green spaces of their own. It will have to look and feel public. The main difficulty in the design of the open space is the odd shape of the park, resulting in a relatively large circumference regarding a surface area of ‚only‘ 6ha.The concept thus emphasises the importance of the edges of the park, designing the transition between the public and residential sphere in a way that both sides can benefit. A second focus lies on accessibility, with three street types that offer different qualities for residents and visitors.

06// academic 51


chess

play: nets and climbing structures seating

play: concrete waves bakery

retained platform

district square

platforms cafe/ restaurant

district centre

small play meadow

lawn galleries/shops

community garden slackline

raised bed seating edge

barbecue places

the narrowest part foresees dense vegetation in linear gardens, creating a gradient between the residential district and the market halls.

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circUlar road

residential street

indeX street

to increase the walkability of the district, automobile traffic is only allowed on the circular road that gives access to the underground parking. the residential streets are designed in to allow for frequent meetings and chats among neighbours, with plantations, terraces and sitting nooks, while the main streets leading towards the park are visually accentuated by the plantation of an alley of fraxinus americana. the largest part of the park will serve as a multi-functional and calm green space - a wide lawn with large trees. the change in elevation between the park and surrounding pathways give it a strong frame and emphasise its character as a place to stay rather than pass through. while the southern edge is animated by the public uses of the adjacent buildings, the northern edge is characterised by water: the rainwater retention basin below, playful water fountains above.

06// academic 53


07 s u bm e r g e e m e r g e breathing life into a shadowy promenade Group studio project Université de Montréal Group of 4 I Summer semester 2013 Urban design Location: Montreal, Canada Montreal‘s Griffintown, an abandonned industrial district on the banks of the Lachine Canal, will be turned into a high-end residential and commercial part of town. The project site is the „Promenade Smith“, a pedestrian route that lies pent-up inbetween the elevated freight train line and the „District Griffin“ development. The design mediates between the pedestrian and the tall, 20 storey residential towers that overshadow the boardwalk. Making a virtue of this reality, the design contrasts the narrow, shady segments of the promenade with wide open views on the surrounding postindustrial landscape.

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wn wn to

st. riv laure er nc

e

do

mo pa nt ro rk ya l

site: ProMeNaDe sMith

56 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner


1 THE DISTRICT UNDER TRANSFORMATION

disused port

In the past, the port vibrated in the rhythm of its canal, trains, industries and church bells. Factories and silos are remnants of that boosting era.

transformations

Construction sites seem to take over the area. Which transformations are hidden behind the scaffolding?

far views

The passing of time is visible in all the layers of the place. Wind, water, wood, stone, brick, iron and glass. We catch a glimpse of the city from skyline to canal.

impersonality

The entire Griffintown district seems abandoned, interspersed with wide empty streets and impenetrable volumes.

vital signs

Urban phantoms appropriate the space and leave their traces. Suddenly, a colorful alley welcomes the visitor. Craftsmen have settled down here for longtime. 57


2 the CoNCePt: LiGht aND shaDoW

The â&#x20AC;&#x161;Promenade Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC; lies sandwiched between elevated freight railway line and the tall residential/ mixed use towers of the District Griffinâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;. this causes the promenade to lie in deep shadow most of the day.

promenade smith

sUmmer

winter

16h

12h

09h

an oscillating line of lighting elements leads the visitor through a spectacle of light and dark. in the shady segments next to the housing blocks, the poles support a planted filament web that intensifies the feeling of descent and emergence along the way. by serving as an intermediate layer between the tall buildungs and the pedestrian boulevard, this design element restores the human scale of the promenade. wide open views are given at the park and the waterfront plaza as well as on top of the slope mounting up to the rail line. at night the image is reversed by the bright illumination along the line. the open and sunny spaces during the day now turn into calm retreats.

