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Frankston An independent voice for the community Your weekly community newspaper covering Frankston, Frankston South, Karingal, Langwarrin and Seaford For all advertising and editorial needs, call 03

FREE

Tuesday 16 February 2021

5974 9000 or email: team@baysidenews.com.au www.baysidenews.com.au

On track

Funding has been made available for more works at Nat’s Track. A mural in memorial of Natalie Russell will be installed. Cr Sue Baker and Frankston MP Paul Edbrooke (pictured) announced the funding boost last week. Picture: Supplied

Snap lockdown due to end soon Brodie Cowburn brodie@baysidenews.com.au FRANKSTON residents have been plunged back into lockdown after a cluster of COVID-19 cases broke out from a quarantine hotel in Melbourne. The five-day statewide lockdown is expected to come to an end at 11.59pm on Wednesday, 17 February. In response to the growing number of cases linked to hotel quarantine, premier Daniel Andrews announced

that the state would move into a snap lockdown effective at 11.59pm on Friday, 12 February. There are no COVID-19 exposure sites listed in the Frankston municipality as of 14 February. The four reasons to leave home that were in place during the state’s extended lockdown in the middle of last year were reinstated. People are only allowed to leave their home to shop for essentials, caregiving, exercise, and work. The five kilometer travel

limit was also reinstated. Masks in public and private places were made mandatory again. Restaurants were restricted to takeaway only, while gyms, pools, community centres, entertainment venues, and libraries shut their doors. School students were sent home to learn remotely, although childcare and kinder remained open. Premier Daniel Andrews said the lockdown was implemented to contend with a “hyper-infectious vari-

ant” of COVID-19 “moving at hyperspeed”. “As we’ve seen – here in Australia and around the world – we are facing a new kind of enemy. A virus that is smarter, and faster, and more infectious,” he said. “And until we have a vaccine, we need to do everything we can to keep this virus at bay. It’s why on the advice of our public health experts, the whole of Victoria will move to circuitbreaker action (...). This is a short,

sharp blast – the same as we’ve seen in Queensland and WA – that will give us what we need to get ahead of this faster moving virus.” Victoria recorded five new locally acquired COVID-19 cases on the day it was announced the state would move back into lockdown. As of 14 February there are 21 active cases of COVID-19 in Victoria. For the full list of exposure sites visit dhhs.vic.gov.au/case-locationsand-outbreaks-covid-19

3 Hastings Road, Frankston VIC 3199 155 Sladen Street, Cranbourne VIC 3977

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Editor: Brodie Cowburn 0401 864 460 Journalists: Brodie Cowburn, Stephen Taylor, 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Anton Hoffman 0411 119 379 Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production and graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Craig MacKenzie, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@baysidenews.com.au Web: baysidenews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2021 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: TUESDAY 23 FEBRUARY 2021

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A GIANT mural in Frankston. Picture: Supplied

Seeing the bigger picture BIG Picture Fest 2021 is scheduled to kick off next month. The annual festival sees artists come to Frankston to create giant murals. Frankston councillor Suzette Tayler says “the Big Picture Fest was initially held in 2018, with the artworks transforming drab walls in high profile locations and hidden laneways into an epic spectacle of storytelling, colour and vibrancy.” “Showcasing Frankston’s evolving arts and culture edge, Frankston City is now home to over 30 larger than

life street art pieces and murals created by some of the world’s best street artists. Dotted throughout the city’s streets and laneways, these artworks are all just waiting to be discovered,” she said. Those artworks can be seen as part of a guided tour. Council’s tourism coordinator Amy Parsons said “Frankston’s Street Art Walking Tours are a great way for people to discover the creative energy within Frankston City.” “Our street art helps create a sense of place, an identity for Frankston

that builds on the reputation that our city is evolving. You’ll be fascinated by the inspiration behind these artworks, created by some of the world’s best street artists. Our local guides share these stories. It’s a vibrant urban art experience that you don’t have to travel to Melbourne for,” Ms Parsons said. Street Art Walking Tours cost $15 and run for 90 minutes. To book visit discoverfrankston.com/things-to-do/ tours/frankston/street-art-walkingtours

GALLERY TALK There is only two weeks left to see the 2020 National Works on Paper the exhibition must close on Sunday 21 February. With a long and rich history, NWOP features leading artists from across Australia working in the fields of drawing, printmaking, digital prints and paper sculpture. You are able to vote for your favourite work in the People’s Choice Award - the winning artist will receive $1000. On MPRG TV you can watch a conversation with six artists featured in the 2020 National Works on Paper from all around Australia - Kath Fries (NSW), Tamika Grant-Iramu (QLD), Winsome Jobling (NT), Annika Romeyn (ACT), Robert Ewing (WA) and Robert Fielding (SA). Our Young at Art program for preschoolers is now being run every Tuesday morning. With the guidance of an experienced early childhood educator, participants respond to works in the current exhibition with a different hands-on creative activity every week, using materials from the take-home art materials box supplied each session. In our online workshops for kids and adults, Nobenti Oho shows us how to

5 DEC 21 FEB

on exhibiti l Gallery Regiona insula ton Pen A Morning

NWOP supports and promotes contemporary Australian artists working on or with paper with up to $50,000 acquisitions and awards.

make a basket with recycled materials, using weaving, coiling and twining and artist-educator Jill Anderson is inspired by the dynamic and immediate way artist Locust Jones records aspects of his life and asks you to get creative expressing your own current experiences. Artists: Kim ANDERSON, Suzanne ARCHER, Lyn ASHBY, Peter ATKINS, Elizabeth BANFIELD, Hannah BEILHARZ, Chris BOND and Drew PETTIFER, Godwin BRADBEER, Kaye BROWN, Jane BURTON, Penelope CAIN, Marilou CHAGNAUD, Timothy COOK, Matt COYLE, Sam CRANSTOUN, Julia DAVIS and Lisa JONES, Stephen EASTAUGH, Naomi ELLER, Robert EWING, Robert FIELDING, Anna FINLAYSON, Belinda FOX, David FRAZER, Kath FRIES, Brian FUATA, Ash GARWOOD, Minna GILLIGAN, Shaun GLADWELL, Tamika GRANT-IRAMU, Katherine HATTAM, Judy HOLDING, Anna HOYLE, Clare HUMPHRIES, Winsome JOBLING, Deborah KELLY, Iluwanti KEN, Martin KING, Ilona KISS, Barbie KJAR, Jenna LEE, Dane LOVETT, Chips MACKINOLTY, Laith McGREGOR, Noel McKENNA, Roma McLAUGHLIN, Todd McMILLAN, Fiona McMONAGLE, Vera MÖLLER, Ray MONDE, Kent MORRIS, Tom O’HERN, Becc ORSZÁG, David PALLISER, Louise PARAMOR, Hubert PAREROULTJA, Riley PAYNE, Tom POLO, Patrick POUND, Linda PUNA, Cameron ROBBINS, Brian ROBINSON, Annika ROMEYN, Pip RYAN, Wendy SHARPE, Kylie STILLMAN, Jacqui STOCKDALE, Marina STROCCHI, Hiromi TANGO, Hossein VALAMANESH, Lisa WAUP, Rosie WEISS, Regina WILSON, Judith WRIGHT, Heidi YARDLEY

mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

KEY FUNDER

16 February 2021

MEDIA PARTNERS

We hope to see you at the Gallery soon! Danny Lacy Artistic Director Senior Curator

Civic Reserve, Dunns Road, Mornington Ph 5950 1580 Frankston Times

PARTNER

EVENT PARTNERS

You can still purchase one of our art boxes for $55 with all the materials you’ll need for one of our online workshops with master printmaker David Frazer, Wynne Prize winner Hubert Pareroultja or do a watercolour workshop with Rosie Weiss.

www.mprg.mornpen.vic.gov.au

PAGE 2

GOVERNMENT SUPPORTER


Mixed reactions to new council social media policy Brodie Cowburn brodie@baysidenews.com.au A FACEBOOK post made by a Frankston councillor comparing a proposed social media policy to life in the Soviet Union has been labelled “extremely offensive”. Cr Steven Hughes made a post last week criticising proposed changes to council’s social media guidelines. The post and accompanying image have been described as “shocking” by the mayor. Council’s new draft communications policy proposes that councillors on social media must remove content for up to 24 hours if directed to by the mayor. “In instances where there is a breach of [the communications policy] or relevant code, the mayor can direct a councillor to temporarily remove the content in question from their social media channels and website for a period of up to 24 hours to allow investigation into the severity of the alleged breach,” the draft policy reads. Council has confirmed that a complaint about an alleged breach can be made by anyone. Council officers have recommended that the draft policy be approved and sent out for public consultation. Cr Hughes’ lengthy Facebook post read that the proposed changes would “suffocate free speech”. He told The Times that council would have a “censorship committee of the mayor and CEO” if the changes to the communications policy pass. “This is essentially censoring any criticism of council, and I think that’s dangerous. We don’t have

that in other areas of politics, you can post the truth,” he said. The mayor Kris Bolam called Cr Hughes’ claims on Facebook “melodramatic and simply untrue”. “The right to freedom of expression is important but it is not absolute, and it may be limited when its exercise causes harm to the public interest or the rights of others,” he said. In his post, Cr Hughes said “proposed changes to the code of conduct and communications policy will greatly limit the accountability of Frankston Council. Any criticism of a council decision will be an offence. Any commentary (even if factual) that brings council into disrepute will be sanctioned. The mayor will have unprecedented power to shut down any councillor’s social media accounts even if an offence has not been proven. Lenin would be proud.” The proposed policy would not actually allow for a councillor’s social media account to be deactivated at the instruction of the mayor. “Nowhere in the proposed update does it give council the power to deactivate a councillor’s social media account,” Cr Bolam said. “What the policy does propose is to allow the mayor at his or her discretion, to request that a councillor remove content for a period of up to 24 hours should there be a suspected breach of the relevant code or policy, in order for a proper investigation to be undertaken. If no breach is identified, the councillor is within their rights to reinstate the content.” Cr Bolam said that punishments for breaching the new communications

policy “would depend on the severity of the situation and is assessed on a case by case basis.” When asked if he thought he was being targeted by changes to the communications policy, Cr Hughes said “I can’t say yes or no to that, it’s to keep all councillors in line I suppose. I have made some posts and they haven’t been popular.” Cr Bolam said “it’s not unusual for policies and strategies to be reviewed and strengthened at the commencement of a new council, and in this case there were changes to several sections that required updating, including the social media portion.” Cr Hughes’ post criticising the proposed changes was accompanied by a bizarre Photoshop of a dolphin in front of the Soviet Union flag. Cr Hughes said the image was created by him and his son, and that the post had been constructive. “I had to make it dramatic and big,” he said. “Look at the attention that it has brought. If I hadn’t done a post, then there’s no more posts about the communications policy.” In a statement, Cr Bolam said “Cr Hughes to put it bluntly, your post is extremely offensive not only to council, but to the members of our community and indeed staff who have personal experience or connections to those who have fled communist regimes. The imagery depicted, which was clearly planned and calculated would be highly concerning by anyone, but the fact that it was disseminated by an elected official is quite frankly shocking – and it’s sad that so many have already been exposed to it.” “Councillor Steven Hughes, I im-