wellin

stree

t

stree peel

youn g

stree

library

t

t

gton

district park labyrinth pedestrian promenade

waterfront plaza nbhd center look-out platform

ilway line

elevated ra

e tur

n ve na

canal lachine

bo

58 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner

ay

rw

to mo


3 the DesiGN: seQUeNCe oF sPaCes

the waterfront plaza is framed by the neighborhood park and the community center that is located in the restored train service building. as multiusable hardscape, is can host daily activities, but can also be used as venue for numerous events.

along the new buildings, the promenade will be bustling with residents and shoppers. Underneath the filament web planted with Aristolochia macrophylla, a calmer atmosphere invites the visitor to relax or take a stroll up the slope. once mounted up through through the dense shadow plantations, the visitor gets the opportunity to overlook the scenery and to catch a glimpse of the canal on the other side of the rails.

today - concrete, water, metal. tomorrow - glass, light, shadow. the design is inspired by these contrasts and tries to combine the essence of the past, the rough, industrial charm of the rue smith, with its most important future characteristics. Underneath the railway bridge, the industrial spirit of the concrete colums and graffiti walls is preserved. a light installation on the ground guides the visitor through this â&#x20AC;&#x153;labyrinthâ&#x20AC;?.

07// academic 59


08 10 11

aCaDeMiC

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p.06


09

proFeSSionaL & other

p.78

61


08 l i n c o l n s q u a r e design of a residential shaded courtyard Object Planning I Spring/Summer 2015 Gustafson Porter + Bowman Urban design I Location: London, UK Contribution I preparation of plans, sections, technical details and layouting presentations I sunlight studies I exploration of pavement patterns, water feature and planting schemes Situated in central London, the inner courtyard of Lincoln Square will form the heart of the high-end development and function as backdrop for the two residential lobbies on Portugal and Carey Street. The design provides a calm and leafy environment that retains its beauty throughout the year. The courtyard allows for tranquil uses and represents an aesthetic sight from the upper floors due to its ornamental character.

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08// professional 63


play element

water feature lawn

© Gustafson porter + bowman spring

© Gustafson porter + bowman summer

© Gustafson porter + bowman winter

© Gustafson porter + bowman autumn

© Gustafson porter + bowman 3d model - sculptural bench

64 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner


Š Gustafson porter + bowman construction detail - sculptural bench

Š Gustafson porter + bowman construction detail - water feature: fountain and thin water mirror

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09 s i n g a p o r e n at i o n a l o r c h i d garden redevelopment CompetitionI Summer 2015 Gustafson Porter + Bowman Landscape design I Location: Singapore Contribution// preparation of plans, sections, and conceptual drawings I calculation of pathway slopes I research on orchid habitats I contribution to atmospheric colour concept and perspectives The proposal for the redesign of Singaporeâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s National Orchid Gardens aims to strengthen the aesthetic and educational value of the gardens while maintaining their high reputation . Resulting from extensive research on orchids and their habitats, the proposal enhances the visitor experience by guiding the guests through different living environments and colour themes, allowing them to observe the flowers from diverse angles and viewpoints.

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Š Gustafson porter + bowman

09// professional 67


the design enhances the visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s experience by allowing orchids to be displayed in an environment that appears as natural as possible. they can be viewed from different angles; from pathways on the ground as well as from an elevated canopy structure that simultaneously acts as planting support.

orchid nursery kenwood house

viewtower

cool house

entrance

Š Gustafson Porter + Bowman

68 Urbanism portfolio franziska Unzner


© Gustafson porter + bowman

© Gustafson porter + bowman

© Gustafson porter + bowman

three different visitors route are offered, varying among the abilities and time constraints of the visitors: the canopy walk (yellow), the long route (orange) and the wheelchair accessible path (pink). the long route includes a visit of the orchid nursery to support the educational value of the Garden.

the routes down from the hilltop is designed to offer an intriguing and enriching experience, passing through different atmospheres, colour-themes and living environments before reaching the new-proposed ‘cool house’ that displays rare mountain orchids in a misty environment.