Making a splash: A provocative image posted on Cr Steven Hughes’ Facebook page. Picture: Facebook plore you to concentrate your efforts on working together with your colleagues and council officers, in the interests of the community we have been elected to represent. If you feel you cannot do that, then I suggest you reconsider your position, because as it stands your behaviour is not conducive with what our community expects from their local

government representatives. “As you seem to be unable to take responsibility for your actions, I will – and I would like to sincerely apologise to the people in our community, and officers within our organisation who have in any way felt hurt or offensive as a result of his poorly judged post.”

Cancer fundraiser a success NEARLY $4000 for breast cancer research has been raised by the City of Frankston Bowling Club. The club’s inaugural Pink Pennant Bowls Day featured donation tins and a raffle. A total of $3700 was raised for Breast Cancer Network of Australia. Dunkley MP Peta Murphy, who was diagnosed with breast cancer herself in 2019, said the Breast Cancer Network of Australia “does a terrific job raising awareness of breast cancer and supporting people with the illness”. “In Victoria, breast cancer claims the lives of over 740 women every year. The City of Frankston Bowls Club should be very proud of their efforts; I know this money will support BCNA to make a real differ-

ence,” she said. City of Frankston Bowling Club CEO Craig Williams said “we all know someone who has been impacted by breast cancer. At the City of Frankston Bowling Club, we are committed to supporting this terrific cause and raising awareness.”

THE City of Frankston Bowling Club don pink to raise funds for breast cancer research. Picture: Supplied

LACHLAN FAIRFIELD

Year 12 Prefect 2020

Inspiration is irresistible – you can’t force it or manufacture it. You simply have to find it, and nurture it. At Peninsula Grammar, our students continue to be guided by this teaching philosophy, because inspiring young minds is at the heart of who we are. peninsulagrammar.vic.edu.au

Frankston Times

16 February 2021

PAGE 3


Carrum Downs Tennis Club

OPEN DAY

Sunday: 21st Feb 10am - 2pm Wedge Road Recreation Reserve, Carrum Downs

ENJOY FREE TENNIS (equipment provided)

FREE coaching FUN competitions Prizes & Giveaways FREE sausage sizzle.

For inquiries or information on our wide range of Community Programs, contact Larry on: 0409547833

Did you know... you can view our papers online

www.baysidenews.com.au Bayside

NEWS DESK

Mural to remember Natalie Russell A MURAL in memory of Natalie Russell will be installed on the Frankston North track named after her. Natalie Russell was walking home from school on what is now known as Nat’s Track in 1993 when she was taken and killed. Works will soon begin to improve the track, which is still used by students today. Ms Russell’s parents Brian and Carmel praised the plans to improve the track. “We are pleased and honoured about the works – it’s what we have wanted and they will improve safety,” Brian Russell said. Frankston Council recently approved spending another $87,000 on the track. That funding will be used for solar lights, landscape beautification, public art, and the installation of the memorial artwork in consultation with Ms Russell’s family. Frankston mayor Kris Bolam said council has already spent $80,000 “for the installation of CCTV at the Skye Rd end of the track, with footage streamed live to the Frankston Police Station.” “Council has also invested $25,000 on the installation of warning signage and access gates to deter monkey bike activity, and the construction of decorative planter boxes as part of a Monterey Secondary College VCAL program,” he said. “Peninsula Kingswood Golf Club also replaced 100 metres of fencing along the track with the support of a $10,000 council grant. The track was also recently repaved to improve wheelchair and bicycle accessibility.” Principal of John Paul College, where Ms Russell attended, John Visentin, said “the school community is proud to be a partner in the project with Frankston City Council and other schools and organisations to ensure that Nat’s Track is safe for the use of students and the wider public.” “Our students acknowledge the College’s special link and responsibility for this track given the connection to former John Paul College student, Natalie Russell, and they look forward to lending their skills and time to bring this project to its completion,” he said.

CR Sue Baker with Frankston MP Paul Edbrooke at Nat’s Track. Picture: Supplied

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Frankston Times

16 February 2021


Fines loom for non-voters

Picture: Gary Sissons

FRANKSTON residents who chose not to vote in last year’s council elections will be sent “please explain” notices by the Victorian Electoral Commission. The VEC says it may send an infringement notice and a penalty of $83 to anyone who doesn’t respond to the letter, or doesn’t provide a sufficient reason for not voting. Around 350,000 letters will be sent out statewide. The letters are due back to the VEC within 28 days.

“This notice is not a fine. It’s your chance to explain why you appear not to have voted, if this is the case. This is a question that must be asked of those who appear not to have voted,” electoral commissioner Warwick Gately said. “Please complete and send the notice back within the 28-day timeframe so that we can consider your explanation.” Total voter turnout in Frankston for the 2020 council elections was 79.35 per cent of eligible voters, an improvement on the 2016 election.