© Gustafson Porter + Bowman

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10 participatory design workshop a new face for the heinickeplatz Competition I October 2014 ver.de landschaftsarchitektur result: one first price, engagement to design the square Urban design I Location: Nuremberg, Germany Contribution I participant in workshop: member of team of three communication with residents and other stakeholders I codefinition of urban and design concept I illustration of schemata and plan graphics

The lack of accessible green spaces in Nuremberg’s Weststadt has led to a high pressure of use on the “Heinickeplatz” square, resulting in a degradation of its vegetation and frequent conflicts of use between pensioners, parents with children of all ages and adolescent soccer players. Four landscape architecture companies were invited to spend three days on site and work in an „open studio“ to mediate between the different stakeholders s well as develop ideas for the improvements of the adjacent primary school. Ver.de’s proposal includes a re-design of the “Heinickeplatz” and school grounds as well as the activation of additional sites in the district.

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historical pavillon

historical pavillon

bouldering wall table tennis

volleyball court

school garden playground

schrebergardens roof garden

schoolyard

paul-ritter school

PestalozzistraĂ&#x;e

sitting steps

playground for small children boules

chess tables

raised beds

Muggenhofer

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20 m


1 WorKshoP

the „open studio“ included guided tours, open councils, presentations and dialogues with residents, scholars and city employees.

2 oPeN sPaCe CoNCePt pegnitz valley football field

historical pavillons

football field

fuchsloch playgcampus round heinickeplatz

PreseNt The football field and school facilities are closed to the public, requiring the football players to use the heinickenplatz.

heinicke platz

steP i Give visual and physical access to other existing green spaces - creation of new pathways and reactivation of historical lookout pavilions.

heinickeplatz

steP ii raise the supply of green spaces: designation of different sub-spaces for different user and age groups. a re-arrangement of the school buildings allows for sports facilities within campus, freeing the football field for public use.

3 the heiNiCKePLatZ

neighborhood meet up

multifunctional forecourt lawn

flowering bed

children‘s play

the heinickeplatz itself remains a place for everyone. the design for the square provides a set of clearly distinctive spaces for different user groups with a special focus on the elder and youngest generations. inspired by the art nouveau facade of the adjacent school building, organic forms give a strong identity to the place.

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11 erlangen urban conversion gossen garden district Competition I August 2014 ver.de landschaftsarchitektur result: 2nd first price Masterplan I Location: Erlangen, Germany Contribution I development of landscape concept I illustration of plan graphics I coordination with Knoop & Rรถdl architects The project site is located on the fringes of the historical centre of Erlangen, a rapidly growing mid-sized town in Northern Bavaria. On a derelict industrial site surrounded by train and highway structures, the aim was to develop a green neighbourhood with a protected interior while being sensitive to the heritage of the place.

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CeNt

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offices

train tracks

sMes

community centre

internal park: office workers and residents

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rground pa

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community gardens

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sports facilities

community gardens

student housing

high school sports facilities

highway

20 m

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Š ver.de landschaftsarchitektur


SECTION AA‘

SECTION BB‘

orientation towards the green

reaction to the surroundings

creation of a place of retreat

noise-shield

unmistakable adress towards the outside

differentiation of sub-spaces

Aiming to develop a high-quality, green new neighbourhood, the team of ver.de landschaftsarchitektur and Knoop&Rödl architects propose a ring-shape building development surrounding a large, continuous open space. Protected from the noise of the surrounding infrastructure lines, the space offers varied atmospheres and activities to suit its different residents (studios for students and family sized apartments for owner occupation and social rent). The local heritage including an old factory hall and the existing tree population, reinforcing the park-like character of the site, were integrated in the design concept.