New councillors propose rate cut No shire compo for firefighters A RATE cut has been discussed by Frankston councillors, although it would come at a huge estimated cost to council’s budget. New councillors Steven and Liam Hughes have proposed that ordinary rates be slashed by greater than or equal to 1 per cent. Council officers estimate that the proposed cuts would cost council up to $30 million over the next decade. The motion prepared by Crs Hughes reads “Frankston residents are the highest paying ratepayers in our region when considering median house prices and average household incomes.” “The budgeted adjusted underlying result for [the 2021/2022 financial year] will be required to run at a surplus even with the reduction in rate revenue. This is to make sure that the budgeted financial result in FY21/22 isn’t run at a deficit due to budgeted lower rate income. Understanding that

the above may impact the revenue for the FY21/22 budget, council may seek to reduce budgets for departments. As we are both new councillors we are not 100 per cent certain of the structuring of budgets at council and whether budgets are done by department and we are happy to take council’s advice on this,” the motion reads. Council’s chief financial officer Kim Jaensch wrote in the council agenda “first and foremost, it needs to be stated that Frankston City Council rates are not higher than average in comparison to other Melbourne councils and are in fact generally lower particularly when comparing residential rates to other councils in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs. The average valuation however in Frankston is generally lower than many of these councils and significantly lower in comparison to inner Melbourne bayside suburbs. The average residential valuation in

Stonnington (Toorak) for example is approximately $1.3M as compared to the average valuation in Frankston which is $580,000. This means that for Frankston City Council to raise a similar amount in rates as other councils (for it to provide a similar level of local government services) it must use a higher rate in the $ which is applied to the valuations. This results in an outcome where a $1M property in Frankston will pay significantly higher rates than a $1M property in Toorak.” “Viewed over several financial years, the implications of this NOM are extremely significant and will impact on councils future ability to both provide services and deliver key community infrastructure projects,” she wrote. A vote on the motion will be held on Monday night, shortly after publication deadline. Brodie Cowburn

MORNINGTON Peninsula ratepayers will not have to pay $10,000 to Rye CFA because of a “muck-up” by a “junior officer”. The CFA was told by the officer on behalf of the shire that it could not hold its annual tin rattle because of safety issues. CFA volunteers traditionally approach motorists for donations every January at the corner of Dundas Street and Nepean Highway. The shire, after “banning” the tin rattle, later admitted its traffic and transport team did not have the power to stop the collection. It said there had been a mix up, and the decision was a police matter. But this was cold comfort to the CFA, whose captain, Glenn Diamond, said members had been looking forward to the day and the usual banter with motorists. He said the tin rattle had been a major fundraiser for more than 10 years

usually raised about $10,000. At the council’s Tuesday 9 February meeting Cr David Gill said it was necessary to “look after our volunteers … especially those that put their lives at risk”. The loss of income meant the CFA would be unable to buy new equipment. C Gill said the $10,000 was “on a very small scale for us to recompence what was a muck-up. “I’ve been told [by council officers that it wasn’t a muck-up - well I think it was”. CEO John Baker confirmed that a council officer sent a letter “denying the right” for the CFA to conduct its tin rattle. Councillors rejected Cr Gill’s motion to pay the CFA and compensate any other volunteer organisation that protected community health and safety but were unable to hold roadside collections because of COVID-19. Keith Platt

Is it time to make Village Glen your safe & secure new home on the Mornington Peninsula? Village Glen Aged Care Residences provide residents and their family the peace of mind that there is support along this journey. Our team can answer all your questions about the aged care process as we know it can be complicated. You simply need to tell us what we can do to assist you. The Village Glen difference extends into our offerings to our residents. While we have a beautiful facility with stunning bay views, we also offer residents in-house physiotherapy, a lifestyle program run by diversional therapists and of course a team of executive chefs creating tempting delights. Plus, there’s the security of having the highest level of nursing care including our memory support unit with a very special sensory garden.

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Frankston Times

16 February 2021

PAGE 5


NEWS DESK

Council ignores move to end kangaroo shoots Keith Platt keith@baysidenews.com.au A LACK of scientific evidence has seen all but one of the shire’s 11 councillors decline to call for a ban on the slaughter of kangaroos on the Mornington Peninsula. Cr David Gill said kangaroo shooting should be stopped because “we don’t know how many there are and how many are being killed”. His move failed to get the backing of even one councillor and lapsed without a vote being taken at the council’s Tuesday 9 February meeting. Cr Gill’s motion called for a ban of kangaroos shooting “until scientific research is undertaken justifying the need for this practice and determining the long-term ramifications on our kangaroo population”. However, his 10 council colleagues appeared to want the scientific evidence before wanting to stop the issuing of licences which property owners to kill kangaroos. The licences are issued by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) but the information about how many kangaroos are allowed to be killed is only available through a freedom of information (FOI) application. The peninsula is included in the Gippsland region for the purposes of issuing licences. Unofficial estimates of the number of kangaroos on the peninsula range from 1500 to 3500. Chris McEvoy, whose family runs

Picture: Gary Sissons a wedding reception business and grows grapevines on more than 40 hectares at Merricks North, saw councillors’ reactions to Cr Gill’s concerns as “a joke”. “I would have thought there wouldn't be one Australian that doesn't like a kangaroo - we really have to change the perception they are pests,” he said. Mr McEvoy said kangaroo habitat on the peninsula was “rapidly shrinking, and so are their numbers”.

He said scientific studies had shown kangaroos did not compete with livestock for grass, or eat crops, or destroy fences “and they only get caught in poorly maintained fences without access points or when terrorised by shooters or dogs”. “Studies have shown a cow eats seven times more grass than a kangaroo and generally they are eating different grasses.” Nathan Stamkos, DELWP’s conservation regulator manager, regula-

tory operations Port Phillip, said the number of kangaroos available for “harvesting” varied each from region to region “based on environmental conditions, such as rainfall and the availability of food”. The decision was made by DELWP scientists after annual aerial surveys and information such as rainfall data, the age and sex ratio of the animals and how far grey kangaroos move around the landscape, to ensure the population remains sustainable.

The DELWP would not provide The Times with details of how many kangaroos were living on the peninsula or how many were allowed to be killed each year. “The number of kangaroos controlled through the commercial harvesting program and the ATCW system is closely monitored throughout the year to ensure it remains sustainable. Harvesting may be suspended or closed if numbers taken approach the total allocation, or other events, such as bushfires, threaten kangaroos,” Mr Stamkos said. Before Cr Gill’s motion to ban kangaroo shooting on the peninsula lapsed through want of a seconder, he said spotlight shooters were killing kangaroos from a distance. He knew of one farmer who said kangaroos had an impact on his property, while another had told him about a mother kangaroo and two joeys being shot. Cr Anthony Marsh wanted to know if Cr Gill knew what “impact” a shooting ban would have, while Cr Sarah Race asked how long Cr Gill had “known about this issue”. Cr Gill said he was a “third generation” peninsula resident and had known about kangaroos being killed “since I was a baby … it’s always been an issue”. Cr Race then stated that Cr Gill did not have “much information to go on” and wanted to know if he had lobbied MPs or sought details through FOI. Cr Gill said her questions were “totally irrelevant”.

Attention Schools, sporting clubs & community groups

Free advertising listings Each month the Frankston Times will run a Community Events page, where your school or organisation can promote upcoming events, fund raisers, social events, etc. at no charge. This page is sponsored by Frankston Arts Centre, and listings are completely free. Lisiting should be about 40 words and include event name, date, time & address.

Send your listing to:

Community Events

PO Box 588, Hastings 3915 or email

communityevents@mpnews.com.au PAGE 6

Frankston Times

16 February 2021


Frankston

property

ELEVATE THE SENSES PAGE 3

TUESDAY, 16th FEBRUARY 2021

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To arrange your site inspection contact David Nelli 0403 111 234 or at the office on 5979 2700 / Email: david@peninsulaparklands.com.au mpnews.com.au

Tuesday, 16th February 2021

FRANKSTON TIMES

Page 2


ON THE COVER

ENGINEERED FOR YOU TO LIVE LIFE LARGE ELEVATE your thinking and your prospects from this astounding architecturally-designed home, peacefully set on a superb 2692 square metre block with captivating rural vistas towards Western Port always on show. The build shows a considered use of materials, you could say that the home has been engineered for longevity, with steel cladding and retaining walls, plus concrete and hardwood floors all used to aesthetic and industrious effect. Also impressive is the generous array of luxurious inclusions that offer plenty of options to live effortlessly and entertain with abandon. At ground level is the first of three excellent living zones all with views over the treetops. Ascending to the main open

HOME ESSENTIALS

plan first floor you are struck by the incredible sensation of space and light with soaring ceilings and full length windows a sight to behold. Handsome polished timber floors extend throughout the space with subtle splashes of grey and black making a stylish contrast. The kitchen features a full retinue of European appliances with an induction cooker and two ovens whilst overhead the feature pendant lights are a real attraction. Adjacent to the kitchen is a large dining area that will easily seat eight, there is a separate family room and a larger, very comfortable lounge area is anchored by an impressive wood fire. To the north corner is the first of four bedrooms, well-suited as a guest bedroom, adjoining a

second bathroom. Moving up another level via the floating timber stairs you reach the bedrooms and another versatile living space that opens out to a north facing deck. Two bedrooms have built-in robes and share the main bathroom, and to the spacious master bedroom is a walk-in robe and ensuite bathroom. From the street, a sealed driveway leads up to a double garage with observation deck above. With premier schools and convenient access to city bound traffic, this enviable lifestyle property is your personal gateway to the Mornington Peninsula.n

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ADDRESS: 82 Two Bays Road, MOUNT ELIZA FOR SALE: $2,000,000 - $2,200,000 DESCRIPTION: 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 2 car AGENT: Vicki Sayers 0410 416 987, RT Edgar Real Estate, 82 Mt Eliza Way, Mount Eliza, 9776 3369

mpnews.com.au

Tuesday, 16th February 2021

FRANKSTON TIMES Page 3


38e Violet Street Frankston South a

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This is first-class design for exclusive coastal living, within a 4minute walk to the beach at the home known as “Dunrobin”. A striking architectural design full of luxurious finishes, with outdoor spaces to inspire a lifestyle of pure relaxation, the timeless layout features three spacious living zones, soaring ceiling heights, bespoke cabinetry and calming views of leafy gardens and bay vistas. The kitchen extends out through bi-fold doors to a north-facing garden, while the first-floor balcony and rooftop terrace both offer breathtaking views over Oliver's Hill toward Melbourne's city lights. No Body Corporate.