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12 Urban and landscape week 2016 20:61 - Dialogues for the future 3-day symposium & interdisc. student competition I Oct. 2016 POLIS study association of Urbanism & Landscape Arch. Workshop Organisation I Location: Delft, Netherlands Contribution I committee member: treasurer (grant applications and financial oversight) and program team (definition of theme, program and content of the competition; invitation of international speakers; management and moderation of the event)

How might climate change, large scale migration and political instability affect our cities? What effects could future innovations have on our way of life? How can we work together for a better future? The aim of the 2016 Urban and Landscape Week was to open up a dialogue between students, academics and professionals about the possibilities of this uncertain future. To see different perspectives, expand our set of knowledge and understand certain problems in their entity, we chose to take an integrative approach, inviting speakers from outside our profession and reach out to students from different fields.

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the three-day event consisted of lectures from international speakers from various fields such as future studies, scenario planning, space architecture, virtual reality or mobility, and a round-table dicussion with key note speaker carlo ratti who explores the interface between technology and architecture.

Group F: Abdul Said Ahtar Timothy Djagiri Yafim Simanovsky Piyali Sircar

the lecture series was accompanied by an intense student competition, in which eight multidisciplinary teams of four creatively explored extreme scenarios for an imaginary city. the scenarios were (1) eco-fascism (2) retreat into virtual reality (3) rising water levels and dramatic increase in natural disasters (4) city bought up by global corporations. illustrated below is the output of the winning team. five senses realistically to evoke the emotions and sensations generated by food.

The Salcur Times

Is the environment going to flood us all?

MAYOR DIAZ, SAVIOR? Blackout causes major reconsideration of urban planning

Since 2016

VR has reached a point today where people cannot distinguish between VR and reality. As predicted this has caused a few legal battles where citizens who commit crimes in the real world, often plead that they thought they were “in the virtual world.” Controversy continues as people claim that if people are going to treat the VR world like a real world, the same laws should apply to both worlds. Doesn’t morality transcend the issue of the real versus the virtual?

1.79

Present state of affairs There has been a steady and powerful polarization in our society due to VR corporations buying up land in the city center and real estate prices have spiked up all around the city, pushing most of the lower class citizens to the outskirt neighborhoods. New VR data-centers now fill up entire city blocks by replacing the vacant buildings with segregated simulation complexes where the upper-middle class and the rich can enjoy the limitless benefits of virtual worlds, ignoring the harsh and air polluted reality of the streets. Last month’s events, namely the river flooding of the downtown data-centers, caused a week-long electric paralysis for the major VR corporations, and perhaps now they will stop resisting some positive changes that will allow the public space of the city to be more livable, being forced to experience it first-hand as well. The future of our city is, as it has always been, in the hands of the municipal government, which so far has neglected the key issues of infrastructure and housing. The once unpopular political party of Salman Diaz, who successfully pushed forward the SWI (solar-field and wind-farm initiative) back in 2052, is positioned to be ahead in the municipal elections coming this November. Salman, a 4th generation migrant, is no stranger to the hardships of the lower classes in Salcur. His family lived through the deterioration of the environment, the neglecting of public facilities and the recent pushing-out of certain demographics out of the center and into the outskirts. Under his lea-

Mayor Diaz - Urgent press conference

What has VR done to our urban fabric? Over the last few decades we’ve witnessed an exponential rise in VR technology. While VR services have become cheaper and more accessible, people like Tim, who belong to a lower socio-economic class, still have to venture outside into the now unbearable heat and pollution in order to use many of the services that the masses take for granted. Tim sees the world in its ‘true colors’ as he says, not through VR-colored glasses like the rest of society. For the first time in decades, many of Salcur’s residents saw what Tim sees daily and it’s not pretty: “When the power went out I was in my vacation home in Hawaii. The weather was nice, as usual, so I was thinking of taking my jetski out for a ride. Needless to say, it was a rude awakening to be back here, sitting on my couch in Salcur. I was pretty confused so I did something I rarely do, I looked outside my apartment window, and I saw the world for what it really is. And let me tell you, it wasn’t pretty.” -CEO of Radworks (the largest retail chain in 2061) Our city has been suffering from an increasing neglect of the city’s infrastructure ever since VR technology became ubiquitous. As VR penetration increases, bringing outdoor activities to our fingertips at home, Salcur’s residents are left with fewer incentives to go outside and interact with the physical world. Many of us can recall a time (circa 2016) when the elite few had access to the Oculus Rift. However, this technology was very limited in its ability to engage all the senses to emulate an authentic experience. Back then 45% of all VR users would experience nausea that barred this from becoming a part of daily use. VR was a largely science fictional concept and critics decried that this technology would largely remain confined to the world of gaming.

What is the future of the outskirt housing areas? Needless to say, they were wrong. For the next 20 years or so VR grew at an alarmingly rapid rate and life changed in ways many couldn’t imagine. At first virtual reality was a relatively cheap way to simulate dangerous situations to train military personnel and a way for doctors to practice surgery before the real deal. Designers and architects didn’t have to imagine the spaces and objects they were creating, they could touch, feel and sense, taking creation to the next level by delivering what clients really wanted. VR was the gateway to empathy for many, who could, literally, step into the shoes of another human. Because they don’t have to anymore, many people today report difficulty developing empathy in the traditional way: by imagining what it feels like to be in someone else’s shoes. Online shopping had reached peaked penetration for some time back

VR trend infographic

FLOOD DISASTER - The aftermath of the massive flood which ruined VR server buildings in the downtown area.

MASTER PLAN FOR SALCUR 2071 BY MAYOR DIAZ

dership and as the new mayor of Salcur, Diaz is proposing a bold strategy not only to make our city more resilient to climate risks, but more livable and affordable for everyone. “The flood has washed our eyes clean! We now see the reality of our city as it really exists outside the realms of the virtual. The VR corporations have pushed the poor out of their homes! Regular citizens find it hard to commute, to find green spaces to enjoy and afford living close to their workplace. As mayor I will lead a strict policy where corporations that control your virtual world do not control your reality as well! They cannot take hold of real estate in such a forceful manner any longer! They will be forced to provide not only quality technology for whoever demands it, but also public facilities, open spaces and parks for everyone to share, even for people who cannot afford their expensive VR fantasies!” With this statement, Diaz is promising the majority of the citizens that regardless of the price of VR, they will have parks to walk in, squares to meet in, and good transportation to get to and from their home.

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Data centers (#)

Historic Image - VR gaining popularity in new simulation complexes - 2045

then, or so we thought, with shoppers complaining that they missed what it felt like to walk around in a shop, touching, feeling and interacting with the sales staff. VR changed all of that. Brick and mortar stores are few and far between and exist today, to service an army of “delivery men” - men subjected to the harsh, dystopian conditions of the real world to bring the masses the “things” they can’t live without. This mostly includes materials for food, clothing and furniture. A few like Tim, who comprise

Simulators (#)

3% of the population, continue to live without the luxuries afforded by VR, while another 5% disavow VR completely, arguing that the rest of us are hiding in the VR world to escape responsibility. Ironically this is the same argument critics used back in the year 2016. Education was already moving towards an online platform; VR accelerated this rate. Then in 2045 we witnessed, what in retrospect could be called a game-changer, with: virtual food. VR reached a point where it was able to engage all

1900

Housing (m2)

Office space (m2)

Green space (m2) 1950

Car usage (km/week)

Air traffic (km/week)

2016 2016

Homelessness (per capita)

2036

2061

2016

Data Centers (number)

VR company ‘buying power’ (stock price)

Housing area

2061 2061

2

67

93

VR penetration (% of population)

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thank you.

Fr anzi ska U n z n e r urbanism p o rt f o l i o 84 Urbanism portfolio franziska unzner

Urbanism portfolio  

An extensive selection of academic and professional work as urbanist and landscape architect

Urbanism portfolio  

An extensive selection of academic and professional work as urbanist and landscape architect

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