   

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Linda Ellis 0400 480 397 1 Colemans Rd Carrum Downs 3201

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Tuesday, 16th February 2021

FRANKSTON TIMES

Page 4


100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Motorcyclist accused of negligence Compiled by Cameron McCullough THERE was an extraordinary conflict of evidence in the Frankston Police Court on Monday last, when John Bell was charged with negligently driving a motor cycle. Additional interest was given the case from the fact that the chief witness for the prosecution was a well known resident of the Peninsula named William Cooper Meldrum, who was knocked down by the motor cycle in question, and sustained injuries resulting in the loss of a leg. The Bench was occupied by Mr. Knight, P.M., and Messrs C. G. V. Williams, C. W. Grant, and Cr W. Armstrong, J’s.P. When Mr Meldrum’s name was called, a stalwart relative carried the old gentleman from the body of the court and placed him in a chair near the witness box. Mr Meldrum gave his age as 67, and his occupation as an orchardist at present residing at Carrum. He said that on the 12th August last he was standing on the edge of the road at Carrum, near the railway station. He was standing still, facing towards Melbourne, when the motor cycle struck him. After the accident he was conveyed to the Melbourne Hospital where he remained for 15 weeks and 3 days, during which time his leg was amputated. Cross-examined Witness did not step back when he heard the cycle approaching. A van was standing close in to the gutter on the other side of the road.

Witness did not know Bell, the driver of the cycle, and he did not remember Bamford, giving assistance after he had been knocked down. To the P.M.– I am certain I stood still, on the edge of the road while waiting for the train. Frank Guy, builder, and a councillor of the Borough of Carrum, said he was standing at the door of Hacking’s store, when he saw defendant’s cycle with side-car pass; it was travelling at about 20 miles an hour. The side car struck Meldrum who was standing on the side of the road. The cycle was on the centre of the road, but the side car, which was affixed to the right hand side of the cycle, was on the wrong side of the road. Witness ran to Meldrum, whose leg was broken, the bone was sticking through a tear in the trousers. Defendant continued on for about 60 yards and witness signalled to him to return which he did after some delay. Witness then told defendant that he had plenty of room to pass. Cross Examined – Witness was certain the cycle was on the crown of the road and would swear the side car was affixed to the right of the cycle. Albert Henry Hackling, retired storekeeper Carrum, said he rendered first aid to Meldrum. He noticed that the tracks of the motor cycle went well over towards the railway fence. Cross examined – I did not see the accident. Louis Poulson, painter, Carrum, said he saw Meldrum standing about 3ft on

the asphalt before the accident. He was standing quite still. Cross-examined—I was about 70 yards distant from Meldrum. This closed the case for the prosecution. The defendant, John William Bell, employed as hall-keeper at the Prahran Town Hall, said he saw a van standing on the road and an old gentleman on the other side; he tried to steer his way between the two, but something went wrong with the control, the rod broke and his machine dashed off at 50 miles an hour. The handle of the machine and the step on the right side struck Meldrum. The side car was on the left of the machine, and the cycle was running on the crown of the road at the time. Cross-examined – I visited two hotels on the road and had three drinks. I have had the machine repaired since the accident. The position of the side-car was not changed. It was always on the left of the machine, which is an “Excelsior”. James Bamford, who was the occupant of the side-car, said defendant tooted the horn on approaching Carrum station and continued doing so. A train was just coming in. There was a lorry standing on the side of the road and as the cycle approached Meldrum stepped back. Bell was working at the machine as though something had gone wrong. The side-car was on the left hand side of the cycle. Frank Guy (recalled) said he still maintained that the side-car was on the left hand side of the cycle. The P.M. – We find defendant guilty.

We think he was too far over on his wrong side, and the pace was too fast. Remarking on the possibility of defendant having to bear civil damages (although a conviction was not necessary to establish civil liability) the Bench inflicted a fine of £3 with 30s costs. *** A DISASTROUS fire occurred in Hastings last Saturday, when the residence of Mr Phillips was destroyed by fire. The origin of the fire is a mystery. The whole of the furnishings, &c, to the value of £200, were reduced to ashes. Mr Phillips was at Sorrento when the fire occurred. *** THE Shire of Mornington is about to issue debentures for the raising of £10,000. The date of repayment covers a period of 20 years. The purpose for which the money is being borrowed is for the installation of an electric light and power plant at Mornington. *** A CORRESPONDENT writes: – It is rumored that some time ago a man and his three daughters, who were ailing, were recommended to take a drink of the Kananook Creek because of its “saline qualities.” In time, he died – likewise his fair daughters. This is what he arranged to have placed on his headstone: “Here lie I and my three daughters – all through drinking Kananook waters; if we had but stuck to Epsom Salts, we should not now be in these

vaults!”

*** REFERENCE to the Sorrento convict settlement in “The Standard” some issues ago, recalls the fact that “the wild white man,” William Buckley, whose life has formed the theme of many stories by novelists, was a convict at Sorrento. Buckley had been transported for attempting the life of the Duke of Kent at Gibraltar. Ignorant of the country, he and two others escaped from Sorrento, and “set out to walk to China”. But he got amongst the blacks and lived the simple life for 32 years before being discovered! *** MR and Mrs Bland Holt, of East Melbourne, motored through “our little village” a day or two ago en route for Sorrento, where they are staying with Miss Lucy Coppin at The Anchorage. Most old-time theatre-going people doubtlessly recall the days when George Coppin and Bland Holt were the shining lights in the theatrical firmament. *** MISS Mary O’Shea, a youthful Morningtonite, was one of the most successful students at the last Melbourne University examinations, passing in English, Latin, French, history, arithmetic, algebra, geometry and trigonometry. Miss O’Shea was prepared by the College of Our Lady of the Sea, Mornington. *** FROM the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 11 February 1921

THINKING OF SELLING? Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au.

Be seen everywhere. Frankston Times 16 February 2021

PAGE 11


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18. Offensively loud 21. Strong (feelings) 22. Entwine hair 23. Significant

DOWN 1. Movie outline 2. Swiss cereal 3. Long elephant tooth 4. Be introduced to 5. Made of clay 6. Dry with cloth 10. Hang limply 11. Remove soap from

13. Degree-holder 14. Mosquito-borne fever 16. Queasiness 18. Part of arrow 19. Posterior 20. Stupefy

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THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

Making a Spectacle of Myself By Stuart McCullough I’VE been wearing glasses for a long time. They became a necessity part way through high school and I embraced them in the hope that they might make me appear more intelligent and thoughtful. In retrospect, a more diligent approach to studying might have achieved much the same outcome. The thing about glasses is that once you start wearing them, there’s really no going back. My first pair of glasses were roundish gold frames, the closest I could find to those worn by John Lennon in the ‘White Album’ era. They were a wholly unusual choice for a fifteen year old in the mid-eighties. They were the kind of shape that – no matter what mood you were in – made you look slightly surprised. ‘Surprised’ and ‘intelligent’ are, sadly, not the same thing. No one mistook me for a former Beatle, either; and my guitar playing remained, at best, rudimentary. Nevertheless, these were the glasses that got me through high school and well into university. If roundish gold-rimmed glasses were an odd choice, my next pair was nothing short of baffling. For reasons that are lost to me now, I thought it was a good idea to get a pair of ‘half glasses’. These are the kind of frames over which a stern Magistrate might peer as a means of expressing incredulity towards some hapless defendant. They most definitely did not belong on the face of a second year university student. The effect was almost immediate. Fellow students gave me

PAGE 12

a super-wide berth. Perhaps they were concerned that I might stare at them over the rim of my glasses – fact is, they never got close enough for me to ask. My spectacles were spectacular form of self-inflected social isolation. At a certain point, I must have tired of my half-glasses. Presumably I had

Frankston Times 16 February 2021

become somewhat pessimistic and concluded that my half glasses were half empty rather than half full. I aspired to something more conventional and yet striking. Either my next pair would be an expression of my personality or, alternatively, a substitute for not having a personality at all. I chose

black-rimmed glasses. The kind preferred by librarians everywhere. Presumably I had abandoned my teenage dream of being mistaken for a Beatle, preferring instead to be confused for a chartered accountant. They were remarkably effective. To this day, complete strangers slip their tax returns under my front door in the hope that I might assist them. This, of course, gives me little chance to explain the mix up. All I can say is that those people are in for a rude surprise when the ATO comes knocking. My eyesight is quite appalling. Colleagues who’ve caught a fleeting glimpse of the font-size on my phone, which I have set to ‘ginormous’, have noted as much. In fact, it’s getting worse the older I become. A while ago, I thought I might be going blind. However, a visit to an optometrist managed to simultaneously reassure and insult me when I was told it was a natural part of reaching middle age. Upon being reminded of my advancing years, I failed to see the point. That said, I failed to see anything much, which was why I was visiting the optometrist in the first place. The time had once again come for me to get my eyes tested. This involved staring at an eye chart and taking a flying guess at what the letters may be. I am concerned that – as a result of sheer chance – I might be guessing them correctly even if they appear to me as little smudges on a light bulb. If people can guess the lotto numbers then, in theory, there’s a chance – no matter how slim – that

I might be correctly identifying letters on the eye chart. What should happen is that you get some kind of score – like getting a test back with ticks and crosses - that way, I could disclose whether I stumbled upon the answer as a result of sheer, dumb luck. This time, however, the results were emphatic – it was time to update my prescription. Grasping both the nettle and my wallet, I decided it was time for a new set of frames also. The shop assistant was incredibly young and very, very trendy. His glasses told me as much. My instructions were simple – I wanted frames that were positioned somewhere between ‘edgy’ and ‘arts administrator.’ He’s seemed to understand what I was saying. The first pair were more like a sculpture than your routine face furniture. Had I picked them, I’d definitely be handing out money for some kind of avant-garde experimental dance troupe. I waved them away. The next were in a style that I would describe as ‘ironic nerd’. The difference between an ‘ironic nerd’ and a regular nerd is subtle yet spectacular. Either way, they screamed ‘part-time DJ, full time barista’. They would never do. Eventually, I settled on a pair of somewhat severe black-rimmed glasses. Kind of like my current ones but more so. Now that they’ve arrived, I can see things clearly. Glasses aren’t going to make me appear thoughtful, intelligent or like John Lennon. Ideally, they’ll make me look like, well, me. stuart@stuartmccullough.com


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Frankston Times 16 February 2021


Schwellinger’s promotion plan SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie TEAM formation, culture change and depth are the key elements of success according to Seaford United senior coach Peter Schwellinger. The former Melbourne Knights, Richmond and Langwarrin goalkeeper has coached at Frankston Pines, Old Carey, Melton Phoenix and Whittlesea United and success has walked handin-hand with him in recent years. Schwellinger took Whittlesea United from State 3 to State 1 North-West in successive seasons so he knows what it takes to climb through the leagues. “I want to use a formation that has won promotion for me previously,” he said. “I don’t know that I should talk about it too much but I can tell you it is pretty much a radical change from what we have been doing before. “I also want to try and cover each position. “That’s hard because it’s not easy to get two players for each position but to do that is a big thing for me.” Schwellinger took over the reins at Seaford late last year and has identified a lack of discipline and commitment at State 4 level that he has addressed. “Obviously discipline and commitment are part of your culture and they are just so important,” he said. “You have to train and you have to turn up at the right time and to train properly. “At our level players are often allowed to take it a bit easy but I’ve told the boys if they can’t train then don’t expect to get a spot in the team. “It’s not like you rock up once a week and expect to play because I don’t work like that.” So far the reaction of the players at North Seaford Reserve has been positive. “Yes I’m pleased with the way they have reacted. “When we played our first practice match against Hampton Park we only had a half a team but the Mount Eliza game a few days later was much, much different. “I had more players there and their response was encouraging. “I thought the players understood the system in the Wallace Cup and looked pretty good. “We should have won against Skye

Schwellinger’s system: Seaford United at the 2021 Wallace Cup with senior coach Peter Schwellinger (far left back row) and assistant Andy Lancaster (far right back row). Picture: Darryl Kennedy

who scored from a corner not from open play so my defence was very hard to break down. “Against Strikers I left out some key players and we did well. “We won that one and it was great to see some young players from the ressies who really stepped up and I think they understood the formation and what we are trying to do.” Schwellinger is keen to add two or three more players to his squad, perhaps a midfielder and a central defender. “I’m pretty happy with the squad from an attacking point of view and I’m pleased to see Tom Hogan back at training. “He’s a good player. He can play on the wing and he’s looking nippy and quite fit.” Schwellinger also confirmed that club great Andy Lancaster will assist him this year. Meanwhile on Tuesday last week Peninsula Strikers defeated Casey Comets 1-0 at Comets Stadium with a first-half goal from Jai Power. Power also hit the post, Nick Simmons hit the bar and Aaran Currie should have finished from a one-onone so there were lots of positives for

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“I’m very pleased to have Max with us,” Taylor said. “He’s worked really hard in his rehabilitation to get himself back into the game and to a similar level of fitness he had pre-injury and I’m sure he will be an integral part of our squad this season and beyond.” In State 4 South news Baxter will host the second Steve Driver Memorial Day at Baxter Park on Saturday. Long-serving clubman Driver lost his battle with cancer in September 2017. An intraclub match featuring past and present club members who knew Steve kicks off at 11am followed by the reserves and seniors pre-season practice matches against Brandon Park. At the request of the Driver family all proceeds from the day will again go to the Cancer Council. In other State 4 news Mark Pagliarulo (Rosebud), Cal Richardson (Pines) and Carlo Cardoso have been linked to a return to Somerville Eagles. They were part of the Eagles’ 2019 State 5 championship side but Cardoso lives in Elwood and it’s understood he was going to play locally last year before the season shutdown.

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Strikers gaffer Paul Williams. The following evening Mornington lost 3-0 to NPL heavyweight Bentleigh Greens at Dallas Brooks Park with Braedyn Crowley (2) and Will Bower scoring. On Thursday night Skye United lost 4-1 away to Endeavour United with Daniel Walsh scoring for the visitors. Skye used 21 players and a lot of rotations during the match but there still were seven senior players missing so head coach Phil McGuinness and assistant Stephen Duffy are going to have to make some tough decisions in coming weeks. The club expects a couple of new players to train shortly. In State 3 news Frankston Pines signed Max Boulton last week. The 23-year-old has been used in a wide midfield role during the preseason. He’s a former Langwarrin and Phillip Island player who did an ACL during the 2019 pre-season when training with Casey Comets and has not played a league game since. Pines head coach Kevin “Squizzy” Taylor coached Boulton at Langwarrin during the club’s inaugural NPL season in 2018.

Somerville player-coach David Greening gave a blunt response when asked if the rumour was true. “I can’t and won’t speculate on any rumours until such time as a player has signed for Somerville Eagles,” he said. “As a club we will be keeping things a lot more in-house and striving to do things more professionally moving forward.” In other news Victoria’s five-day coronavirus lockdown forced Football Victoria to suspend all football activity during that period. The FV announcement on Friday afternoon included “all organised competitions (Junior Boys’ NPL), all practice matches, club and/or player training sessions, refereeing training sessions, coaching courses, Talent ID camps and FV elite development programs.” The federation hopes to resume all football activity at the end of the lockdown period. In FFA Cup news Rosebud is unable to host this weekend’s home tie against Lara United and has been forced to play away. As we went to press no venue or kick-off time had been confirmed but the clash is expected to take place on Saturday restrictions permitting. This weekend’s scheduled FFA Cup qualifying round matches: SATURDAY: Aspendale Stingrays v Bundoora Utd (Kingston Heath Soccer Complex, pitch 2, 7.30pm), Mount Martha v East Kew (Civic Reserve, 2pm), Lara Utd v Rosebud (TBC). This week’s scheduled friendlies: THURSDAY: Frankston Pines v Beaumaris (Monterey Reserve, 7.30pm, reserves 6.15pm pitch 2). FRIDAY: Box Hill Utd v Mornington (Wembley Park, 7.30pm), Rosebud v Essendon Utd (Olympic Park, 7.30pm). SATURDAY: Nunawading City v Langwarrin (Mahoney’s Reserve, 11am, U21s 1.15pm, U19s 3.15pm), Frankston Pines v Croydon (Monterey Reserve, 5pm & 7pm), Seaford Utd v East Bentleigh (North Seaford Reserve, 1pm & 3pm), Baxter v Brandon Park (Baxter Park, 1pm & 3pm), Lyndale Utd v Chelsea (Lyndale Secondary College, 1pm & 3pm), Somerville Eagles v North Melbourne Athletic (Somerville Secondary College 3pm, reserves v South Springvale U21s 1pm).

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Frankston Times 16 February 2021

Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Frankston Times 16 February 2021  

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